Sailbydate

Coolboats to admire

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5 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

My ten minutes on the internet suggests people adding tar to the cement. 

I wouldn't know about that, but I have nearly 40 years experience with latex cements. Liquid latex disperses easily and evenly through a cement slurry, I'm not sure how you would get tar evenly distributed in the slurry. Maybe it's not an issue, but you have to be very cautious of side effects. Most people don't know, for example, that adding gypsum, as found in drywall, makes cement thixotropic, it will start setting up as soon as you stop internal shear (mixing or pumping).

 

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"Thixotropic"?  I learned a new word. My Chicken and Dumplings are thixotropic. 

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3 hours ago, RKoch said:

"Thixotropic"?  I learned a new word. My Chicken and Dumplings are thixotropic

And its opposite is rheopectic. Never heard that one. I guess butter is cream that has gone all rheo?

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6 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

You want a hole Tom, you got it!

84469DEA-C76C-4350-8E19-209004F6F2E3.jpeg

Crikey, what a great photo. It looks like it might do a 69 on itself at the gybe mark. The runner man will earn his beer during that manoeuvre (if he can stay aboard). 

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+1.  Is that what it looks like when a displacement hull is about to go submarine?

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On 5/11/2018 at 6:33 AM, Steam Flyer said:

Varnish is soft and porous...... maybe it depends on the environment, down here the alternating scorch of dry heat, and then 99.99% humidity, softens and twists the planks like a rubick's cube. I wouldn''t think it's that different where you are. One of my friends down here has a varnished Chris Craft (I think from the '40s) that he is struggling with after bringing it from Michigan where it lived in a barn anytime they weren't riding in it. I had a number of wooden boats with varying degrees of varnish, including a Kings Cruiser with a bright hull.

As an act of religious devotion, highly admirable.

I love the Wianno, it would be a great boat for around here

FB- Doug

Fun fact: varnish is simply paint without any pigment added. In terms of adhesion, flexibility, flowout, and most physical properties, varnish (or clear lacquer) is superior to paint, all else being equal. The addition of pigment -- finely-ground dirt -- kinda messes with the formula.

There's some evidence overlapping 'plates' of pigment as the film draws down may slightly improve an opaque finish's resistance to water migration (all plastics are more or less permeable.) There's tremendous evidence that clear coatings allow a broad spectrum of light to penetrate all the way to the  substrate and to attack the substrate/first coat bond, and all the coats above it simultaneously. Pigment is a damn fine visible light and UV blocker, rendering the top coat something of a sacrificial layer while protecting the bond & matrix of all the finish beneath the immediate surface. I suspect your observation that varnished topsides get rekt is accurate: not because varnish is initially softer or less-waterproof than paint, but because a clear coat will begin breaking down faster than paint, releasing its bond with the substrate, losing film elasticity due to UV, and developing microscopic cracks which allow moisture to invade all the way down to the wood & then spread laterally.

If I were planning to clear-coat topsides, I might look into some of the 2-pack clear LPUs available, maybe with extra UV blockers added. It's Awlgrip minus the colorants. But I've had to deal with way too much destroyed clear-coated wood here at 7200' to even consider that. People are like, "How can we stop our south-facing front door from splitting apart?" & My answer is, Paint the damned thing.  Better yet, buy a steel or fiberglass door and (if you care) paint it to look like wood.

tl;dr Varnish starts off better than paint but degrades faster. Glide paths cross about 6mo-1yr into service.

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5 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

Fun fact: varnish is simply paint without any pigment added. In terms of adhesion, flexibility, flowout, and most physical properties, varnish (or clear lacquer) is superior to paint, all else being equal. The addition of pigment -- finely-ground dirt -- kinda messes with the formula.

There's some evidence overlapping 'plates' of pigment as the film draws down may slightly improve an opaque finish's resistance to water migration (all plastics are more or less permeable.) There's tremendous evidence that clear coatings allow a broad spectrum of light to penetrate all the way to the  substrate and to attack the substrate/first coat bond, and all the coats above it simultaneously. Pigment is a damn fine visible light and UV blocker, rendering the top coat something of a sacrificial layer while protecting the bond & matrix of all the finish beneath the immediate surface. I suspect your observation that varnished topsides get rekt is accurate: not because varnish is initially softer or less-waterproof than paint, but because a clear coat will begin breaking down faster than paint, releasing its bond with the substrate, losing film elasticity due to UV, and developing microscopic cracks which allow moisture to invade all the way down to the wood & then spread laterally.

If I were planning to clear-coat topsides, I might look into some of the 2-pack clear LPUs available, maybe with extra UV blockers added. It's Awlgrip minus the colorants. But I've had to deal with way too much destroyed clear-coated wood here at 7200' to even consider that. People are like, "How can we stop our south-facing front door from splitting apart?" & My answer is, Paint the damned thing.  Better yet, buy a steel or fiberglass door and (if you care) paint it to look like wood.

tl;dr Varnish starts off better than paint but degrades faster. Glide paths cross about 6mo-1yr into service.

Wow! I learned some stuff. Nicely put.

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14 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

You want a hole Tom, you got it!

84469DEA-C76C-4350-8E19-209004F6F2E3.jpeg

She is trying really hard to plane properly like these newfangled yachts with their fat ass.

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that was a great race. we had about 35kts of wind and big waves. we were on Falcon. first the bow would go under water, than the aft deck would dive as we drove of the waves. that was the final race day of the championship

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11 hours ago, RKoch said:

Very interesting. Do you know what happened next?

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27 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Very interesting. Do you know what happened next?

The poster put up LFH's reply, but it wasn't in a file form I could grab. Basically, LFH agreed that there was too much weight in interior. He felt the boat was strong enough w/o adding structural bulkheads, agreed with smaller motor, suggested a method for checking keel bolts but didn't think it necessary b/c they were torbin bronze, and suggested the bolts on bronze hanging knees  and steering gear be checked. Between the two, 75 pages of letters were exchanged, so apparently LFH was involved in some fashion with the refurbush and modifications. 

Ti went on to win TransPac  in '65 in a notable race against Stormvogel, but apparently suffered some damage, and Bob Johnson realized the boat was too old/outdated to win ocean races. That was likely the genesis of Windward Passage.

http://articles.courant.com/1999-12-26/news/9912260136_1_yachts-sails-ticonderoga/2

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2 hours ago, JMOD said:

that was a great race. we had about 35kts of wind and big waves. we were on Falcon. first the bow would go under water, than the aft deck would dive as we drove of the waves. that was the final race day of the championship

Impressive skill from the helm to avoid the impeding Chinese gybe!

I raced a bit as the bowman of a helm who had done some 8m racing and who was an expert at sailing by the lee with the spinnaker pole not that far away from the water, I was a bit apprehensive at the beginning but soon learnt to trust his skills. Now I know why he was so good at this game.

First time he did it I could see the leeward mark coming, I was thinking, the douse is never going to happen in a clean manner, just before the mark he went DDW to straighten things and to my amazement everything went fine.

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1 hour ago, RKoch said:

The poster put up LFH's reply, but it wasn't in a file form I could grab. Basically, LFH agreed that there was too much weight in interior. He felt the boat was strong enough w/o adding structural bulkheads, agreed with smaller motor, suggested a method for checking keel bolts but didn't think it necessary b/c they were torbin bronze, and suggested the bolts on bronze hanging knees  and steering gear be checked. Between the two, 75 pages of letters were exchanged, so apparently LFH was involved in some fashion with the refurbush and modifications. 

Ti went on to win TransPac  in '65 in a notable race against Stormvogel, but apparently suffered some damage, and Bob Johnson realized the boat was too old/outdated to win ocean races. That was likely the genesis of Windward Passage.

http://articles.courant.com/1999-12-26/news/9912260136_1_yachts-sails-ticonderoga/2

If anyone wants to read LFH's reply, or follow the FB thread...here:

 https://m.facebook.com/groups/95162892145?ref=m_notif&notif_t=group_comment_reply

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6 hours ago, RKoch said:

The poster put up LFH's reply, but it wasn't in a file form I could grab. Basically, LFH agreed that there was too much weight in interior. He felt the boat was strong enough w/o adding structural bulkheads, agreed with smaller motor, suggested a method for checking keel bolts but didn't think it necessary b/c they were torbin bronze, and suggested the bolts on bronze hanging knees  and steering gear be checked. Between the two, 75 pages of letters were exchanged, so apparently LFH was involved in some fashion with the refurbush and modifications. 

Ti went on to win TransPac  in '65 in a notable race against Stormvogel, but apparently suffered some damage, and Bob Johnson realized the boat was too old/outdated to win ocean races. That was likely the genesis of Windward Passage.

http://articles.courant.com/1999-12-26/news/9912260136_1_yachts-sails-ticonderoga/2

Cool boat, cool story. Thanks.

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You can guess this cool boat. From a distance it looks like a one design or racing class from a bygone era. Gorgeous on a mooring. 

libertine-moored-jpg.150330

But, not an old boat. That Spirit of Tradition theme,....

libertine-bow_-jpg.150322

Names a good clue. A boat like this is for extreme hedonism. 

libertine-transom-jpg.150319

Ayuh, you know what it is. Spirit 46 (46' loa), which is all of 9'3" wide and weighs 10,000. 

libertine-launched-jpg.150331

We have nothing on the Brits when it comes to classic boat design and world class craftsmanship. 

libertine-cockpit-jpg.150332

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There used to be a poster here who owned one of those on the west coast. He really loved it, but sold it and bought a famous Alden schooner. Nice guy.

He left here a few years ago due to extremely boorish behavior on the part of others. 

Do you ever run up to Brooklin? They should be launching mine pretty soon.

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Kris,  the first picture doesn't seem to be of the same boat.  (note the house does not extend fwd of the mast as in the Spirit 46).  Might that be a W-46 instead?

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4 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

You can guess this cool boat. From a distance it looks like a one design or racing class from a bygone era. Gorgeous on a mooring. 

libertine-moored-jpg.150330

But, not an old boat. That Spirit of Tradition theme,....

libertine-bow_-jpg.150322

Names a good clue. A boat like this is for extreme hedonism. 

libertine-transom-jpg.150319

Ayuh, you know what it is. Spirit 46 (46' loa), which is all of 9'3" wide and weighs 10,000. 

libertine-launched-jpg.150331

We have nothing on the Brits when it comes to classic boat design and world class craftsmanship. 

libertine-cockpit-jpg.150332

Just screwing the cockpit winches to the deck seems odd, like they got lazy. Also makes them low and far outboard on a boat that heels a lot.

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7 minutes ago, sean9c said:

Just screwing the cockpit winches to the deck seems odd, like they got lazy. Also makes them low and far outboard on a boat that heels a lot.

There's probably a big solid electric motor under each of those. 'Spirit' of tradition indeed...

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2 hours ago, Cruisin Loser said:

There used to be a poster here who owned one of those on the west coast. He really loved it, but sold it and bought a famous Alden schooner. Nice guy.

He left here a few years ago due to extremely boorish behavior on the part of others. 

Do you ever run up to Brooklin? They should be launching mine pretty soon.

We were in Brooklin last year, on the boat. I hope to see your boat this season. 

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1 hour ago, Veeger said:

Kris,  the first picture doesn't seem to be of the same boat.  (note the house does not extend fwd of the mast as in the Spirit 46).  Might that be a W-46 instead?

You're right, good eye. In fact that boat has no lifelines either. I don't think it's a W-class as they have square ports. A mystery I'll try to figure out. 

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3 minutes ago, Kris Cringle said:

You're right, good eye. In fact that boat has no lifelines either. I don't think it's a W-class as they have square ports. A mystery I'll try to figure out. 

Maybe an 8 meter like this one?

http://tayloryachtdesigns.com/designs/8m-pleione/

Checkstays are the same.  Portlights are the same.

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The first boat looks bigger than the others...perhaps it's the lack of lifelines, which eliminate scale and make it look sleeker.

The boats look pretty nice. I agree about the winches...placement looks awkward to use, and IMO electric winches aren't 'spirit of tradition'.  I don't much care for the layout of aft end of cockpit either, but that's a trivial criticism. 

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14 minutes ago, RKoch said:

The first boat looks bigger than the others...perhaps it's the lack of lifelines, which eliminate scale and make it look sleeker.

The boats look pretty nice. I agree about the winches...placement looks awkward to use, and IMO electric winches aren't 'spirit of tradition'.  I don't much care for the layout of aft end of cockpit either, but that's a trivial criticism. 

Cockpits aren't trivial for me.  In fact, my fondest desire is to go to a designer and say "Design a cockpit for me.  Put a nice boat around it."  In this case, since the cockpit narrows aft, the helm person is likely to be pulling that tiller right into his/her ribcage during a maneuver.  Alternatively, the already small cockpit is useless for the last third and the traveller pretty well prevents sitting a bit ahead of the tiller.  Travelers in the prime real estate position in the cockpit are real turnoffs to me.  It's also too shallow.  Small and shallow is great for draining a boarding sea but is uncomfortable, unprotected and gets tough to endure after a few hours.  I like a nice deep cockpit and a tiller head that is below deck (so the tiller is below that aft deck and extending into the aft part of the cockpit)  It beats keeping my arm up in the air all the time hanging off the tiller.   FYI,  I'm totally spoiled by the Yankee One-Design that I had for a number of years.  That was a comfy cockpit but it could still have been improved upon.

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IMHO Spirit Yachts are a complete pastiche.  Not enough spring in the sheer, short bow overhang and an exaggerated stern.  Take a look at Alfred Mylne's work on how to do it properly.

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They're beautiful - that's good enough for me.

Is this a "real" hot rod?

image.png.e4d91b48055efbfd41e8a385ed99dbdb.png

Or does it have to look like this to be "done properly"?

image.png.8ec1da3f32d3e0f3102dd802ebfab2a8.png

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47 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

They're beautiful - that's good enough for me.

Is this a "real" hot rod?

image.png.e4d91b48055efbfd41e8a385ed99dbdb.png

Or does it have to look like this to be "done properly"?

image.png.8ec1da3f32d3e0f3102dd802ebfab2a8.png

No, the Prowler, with a weak V6 is not a hot rod or sports car.

Now, the Panos Roadster (Similar vintage) , hand built in Atlanta and powered by a Ford V8.......

Image result for panoz roadster pic

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The Prowler was over 250 HP - hardly weak. Hot rods were around for decades before many of them had anything like that much power.

Ford flatheads struggle to make over 150 HP.

There's a lot more to a rod than brute HP.

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1 hour ago, RKoch said:

The first boat looks bigger than the others...perhaps it's the lack of lifelines, which eliminate scale and make it look sleeker.

The boats look pretty nice. I agree about the winches...placement looks awkward to use, and IMO electric winches aren't 'spirit of tradition'.  I don't much care for the layout of aft end of cockpit either, but that's a trivial criticism. 

Definitely designed by someone who has not worked much in a cockpit.

- Stumbling

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1 hour ago, Whinging Pom said:

IMHO Spirit Yachts are a complete pastiche.  Not enough spring in the sheer, short bow overhang and an exaggerated stern.  Take a look at Alfred Mylne's work on how to do it properly.

I'm also with my suspiciously sober-looking avatwin.

Freeboard too high to be beautiful, looks awful in combination with this ducked cabin.

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Just%20Launched.jpg

Needed a dose of a true classic.

(Sound of drinking bilge water...) Ahhhh. much better.

Marcita. Illingworth design

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'Hot' is an implication that performance is improved (usually by owner)  over stock. The Prowler is merely a retro-styled personal vehicle....just like a showroom bought Harley isn't a chopper. 

Reguarding Veeg's cockpit comments,  hard for me to tell the ergonomics just from a pic. I've got shorter legs, narrow doesn't bother me like it might others. Shallower cockpit is fine here in Florida, deeper would be nicer in higher latitudes. I would hope the designer didn't draw a boat with helm so bad it has to be sailed with the tiller up in ones chin. That's not really a cockpit flaw, but a balance flaw. The winches are an obvious no-no...they'd be awkward to use regardless. And the rounded foaming and seat aft don't seem to serve any ergonomic function, it's just a styling exercise that adds unecessary (IMO) expense. But  I suspect BPerry knows more than the rest of us, combined, in regards to ergonomics. 

Sheer and freeboard on the first pic look fine to me. Can't really tell on the other boat...but I do like the hull sections. 

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4 hours ago, Veeger said:

Cockpits aren't trivial for me.  In fact, my fondest desire is to go to a designer and say "Design a cockpit for me.  Put a nice boat around it."  In this case, since the cockpit narrows aft, the helm person is likely to be pulling that tiller right into his/her ribcage during a maneuver.  Alternatively, the already small cockpit is useless for the last third and the traveller pretty well prevents sitting a bit ahead of the tiller.  Travelers in the prime real estate position in the cockpit are real turnoffs to me.  It's also too shallow.  Small and shallow is great for draining a boarding sea but is uncomfortable, unprotected and gets tough to endure after a few hours.  I like a nice deep cockpit and a tiller head that is below deck (so the tiller is below that aft deck and extending into the aft part of the cockpit)  It beats keeping my arm up in the air all the time hanging off the tiller.   FYI,  I'm totally spoiled by the Yankee One-Design that I had for a number of years.  That was a comfy cockpit but it could still have been improved upon.

I’m lucky enough to have a boat with a deep cockpit and the traveler mounted on the bridge deck for a wide open cockpit(since I removed the pedestal) and I laminated a recurve tiller so I wouldn’t look like a biker riding ape hangers. It’s lower than it is in the pic...

67C3C51A-AB79-4094-9EE3-F9750B242D3B.jpeg

968A2CE3-CD46-401D-9946-FCEF8A88F1D4.jpeg

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5 hours ago, RKoch said:

Ape-hangers are a ton of fun to look at. Can't be much fun to drive. 

May as well wear a "shmuck" T-shirt.

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6 hours ago, RKoch said:

Ape-hangers are a ton of fun to look at. Can't be much fun to drive. 

Peter Fonda said he couldn't lift his arms after a day riding with them on Easy Rider.

And his weren't stupid tall like the ones in Beer's post.

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8 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

I’m lucky enough to have a boat with a deep cockpit and the traveler mounted on the bridge deck for a wide open cockpit(since I removed the pedestal) and I laminated a recurve tiller so I wouldn’t look like a biker riding ape hangers. It’s lower than it is in the pic...

67C3C51A-AB79-4094-9EE3-F9750B242D3B.jpeg

968A2CE3-CD46-401D-9946-FCEF8A88F1D4.jpeg

Those handle bars must make basic things like turning quite difficult

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10 hours ago, Mitre cut said:

Those handle bars must make basic things like turning quite difficult

What it lacks in maneuverability it makes up for in noise production.  It's like someone said: Let's study everything that makes a motorcycle perform well: high power-to weight ratio; forward seating posture with low, narrow handlebars;  multiple small displacement cylinders with a smooth power stroke and 15,000 RPM redline; high side clearance ... let's take all that, and do exactly the opposite! Let's make the slowest, least efficient, least ergonomic, worst-handling motorcycle in the world! Because stupid is cool!

Sportbike-Tire-Guide-cover-1100.jpg

(Says a person who like sailboats. *sigh*)

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11 hours ago, Mitre cut said:

Those handle bars must make basic things like turning quite difficult

A bee smacking his armpit, at speed, would be painful and entertaining.

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I think y'all are missing the point. It's a styling exercise, not intended to be either practical or performance oriented. Meant to be ridden slowly, if at all, for attention-getting. Think of it as performance art.

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19 minutes ago, RKoch said:

I think y'all are missing the point. It's a styling exercise, not intended to be either practical or performance oriented. Meant to be ridden slowly, if at all, for attention-getting. Think of it as performance art.

Agreed. as someone once told me, even if it's just you on a Harley it's a parade. Besides, they actually ride quite well at traffic speeds. That full fairing sport bike would not be a comfortable ride or easily handled in the city. Different horses.....

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Here's a horse I've been in lust with, a nicely tarted up RD350.

Image result for rd 350

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2 hours ago, py26129 said:

Here's a horse I've been in lust with, a nicely tarted up RD350.

Image result for rd 350

The Yamaha 2-strokes are great bikes. I have an RD400 and an RZ350. 

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4 hours ago, RKoch said:

I think y'all are missing the point. It's a styling exercise, not intended to be either practical or performance oriented. Meant to be ridden slowly, if at all, for attention-getting. Think of it as performance art.

Sounds like some yachties I know...

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15 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Sounds like some yachties I know...

Exactly.

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6 hours ago, py26129 said:

Here's a horse I've been in lust with, a nicely tarted up RD350.

Image result for rd 350

Of all the bikes that get posted here, this one makes we want a bike again. That thing would be hella fun. A bet that two in one header really barks at 7500 rpm

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5 hours ago, RKoch said:

The Yamaha 2-strokes are great bikes. I have an RD400 and an RZ350. 

I used to dream of a YZ250 when I was a teen.

 

10_4.jpg

 

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2 hours ago, chester said:

Of all the bikes that get posted here, this one makes we want a bike again. That thing would be hella fun. A bet that two in one header really barks at 7500 rpm

Not so sure it has a two in one.

RD350 LC 1981 cracker of a bike.

9vOCMGC.jpg

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That slipper launch couldn’t run over a wave. Beautiful but just a 4 ksb.

Notice the massive 1100cc powerplant typical of the type seen on the River Thames...

 

4F0E584F-8B45-4C73-98E7-71B47028F2C3.jpeg

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Nice patina on the bronze roller and chock on the Nielson

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13 hours ago, chester said:

Of all the bikes that get posted here, this one makes we want a bike again. That thing would be hella fun. A bet that two in one header really barks at 7500 rpm

It would make a loud, nasty two stroke sound.

Give me a Honda 750 for sound effects.

Almost as good as a Colombo V12.

And I had 3 Yamaha 2 strokes - A Catalina 250 was my first bike, later a hot rodded 70 and last an RT 360.

All fun bikes, all made nasty noises.

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2 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Commuter plumb bow. 

The last thing you see if it runs you over:  before it cuts you in two.

27316560307_8505267d94_c.jpg

 

FIFY

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20 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

It would make a loud, nasty two stroke sound.

Give me a Honda 750 for sound effects.

Almost as good as a Colombo V12.

And I had 3 Yamaha 2 strokes - A Catalina 250 was my first bike, later a hot rodded 70 and last an RT 360.

All fun bikes, all made nasty noises.

At the other end of the spectrum was my college bike of choice, a Kawasaki KZ650. It sounded like a well-oiled, gas-powered sewing machine. 

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4 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

A couple old bows in the boatyard. 

 

A nice Nielsen spoon. 

27316560327_683e76d118_b.jpg

Commuter plumb bow. 

42187600101_c4a6b58da9_b.jpg

The last thing you see if it runs you over: 

27316560307_8505267d94_c.jpg

Nice. 

42187600001_a813a5cf11_c.jpg

 

 

Gosh, Mr. Kringle but you're putting me off taking our old girl to New England. We're going to look so SHABBY there. We look quite smart over here . . . Those are very well fettled vessels. 

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2 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Gosh, Mr. Kringle but you're putting me off taking our old girl to New England. We're going to look so SHABBY there. We look quite smart over here . . . Those are very well fettled vessels. 

He lives in a pocket of goodness.  Avoid Maine with a shitty boat if you can help it.  :P

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3 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Gosh, Mr. Kringle but you're putting me off taking our old girl to New England. We're going to look so SHABBY there. We look quite smart over here . . . Those are very well fettled vessels. 

Those are professionally fettled,...Ed. Most of us don't look that good. And besides, the lens at the right distance, makes everybody look well fettled. 

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3 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Gosh, Mr. Kringle but you're putting me off taking our old girl to New England. We're going to look so SHABBY there. We look quite smart over here . . . Those are very well fettled vessels. 

Yeah, but you'll get so many bonus points for having sailed there. 

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10 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

A couple old bows in the boatyard. 

 

A nice Nielsen spoon. 

27316560327_683e76d118_b.jpg

Commuter plumb bow. 

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The last thing you see if it runs you over: 

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Nice. 

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What's the rotating handle in the center of the steering column (above the wheel) for?  Is that just a crank to take the wheel on and off?  

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Throttle, I beleive. Shifter is the long handle sticking up just inboard the seat.

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Just now, longy said:

Throttle, I beleive. Shifter is the long handle sticking up just inboard the seat.

Yes, that would be the throttle.

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Shifter? So these were manual transmission?  Is that crank on top of the wheel a clutch perhaps?  I realize that automobiles didn't really have effective automatic transmissions until 1940, and that they were not popular until the 1950's (the hydromatic).  I didn't know vintage boats were manual.

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3 minutes ago, Hawaiidart said:

Shifter? So these were manual transmission?  Is that crank on top of the wheel a clutch perhaps?  I realize that automobiles didn't really have effective automatic transmissions until 1940, and that they were not popular until the 1950's (the hydromatic).  I didn't know vintage boats were manual.

It's the throttle.  The shifter is for Forward and Reverse, just like on every other motorboat.  There is no 1-2-3-etc gears.  No clutch.

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A few years ago on another forum, a gentleman posted photos of his Westerly Centaur in the drying harbor of Staithes on the North Sea coast of England.  I shamelessly copied the photos and am reposting them below.  Being able to stand upright on twin keels when the tide goes out is a neat trick.  The photos were taken at about the same time that Dylan Winter was buying his Centaur, Harmony, to serve as his over-the-top-of-Scotland boat for his Keep Turning Left video series.  It's a brilliant boat for a region with large tidal ranges and drying harbors.  I'm attaching below two of the Keep Turning Left videos.  One is a straightforward description of the Centaur, and the other is a mood video.

 

Staithes 1.jpg

Staithes 2.jpg

sail_plan_and_arrangement.png

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In old automobiles, that lever was the advance and retard for the distributor.

driving was different then. I wasn’t there  

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21 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Commuter plumb bow. 

42187600101_c4a6b58da9_b.jpg

 

I admire the guard over the bow. It's hard to make those stay smooth going around the corner, especially on a boat with that knife edge type bow.

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17 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

Gosh, Mr. Kringle but you're putting me off taking our old girl to New England. We're going to look so SHABBY there. We look quite smart over here . . . Those are very well fettled vessels. 

I don't often show the boats maintained by their owners, right around the corner. There are a dozen or so of us that store and work outside on the public landing. I keep my boat stored there in the off season for about 400. 

 

My friend John pays twice that for his Tri. He works one of his three hulls, each year. He's a clever guy (architect) and fashions an enclosure around his work. He designs these, 'just strong enough' His port ama started weeping water this spring so he pulled out the grinder (he pulls it out every spring by the sounds). 

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Step inside:

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We all have just a few weeks left on the landing before they begin to fine us. John will make it, he always does. 

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I have the best spot, close to the power head (we have no water). I'm stripping my toe rails. I've set up a staging so that I can do the inside and outside, from a standing position. Step ladders just fit between the boats. 

staging-foreward_-jpg.150235

Amazingly, these toe rails haven't been 'wooded' in the 19 years I've owned the boat. Just a maintenance coat each season. They're way past due, though. It's going well. One is stripped, stained, and sealed with a couple sealer coats. I'll have the other one cleaned up this weekend. Easy flat sand with a long block just above the waist. You've gotta use your head, not your muscles if you're not writing checks. 

staging-aft_-jpg.150236

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41 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Being inside that tent with a grinder is a labor of love for sure.

Of course being right on the waters edge here in Maine - in May - I go in there to warm up. :) 

 

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1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

Of course being right on the waters edge here in Maine - in May - I go in there to warm up. :) 

 

You seem to be in the land of cool boats.  Is that a Stone Horse next to you?

PAF_0706Stonehorse.gif

picstonehorse23102c.jpg

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8 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

Amazingly, these toe rails haven't been 'wooded' in the 19 years I've owned the boat. Just a maintenance coat each season. They're way past due, though. It's going well. One is stripped, stained, and sealed with a couple sealer coats. I'll have the other one cleaned up this weekend. Easy flat sand with a long block just above the waist. You've gotta use your head, not your muscles if you're not writing checks. 

Kris, this is dreaded thread drift, but... I don't have a lot of topside teak, and I use Cetol Natural Teak, which has worked pretty well. During the renovation of the boat, before topsides and deck were Awlgripped, I used a heat gun and scraper (the draw type) to remove the old varnish, then some light sanding. Did you use anything besides sandpaper when you "wooded?"

Thanks.

B.C.

P.S. I have always liked the Stonehorse. How did it get its name?

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e7e79d58-d37b-4a95-a0d2-21fc6ada2623.jpg

 

This believe it or don't is a 2018 Yamaha SR400.  With a kick starter. No electric starter is offered. Air cooled. Single cylinder, two valves, 7000 RPM. I didn't know they have been making them for a few years already.

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29 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Kris, this is dreaded thread drift, but... I don't have a lot of topside teak, and I use Cetol Natural Teak, which has worked pretty well. During the renovation of the boat, before topsides and deck were Awlgripped, I used a heat gun and scraper (the draw type) to remove the old varnish, then some light sand