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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
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5 hours ago, olaf hart said:

How did you go?

At MORC Internationals we did OK, 3rd in class, somewhere around 20th in fleet. Sailed well, crew did a great job (they were blowing peeps minds with jibing the assy off a spin pole...this was over 20 years ago!), all light wind didn't help us. I was happy that the designer had a boat in the regatta again after 25 years. Beat my Dad who was sailing the J-22 he'd just bought. We'd both sailed on the Holmes 30 in '71 while he was waiting for his to be finished. 

Overall, we had a good record in the 2 years we campaigned the boat in MORC and PHRF, particularly in the long races. Boat loved getting out in waves in the Gulf. And I was satisfied the boat was finally finished off as intended, and had proven itself.

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I love it... monofilm and fiberglass strapping tape.  Early Tape Drive. LOLOL

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31 minutes ago, Alan H said:

I love it... monofilm and fiberglass strapping tape.  Early Tape Drive. LOLOL

Sort of. Tape drive was already around. Around '90 or '91 a friend needed inexpensive sails for his J-30. Another friend (former sailmaker, he was the guy who taught me in '79) had scored a 100 lb roll of 3 mil Mylar from DuPont, but didn't know how to reinforce it. I came up with the FG packaging tape idea. Need to use quality tape that has some UV resistance, I used 3M. Guy who procured the Mylar came up with an improved tape layout over what UK was doing at the time. Several other guys came up with ideas to make building them more efficiently. A typical sail cost about $200 in materials...most of that was standard sail hardware like o-rings, luff tape, dacron tape for batten pockets and leech tapes, etc. Biggest problem was putting enough seams into sail to build in shape. We built sails for the J-30 and a few other boats. The sails worked well, and held up better than expected for a cheap DIY  project. They were very lightweight.  Get 2 years with no issues at all. 3rd year the Mylar would start to get brittle and split between tapes, patched with sticky-back. By 4th year, splits would appear every tack, and sails nearly toast. Shape was still good though. Noisy as all fuck...we called it God's own potato chip bag.

Funny story...building the first sails for the J-30, we were using the floor space at the J owners wife's photography studio. She was shooting an album cover for Def Leppard at the same time. When she'd go into darkroom to develop, we'd roll out the sails and work on them. Band hanging over us asking tons of questions...they seemed to know a little bit about sailboats, so they were intelligent questions. Really nice guys, and they shared their beer with us.

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52 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Sounds like NuClear Sails.

It was the beginning of NuClear Sails. We called them Stealth Sails. The guy who procured the Mylar wanted to go into business. The J owner and I were fine with him doing that, but didn't want to be partners with him as he was pretty irresponsible. So he started a loft on his own and changed name to NuClear Sails. He couldn't run a business, and another guy bought it and expanded it and made it profitable. He then sold it to a guy who dumped the monofilm and started manufacturing his own tapes to increase durability. Currently called Sail Technologies, they do a pretty good job.

you can lay trivia on your friends by telling them that NuClear Sails were developed with assistance of Def Leppard by supplying beer, and you'd be accurate.

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9 hours ago, olaf hart said:

How did you go?

We need to know. 

Edited by Mr. Ed
Now we know. Sorry for not reading. Indeed excellent story.

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Oh, that's awesome!  LOLOL.  I need one. 

OK, maybe not. But it's still awesome.

 

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So, you wrote earlier that 6 were molded and three got finished. Any clue what happened to the other three?

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3 minutes ago, Alan H said:

So, you wrote earlier that 6 were molded and three got finished. Any clue what happened to the other three?

I think they may have burned. The project started in a small warehouse type space in Punta Gorda, near where Uncooperative Tom lives. Butted up against the building was an old vacant hotel that was 3 or 4 floors. The hotel caught on fire. A few of the guys rushed over to save what they could...they tied a long rope to the hulls and decks and dragged them out behind a pickup. What they couldn't save was lost when hotel wall crashed into the shop. This might have been about '73 or '74? A while later they regrouped at a hanger at Punta Gorda airport and got bulkheads in and decks on. One of the guys got busted with 2000 lbs of weed in Texas and went to prison. His boat was bought by a guy who took it to B&R Rigging to be finished. It got a bigger frac rig and deeper keel and was launched about '77, but never got rigging finished or sails bought. It languished in Venice for several years until sold again in '81 or so and finally finished. It raced a bit in early 80s without much success despite a gift PHRF rating.

I got involved with the Yellow boat about late '77 or early '78. By that time he'd relocated it to a shop shared with a picture framer in Port Charlotte. I was more or less homeless (living on a friends SJ24), was trying to get back in school and needed a place to stay and wheels. Owner had a MIL apt next to his house that was vacant, and needed technical help with interior, deck hardware, etc. He had no money. Hull, deck, bulkheads already in. So I traded out help on his boat for rent and use of his '56 Chevy Sedan Delivery which he wasn't using. Loved that car, begged him to sell it to me. Had a 327 Corvette motor and Hurst floor shifter.

Guy building third boat stopped for a while when he went to Saudi Arabia to teach English for many years, about 1980. At some point he gave the boat to his son. I heard it got finished, but I haven't seen it and it wasn't raced AFAIK.

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Oh shit, I saw the photo of the guy in the dory with foils, and chuckled, "Must have got the plans from Popular Science." Then I saw that the article was from P.S. Indeed. Any body remember the old Edmund Scientific Company catalogues?

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4 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Oh shit, I saw the photo of the guy in the dory with foils, and chuckled, "Must have got the plans from Popular Science." Then I saw that the article was from P.S. Indeed. Any body remember the old Edmund Scientific Company catalogues?

You bet, I loved those catalogues. Same era when Heathkit and Dynaco were big with electronics nerds.

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5 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

You bet, I loved those catalogues. Same era when Heathkit and Dynaco were big with electronics nerds.

My dad had a Heathkit RDF his brother built on his 28' sled. That's what I learned to navigate on.

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57 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Koch,

    Come on, two guys named George Hard and John Holmes building boats? That is a porn duo for sure!

About '68 or so Holmes won a design competition by Boating magazine, with a design that was the forerunner of the Annapolis 26. It was picked up by a boat manufacturer in Bradenton called Durbeck Yachts....they called it the Gulfstream 25. In their ads was a picture of Holmes sitting  naked (except you couldn't see anything) in an old claw foot bathtub full to the brim, in a field, holding a toy boat. The caption said "Our designer tank tests, too". LOL!  He kind of looked like a mad scientist. The deal soured pretty quickly, I suspect Durbeck wasn't paying the royalties owed. Molds were sold to Annapolis, they did a new cabin. The Gulfstream 25 was a very successful local  MORC boat prior to the Morgan 27 coming out.

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On 10/27/2017 at 2:42 AM, RKoch said:

John Holmes 27. 1971 design. Same designer as the Annapolis 26 and Helms30, but they had different cabins than original. The 27 (nearly 28') was a redesign of a 28' sled designed in '65 that my dad owned that was a hot MORC boat in late 60s.  3 were home built (6 started) but it took many years for them to be finished. Divorces, bankruptcies, drug busts, putting a wife through pharmacy school...took its tolls on the owner/builders. I did a lot of work building one in pic in 70s, rebuilt it in early 90s, 3rd in class in MORC Internationals in mid-90s in conditions not suited to us at all. Won Florida Ocean Racing Association series following year by a lot, beating a Cal 39, Santa Cruz 50...we were by far the smallest boat. The one in picture went to NJ about 20 years ago, I have no idea where they all are now. One was possibly cut up.

Was that before O optimized Flanksteak?   I do remember well when you had the first Mylar sails.   Could definitely hear you during pre-starting maneuvers!

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2 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Tad Roberts put Tumblehome on FB

I admire the round house and the nesting dink. Although both did make me consider nominating this boat for Admiration by the Society.

22829100_1943576495965618_14488528023799

We've seen that one before, although it's been a year or so and I think it was in the Ugly Admiration thread.

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Gulvain ugly? For shame! 

Definitely cool. Especially for 1949. And doubly so for being the first offshore boat in aluminium. Jack Laurent Giles smashes another six.

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4 hours ago, Presuming Ed said:

Gulvain ugly? For shame! 

Definitely cool. Especially for 1949. And doubly so for being the first offshore boat in aluminium. Jack Laurent Giles smashes another six.

Gulvain is def cool.

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13 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Tad Roberts put Tumblehome on FB

I admire the round house and the nesting dink. Although both did make me consider nominating this boat for Admiration by the Society.

22829100_1943576495965618_14488528023799

Scott is a friend of mine so he anchors here in Blakely Harbor from time to time. That nesting dink is really pretty cool. He designed and built it and it is one of one. Rows GREAT (in a straight line, super stable.) Tumblehome is a pretty unique boat, I have spent time in her cockpit chatting with Scott and it is always a fun afternoon activity.

His mast is a rotating wing mast!

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7 hours ago, Presuming Ed said:

Gulvain ugly? For shame! 

Definitely cool. Especially for 1949. And doubly so for being the first offshore boat in aluminium. Jack Laurent Giles smashes another six.

As with Sopranino, the reverse sheer gives her a look of being eager, in a hurry, like a horse bunching up to hurl himself at a big fence. 

001-Sopranino-cropped.jpg

minim1+(2).jpg

31393-large.jpeg

 

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On 10/27/2017 at 3:35 PM, RKoch said:

It was the beginning of NuClear Sails. We called them Stealth Sails. The guy who procured the Mylar wanted to go into business. The J owner and I were fine with him doing that, but didn't want to be partners with him as he was pretty irresponsible. So he started a loft on his own and changed name to NuClear Sails. He couldn't run a business, and another guy bought it and expanded it and made it profitable. He then sold it to a guy who dumped the monofilm and started manufacturing his own tapes to increase durability. Currently called Sail Technologies, they do a pretty good job.

you can lay trivia on your friends by telling them that NuClear Sails were developed with assistance of Def Leppard by supplying beer, and you'd be accurate.

Cool history. I raced on a Catalina 25 back in the 90s that had NuClear sails. I remember putting a genoa back together after a regatta with reinforced packing tape after it let go along a seam. We raced with that sail the next day and I can't say the performance suffered much.  Fast forward to 2010 or so and we bought our current boat. It came with two NuClear #1s and a #3. One #1 has shrunk to a very fine entry due to all of the micro folds in the mylar and has a lot of pin holes, the other is still in pretty good shape. I still use the #3 all the time and it is surprisingly still in great shape. Those #1s are deafening when tacking, hoisting, lowering... looking at. 

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On 10/29/2017 at 11:37 AM, kimbottles said:

Scott is a friend of mine so he anchors here in Blakely Harbor from time to time. That nesting dink is really pretty cool. He designed and built it and it is one of one. Rows GREAT (in a straight line, super stable.) Tumblehome is a pretty unique boat, I have spent time in her cockpit chatting with Scott and it is always a fun afternoon activity.

His mast is a rotating wing mast!

Thanks for the back story, Kim. Do you happen to have a pic of the dink assembled?

Wing mast, huh? Is that boat actually fast?

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LUCY is a Nielsen design double ender. Built in 1966 of typical plank on frame construction.  She's a 26' sloop with a 9' beam. Unlike the similar aged and sized boat in the background, her house ends short of the mast partners. 

lucy-beam_-jpg.143587

A large hatch over the forepeak looks like it opens at the aft end for dry ventilation. Plus it has a lid that slides forward into a hood for stuffing sails or to use as a forward companionway. 

lucy-quarter-jpg.143588

Probably have near or full head room under the short house and - if there is a berth forward - a nicely ventilated vee berth. You put up with having to duck because that's how she was built (probably for strength around the mast partners?). LUCY is solid looking in the water, a serious boat. 

For a few friends that own Nielsen double enders, this is what it's all about. They are a staunch group of owners and talk of their boats in near mythical ways. 

lucy-stern-jpg.143590

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7 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Thanks for the back story, Kim. Do you happen to have a pic of the dink assembled?

Wing mast, huh? Is that boat actually fast?

I will look for a dink picture.

I do not believe TUMBLEHOME is particularly fast.

Scott however has sailed with us on FRANCIS and he is a good sailor and great shipmate. 

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Saw Lucy at the ERR this year, she is quite lovely. A pedigree indeed, I believe she was built by Walsted.

 

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11 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

LUCY is a Nielsen design double ender. Built in 1966 of typical plank on frame construction.  She's a 26' sloop with a 9' beam. Unlike the similar aged and sized boat in the background, her house ends short of the mast partners. 

lucy-beam_-jpg.143587

...

Lucy has a cute butt and looks well-loved but I like the one in the background better. That split house is just strange looking to me.

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They both have their charms, so I like them both.  I'm a boat slut, I know. 

 

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I saw Lucy at the ERR this summer and later in Bucks harbor.   I️ was completely smitten.  It’s quite hard to make a boat that short look so good, and Lucy is just about perfect. 

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I'm with you. Lucy is beautiful.

Among other attributes, I've learned from Bob that her voluminous rear makes for a well-behaved girl.

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This one makes me think someone should develop a Hot/Crazy matrix for boats. 

She's off the charts in the looks department but...just what am I gettin myself into here...

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Those legs masts certainly go all the way up.;)

What's the hovering orb above the foredeck? Looks like a temporary reflector but seems odd for a boat that well turned out.

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32 minutes ago, HFC Hunter said:

Those legs masts certainly go all the way up.;)

What's the hovering orb above the foredeck? Looks like a temporary reflector but seems odd for a boat that well turned out.

Anchor ball

 

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I have no idea if this is cool or crap, but didn't know where else to put it. It's described as a staysail schooner, designed by Dick Carter, one of 4 built in Italy. Bob, any idea if this rig actually works?

 

5461120_20160623201136396_1_XLARGE.jpg&w

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1 hour ago, Mr. Ed said:

Is that black thing hanging down at the back an artefact of the photo, or some sort of eccentricity? 

I think it's the rudder.  I suppose it works since it's still there.  

Maybe someone can help but I don't recall ever seeing something like this drawn from 1935.  Looks 1960's.  Avante Garde for the time?  

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2 hours ago, southerncross said:

I think it's the rudder.  I suppose it works since it's still there.  

Maybe someone can help but I don't recall ever seeing something like this drawn from 1935.  Looks 1960's.  Avante Garde for the time?  

Yeah, but it looks like there's a rudder at the back of the keel. I can see why you'd need another one, because the keel one is a long way forward. Certainly a radical boat. 

Good idea about the vane - there appears to be a vane arrangement on the back of the boat already.

But I think it's someone that's been photoshopped from history - a woman who wasn't supposed to be there maybe?

 

E

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4 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I have no idea if this is cool or crap, but didn't know where else to put it. It's described as a staysail schooner, designed by Dick Carter, one of 4 built in Italy. Bob, any idea if this rig actually works?

 

5461120_20160623201136396_1_XLARGE.jpg&w

Looks like the same design philosophy as Terlain's V-13, also by Carter.

Self tending and super easy sail handling.

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1 hour ago, RKoch said:

There is a thread about the building of that tri...a bit of an abortion.

where is it? would like to witness that abortion ;-)

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18 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

Shanty

Jim Cottier was the captain of the Soren Larsen for many years.

s6V2Xgh.jpg

dD18wYV.jpg

Wow!.

Looks like Bruce King may have known that boat when he designed - or at least styled - the Ericson 36C.

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5 hours ago, Ishmael said:

This seems to be the above-deck companion to the aft rudder. I'm guessing it's controlled by the vane.

6351520_20170830172303045_1_XLARGE.jpg&w

I think you’ve got it. I’d thought the aft facing tiller thing was a stub that flopped forward to make an emergency tiller. Looks a bit mad. Wonder if it works. 

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3 hours ago, Papaji said:

Sorry, but even the woman with the nice dorsal cleavage can’t fix that amount of oddness. Yacht design by captain Kurtz: “the horror, the horror”. 

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4 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

Sorry, but even the woman with the nice dorsal cleavage can’t fix that amount of oddness. Yacht design by captain Kurt: “the horror, the horror”. 

yeah, even that goddess must have told the guy - pleeease sell it. not even a year in the wet up for sale. something seriously wrong with that boat for sure. But I bet some flaky hippie in the old world will think of it as "the next best thing" and scoop her up. at a steal for only half a million whahahaha

(maybe I should have posted this one in the uglyboat admiration threat instead? I guess it qualifies for both!)

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3 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Sorry, but even the woman with the nice dorsal cleavage can’t fix that amount of oddness. Yacht design by captain Kurtz: “the horror, the horror”. 

Looks like someone decided to build a small tiki bar and somehow a 3  hulled boat ended up underneath it. 

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21 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I have no idea if this is cool or crap, but didn't know where else to put it. It's described as a staysail schooner, designed by Dick Carter, one of 4 built in Italy. Bob, any idea if this rig actually works?

 

5461120_20160623201136396_1_XLARGE.jpg&w

After studying thousands of designs, Hot Rod settled on a similar rig. So there's that.

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That Dick Carter  "cat schooner" was the one project that I did the preliminary design studies for while at Carter's office. We called it the "Luna rig". They built quite a few of them in Italy. Love to see my old drawings today.

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11 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

That Dick Carter  "cat schooner" was the one project that I did the preliminary design studies for while at Carter's office. We called it the "Luna rig". They built quite a few of them in Italy. Love to see my old drawings today.

How well did the rig work? It looks like a bit of an outlier . . .

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Ed:

It was an offspring of the VENDREDDI TREIZ giant single hander that Dick did before I got to the tower. I never sailed the boat and I can see limitations. But, for lazy sailing where you can count on some breeze I suspect it's fine.

 

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3 hours ago, kinardly said:

Huh, I don't get it. What would be the advantage for rotating spars with a rig like that? 

Yes, and I wonder about the variable trailing edge effectiveness on a soft sail. Can someone enlighten me on this?

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49 minutes ago, S/V Eva said:

barracudax.jpg.506b97c9a05289fe677e736a83da8fad.jpg

Here is a better shot.

So the wing masts are independent airflow from the "jibs"?

I'll go look at it, it's five minutes from my boat.

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36 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

So the wing masts are independent airflow from the "jibs"?

I'll go look at it, it's five minutes from my boat.

Ish

   Wish you would have a look Ish. I've been skeptical about the benefit of going to the trouble of rotating those spars. Sure it lets them streamline better with the airflow and if rotated a fit further you might get some drive. But how much resultant drive could you expect based on the projected area? There have been a couple of dismastings of these rigs, one at the dock! I have a friend who repaired the one from the dock incident and I tried to get his take on what happened but he was reluctant to say much. My guess is that those wings spars are apt to get into a flutter situation unless they are free to rotate and when tied to the dock and a nasty squall comes up things get wonky pretty quick. It seems that the designer has abandoned the rig as well. 

    Inquiring minds want to know!

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14 hours ago, Bob Perry said:
18 hours ago, kinardly said:

Huh, I don't get it. What would be the advantage for rotating spars with a rig like that? 

Yes, and I wonder about the variable trailing edge effectiveness on a soft sail. Can someone enlighten me on this?

Better lift/drag ratio than just a round spar. You gotta have the spars anyway, why not get a little something out of them? I mean, if you don't mind spending the money.

The usual fixed teardrop shape is actually worse than a round section for the leading edge of the sail; but that doesn't matter for a rig like this.

FB- Doug

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20 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Ed:

It was an offspring of the VENDREDDI TREIZ giant single hander that Dick did before I got to the tower. I never sailed the boat and I can see limitations. But, for lazy sailing where you can count on some breeze I suspect it's fine.

 

Vendredi Treize. 128'

V13Taleau-MH07-16.jpg

3v-13.jpg

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Have I got it right that VT had booms on the staysails and the Italian-built two masters don't? It must have been interesting to engineer the forward end of the booms for VT. 

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1 hour ago, Steam Flyer said:

Better lift/drag ratio than just a round spar. You gotta have the spars anyway, why not get a little something out of them? I mean, if you don't mind spending the money.

The usual fixed teardrop shape is actually worse than a round section for the leading edge of the sail; but that doesn't matter for a rig like this.

FB- Doug

Suppose a winged spar adds maybe up to %15 to the sail area. That's %15 you will never be able to reef, rotating or otherwise. Now the idea of running under bare poles during very high winds is no longer an effective option.

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42 minutes ago, Tanton Y_M said:

Vendredi Treize. 128'

V13Taleau-MH07-16.jpg

3v-13.jpg

Friday the Thirteenth...  Restoration is stalled?  In French: https://www.bateaux.com/article/25356/conflits-autour-de-vendredi-13-2-ans-de-renovation-tombes-a-l-eau

Quote

In August 2016, we learned that the mythical sailboat Friday the 13th had been bought by Norbert Fradin, to regain its pride of yesteryear. The Rêves de Sens association was appointed to carry out the renovation work. But since then, the two parties have disagreed and the restoration of the boat has been suspended.

Friday 13th is the name of the magnificent three-master designed by the navigator Jean-Yves Terlain in 1972. With a length of 39.13 m, it was at the time the longest sailing yacht ever built for a transat alone, and described as impossible to navigate by one man . He finished second in the Ostar in 1972 and then participated in the 1976 race and the first edition of the Route du Rhum in 1978, with Yvon Fauconnier as skipper. 

vendredi-13-5.jpg.7c401ee0d0aab42af1932355f129d44c.jpg

And a "replica", Friday Starhttp://www.cmnyacht.com/cmn-yacht-mono-hulls-friday-star.html

Quote

This remarkable three masted schooner is the replica of the 1972 OSTAR single-handed transatlantic racing yacht, skippered by Jean-Yves Terlain, ‘Vendredi 13’.
 
CMN Yachts created a charter yacht for the Stardust Marine fleet to the same basic high-tech specification but fitted out for serious (and fast!) cruising. The 43.3m (139ft) yacht was transformed into a luxury, high performance, charter vessel of the very best pedigree.

cmn-yacht-friday-star.jpg.c868be1be71a7d7ea1db0b4ed5dd2074.jpg

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There was a story about the big three masted single handed schooner V13 that in the opening ceremonies at a gala to open the race, the other competitors had taken up a collection and bought the skipper a bicycle for the boat in case he needed to go to the bow...

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49 minutes ago, fufkin said:

Suppose a winged spar adds maybe up to %15 to the sail area. That's %15 you will never be able to reef, rotating or otherwise. Now the idea of running under bare poles during very high winds is no longer an effective option.

Why couldn't you just set them loose to rotate freely? Then they'd weathervane and produce less drag than a round spar.

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5 hours ago, IStream said:

Why couldn't you just set them loose to rotate freely? Then they'd weathervane and produce less drag than a round spar.

A rotating mast on something like an Open 60 is set up to rotate through maybe 60 degrees. If you were running under bare poles with wind on your aft quarter, you'd have to rotate your mast(starting from centre) something like 120 degrees to face the spar head to wind. Even if you were able to do that, there would be a rotational limit at the gooseneck, presuming you wanted to keep your boom sheeted in and out of the water, that would be stretched to the limit if the wind or your stern clocks to put you dead down wind.

But there are different rotating mast set-ups, like a catboat with no shrouds, that might change things slightly. Maybe the Chris White design above has a much wider rotation range as there is no boom attached, not really familiar.

As for the concept of the winged spar as weathervane, I woudn't characterize it as benign if left to freely rotate and face the wind. If you watch a windex for instance, it's pointing into the wind but constantly swaying a little back and forth. I suspect the same effect would be with a 60 foot mast. Think of a riding sail at anchor. It's still gonna move the stern back and forth depending on small shifts.

That's all I got, cause I'm no expert on rotating masts but I'm sure someone here is.