Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

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6 hours ago, RKoch said:

 I think they used whatever they had lying around.

their quantity's could have been large enough they made it themselves, and things had evolved by 1900. But earlier (17th-18th century) common paints, varnish ingredients, varnishes and grounds (basically what you are putting on the sail) could be bought from your local chemist so it might be whatever they had around. Some people theorize the secret to classic Cremonese violin varnish is whatever the town chemist made. Such producers were often banned from functioning inside the city walls by local ordinance (boiling linseed oil over a wood fire is a bit of a fire risk to a wood town, and other things could be explosive). There are also changes in how linseed oil was produced which make it behave differently - Tad Spurgeon wrote a whole book about paint technology evolution and how you could work on recreating the old masters paints.

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Why would you want to cover your sails in piss and shit?   

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15 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

Why would you want to cover your sails in piss and shit?   

Just for the kinky pleasure in it?

Back in the old days, sails were made out of biodegradable materials. Not very UV resistant either. The coating made the microbes that might eat the fabric nauseous, and protected it from the sun's rays. They lasted longer..... or maybe it just seemed like it.

FB- Doug

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6 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

Just for the kinky pleasure in it?

Back in the old days, sails were made out of biodegradable materials. Not very UV resistant either. The coating made the microbes that might eat the fabric nauseous, and protected it from the sun's rays. They lasted longer..... or maybe it just seemed like it.

FB- Doug

Hoisting the main would have been really ugly if you happened to be under it.

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This leaves me breathless....

 

 

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@OSPREY How can you down vote Endeavor??  lol   She is gorgeous.

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18 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Hoisting the main would have been really ugly if you happened to be downwind of it.

FIFY

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Rainbow racing Antigua j boats are awesome to watch. Maui , my neighbors son 7 was looking at the pictures and must have hit the button and I didn’t catch it. I’ll have to look threw the pictures and see what else he did. 

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29 minutes ago, OSPREY said:

Rainbow racing Antigua j boats are awesome to watch. Maui , my neighbors son 7 was looking at the pictures and must have hit the button and I didn’t catch it. I’ll have to look threw the pictures and see what else he did. 

easier just to check here :

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?/profile/35761-osprey/

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51 minutes ago, OSPREY said:

Rainbow racing Antigua j boats are awesome to watch. Maui , my neighbors son 7 was looking at the pictures and must have hit the button and I didn’t catch it. I’ll have to look threw the pictures and see what else he did. 

No problem.  :)   I thought maybe Endeavor ran over your puppy or something.  :P

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11 minutes ago, MauiPunter said:

No problem.  :)   I thought maybe Endeavor ran over your puppy or something.  :P

Scratched his anchor...

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Several 1-tons in England were trapezing about 1966-67, until the rules were rewritten to ban it. Pic from Julian Everitt's FB page.

 

image.jpeg

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This beautiful Phil Rhodes design is sitting behind a business in Zombie mode. It’s coming home with me for a full restoration. Has original 1937 cotton sails that are clean and a crispy new set. Can’t believe how dainty and fine the tiller,  jib boom and spinnaker pole are...

78101DBC-C48C-46D5-9FB5-E4B795AB56FD.jpeg

2F5CEDC8-73B1-4BDE-A17C-29A925678C5B.png

B249FB7E-6141-40AC-8117-4012C6E86B3F.jpeg

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50 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

This beautiful Phil Rhodes design is sitting behind a business in Zombie mode. It’s coming home with me for a full restoration. Has original 1937 cotton sails that are clean and a crispy new set. Can’t believe how dainty and fine the tiller,  jib boom and spinnaker pole are...

...     ...     ...

 

Wow!

Very cool, congrats............. I'm looking forward to seeing you two in the "Show Your Boat Sailing" thread

FB- Doug

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Congratulations Beer! Please start a topic on her and restoration.

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1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

This beautiful Phil Rhodes design is sitting behind a business in Zombie mode. It’s coming home with me for a full restoration. Has original 1937 cotton sails that are clean and a crispy new set. Can’t believe how dainty and fine the tiller,  jib boom and spinnaker pole are...

78101DBC-C48C-46D5-9FB5-E4B795AB56FD.jpeg

2F5CEDC8-73B1-4BDE-A17C-29A925678C5B.png

B249FB7E-6141-40AC-8117-4012C6E86B3F.jpeg

Kingman Yacht Center is still alive and well in Cataumet. We kept Sparky next door at the smaller Parker's for many years. The two yards have been friendly neighbors for decades. There is plenty of business for both. The chart room restaurant at Kingmans is excellent. 

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Speaking of restorations. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tally_Ho_(yacht)

Tally Ho is a 48 ft/14.6m (LOA) by 44ft6/13.5 (LWL) by 12ft10/4m (beam) by 7ft6/2.3m (draft) gaff cutter yacht designed by the renowned artist and yacht designer Albert Strange. She was also later named Escape, but is now again known as Tally Ho.

Tally Ho, originally named Betty, was built in Shoreham-by-Sea (Sussex, England) by Stow and Son for Charles Hellyer of Brixham (Devon, England) for relaxed cruising and some deep sea fishing. In 1913, Charles Hellyer commissioned the larger Betty II and sold Betty, ownership of which passed in 1927 to the then Lord Stalbridge, who renamed her Tally Ho.[4]

Albert Strange is best known for the canoe yawl with a Double-ended or canoe-stern hull and the two masts of the yawl rig. Unusually for him, Tally Ho was designed with a transom stern and a cutter rig.

Tally Ho was one of only two yachts from the fifteen starters[3] to complete the 1927 Fastnet Race,under heavy conditions finishing second, 52 minutes after the John G. Alden designed 30 ton schooner La Goleta, but winning on corrected time.

Until 2017 the Albert Strange Association owned the boat, and planned to move, repair, restore, and refit her. The effort was urgent, as the ship had to be moved from its shipyard, which was going to become part of an expanded sewage treatment facility. The hope was to eventually facility her return to the British Isles.

However, in June 2017, Tally Ho was sold to English boatbuilder and sailor Leo Sampson Goolden for $1. He moved her to Sequim, Washington and plans to refit her and eventually to return her to England. By the end of 2017, she had been placed in a temporary boat shed and stripped down to the basic hull structure in preparation for restoration, including complete removal of the deck. His intention is to replace most or all of the ribs, much of the planking, and the keel timber, but to retain as much of the original removed woodwork and fittings as possible.

Tally-Ho-B0003-1027x1024-1024x1021.jpg

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5 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Skin tone foulies are disturbing.

Only if your skin tone is peach.

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48 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Congratulations Beer! Please start a topic on her and restoration.

That’s a good idea! The boat is so small and beautiful that it would make for a great thread without the time lapse that my current projects are taking. If you like wooden boats, I have a couple ongoing with lots of pics. Thought peeps here don’t like the splinter boats much...

I also have a secret Turbo project that I’m working on that has to occur by summer to help save an older OD class.  So much work, so little money...

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48 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Restoration of MARILEE, a 1926 NY 40, is featured in a video to come out this fall. Here is a link to the trailer:

http://www.langleyphoto.com/blog

I went back to college in my early 30’s to finish my degree after a car wreck put that on hold and helped build the Spars as part of my college internship program during the 2000 restoration project.  Helped build the 100’ lathe table for that work and spent many hours planing, shaping, glueing, lathe sanding and varnishing those pieces and many hours shaping and polishing the bronze castings...

...the good old days!

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39 minutes ago, Cruisin Loser said:

Kingman Yacht Center is still alive and well in Cataumet. We kept Sparky next door at the smaller Parker's for many years. The two yards have been friendly neighbors for decades. There is plenty of business for both. The chart room restaurant at Kingmans is excellent. 

I looked them up and found only good things about the marina and facility. I’ll be sure to go there this spring or summer since I usually get called upon to pick boats for my clients on the Cape

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8 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

That’s a good idea! The boat is so small and beautiful that it would make for a great thread without the time lapse that my current projects are taking. If you like wooden boats, I have a couple ongoing with lots of pics. Thought peeps here don’t like the splinter boats much...

I also have a secret Turbo project that I’m working on that has to occur by summer to help save an older OD class.  So much work, so little money...

Speaking for myself, I love wooden boats.

Unfortunately, I don't have the knowledge or skills to take care of one, or the disposable $$ to have someone else do it, and if I did, there is a dearth of skilled people in my geographic area.

Looking forward to your thread.

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4 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

I looked them up and found only good things about the marina and facility. I’ll be sure to go there this spring or summer since I usually get called upon to pick boats for my clients on the Cape

The esteemed wooden boat specialists Ballentine's Boat Shop is also right there. They have a dock at Parker's where they do commissioning.  They do museum quality restorations and maintenance, and are super nice people.

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Good find Southern Cross. I'm a big Albert Strange fan. Sequim is not that far from me. It might be worth a road trip this spring to see if I can find that project.

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On 1/18/2018 at 12:36 PM, SemiSalt said:

"Martingale" is also a name for some betting systems. Doubling a bet after a loss is the simplest.

"Martingale" is also the name of some horse equipment (tack). 

It's a strap that goes from the chest to the nose with the intent of keeping the horse's head down.  

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On 1/29/2018 at 2:01 AM, Bull City said:

Congratulations Beer! Please start a topic on her and restoration.

hear hear , absolutely deserves a thread on it's own , looking forward to it B)

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Saw this sailing up the harbour with a bunch of other classics yesterday. Someone else can jump in with the historyIMG_0786a.thumb.jpg.b8fa08e4b1362cfdce8f18d48c386873.jpg

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On 1/18/2018 at 7:13 PM, Mr. Ed said:

I always had "steeve" for stowing bowsprits. I thought martingales were largely for horses. I should have said that to be collectible the monosyllables need to be nouns really, or place names. Berm, culch, mulm. I've just helped bury a very good friend who shared my joy in them, and read this rhyme of his at the funeral: he came up with it on the spur of the moment, about a town called Clun in Shropshire, which lies on the rivers Clun, Unk and Lugg. 

    As I walked out to sowing
      By Lugg and Unk and Clun,
    I heard the waters flowing
    But little thought of knowing
      How far they had to run.
    
    Now in the churchyard mowing
      I see a grave fresh dug:
    A handy spot for stowing
    The lad who went a-hoeing
      By Clun and Unk and Lugg.
    
                   A.E. Housperson

Martingale is a French word, initially it was a strap to stop horses raising their head to high. On a boat (for us) it either  stops the bowsprit from bending (goes from end to end via one or several "spreaders") or on a catamaran is the cable that links the compression post underneath the mast to the end of the cross beam.

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1 hour ago, overbend said:

Saw this sailing up the harbour with a bunch of other classics yesterday. Someone else can jump in with the history

Rawhiti

Vessel Number: HV000019
Date: 1905
Builder: Logan Bros
Designer: Logan Bros
Dimensions:
Vessel Dimensions: 16.46 m x 11.12 m x 2.95 m x 2.29 m, 13.5 tonnes, 146.77 square metres (54 ft x 36.5 ft x 9.7 ft x 7.5 ft, 13.72 tons, 1579.98 square feet)
Engine dimensions: 37.3 kilowatts, 4 cylinders (50 horsepower)
Classification:Vessels and fittings
 
 
Significance
RAWHITI is a racing yacht built in 1905 in Auckland New Zealand. The gaff rigged cutter was built by the Logan Bros for racing on Sydney Harbour. RAWHITI had a major involvement in Australian yacht racing over a long period in the first half of the 20th century. It challenged for the Sayonara Cup in early 1907, and later became the champion yacht on Sydney Harbour for many years, where it was a very well known yacht. Logan Bros were the premier New Zealand yacht builders of the early 1900s and at this time it represented the highest boat building standards available in the either Australia or New Zealand.
DescriptionRAWHITI is a 16.46 metre (54 ft) long racing yacht that was designed and built by Logan Bros NZ in 1905 as the last of three 54 footers from their yard, the others being ARIKI and IORANGI. The kauri planking is done in the Logan Bros. method of triple-diagonal construction.

RAWHITI's success came under two owners, firstly C T Brockhoff, a champion skipper of his period, and then the well known music publisher and keen sailor Frank Albert. The wooden, gaff rigged cutter was built to the 2nd Linear Rule and rated close to 38 feet when measured for the Sayonara Cup. This rule encouraged designers to give their craft the long overhangs at the bow and stern. These are a major part of the craft's elegant profile.

It was designed for New Zealand yachtsman AT Pittar who had settled in Sydney, and the design was intended for the Interstate yachting events. In October and November 1905 RAWHITI sailed across the Tasman Sea to Sydney in 28 days, and was hove to in severe conditions at one stage. Pittar sold it to Brockhoff after only a few months, and Brockhoff then entered RAWHITI in the Sayonara Cup contest for 1907.

The racing was held on Port Phillip, against the defender SAYONARA. As required by the rules which were similar to the America’s Cup, the challenger, RAWHITI, had to sail to Melbourne instead of going by ship. It arrived early in 1907 and prepared for the event by sailing in the La Carabine Cup series, open to yachts of all sizes. SAYONARA also raced in the series, but pulled out of the third and final race as it was sailing quite badly and was out of trim. RAWHITI however was performing well and at the end of the three races there was a remarkable three-way tie between RAWHITI, SJS and HEATHER. A sail off between those three was needed to declare a winner, but first the Sayonara Cup had to be raced.

SAYONARA had been re-ballasted to its original configuration and was back to its best. It defeated RAWHITI in the first two races to successfully defend the cup for Victoria. RAWHITI then matched up with only SJS for the deciding La Carabine Cup race, as HEATHER had returned to NSW by steamer. RAWHITI won the race on handicap and returned to NSW with one cup to celebrate its racing on Port Phillip.

It continued to race under Brockhoff and won many events, but by the end of the decade it had been sold to Frank Albert and EE Sayers. They campaigned the boat for more than two decades, with numerous race wins on the harbour or on Pittwater. At one point they commissioned naval architect Walter Reeks to overhaul the craft and he designed a new larger rig, and added 1.5 tonnes of ballast to the keel. The waterline length increased about 600 mm. It is though that this may have not been entirely successful and some of the changes were later reversed. In 1927 a new Bermudan rig designed by William Fife and Sons was stepped to keep pace with more modern yachts of the era and it continued to be a champion yacht. However the first outng with the new rig ended disastrously when the yacht was involved in a collision and the hollow spar was broken.

RAWHITI was also known for its unusual colour scheme, sporting green topsides. It is understood it was painted 'Eau de Nile' green by Brockhoff, and Albert then retained the colour. In 1910 the report on Reeks' work also noted that as well as keeping the topsides green, the bottom was now pink in colour. The flamboyant scheme however was matched with excellent results.

In the 1930s it spent much of its time laid up as newer craft were now dominating yachting; including Frank Albert’s son Alexis Albert’s International 8 Metre class NORN. Toward the end of World War II RAWHITI was sold to new owners in New Zealand. It sailed back across the Tasman soon after the war ended. In Auckland the rig was later changed again and at some point the keel hung rudder was replaced with a spade rudder.

In 2006 RAWHITI began a huge restoration in New Zealand, bringing it back to the original 1905 - 1907 hull and rig configuration, and original white topsides. In 2011 it was re-launched in September and soon after began sailing in company with the other Logan big boats on the Waitamata Harbour.
Vessel Details
Ballast:externallead
Cabin or superstructure material and construction:timber planked
Current status:hard stand/cradleinside buildingnon-operationalnot on display
Deck layout:decked with cockpit
Deck material and construction:timber planked
Hand propulsion/steering mechanism:tiller
Hull material and construction:cold mouldedtimbercold-mouldedtimberdouble diagonaltimbertriple diagonaltimberdouble-diagonaltimbertriple-diagonaltimber
Hull shape:displacementmonohulloverhanging stemoverhanging transomround bottom
Keel/centreboard/rudder type:full keel-shortkeel hung rudder
Motor propulsion:dieselinboard
Propeller:foldingsinglefeatheringsingle
Related materials:drawingsmodelsnews clippingsphotosplansreferences
Rig type:cuttergaff
Sail cloth:synthetic
Spar material:timber
Alternate Numbers

Official Number: 122905

Sail Number: 6

Sail Number: A2

 

http://arhv.anmm.gov.au/objects/121363

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13 hours ago, overbend said:

Saw this sailing up the harbour with a bunch of other classics yesterday. Someone else can jump in with the historyIMG_0786a.thumb.jpg.b8fa08e4b1362cfdce8f18d48c386873.jpg

I admire the use of speed wrinkles.

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15 hours ago, Mid said:

hear hear , absolutely deserves a thread on it's own , looking forward to it B)

I’ll do it. I just have to pay for it first!

maybe if I get some real downtime I’ll start a thread about the Crosby Curlew I bought and am restoring. It’s the one in front...the one in back is the Ocean racer I’m restoring as well. Wait !! That could be another thread! 

 Then there’s the top secret Turbo project that will launch in June if all goes well...putting the best into that one-carbon sails on a new rig, etc to help the class survive

5201E46E-8D46-4C08-88FE-E90830BB655B.jpeg

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9 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

I’ll do it. I just have to pay for it first!

maybe if I get some real downtime I’ll start a thread about the Crosby Curlew I bought and am restoring. It’s the one in front...the one in back is the Ocean racer I’m restoring as well. Wait !! That could be another thread! 

 Then there’s the top secret Turbo project that will launch in June if all goes well...putting the best into that one-carbon sails on a new rig, etc to help the class survive

5201E46E-8D46-4C08-88FE-E90830BB655B.jpeg

Those are neat and all but can you get a better pic of the catboat?

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30 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

I’ll do it. I just have to pay for it first!

maybe if I get some real downtime I’ll start a thread about the Crosby Curlew I bought and am restoring. It’s the one in front...the one in back is the Ocean racer I’m restoring as well. Wait !! That could be another thread! 

 Then there’s the top secret Turbo project that will launch in June if all goes well...putting the best into that one-carbon sails on a new rig, etc to help the class survive

5201E46E-8D46-4C08-88FE-E90830BB655B.jpeg

Pretty boat Mr. Beer.

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56 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

I’ll do it. I just have to pay for it first!

maybe if I get some real downtime I’ll start a thread about the Crosby Curlew I bought and am restoring. It’s the one in front...the one in back is the Ocean racer I’m restoring as well. Wait !! That could be another thread! 

 Then there’s the top secret Turbo project that will launch in June if all goes well...putting the best into that one-carbon sails on a new rig, etc to help the class survive

5201E46E-8D46-4C08-88FE-E90830BB655B.jpeg

Excellent!

Do you think you’ve reached Peak Boat yet?

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25 minutes ago, Mr. Ed said:

Excellent!

Do you think you’ve reached Peak Boat yet?

Peak boat is a myth. Between steel, aluminum, fiberglass, wood, and cement, the entirety of the Earth's surface can be converted to boat.

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1 hour ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Those are neat and all but can you get a better pic of the catboat?

No problem, I’ll just have to get some snow off of it. I think that’s the Marshall Sand Piper. There’s that and a Marshall Sanderling and 2 or 3 Herreshoff America cats plus a 10 year resto Herreshoff Eagle. 

 

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The boat isn’t around, so here are a pair of Herreshoff America cats and a couple of Atlantic City cats. 

B962188C-4DD8-4DFF-A0F2-B23AFAD3704E.jpeg

76D59D66-2BD6-4D47-A607-FABF56AB1B77.jpeg

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Beer, is this your back yard?

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No. I re-read the post and it sounds like it to me, though. It WAS my back yard for a year when I rented a house on the property. 

 I was offered the yard when I lived there but passed. I was only 30 something, newly wed and poor. The yard was picked up soon after I bought a house and moved out. 

I had my business at a much smaller yard. I closed it last year to concentrate on family and my Sandy damaged home which is still incomplete. I just couldn’t keep those 2 wood boats there any longer due to space constraints. I still maintain the yard for the number of boats that I acquired while the shop was open for business and will re-open when the house is complete in March or April. 

Thats why it’s so many boats and not enough time...or money!

I do love restoring boats though!

your H boat is sleek by the way;)

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How are you recovering from the assault? What happened to the slimeball who jumped you?

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Damn, Beer. Looks like you have a twelve pack of nice boats.

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38 minutes ago, lasal said:

Damn, Beer. Looks like you have a twelve pack of nice boats.

It's a pretty severe case of Polynavicular Morbus Restoratus. Nearly as bad as the Boatbuildicus strain.

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2 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

It's a pretty severe case of Polynavicular Morbus Restoratus. Nearly as bad as the Boatbuildicus strain.

There's only one cure for that: Yoga.

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29 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

It's a pretty severe case of Polynavicular Morbus Restoratus. Nearly as bad as the Boatbuildicus strain.

Not that severe, most sufferers dont really recognise this condition.

their close family members make the error of measuring severity by the total number of boats involved, but experts have found it should really be measured by total  displacement ...

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I prefer maximum displacement!

Cruiser, I have almost gotten back the use of my right arm. There is one seriously tight tendon that goes across the top of the shoulder which I can’t free up yet. Matt is going to feel the brunt of New Jersey’s legal system in the near future. The paperwork has been filed for simple assault and I’m going for a lien on his boats and business to recover some portion of my losses from this. It might be admiralty court for him and arrested vessels this summer!

I have been working on my own projects since then,  but that doesn’t help with the bills much, so I’m forced to sell the sportboat I bought to campaign-(check the classifieds here for the Fareast28R and you’ll see  another headache due to others keeping my money and not delivering).

But, I did pick up my acoustic and play for 10 minutes this morning and I watched the Vh1 Santana/ Green video with Greg Rollie on keyboard /vocals as he should be. That makes life enjoyable

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On 12/30/2017 at 7:19 AM, Kris Cringle said:

With New Years coming we're promoting Alden design work for an upcoming get together at Mystic Seaport in 2018.

 

 1958: John Alden design office in Boston. 

949-sailplan-jpeg-1300-2-copy-jpg.144973

You can spot an Alden Challenger, a mile away. And an Alden Mistral, Zephyr, Countess… A prominent link in these Alden designs are the unique - large,“D” ports, first penciled on vellum in 1958.
d-ports-deck-jpg.144974

I am curious about the history of the “D” port design. Research shows similarly styled windows in auto design, in the same 1950’s era. 

I found a classic old bloke in a musty wool suit, sitting next to a vintage 1950’s Jaguar window. The flattened oval shape was in fashion when Alden drew their Challenger ports. 

the-crown-julian-broad-ss04-jpg.144975

Is this the “D” port origin, automotive style?

I like to think the designers at Alden were channeling an older form. Fashion is fleeting, Alden style was/is timeless. Here's my take: 

The shape of the ports, specifically the graceful top line on the pair of Alden Challenger “D” ports, is ancient. 

Alden’s designers drew an Elliptical shape - a perfect curve that is formed mathematically - for the top half of the pair of “D” ports.

ellipse_properties_of_directrix_and_stri

This lovely form that draws the eye, is the familiar, graceful, elliptical arch, which dates back to (and before) the Renaissance period. An elliptical arch is classic, and never goes out of style. 
019d246l-png.144978

Alden was challenged structurally, installing the big ports in the solid 16” mahogany house side. But they wanted this unique port design - dearly, and were willing to incur the added costs and complexity the “D” ports would add. 

A large laminated beam as well as full house depth drifts, were needed between the ports for strength in the weakened house side plank, between the D port cut outs. 

Alden also wanted a bright cabin below in the Challenger. They got that. 

d-ports-below-jpg.144979

To further accent their design, they used a delicate wooden trim to secure the tempered glass. The trim was proud of the house side. This element leaves a lovely shadow line that constantly changes. 

When it came time to replace the delicate port trim(years ago), I enhanced the detail by milling the stock oversized. This accents the detail by extending the trim, further out, beyond the house side(plus it should be easier to remove and replace in the future). 

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52 Challengers were built with Alden's signature “D” ports. 

On the eve of 60 years removed from the drafting table in Boston, Alden’s design work continues to be timeless. 

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I just bought a john alden boothbay challenger, whats this about an alden get together at mystic seaport? 

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Not here much lately but photographed this on Pittwater (Sydney) last week in a classic Nor Easter. Lion Island in the background

 

fullsizeoutput_c50.jpeg

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9 hours ago, frozenhawaiian said:

I just bought a john alden boothbay challenger, whats this about an alden get together at mystic seaport? 

Nice boat! I see you found our Alden owners group on SBO website https://forums.sailboatowners.com/index.php?categories/alden-sailboats.173/.

The get together is going to happen and is scheduled. But that's about as much as we know. At this point there is no way to sign up and reserve space at Mystic. 

There is one guy who is doing the work of coordinating the event. I expect more info soon that will be posted soon on the above as well as on the Alden yachts facebook page. I'll post any important updates here as well. There are not that many Alden owners so we'll need participants. 

 

 

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11 hours ago, Trickypig said:

Not here much lately but photographed this on Pittwater (Sydney) last week in a classic Nor Easter. Lion Island in the background

 

fullsizeoutput_c50.jpeg

Bee-oot-ee-ful. Is that a Rozinante? Thanks.

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

I ran across this $95,000 gem. Quite a temptress!

1965 Herreschoff Rozinante

rozinante.jpg.08d7f14be954f0da37716d03167f85bc.jpg

Yup, a really, really, really, strong temptation....

At first I thought, yeah, well, they're just trying to get some of their money back out of a refurb, I don't want a woody.... But fiberglass hull, no mods to the original design, virtually brand new,  I'm falling.......

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1 hour ago, Veeger said:

Yup, a really, really, really, strong temptation....

At first I thought, yeah, well, they're just trying to get some of their money back out of a refurb, I don't want a woody.... But fiberglass hull, no mods to the original design, virtually brand new,  I'm falling.......

From the ad:

Quote

She has not been launched since her restoration and has been in indoor storage, she is in like new condition.

I get that. Too pretty to take outside or anything. At least, I'm going to assume that's the reason and the next owner will keep her indoors too.

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2 hours ago, Veeger said:

Yup, a really, really, really, strong temptation....

At first I thought, yeah, well, they're just trying to get some of their money back out of a refurb, I don't want a woody.... But fiberglass hull, no mods to the original design, virtually brand new,  I'm falling.......

Nothing said about spars or sails. I assume there is no engine. Probably a Kenner boat?

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I guess with the photos Tyler outed himself. Tyler Fields works for Ballentine's Boat Shop, but is also a highly regarded marine Photog. Pics I've posted of my boat at Eggemoggin reach and other races were taken by Tyler.

Ballentine's is the premier classic boat restorer of southern New England. Want a 1906 Herreshoff restored to perfection? That's your place.

I'm VERY familiar with their work, as they commission their boats at the boatyard where I kept my Hinckley for years, and in that time had the pleasure of meeting the yard owners on many occasions. Their work is the best. Period. If the boat has been done by Ballentine's, you won't be disappointed. 

The Rozinante, as I'm sure you are aware, is named after Don Quixote's horse. I can think of no better small steed in which to go tilting at windmills, and after all, isn't that what sailing is all about?

If I hadn't just started planning a serious, multi year adventure cruise, I would consider picking that boat up as a little Maine gunkholer. 

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1 hour ago, olaf hart said:

Here is another glass Rozinante.

These folks also had LFH’s original Rozinante for sale, but it seems to have gone now.

http://www.blockislandmaritime.com/boats-for-chartersale/sailboats/1976-rozinante-28/

 

That's almost within reason. I can afford one boat, one place, although I would love to restore a Rozinante and that's one boat too many.

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7 hours ago, Veeger said:

Yup, a really, really, really, strong temptation....

At first I thought, yeah, well, they're just trying to get some of their money back out of a refurb, I don't want a woody.... But fiberglass hull, no mods to the original design, virtually brand new,  I'm falling.......

Damn, that is tempting! I wonder what SWMBO would say if it appeared on our buoy........

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2 hours ago, kimbottles said:

Damn, that is tempting! I wonder what SWMBO would say if it appeared on our buoy........

You can never have too many double enders

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14 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

Except the rig...

I don't seem to have that one - Second Wind - rigged. There are quite a few around here at launch time, although, I don't see them in season, out on the water.

Once launched, I suspect they are hidden somewhere in the reeds and backwaters, cunningly gunk-holing,... as they were designed.  

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On 1/31/2018 at 7:19 AM, Kris Cringle said:

Nice boat! I see you found our Alden owners group on SBO website https://forums.sailboatowners.com/index.php?categories/alden-sailboats.173/.

The get together is going to happen and is scheduled. But that's about as much as we know. At this point there is no way to sign up and reserve space at Mystic. 

There is one guy who is doing the work of coordinating the event. I expect more info soon that will be posted soon on the above as well as on the Alden yachts facebook page. I'll post any important updates here as well. There are not that many Alden owners so we'll need participants. 

 

 

Fill me in on details as you get them, friend of mine owns the alden schooner WHEN AND IF and seemed interested when I mentioned this event to him the other day. The alden schooner BLACKBIRD is also here in casco bay, the owners finished an extensive refit last summer and are eager to stretch the boats legs so they may also be interested.  it's a bit of a haul from penobscot bay but the the alden schooner VOYAGER may also be interested if it matches up with their schedule. 

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25 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

I don't seem to have that one - Second Wind - rigged. There are quite a few around here at launch time, although, I don't see them in season, out on the water.

Once launched, I suspect they are hidden somewhere in the reeds and backwaters, cunningly gunk-holing,... as they were designed.  

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Any other pics of Off Call? Beautiful as well

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Here is PETREL. We spotted her several years ago on a Maine Windjammer cruise:

petrel.thumb.jpg.257739a1ce6432eb6e7d7365bc73d4f4.jpg

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Serious little boat, the Rozinante. Everything is there in a slight and slender package. 

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Nice photo.  Know anything about Fern? Which btw I happen to be reading Charlotte's Web to one of my kids at the moment.

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2 hours ago, monsoon said:

Nice photo.  Know anything about Fern? Which btw I happen to be reading Charlotte's Web to one of my kids at the moment.

I do. FERN was designed by K Aage Nielsen (built in Germany, Walsteads?) on the  commissions of the success of Charlottes Web(I think,...).

She is now owned by EB's grand daughter and her family, and the boat sails out of Rockport Harbor. 

I saw FERN out this fall, sailed very nicely by one of EB's Whites great grandsons(a great kid my sons age, we know well). 

Whites grand daughter is also a writer, and I know she would be very happy to hear that you're reading the Charlottes Web to your daughter. 

I don't know if this artful touch is original to FERN, but your daughter might like it. 

fern6_1015-2583-650x550-0-jpg.145810

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5 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

And here I was thinking that the hiking boards on a Chesapeake Log Canoe were nuts.... 

And they say sailors aren't athletes.

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3 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I do. FERN was designed by K Aage Nielsen (built in Germany, Walsteads?) on the  commissions of the success of Charlottes Web(I think,...).

She is now owned by EB's grand daughter and her family, and the boat sails out of Rockport Harbor. 

I saw FERN out this fall, sailed very nicely by one of EB's Whites great grandsons(a great kid my sons age, we know well). 

Whites grand daughter is also a writer, and I know she would be very happy to hear that you're reading the Charlottes Web to your daughter. 

I don't know if this artful touch is original to FERN, but your daughter might like it. 

fern6_1015-2583-650x550-0-jpg.145810

Thank you! Great story. One tiny correction - I'm reading CW to my son now, having read it several times to his older sister in years past.

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4 hours ago, kinardly said:

And they say sailors aren't athletes.

Best grinder I ever sailed with was a 180 pound special teams player/defensive back for the Seattle Seahawks.

Now he WAS/IS an ATHLETE!

Damn he was strong!

(Donny Dufek for you Seahawks fans.)

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