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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
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On 17/01/2018 at 5:10 AM, RKoch said:

From Historic SV Vega FB page... tanning a fishing boat sail, about 1900, Ramsgate, England.

 

image.jpeg

I collect monosyllables, and "cutch" is an old word for the stuff that you dress the sails with. It's at least partly piss and shit, with some fishguts if you have them. From somewhere on the internet "cutch/catechu, an extract from Acacia Catechu, a tree from East India, containing catechin and catechutannic acid, vegetable tannins, along with fermented urine (for the urea, which I believe acted as a mordant to fix the cutch) and, um, other stuff (e.g., fermented dung)." 

Don't ask me about "mulm"

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Cool find Kocher and a new word to boot.

I've got a word for you Ed, "stive".

I also have a question. is "martingale" the same as "dolphin striker"? This came up on FB.

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11 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Cool find Kocher and a new word to boot.

I've got a word for you Ed, "stive".

I also have a question. is "martingale" the same as "dolphin striker"? This came up on FB.

Stive is to bowsprits as rake is to masts.

What do I win?

My understanding of the martingale/dolphin striker controversy is that 1- it is very uncool to go around striking dolphins and 2- the distinction is a very finnicky one: the martingale is butted to the bowsprit cap (the clamp holding the bowsprit to the jib boom) or saddle, while a dolphin striker is butted to the bow of the vessel. That may be some arcane bullshit invented by one of my uncles ~50 years ago, I dunno....... amazing what lurks in the far recesses of the brain.

I have one but gotta go, elec power just went off

FB- Doug

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4 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I collect monosyllables, and "cutch" is an old word for the stuff that you dress the sails with. It's at least partly piss and shit, with some fishguts if you have them. From somewhere on the internet "cutch/catechu, an extract from Acacia Catechu, a tree from East India, containing catechin and catechutannic acid, vegetable tannins, along with fermented urine (for the urea, which I believe acted as a mordant to fix the cutch) and, um, other stuff (e.g., fermented dung)." 

Don't ask me about "mulm"

 I think they used whatever they had lying around. Even Claude Worth gives several 'recipies', but this seems to be his preferred:

"Oil and Ochre - The method usually employed by sailmakers is to brush the sails on both sides with a mixture of linseed oil, ochre, and water. The over and water form an emulsion with the oil. When the water evaporates, the globules of oil and particles of ochre are spread over the the surface of the canvas. But the oil only penetrates the the fabric of the canvas slightly, and the rankings not at all. It therefore does little towards preserving the sails. 

A good recipie for oil and ochre dressing is as follows. Put in a copper 5 gallons of the best raw linseed oil and 1 1/4 lbs of beeswax. Heat it until it begins to boil. The gradually add 20 lbs of Venetian red ochre and 10 lbs light purple-brown ochre, and boil for 5 minutes, stirring all the time. When cool enough, add 10 gallons of the best paraffin (kerosene).  Spread the dry sails on a clean floor or shingle beach. Keep the contents of the copper constantly stirred. Brush it on both sides of the sails with a large paint scrubber, working the mixture well into the tablings. The sails should be temporarily bent to spars and hung up to dry in an open shed. Two days later they should be moved a little so the oil doesn't settle in one place. They must be well-ventilated while drying, if left in a heap only for a few hours they may become heated, and rot. After a fortnight they may be spread in the sun to complete the drying process. "

He goes on with other formulas, including one for nets that sounds pretty nasty.

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