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I didn't say that the present War Baby is a 12, I said the prior one (ex-American Eagle) was. She did the '79 Fastnet under Brown, which must have been a really wet ride!

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I'll be out on one the restored 12s off of Newport for a benefit next week. I'll take some pictures. Which of these should I choose? American Eagle, Columbia, Enterprise, Freedom, Gleam, Heritage, Intrepid, Nefertiti, Weatherly.

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Thanks, Bob. Not sure we'll have a choice but if we do that will be it.

 

Those boats are out on the bay a lot. I think it's fantastic that they're still sailed so much.

 

Edit: just heard from the buddy who invited me and he was on Intrepid last year and won.

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I always thought Turner did the Fastnet with her...........

Turner won the '79 Fastnet on Tenacious, 61' S&S Aluminum PJ, ex-Dora IV. Warren Brown did the Fastnet that year on War Baby, ex-American Eagle, Bill Luders designed and Luders built 12 meter converted for ocean racing and Turner's previous ride.

 

The story was that Turner bought American Eagle for less than the original cost of her winches.

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I'll be out on one the restored 12s off of Newport for a benefit next week. I'll take some pictures. Which of these should I choose? American Eagle, Columbia, Enterprise, Freedom, Gleam, Heritage, Intrepid, Nefertiti, Weatherly.

 

 

Boy, hard to go wrong there.

I think GLEAM is the oldest, INTREPID has the proudest history, FREEDOM is the fastest (probably). WEATHERLY has the distinction of being the only non-Olin Stephens 12 to wind the America's Cup (Phil Rhodes), AMERICAN EAGLE is probably the winningest overall even though she failed in the Cup trials. NEFERTITI is a Ted Hood design, HERITAGE is Charley Morgan's masterpiece. Dunno if any of this helps you decide.

 

Definitely give us a full report

 

FB- Doug

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azzura is currently in the UK. she is mostly on the hard in Hamble, but every now and then they train against Sceptre

 

edit, must be another azzura

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The 12 mtr class association website has 4 "Azzurra" listed, none in the UK

 

The info on this site used to be pretty accurate, however it does not state when it was last updated. in the page linked above, there is a column labelled 'year' which now seems to be a mish mash of "build year" & "info last updated"

 

some interesting info on that site.

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Italia lives in ?Lymington?, and comes out occasionally. Plays against Crusader and Sceptre.

 

thumbs_dsc_0091.jpg

 

Twelves - every tack is ripping up a few fifty quid notes.

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you're right. my bad, it is italia.

btw, guy with the hat is john brinkers (always recognizable by the hat). on the 8mr we sail on together, he's called indiana john

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I always thought Turner did the Fastnet with her...........

Turner won the '79 Fastnet on Tenacious, 61' S&S Aluminum PJ, ex-Dora IV. Warren Brown did the Fastnet that year on War Baby, ex-American Eagle, Bill Luders designed and Luders built 12 meter converted for ocean racing and Turner's previous ride.

 

The story was that Turner bought American Eagle for less than the original cost of her winches.

thanks, stories always get twisted around don't they, good to have the straight scoop.

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I don't think you can go wrong in that fleet Keith. I like COLUMBIA because it was the "big dog" on the block at the time I was geting seriously interested in yacht design. But I think INTREPID had a pretty remarkable race record. Now if you could throw VIM into that fleet I may have to go with VIM due to her competitive longevity in the class.

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I don't think you can go wrong in that fleet Keith. I like COLUMBIA because it was the "big dog" on the block at the time I was geting seriously interested in yacht design. But I think INTREPID had a pretty remarkable race record. Now if you could throw VIM into that fleet I may have to go with VIM due to her competitive longevity in the class.

 

+1

 

VIM should have a sistership named VIGOR

 

FB- Doug

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Whilst we're on the subject of 12s what happened to Lionheart? Pretty cool with that bendy skerry cruiser mast.

 

21368.jpg

 

Fairly speedy, but couldn't turn corners IIRC

 

I remember racing against her in Columbia one weekend in The Solent about a 100 years ago.

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I'll be out on one the restored 12s off of Newport for a benefit next week. I'll take some pictures. Which of these should I choose? American Eagle, Columbia, Enterprise, Freedom, Gleam, Heritage, Intrepid, Nefertiti, Weatherly.

 

Columbia is parked at NEB - well for now anyway. That boat has had some serious money spent on it and looks great.

 

Beats me how they can race and still keep all that varnish looking so good.

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Sticker:

Yeah, I know the yawls have "tastefull little ports". I want to know the story behind the boat without any ports. I find it very interesting.t's sort of unique.

 

How many Concordia yawls were built?

without looking it up I thought there were a few over 100 made.

yep, the owners are listed

http://www.concordiaboats.com/yawls.php

 

Oh, very cool. I now know what that beautiful wooden boat was I was parked next to in Milford Harbor a few years ago. #55 Kiva.

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We sailed on Stars and Stripes in St Martin over the winter. Fun to play on a twelve but it felt much smaller then Joli.

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I'll be part of the Mass General Hospital event. My understanding is the boats are each financed/maintained by consortia, in one case I know it's 10 families, and agencies charter them out crewed for "race" events for charities, company morale building, corporate boondoggles, etc.

 

The MGH event is assisted by a small group of New York Yacht Club members, so there's a lunch and a clambake there.

 

Because of the efforts of these good people I see them out sailing a lot--they're a sight to behold.

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post-76289-0-08637700-1371617850_thumb.jpg

 

Bigger

 

 

 

63' Gaff-rigged Schooner, Maggie B, by Nigel Irens. Sadly, she was destroyed by fire after a circumnavigation by her owner.

 

Interesting 'new' interpretation of a traditional craft, including her rig.

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Having a mooring in Jamestown for many years there was hardly a day I went sailing that I didn't see a 12. Often I'd see four or five. Never got tired of watching them sail. Pretty neat to be crossing tacks with boats like Intrepid, Courageous and American Eagle while out puttering around in my own boat.

 

I will miss seeing all the fantastic boats in Newport. I went sailing this evening - absolutely beautiful night for a sail. In two hours I saw exactly two other sailboats.

 

I have literally dozens of pics of 12s. Here's a few...

DSC02359_zps94b9e58d.jpg

DSC02362_zpsc0acc8be.jpg

DSC03888_zpsab06fa90.jpg

DSC04261_zps27377159.jpg

 

This would have been an amazing shot had American Eagle waited another few seconds to tack!

DSC04220_zps2d8c4a76.jpg

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This is moored at the Bell Harbor marina. It's been there all year. It looks...capable.

 

20130517_131001.png

 

Is that one of Allen Farrell's boats? Seems to me one was purchased, and refitted in the Seattle area.

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Looks a bit conventional for Farrell. :)

 

Sailboats that look like they once worked for a living are very cool.

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Looks a bit conventional for Farrell. :)

 

Sailboats that look like they once worked for a living are very cool.

She looks mighty fine, apart from the pilot house. But I understand 'comfort' may be higher on the owner's wish list than aesthetics. Is it an age thing?

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Looks a bit conventional for Farrell. :)

 

Sailboats that look like they once worked for a living are very cool.

She looks mighty fine, apart from the pilot house. But I understand 'comfort' may be higher on the owner's wish list than aesthetics. Is it an age thing?

 

It's living in a cool damp climate thing. And age.

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Looks a bit conventional for Farrell. :)

 

Sailboats that look like they once worked for a living are very cool.

He actually made a number of conventional boats - Native Girl, Ocean Girl, Ocean Bird, Wind Song, numerous trollers. They didn't all look like China Cloud!

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We sailed on Stars and Stripes in St Martin over the winter. Fun to play on a twelve but it felt much smaller then Joli.

 

Probably not the same boat. I took this pic about 15 years ago in San Diego.

 

 

 

 

post-37611-0-90653500-1371819469_thumb.jpg

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..and now for something completely different:

 

I've always liked the Cosmic Muffin

 

cosmic-muffin%20%286%29_thumb.jpg?imgmax

 

cosmic-muffin%20%284%29_thumb.jpg?imgmax

 

cosmic-muffin%20%283%29_thumb.jpg?imgmax

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Then you'll probably like Dobbertin's Surface Orbiter made from a milk trailer.

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This is moored at the Bell Harbor marina. It's been there all year. It looks...capable.

 

20130517_131001.png

 

Is that one of Allen Farrell's boats? Seems to me one was purchased, and refitted in the Seattle area.

 

Nothing to do with Farrell. That is the 52' ketch that used to be (and could still be) called Skol, US built on North Sea fishing boat lines. She once had a fish hold aft but has been a charter boat and live aboard family home in the San Juan's since the 1970's. She did belong to Ron and Rita Saling long ago

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This is moored at the Bell Harbor marina. It's been there all year. It looks...capable.

 

20130517_131001.png

 

Is that one of Allen Farrell's boats? Seems to me one was purchased, and refitted in the Seattle area.

 

Nothing to do with Farrell. That is the 52' ketch that used to be (and could still be) called Skol, US built on North Sea fishing boat lines. She once had a fish hold aft but has been a charter boat and live aboard family home in the San Juan's since the 1970's. She did belong to Ron and Rita Saling long ago

 

Thanks Tad.

 

I remember (misremember?) in Sailing Back in Time, one of his boats went to Seattle, where it was refurbished, and re-rigged. I don't exactly remember what the boat looked like, only that it had clean, workboat like lines.

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"I remember (misremember?) in Sailing Back in Time, one of his boats went to Seattle, where it was refurbished, and re-rigged. I don't exactly remember what the boat looked like, only that it had clean, workboat like lines."

 

trying not to quote the whole thread....... :rolleyes:

 

One of the Farrell boats that has been given an entirly diferent rig is Native Girl (38' DE closely modeled on Ingrid). She started out as a ketch and is now a staysail schooner. Allen did the work on Lasqueti or perhaps Texada Island. I think August Moon (28' dory type) started as a lug ketch and also has become a schooner. Actually at the moment Native Girl is next door waiting for her new main mast and refurbished fore. I don't know of any US conversion but that dosen't mean it hasen't happened. Ocean Girl was sold south many years ago and burned up in Mexico I think. Wind Song was wrecked in the South Seas. Ocean Bird is ashore in Lund waiting for a saviour.

 

Here's Native Girl with her current rig.....

 

PT%20Beauty.jpg

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"I remember (misremember?) in Sailing Back in Time, one of his boats went to Seattle, where it was refurbished, and re-rigged. I don't exactly remember what the boat looked like, only that it had clean, workboat like lines."

 

trying not to quote the whole thread....... :rolleyes:

 

One of the Farrell boats that has been given an entirly diferent rig is Native Girl (38' DE closely modeled on Ingrid). She started out as a ketch and is now a staysail schooner. Allen did the work on Lasqueti or perhaps Texada Island. I think August Moon (28' dory type) started as a lug ketch and also has become a schooner. Actually at the moment Native Girl is next door waiting for her new main mast and refurbished fore. I don't know of any US conversion but that dosen't mean it hasen't happened. Ocean Girl was sold south many years ago and burned up in Mexico I think. Wind Song was wrecked in the South Seas. Ocean Bird is ashore in Lund waiting for a saviour.

 

Here's Native Girl with her current rig.....

 

PT%20Beauty.jpg

Nice lines. See looks longer than her 38'. Love to see her gaff-rigged and flying stays'ls. Not so sure about that yard though. All looks a bit too difficult to me.

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There are certainly times when a bow cannon would make a nice accessory:

Chasers do have a certain appeal, Semi. A stern mounted one can also be helpful (but not in this case unless you want to shoot off your own tiller). I understand grape or canister can be effective in close quarters action. :)

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Great looking boat. Not sure I'd want to face a long beat in it though. It would be really long.

good thing we won't have to worry about that, as gentlemen don't sail to weather.

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Great looking boat. Not sure I'd want to face a long beat in it though. It would be really long.

good thing we won't have to worry about that, as gentlemen don't sail to weather.

 

The more I've sailed the more I've found the wisdom in this. When I didn't know better it seemed silly. One must point the boat at the destination and the wind is what it is. Now I know that one can choose the destination and when to point the boat there.

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There are certainly times when a bow cannon would make a nice accessory:

Chasers do have a certain appeal, Semi. A stern mounted one can also be helpful (but not in this case unless you want to shoot off your own tiller). I understand grape or canister can be effective in close quarters action. :)

 

Chain. It doesn't spread as much.

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Hello everyone, Long time lurker. I am suprised that boats from the Friendship Yacht Company haven't been mentioned..I particularly like FS40, but all their boats are gorgeous..

 

www.friendshipyachtcompany.com

 

FS40

 

 

post-63509-0-35117700-1372033773_thumb.jpg

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Hello everyone, Long time lurker. I am suprised that boats from the Friendship Yacht Company haven't been mentioned..I particularly like FS40, but all their boats are gorgeous..

 

www.friendshipyachtcompany.com

 

FS40

 

 

attachicon.giffriendship-40-photo-3.jpg

Nice looking boat. Not sure about a confident barefoot foothold on that polished deck though. Be OK in boat shoes I guess.

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attachicon.gif2_3.jpg

 

This came into the yard the other day.Nice looking boat,I think maybe her butt has been pinched a few to many times and there is a lot of COTB. What makes her cool to me is that she is STEEL and VERY fair.

I didn't realize that till they started sand blasting the bottom. The guys working on her said there was very litttle fairing compound on her.

All the work order said was her name Camira. and Payne. Chuck? Allen? I couldn't find any thing on line. Does anybody know her or have info? (Phone pics suck)

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0224.JPG

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0223.JPG

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0225.JPG Damn nice steel work here.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0228.JPG

 

Info from Latitude 38, regarding the roster for the 2004 Puddle Jump:

 

Camira - Alan Payne 41 yawl

Mike & Dana Snyder, Bellingham, WA

Oddly enough, Dana learned to sail as a kid while Mike didn't sample the sport until he was a Navy pilot on a tour of duty in the South Pacific. But it was Mike who had fantasies of crossing oceans in a sailboat, and when he and Dana got together, she quickly bought into his cruising fantasies. Together, they worked for 10 years to make those dreams a reality.

Reflecting on his new cruising life, Mike says, "After spending a lot of time going 500 knots, its very cool to slow down and experience a completely different pace. In fact, as a friend put it recently, 'You have to be a 'Type A' to get here, but you'd better switch into a 'Type B' pretty quickly."

"You might say we're successfully mellowing," adds Dana. "I think I'm a 'Type C' or 'Type D' by now."

Their plan is to island-hop to New Zealand, then reassess. So far they seem to be having the time of their lives, exploring new cultures and making new friends. "We've made more friends than we ever had in our former, furiously-working lifestyle," they say. "The cruising community is composed of giving, intelligent, gifted people. Sailing is just a small part of it all."

Alan Payne is an Australian designer. he designed the popular (in Australia) Koonya design with similar lines although mostly built in multi chine. This is the first time I've seen a yawl designed by him.

 

Alan Payne also designed a 40 foot cutter and his nephew Geoff Payne built one called Skookum and cruised extensively in high southern latitudes, winning, in 1993, the `Barton Cup' presented by the Ocean Cruising Club.

 

The photo of the boat on the hard is from Yachthub boat sales site of one currently for sale. The other is Geoff and Margaret's Skookum in Scotland.

Alan Paynes Tasman Seabird design (36 ft) was a yawl originally... there are sloop versions too.

 

Jack Earls MARIS was and remains a yawl, she was the first of the Tasman Seabird design I beleive.

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Hard:

Fine for you but I am no gentleman. I could pretend I was but that wouldn't last long.

 

I never agreed with the "gentlemen don't sail to weather" philosophy; it doesn't seem like good sense to me that a gentleman must be constrained to having a brick barn of a boat.

 

OTOH a gentleman is supposed to wear a sword. I own a couple of swords, in fact I even have a baldric, but somehow the right occasion to wear one doesn't seem to come up very often.

 

FB- Doug

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attachicon.gif2_3.jpg

 

This came into the yard the other day.Nice looking boat,I think maybe her butt has been pinched a few to many times and there is a lot of COTB. What makes her cool to me is that she is STEEL and VERY fair.

I didn't realize that till they started sand blasting the bottom. The guys working on her said there was very litttle fairing compound on her.

All the work order said was her name Camira. and Payne. Chuck? Allen? I couldn't find any thing on line. Does anybody know her or have info? (Phone pics suck)

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0224.JPG

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0223.JPG

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0225.JPG Damn nice steel work here.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0228.JPG

 

Info from Latitude 38, regarding the roster for the 2004 Puddle Jump:

 

Camira - Alan Payne 41 yawl

Mike & Dana Snyder, Bellingham, WA

Oddly enough, Dana learned to sail as a kid while Mike didn't sample the sport until he was a Navy pilot on a tour of duty in the South Pacific. But it was Mike who had fantasies of crossing oceans in a sailboat, and when he and Dana got together, she quickly bought into his cruising fantasies. Together, they worked for 10 years to make those dreams a reality.

Reflecting on his new cruising life, Mike says, "After spending a lot of time going 500 knots, its very cool to slow down and experience a completely different pace. In fact, as a friend put it recently, 'You have to be a 'Type A' to get here, but you'd better switch into a 'Type B' pretty quickly."

"You might say we're successfully mellowing," adds Dana. "I think I'm a 'Type C' or 'Type D' by now."

Their plan is to island-hop to New Zealand, then reassess. So far they seem to be having the time of their lives, exploring new cultures and making new friends. "We've made more friends than we ever had in our former, furiously-working lifestyle," they say. "The cruising community is composed of giving, intelligent, gifted people. Sailing is just a small part of it all."

Alan Payne is an Australian designer. he designed the popular (in Australia) Koonya design with similar lines although mostly built in multi chine. This is the first time I've seen a yawl designed by him.

 

Alan Payne also designed a 40 foot cutter and his nephew Geoff Payne built one called Skookum and cruised extensively in high southern latitudes, winning, in 1993, the `Barton Cup' presented by the Ocean Cruising Club.

 

The photo of the boat on the hard is from Yachthub boat sales site of one currently for sale. The other is Geoff and Margaret's Skookum in Scotland.

Alan Paynes Tasman Seabird design (36 ft) was a yawl originally... there are sloop versions too.

 

Jack Earls MARIS was and remains a yawl, she was the first of the Tasman Seabird design I beleive.

Yes of course! I quite forgot.

 

I always admired Jack's little `Smoky Cape' He spelt it `Smoky' as it was spelled on the chart...

 

Not a good photo of her, so she may not get a cool vote.

post-14496-0-65688200-1372089216_thumb.jpg

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Flyer:

Can we see your baldric? Then I'll know what one is.

Don't ask to see the polish codpiece.

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Hello everyone, Long time lurker. I am suprised that boats from the Friendship Yacht Company haven't been mentioned..I particularly like FS40, but all their boats are gorgeous..

 

www.friendshipyachtcompany.com

 

FS40

 

 

attachicon.giffriendship-40-photo-3.jpg

 

Gotta say, these do nothing for me. They seem more like caricatures of boats than real boats.

 

Guess that's why they make chocolate and vanilla.

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I'm sort of with Soon on this one. They are very well designed boats but to my eye thay are so over the top luxurious that they wouldn't work for me as "my boat". Not that I could ever afford one.

 

Wasn't Baldric the guy in that Silly English TV show?

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I used to love the gentleman's day sailer style of boat... low wooded elegant lines, varnish, finesse in all its finishes, covers on at the end of the day.

 

However the type sometimes seems to lack purpose. If it's not raced or cruised it simply smacks of `success', white plimsolls, a wicker picnic basket and only very occasionally sailed. Even the brochures sell that image.

 

Ok call me a snob but I like that Beau thrashes his W46 around the bouys and doesn't hesitate to screw a go fast fitting onto it.

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Has Zulu made it onto this thread?

 

She strikes me as the antithesis of a gentleman's yacht. `Proper Skookum' and nice lines.

 

I've always liked her no nonsense fit up, the use of paint mostly rather than varnish and weathered but cared for look.

 

From the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Foundation:

 

Husband and wife team George and Julia Maynard designed and built from scratch the 50-foot Zulu over a six-year time frame. After launching her in Port Townsend in 1992, they embarked on an extended Pacific cruise. The Maynards spent several years in the Sea of Cortez in Mexico before embarking on a two-year leisurely crossing of the Pacific. They stopped off at Australia for another two years, including exploring the protected waters inside the Great Barrier Reef in 2005.

 

 

post-14496-0-03227600-1372095230_thumb.jpg

post-14496-0-80398800-1372095605_thumb.jpg

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i also always had a soft spot for pilot cutters...188234177.jpg

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i also always had a soft spot for pilot cutters...188234177.jpg

+1

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Check out this beautiful old-timer. 38' gaff-rigged ketch, designed and built by Robert Davis around 1952.

 

Bigger

post-76289-0-68977300-1372109473_thumb.jpg

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JMOD. As you've any eye for these historic cutters, have a look at this set up.

 

'Leader' is a gaff rigged ketch. She's just lovely, in my opinion. I would love to own a boat, loosely designed on the Falmouth smack, of about 34' with this type of rig. Maybe drawn up by Paul Gartside. She would be my ultimate world cruiser.

 

 

Check Leader out here: http://www.classic-sailing.co.uk/vessels/leader-brixham-sailing-trawler

post-76289-0-99295800-1372110311_thumb.jpg

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Baldric, from Blackadder:

 

tve14825-5-41.jpg

 

Yeah but I'm taller

 

 

 

Flyer:

Can we see your baldric? Then I'll know what one is.

Don't ask to see the polish codpiece.

 

A baldric is like a guitar strap, only you hang a sword in a scabbard from it. Unless your sword is rather short, a baldric is easier to keep from tripping over (or tripping somebody else) than a frog or simple hanger. I was just hunting for a picture of me wearing it but to be honest you'd be be disappointed.

 

I've never thought swords and codpieces really belong together, know what I mean

 

FB- Doug

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i also always had a soft spot for pilot cutters...188234177.jpg

 

There's some heft in that stem. Plenty of land for the planking on that.

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Baldric, from Blackadder:

 

tve14825-5-41.jpg

 

Yeah but I'm taller

 

 

>

Flyer:

Can we see your baldric? Then I'll know what one is.

Don't ask to see the polish codpiece.

 

A baldric is like a guitar strap, only you hang a sword in a scabbard from it. Unless your sword is rather short, a baldric is easier to keep from tripping over (or tripping somebody else) than a frog or simple hanger. I was just hunting for a picture of me wearing it but to be honest you'd be be disappointed.

 

I've never thought swords and codpieces really belong together, know what I mean

 

FB- Doug

 

I would think that having a sword would deter people from commenting negatively about your codpiece. Especially if it was a really nice sword. And a not nice codpiece.

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A nice piece of cod would be good. Been a while.....

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i also always had a soft spot for pilot cutters...

 

There's some heft in that stem. Plenty of land for the planking on that.

My first two boats were named "Mischief" after the pilot cutter used by H.W. Tilman for most of his southern ocean and arctic mountaineering expeditions. IIRC she was eventually lost on Jan Mayen Island and replaced by another pilot cutter

 

http://www.comlay.net/tilman/

post-37611-0-77418200-1372169012_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

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Clearly, I'm a bit biased, but I think this trailerable cat is about as COOL as it gets!!!

 

post-41469-0-92581900-1372278386_thumb.jpgpost-41469-0-78113700-1372278419_thumb.jpgpost-41469-0-06477000-1372278472_thumb.jpg

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...but wait, there's more...

post-41469-0-82582600-1372278670_thumb.jpg

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I think NINA was originally black.

 

NINA was the result of Burgess designing to the American Ocean Racing Rule. In her day those overhangs were seen as "snubbed off" due to the rule. Obviously they were moving away from determining "L" from a simple DWL measurement. But I can't find any definitive data on that specific rule at that time, 1928. NINA is often considered the first "ocean racer" designed to a rule.

As much as we would like to see NINA as a classic yacht in terms of aesthetics the reality is she was designed as a rule beater and she was very successful in that effort.

In Uffa Fox's book he says if NINA had not been designed to that rule, "NINA would have had longer overhangs forward and aft. The result would have be a shorter bowsprit, would make reefing the mainsail easier, as well as giving stability, steadiness and speed in a seaway." No way I would ever argue with Uffa ( Don't call me Mr. Fox.)

 

The footnote to the chapter on NINA in Uffa's book reads, " Uffa resented the short ends of NINA's hull. One of his great precepts was drawing the lines out to their logical conclusion."

 

Probably a sad note to my life that I find this shit fascinating. I don't care. It's fascinating to me.

 

sadly this boat is missing off the coast of NZ

http://www.3news.co.nz/Fears-for-7-missing-on-schooner/tabid/423/articleID/302985/Default.aspx

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I think NINA was originally black.

 

NINA was the result of Burgess designing to the American Ocean Racing Rule. In her day those overhangs were seen as "snubbed off" due to the rule. Obviously they were moving away from determining "L" from a simple DWL measurement. But I can't find any definitive data on that specific rule at that time, 1928. NINA is often considered the first "ocean racer" designed to a rule.

As much as we would like to see NINA as a classic yacht in terms of aesthetics the reality is she was designed as a rule beater and she was very successful in that effort.

In Uffa Fox's book he says if NINA had not been designed to that rule, "NINA would have had longer overhangs forward and aft. The result would have be a shorter bowsprit, would make reefing the mainsail easier, as well as giving stability, steadiness and speed in a seaway." No way I would ever argue with Uffa ( Don't call me Mr. Fox.)

 

The footnote to the chapter on NINA in Uffa's book reads, " Uffa resented the short ends of NINA's hull. One of his great precepts was drawing the lines out to their logical conclusion."

 

Probably a sad note to my life that I find this shit fascinating. I don't care. It's fascinating to me.

 

sadly this boat is missing off the coast of NZ

http://www.3news.co.nz/Fears-for-7-missing-on-schooner/tabid/423/articleID/302985/Default.aspx

Fingers crossed the crew will be safe and Nina will be found.

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JMOD. As you've any eye for these historic cutters, have a look at this set up.

 

'Leader' is a gaff rigged ketch. She's just lovely, in my opinion. I would love to own a boat, loosely designed on the Falmouth smack, of about 34' with this type of rig. Maybe drawn up by Paul Gartside. She would be my ultimate world cruiser.

 

 

Check Leader out here: http://www.classic-sailing.co.uk/vessels/leader-brixham-sailing-trawler

now that's cool! only thing is, this is quite a handful and you need a pretty big crew going for a set up like this. and that's what i like about pilot cutters, is they can be manhandled by 1 or 2. That's what i seek for in most boats/yachts. I like to be able to handle it myself with maybe help from the wife or passenger on board. so, simple setup and easy to point out what needs to be done...

 

but it is a cool setup, also with the fisherman's sail up top! that makes it a big roach or almost square top main.

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i hope the crew of nina is safe! or safely enough to be rescued!

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Clearly, I'm a bit biased, but I think this trailerable cat is about as COOL as it gets!!!

 

attachicon.gifimage.jpgattachicon.gifimage.jpgattachicon.gifimage.jpg

 

 

I like it too. Wondering why the spinnaker is flying from the downwind mast, though? Wouldn't the upwind rig tend to blanket it? Why not fly it from the upwind mast? Or one from each?

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Why trailer when you can car top it?

onroof.jpg

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Why trailer when you can car top it?

onroof.jpg

 

Someone needs to do that with one of the Maestroes cartoon boats.

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I think I beat you to that.

I asked Spike what he wanted for Christmas and he asked for a cartoon submarine. He owned the VW bus "Bluebell" and he loved that old bus. So I combined the sub with the bus "sub-bus"

We worked on the cartoon together. Grace was Spike's fiance. She kept this cartoon.

post-2980-0-89907500-1372352517_thumb.jpg

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Miss Cindy is a cool boat and a cool adventure- http://turtleislands.net/tmc/

 

He just got on with it. As I recall, he had the local folk in Mexico carry the boat into the water and gave them the car.

The picture with the CHP officers is awesome.

theboys.jpg

 

Cool boat and a cool bloke.

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Not that there is anything wrong with that.

 

Years ago I got pulled over and the officer that had taken exception to my rate of travel could have easily been a stand-in for the 'Mirror-glasses and mustached Cop' right out of central casting.

 

It was all I could do not to ask how the construction worker and indian were doing these days, but for once I managed to keep my mouth shut.

Still got the ticket though.

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Sticker:

Yeah, I know the yawls have "tastefull little ports". I want to know the story behind the boat without any ports. I find it very interesting.t's sort of unique.

 

How many Concordia yawls were built?

Caught the owner on board today. It's a one-off built in 1947 for the Forbes family.

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I don't think you can go wrong in that fleet Keith. I like COLUMBIA because it was the "big dog" on the block at the time I was geting seriously interested in yacht design. But I think INTREPID had a pretty remarkable race record. Now if you could throw VIM into that fleet I may have to go with VIM due to her competitive longevity in the class.

 

I ended up on HERITAGE, otherwise known as "the tank." We had an enthusiastic crew and plenty of wind and took 2nd, INTREPID won. I took a bunch of pictures that look a lot like Brodie's.

 

Here's what HERITAGE looks like now. That clew looks a little high to me, Bob.

 

Heritage_Rose_8_06.jpg

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