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Salazar

If you like Marblehead-Halifax, You'll love Race the Cape! Co

48 posts in this topic

If you have never experienced the thrill of sailing the world famous Bras d'Or and coastal Cape Breton Island, this July is the perfect opportunity! Race the Cape 2013!

 

Race%2520the%2520Cape%25202013%2520SA.jpg

 

This is your chance to experience first-hand an ambitious new race, Race the Cape, tailor-made to challenge and thrill crews with point-to-point legs including both inshore and coastal offshore sections. The first two race legs will be held in the Bras d’Or, a salt water lake system roughly 100 km in length and 50 km in width, open to the North Atlantic by natural channels, allowing the passage of even the largest yachts. With fog-free waters, prevailing SW 15 to 20 knot winds, beautiful anchorages, hundreds of coves and islands, accessible small port towns, friendly people and deep, well-marked water, the Bras d'Or is a natural choice for this new regatta. The third leg, of over 40 nautical miles, will carry you through the Great Bras d'Or and out into the Atlantic Ocean, along the rugged Cape Breton Coastline to Sydney Harbour. The final leg involves a run back out into the Cabot Strait beyond Spanish Bay, returning to Sydney for the finish.

 

Cape Breton Island is also famous for its hospitality, and crews will be treated to a "roaring good time". Some of the best entertainment and food Cape Breton has to offer will be showcased each evening at the host yacht clubs. Leveraging our spectacular vistas and rich history of seamanship, Race the Cape's organizing committee is pulling out all the stops to ensure Race the Cape participants a world class event.

If you're a skipper, take advantage of our early bird rates and register your vessel now. If you're looking to sign on as crew, visit our crew bank and share your details before all the berths fill up.

 

Join us July 17-22, 2013!

 

Race the Cape will unfold over six days this July. Four days of challenging point to point racing through the amazing Bras d'Or and along Cape Breton's rugged Atlantic coast. Five nights of legendary Cape Breton food, hospitality and entertainment! Come race with us!

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And yes, if your're doing the Marblehead-Halifax Ocean Race anyway, there is an Offshore feeder race to bring you from Halifax to St. Peters right after Marblehead is over to get you to the start of Race the Cape. BORC Race #2, (Bluenose Offshore Racing Circuit) hosted by the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron.

 

Fair winds.

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ALWAYS a good time in Cape Breton!

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Disappointed to be sitting this one out. Should be an excellent time. The Lakes are simply incredible sailing. Next time...

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Well well now, because nobody asked:

 

Race the Cape is four days of challenging point-to-point sail racing, both inland and coastal ocean, broken into four legs of up to 40 nautical miles through the Bras d’Or and along the Atlantic coast of Cape Breton Island. Race the Cape is an International Sailing Federation - Off Shore Special Regulations (OSR) Category 4 Race, generally sailed during daylight hours. There are both Spinnaker and Non-Spin Divisions.

 

The Location: The Bras d’Or is a 450 square mile inland sea; connected to the Atlantic Ocean through natural channels, with deep salt water, virtually no fog, little tide influence, and few navigational hazards. Prevailing July winds are SW at 10 – 15 knots, typically rising to 15 – 20 knots in the afternoons with gust to 20 to 25 knots as the waters narrow between the long ridges of hills and low mountains (600 to 1000 feet) that define the channels. An exceptionally windy July day will see gusts to 30 or even 35 knots in these channels. In July, Bras d’Or water temperatures are usually in the 70’s.

 

Honking big jpeg of the venue here: http://www.racetheca...s/map-large.jpg

 

Those purple lines on the chart of Cape Breton are approximately the courses for the four legs.

 

More to follow...

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Our Principal Race Officer (PRO) will be Jay Hooper. Jay, a former Olympic Finn Class competitor, is returning to the Bras d'Or as PRO for his second Cape Breton regatta, having been PRO for the West Bay Regatta back in 2010.

 

Among other events, Jay has been Principal Race Officer for:

  • 2012 IOD World Championship in Bermuda
  • 2012 Mahone Bay Regatta
  • 2011 J/24 North American Championship
  • 2009 Bermuda National Keelboat Championship

And has served as Race Officer or Regatta Manager for numerous events such as Chester Race Week, Charlottetown Regatta, Bermuda International Race Week.

 

Here's a photo of Jay reviewing his hand signals.

 

DSCF3575-744261.JPG

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You couldn't find a better PRO than Jay....he knows how to get the job done, well and on time!! Just hoping they let us race a J70, certainly fast enough but it's under the prescribed length requirement. Of course we could yacht merrily with the sprit extended all the time making us more than long enough!!!!???? Just sayin'!

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Ackman, have you still got the Farr11s? That's plenty long enough!

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Still have the 11s but the time etc involved in getting it there and back is to much time wise. The J70 is ramp launch so it makes life easy. The 70 is a minute a mile faster than a J24 so it really should be allowed. We can, like I said, race with the sprit out which would make us like 27'ish long!!!

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Free tip: Install a line cutter on your keel for the lobster pots. First snag is ok, especially if you claim anything in the pot as crew rations. Second snag requires re-entry to a wet wetsuit. Third snag gets a bit boring so you nick back to Halifax and start nailing one of the best pubcrawlable cities on earth. ;)

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Ahh, but Lobster season ends for the year along the entire South and East coasts of Nova Scotia by July 4th or so this year so there won't be any traps out to snag your prop (or keel) on. A clear run from Yarmouth to the Bras d'Or.

 

There will still be lobsters for sale though if you're hankering for some. B)

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That looks like a fun race. Have been offered cruising opportunities up that way, and further north, but there's only so much vacation time one gets.

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Ahh, but Lobster season ends for the year along the entire South and East coasts of Nova Scotia by July 4th or so this year so there won't be any traps out to snag your prop (or keel) on. A clear run from Yarmouth to the Bras d'Or.

 

There will still be lobsters for sale though if you're hankering for some. B)/>

 

If it wasn't that I'm due south of you by about 9000miles then I'd be all over this one. Nova Scotia looked after me super-well when I was a destitute backpacking bowman a decade ago. Outstanding scenery, awesome locals who prob take first for friendliest people on the planet, and beer and mussels everywhere! Hope this event rocks for you!!

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crew finder?

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Anyone who has never sailed in the lakes should put this on their list. I trailered there last summer and the folks in Baddeck could not have been more helpful. It is also much easier to bring a boat back into the US over land than by sea.

 

Someday I'll ask for a multihull division:-)

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And yes, if your're doing the Marblehead-Halifax Ocean Race anyway, there is an Offshore feeder race to bring you from Halifax to St. Peters right after Marblehead is over to get you to the start of Race the Cape. BORC Race #2, (BORC = Bluenose Offshore Racing Circuit) hosted by the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron.

 

Fair winds.

 

The Notice of Race (NOR) is up and Registration for the second of the BORC Series in now open a at BORC Race #2

 

Thread here: http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=145328

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We now have 38 boats entered (or with registrations and cheques "in the mail") for Race the Cape 2013. http://www.racethecape.ca/the-race/entrants/

 

I'm going to post a bit about a few of the entrants to date. One of our early entries, Stephen Kylander's Dreamcatcher is a Swan 48 S & S out of Massachusetts, USA and is entered in the IRC-1 division of the Marblehead to Halifax Ocean Race, coming up soon. A few days after the Marblehead is over, Dreamcatcher and her crew will continue on up to Cape Breton to join us for Race the Cape, starting on July 17th, 2013.

 

Five days of Point-to-Point Inshore and Ocean racing, six nights of parties, its going to be awesome...

 

Dreamcatcher

  • Boat Design: Swan 48 S & S
  • Designer: Sparkman & Stephens
  • Builder: Nautor
  • Year Built: 1972
  • Weight: 36,000 lbs. / 16,330 kg.
  • Beam: 13.60' / 4.15m
  • Draft: 8' / 2.43m
  • Length: 47.90' / 14.60m
  • Sail Area: 1032 sq. ft. / 95.87 m2
  • Rig: Masthead Sloop
  • Home Port: Hingham Yacht Club/New Bedford Yacht Club, Massachusetts, USA
  • Sail No.: USA 10625
  • Skipper: Stephen Kylander
  • PHRF Rating: 72 (provisional rating)

 

Dreamcatcher-Overhead-331x496.jpg

A Note from Dreamcather’s Skipper, Stephen Kylander:

Dreamcatcher is a classic (substitute old) Swan designed by Olin Stephens and built at the Nautor yard in 1972. In her day she was considered modern and promoted to “hustle” around an IOR course, although at 36,000 lbs empty that would hardly be the promotion in today’s world of carbon fibre. However, the Swan 48 still has a wonderful reputation as a great offshore racer/cruiser and sisterships have won the overall Bermuda Race in 1972 and 1992 and we have come close in 2006 and 2012 winning our class on Dreamcatcher.

My wife Nathalie and I bought Dreamcatcher in late 2001 following the events of 9/11 that reminded us to always pursue our dreams. Dreamcatcher has fulfilled her part as we have enjoyed family cruising with our four children and racing her primarily in distance races with our friends. The Race the Cape event in the Bras D’Or Lakes fits nicely into this profile and is a great catalyst for us to push beyond Halifax this summer in exploring what we are told is the highlight of sailing in Nova Scotia.

On behalf of the crew of Dreamcatcher for our Race the Cape adventure, namely Steve, Nathalie, Thomas, Daniel, Sophie and Luc Kylander and the Rand family of Geoff, Anne and Martha, we look forward to a great time in Cape Breton and representing your southern neighbours.

Dreamcatcher-Overhead-2-199x300.jpg

2079-sail-plan-300x261.jpg

2079-arrangement-plan-300x179.jpg

Design 2079 – Swan 48 The Swan 48 was the 6th design developed by Sparkman & Stephens for Nautor of Finland. The boat was developed to rate under the I.O.R. Rule and yet be a great cruising boat. She was introduced in 1971. 46 boats were built during the production run that ended in 1975. Dreamcatcher is Hull No. 5 of that series.

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Dan put together a video for your viewing pleasure:

 

 

Race the Cape is four days of challenging point-to-point sail racing, both inland and coastal ocean, broken into four legs of up to 40 nautical miles through the Bras d’Or and along the Atlantic coast of Cape Breton Island. Race the Cape is an International Sailing Federation – Off Shore Special Regulations (OSR) Category 4 Race. There are both Spinnaker and Non-Spin Divisions.

 

Race the Cape is also five nights of parties and good old Cape Breton hospitality.

 

Details on our Facebook page or the official race web site.

 

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Race the Cape 2013 was pure gold! An awesome regatta, so much so we’re doing it again this summer, July 18 – 24, starting just a few days after the finish of the Route Halifax Saint Pierre Ocean Race. Race the Cape was created to introduce sailors from off island, "come from aways", to the scenic wonders of the island and its Bras d'Or Lakes (French Bras d'Or meaning "arm of gold"). The 2013 inaugural edition of this multi-day series of point-to-point races was a resounding success, drawing 40 keelboats from 23 to 48 feet from all over the Maritimes, featuring a broad mix of entries, ranging from the diminutive J/70, Hot Water, to a classic sky blue Swan 48, Dreamcatcher, fresh from competing in the Marblehead-Halifax Ocean race.

 

DSC_4525-1991.jpg

 

Join us July 18-24, 2014!

Race the Cape 2014 will unfold again over seven days this July. Five days of challenging point to point racing through the amazing Bras d'Or and along Cape Breton's rugged Atlantic coast. Seven nights of legendary Cape Breton food, hospitality and entertainment!

Check out the Website: www.racethecape.com

Email for info: info@racethecape.com

Join us in July for one of the best regattas in one of the best places in the World!

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DSC_2778-1999.jpg

 

Angus Phillips wrote a great article about last summer's Race the Cape 2013, published in the November / December 2013 edition of Sailing World:

THE IDEA BEHIND NOVA SCOTIA'S RACE THE CAPE REGATTA was to introduce sailors from afar to the soaring scenic wonders of Cape Breton Island and the Bras d'Or Lakes, The inaugural edition of this five-day series of point-to-point races in the shadow of spruce-topped hillsides and quaint seaside towns drew 39 keelboats from 23 to 48 feet. By the numbers, a success, But did

these folks see anything? Let's check with the winner.

Ted Murphy, of Halifax, overcame serious obstacles to take overall honors in his older J/24 Juvenile Delinquent." We really liked this regatta;' says Murphy, gesturing to his rambunctious crew of fellow 20-somethings at the lobster-and steak awards dinner in Sydney. "But we'd like to come back to Cape Breton some time and check out the scenery, instead of always trying to make the boat go fast.”

Read More here... (Sorry, the link is a bit slow, but it does work)

Sail-World-Nov-2013-Pages-32-and-33.jpg

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It is... B)

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Looks like more fun than the Lake Ontario 300... maybe next year - tow Evenflow down?

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I love M2H but only once every 2 years. That's how long it takes to forget about the cold

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Looks like more fun than the Lake Ontario 300... maybe next year - tow Evenflow down?

 

Has to be more fun the last LO 300.. I broke 2 flyswatters...

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Looks like more fun than the Lake Ontario 300... maybe next year - tow Evenflow down?

 

Has to be more fun the last LO 300.. I broke 2 flyswatters...

 

Unlike Lake Ontario, we have wind, plenty of it. And if you do want to go for a swim the water is likely warmer in the Bras d'Or than in Lake Ontario. It is certainly cleaner... ;)

 

What kind of boat is Evenflow? What does it rate? B)

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Looks like more fun than the Lake Ontario 300... maybe next year - tow Evenflow down?

 

Has to be more fun the last LO 300.. I broke 2 flyswatters...

 

Unlike Lake Ontario, we have wind, plenty of it. And if you do want to go for a swim the water is likely warmer in the Bras d'Or than in Lake Ontario. It is certainly cleaner... ;)

 

What kind of boat is Evenflow? What does it rate? B)

 

Evenflow is a Henderson SR>Max, rates FS 165 and NFS 183 on Lake Ontario. If you recall there was the C&C version SR 21 called Snoopy in Chester(?) a while back. I have wanted to race in Nova Scotia for years now, okay since going to Dal, just needed a portable boat! Anyone got a boat with an interior to actually sleep on?

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Last year's RHSP was so hot we pulled into St-Pierre in our skivvies... Photos to prove it!

 

Cape Breton isn't like Nova Scotia, they actually have real seasons. Ergo warm in the summer, crazy right!?

 

HW

 

I love M2H but only once every 2 years. That's how long it takes to forget about the cold

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Registrations for Race the Cape 2014 are steadily coming in. As of the morning of Thursday, May 1st there are 35 boats registered to compete in Race the Cape 2014!
18 of these boats are from somewhere on Cape Breton Island, the 17 others registered so far are mostly from mainland Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. A number of these entries are joining us immediately after running in the Route Halifax Saint Pierre Ocean Race.
At this time last year we were at 28 boats registered so we're up 7 to date. We had over 40 boats take part last year. It looks like we'll have even more this time. Great!
This video was shot from "Hot Water" a J/70 that raced last year, finishing 1st overall in A Class, Spinnaker Division. They take you along for part of their run down through the Great Bras d'Or in Leg 3 of Race the Cape last summer. Fun ride.
"Published on Jul 28, 2013

A 15 mile North West Arm.....so shifty and huge puffs. We need to get to the left side of the narrows to honour a nav mark, all the while being swept straight seaward by a 3-4 knot current. (flying the code 0) At exactly the wrong time we get slammed by a huge blast which was also a knock making this one of the messiest roundings ever...but we made it. Our class was the last start, like 30 min after the first, and we are leading the 40 boat fleet at this point as the smallest boat in the race. (biggest a Swan 48)."

 

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I'm going to post a bit about a few of this year's entrants to date. One of our early entries, Bill Tucker's Wandrian, is a Taylor 41 sailing out of Lunenburg Yacht Club (LYC), Lunenburg, Nova Scotia.



Wandrian and crew will be joining Race the Cape 2014 shortly after competing in this year’s Newport Bermuda Race. I was talking to Bill at the Halifax International Boat Show back in February and he was pretty pumped about coming to join us in Cape Breton for this summer's Race the Cape 2014, starting on July 18th, 2014.



Five days of Point-to-Point Inshore and Ocean racing, seven (or more) nights of parties, its going to be awesome... again...



IMG_266.jpg




Wandrian
  • Boat Design: Taylor 41
  • Designer: Jim Taylor
  • Builder: Mark Lindsay (Lindsay Boatbuilders)
  • Year Built: 1993
  • Weight: 15,391 lbs. / 6,981 kg.
  • Beam: 13.0' / 3.96m
  • Draft: 7.8' / 2.38m
  • Length: 41' / 12.5m
  • Sail Area: 979 sq. ft. / 90.95 m2
  • Rig: Masthead Sloop
  • Home Port: Lunenburg Yacht Club (LYC), Lunenburg, NS, CAN
  • Sail No.: CAN 50141
  • Skipper: D. William (Bill) Tucker
  • PHRF Rating: 54 (provisional)
Wandrian (formerly Orion) is a veteran of years of racing on the east coast, participating in many regattas and ocean races including Nova Scotia's Chester Race Week, the Marblehead-to-Halifax Ocean Race and the Newport Bermuda Race.


Wandrian will be competing in the St. David’s Lighthouse Division (for amateur crews on dual purpose racer-cruiser boats).


For those who don't know, The Newport Bermuda Race is a 635-mile ocean race, usually lasting three to six days. It crosses a stretch of the Atlantic Ocean known for challenging weather, especially in the Gulf Stream, where there are strong currents (yeah, lame description, but a quote off the race's home page).


Ocean Racing Anarchy thread on this year's Newport to Bermuda Race here: http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=155017

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Juvenile Delinquent was a force to be reckoned with in Race the Cape 2013. With three first place finishes in C Class, Spinnaker Division and consistently high finishes in their overall standings they ended up winning First Place Overall.

The little boat that could, Juvenile Delinquent, and her crew are returning to defend their 1st Overall victory in Race the Cape 2013!

IMG_5400-001.jpg

Ted Murphy, of Halifax, overcame serious obstacles to take overall honors in his older J/24 Juvenile Delinquent.” We really liked this regatta;’ says Murphy, gesturing to his rambunctious crew of fellow 20-somethings at the lobster-and steak awards dinner in Sydney. “But we’d like to come back to Cape Breton some time and check out the scenery, instead of always trying to make the boat go fast.”


There are two kinds of racing sailors: those who enjoy the weather, exult in harnessing nature, notice ducks and herons and porpoises cavorting, marvel at the way the breeze ripples the surface and the sunlight turns those ripples to sparkling silver. Then there are the winners, who see lifts, headers, and puffs. And numbers.

DSC_1921.jpg

The jury’s still out on Murphy, who went to the Student Yachting World Cup Regatta in La Rochelle, France, a year before Race the Cape and discovered the flip side of racing. “They had point-to-point and overnight races;’ he says, “and we realized there was more to it than just windward-leeward. Now, we like them all-windward-leeward, distance racing, even cruising.”

Murphy had plenty to do to win Race the Cape and little time to savor the view.
He finished the first couple of 30-mile legs in good shape, first and third in class, then decided to use the regattas lone off-day in Baddeck to join a local race. Bad idea. It blew the oysters off the rocks that day, and Juvenile Delinquent was a casualty, losing the rig over the side when a pin snapped.
Two crew made the four-hour drive back to Halifax to fetch a spare mast. They returned to Baddeck at 3 a.m., caught a few hours sleep (in their tents, for heaven’s sake!), and then spent the morning hurriedly re-rigging. They were on the starting line for the most challenging leg-40 miles from Baddeck to North Sydney via a tortuous, current-riddled inland channel that leads out to sea-and wound up beating their main competitor, another J/24 called Adrenaline Rush, by nine seconds. Murphy wrapped up overall honours with a win in Leg 4 from North Sydney to Sydney, and it was all over but the shouting.

DSC_4152.jpg

But did the Juvenile Delinquents ever stop to smell the flowers? Hell, no.

http://www.racethecape.ca/

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Another entry:

 

Yael is a well known presence in the Cape Breton racing scene, a veteran of the island racing circuit. She has been actively campaigned by her owner, Frank Elman and family since the early 1980′s, winning many competitions. Indeed the name Yael is on every yacht racing trophy of importance on Cape Breton Island. There are may competitors out there who still dread the sound of Yael’s bow wave approaching from behind, steadily overtaking them with a bone in her teeth.

 

LAK0403.jpg

 

If Franks’ name seems familiar it may be because Frank and friends first thought up the idea of the legendary East Bay Regatta and organised and hosted it at his lake front property for its first 15 years. Just a reminder, The East Bay Regatta will be unfolding again this summer, just a few days after Race the Cape 2014 winds up, July 25th, 26th 27th! The East Bay Regatta is now based out of Ben Eoin Yacht Club, in plain view from Frank’s place.

 

P1010040.jpg

 

Frank has been less active in the last year or two but Yael is still racing hard, under the care of Frank’s loyal crew. In Race the Cape 2013 a mechanical failure prevented her from competing in Leg 1 (a blade fell off the folding prop). Frank’s son-in-law, Skip Walker managed to skin dive and find the blade in 20′ of water and reinstall it with temporary parts, all without SCUBA gear, just holding his breath! I did mention the loyal crew didn’t I?

 

20130721-Race-the-Cape-2013-Leg-3-Great-

 

Under the steady hand of guest skipper George Connors Yael competed in Class B and finished 4th in Leg 2, The Barra Strait Cup Yacht Race – Ben Eoin to Baddeck. Yael finished 3rd in Leg 3, The North Sails Great Bras d’Or Cup Yacht Race – Baddeck to North Sydney and took a second in Leg 4, The Cibou Cup Yacht Race – North Sydney to Sydney, giving her a respectable 4th overall in Class B for Race the Cape 2013.

 

20130722_Race-the-Cape-2013-Leg-4-Cibou-

 

This year Yael will be skippered by Peter Patterson of Baddeck.

 

The C&C 35 is a survivor and, some claim, a classic. I sure wouldn’t argue with them. Designed by Cuthbertson and Cassian in 1969, the boat was originally called the Redwing 35 and was built by George Hinterhoeller. The name was changed to the C&C 35 after Hinterhoeller merged with C&C Yachts. The C&C 35 was developed during the waning period of the CCA rule, when the IOR was emerging, but before it changed from an idealistic handicapping system to more of an intrusive developmental rule. And that may be why the 35 has survived and thrived—it is an undeniably handsome boat designed to sail well, not rate well, and good looks and good sailing characteristics never go out of style.

 

LAK0407.jpg

 

The C&C 35 was in production for six years, one of the company’s longer runs. This was an era when builders retooled frequently and designs were rarely produced for more than a couple years. In fact, the C&C 35 underwent major changes in 1973 and as result, boats built prior to that are known as the MK I and those built afterward, the MK II. A total of 350 boats were launched.

 

http://www.racethecape.ca/the-race/entrants/yael/

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A Wolf in Sheep's Clothing. Paul Rafuse from the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron and his J/109 WISC has registered to challenge Race the Cape 2014.

Paul and WISC are regular competitors on Nova Scotia’s east coast, frequently found on the hunt at Chester Race Week, The Prince of Wales Regatta and the Marblehead to Halifax Ocean Race.
WISC-1.jpg
In July of 2013 the 35th Marblehead to Halifax Ocean Race commenced in light airs for 80 boats that were taking part and not much else changed for the balance of the blast across the Bay of Fundy / Gulf of Maine to Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Five J boats sailed PHRF 3 with a trio of sharp J/109 teams in the class. In fifth was the first J/109, Paul Rafuse’s WISC.
WISC-5.jpg

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Bell Laboratories helped build a boat? Yes, from 1914 to 1917 the Labs helped build the 55' yawl Elsie, a gift from Alexander Graham Bell (yes, that Alexander Graham Bell) to his daughter Elsie and son in law Gilbert H. Grosvenor. Built by Walter Pinaud at Bell Laboratories on Bell's estate Beinn Bhreagh on the Bras d'Or at Baddeck, Nova Scotia, and launched in 1917, the sleek 55' yawl is a striking example of the boat builder's art.



Elsie-4.jpg



The world renowned naval architect George Owen of M.I.T. using data collected by Bell, drew the lines especially for the wave and wind patterns typically encountered on the lakes. His interpretations were perfect. Elsie could not be better suited to her environment. Elsie is stiff and stable yet as fast and nimble as most modern cruisers/racers. In fact, Elsie was still winning races at Bras d’Or Yacht Club well into the 1980′s.



Elsie-5.jpg



Two yachts from Baddeck, Cape Breton played a role in the founding of the Cruising Club of America (CCA)— Elsie and Typhoon, built in 1920 at the Bell Laboratory for William Washburn Nutting, the CCA’s first Commodore.


In 1919, aboard Elsie on a cruise to Boulaceet Harbour (currently known as Maskell’s Harbour), Nutting, F.W.(Casey) Baldwin and Grosvenor discussed the concept of forming a cruising club. The next year Nutting, Baldwin and Jim Dorsett sailed Typhoon to England where they were welcomed by officers of the Royal Cruising Club and became even more enthusiastic over forming a similar organization in America.


On returning home, Nutting, using the Royal Cruising Club as a prototype, persuaded a group of yachtsmen to launch The Cruising Club of America.


She is the only yacht to be listed in every “Cruising Club of America” year book since 1923.


Elsie (Race the Cape 2014 Flagship)
  • Boat Design: Custom Yawl
  • Designer: George Owen
  • Builder: Walter Pinaud / Bell Labratories
  • Year Built: 1914 - 1917
  • Weight: 22 tons
  • Beam: 11.9' / 3.6m
  • Draft: 6.0' / 1.8m
  • Length: 59.2' / 18.0m - LOD 54.7' / 16.7 m
  • Sail Area: 1,590 sq.ft. / 147.7 m2
  • Rig: Yawl
  • Home Port: West Bay, Nova Scotia, CAN
  • Sail No.: 1917
  • Skipper: Ken Allison
  • PHRF Rating: Pending


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Another entry came in today, Sea Smoke. That puts us up to 37 entries so far.

 

Capt. Mike Evans and his Bavaria 38 Sea Smoke with her unmistakable "Bat Kite" are no strangers to Ocean Racing circles.

 

Sea-Smoke-3.jpg

 

Mike is a veteran search and rescue pilot with the Canadian Forces, and is one of Canada’s preeminent ocean racers. Mike’s sailing resume includes victories in practically every distance race on the North-eastern seaboard, both crewed and double-handed, including being a two time winner of the Route Halifax – St. Pierre Ocean Race and claiming the Friar Trophy with the best combined results in the Marblehead to Halifax Ocean Race and Route Halifax – St. Pierre. Mike has also represented Canada with victories at the Korean Cup International Yacht Race and the Yellow Sea Regatta in Asia.
In 2013 alone Mike raced the Marblehead-to-Halifax Ocean Race, the Van Isle 360, the Lake Ontario 300, then the Silver Sail! He also participated in the Yellow Sea Race in China in August and in the Busan Cup in South Korea in November! Actually, Mike skippered entries in every Canadian offshore/distance race held in 2013 as well as the events in Asia, and the Caribbean.
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Why is Mike smiling? Mike and crew are bringing Sea Smoke to Race the Cape 2014 right after competing in this summer’s Route Halifax Saint Pierre Ocean Race.
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Sea Smoke
  • Boat Design: Bavaria 38 Custom
  • Designer: J&J Design
  • Builder: Bavaria Yachthau GmbH
  • Year Built: 2004
  • Weight: 15,432 lbs. / 7,000 kg.
  • Beam: 12.75' / 3.89m
  • Draft: 5.8' / 1.78m
  • Length: 40.33' / 12.3m
  • Sail Area: 898 fsq.ft. / 83.43 m2
  • Rig: Fractional Sloop
  • Home Port: Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron (RNSYS), Halifax, NS, CAN
  • Sail No.: CAN 54399
  • Skipper: Mike Evans
  • PHRF Rating: 123

http://www.racethecape.ca/the-race/entrants/sea-smoke/

 

Thread on the Route Halifax - Saint-Pierre Race 2014 here: http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=156543

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We're Back! Race the Cape 2015 route announced! New for this season of Race the Cape are coastal/ocean legs to Ingonish!

 

RTC-6-Page-Brochure-2015-2.jpg

 

Cape Breton Island is a sailors’ destination. Race the Cape is a sailor’s dream. Five days of challenging point to point racing, over 175 nautical miles through the amazing Bras d’Or and along Cape Breton’s rugged Atlantic coast. Seven nights of legendary Cape Breton food, hospitality and entertainment!

Planning for an epic Race the Cape 2015 is well under way.

Put us in your racing schedule for next summer and get yourself, your boat and your crew here. They will love you for it!

The Legs: Race the Cape 2015’s first leg, The MacLeod Lorway Insurance Group Red Islands Cup, about 30 nautical miles overall, will start on the morning of Monday, July 13th, 2015 in the Bras d’Or Lake at the entrance to St. Peters Inlet. After a start off of Cape George Lighthouse the fleet will reach past MacRaes Point and Morrison Head up into the 5 mile wide, island dotted West Bay, the bay bounded both sides by high hills reaching an elevation of over 750 feet. The fleet will then round a mark at Paddle Shoal off of Clarks Cove, Marble Mountain to turn downwind into the open lake for what is in typical winds a long spinnaker run past Malagawatch, Militia Point and the Red Islands down into East Bay to finish off of the Ben Eoin Yacht Club & Marina.

Leg Two: The Barra Strait Cup, about 30 nautical miles, starts on July 14thjust offshore of the Ben Eoin Yacht Club in East Bay. Prevailing south-west winds will first find the fleet beating to windward up East Bay past the MacPhee Islands and the community of Eskasoni into the open Bras d’Or Lake to round the headland at Benacadie Point, reaching across Pipers Cove to gain Derby Point, entering the Barra Strait. After transiting the Strait the fleet will be able to crack their spinnakers to the building afternoon winds for an 8 nm run down St Andrews Channel, past Gillis Point and Maskells Harbour (birthplace of the Cruising Club of America), rounding the Washabuck Peninsula at MacKay Point, crossing St. Patricks Channel to enter Baddeck Bay to round Kidston Island for a finish in front of the Bras d’Or Yacht Club on the waterfront of the village of Baddeck.

Leg Three: The North Sails – Yacht Shop Great Bras d’Or Cup is Race the Cape’s longest leg, at about 40 nm, and follows a layover day in Baddeck so will start on the morning of July 16th. After an upwind start the fleet will cross Baddeck Bay, reaching past Beinn Bhreagh to round Red Head to hoist their spinnakers and enter the 18 nautical mile Great Bras d’Or Channel, running between the 1000 foot hills lining the bold shorelines. Yachts will race under the Great Bras d’Or Crossing (the Seal Island Bridge) toward the narrows at Carey & Noir Points (outgoing and incoming currents may reach 5 to 6 knots here, we will time the yachts’ arrivals for favorable outgoing current in the Great Bras d’Or before slack water and well before the current turns to re-enter the Bras d’Or). The yachts will now enter the Atlantic Ocean at the Canso Strait and will then reach for 10 nautical miles along the rugged ocean coast of Cape Breton Island, passing Table Head, rounding Point Aconi to enter Spanish Bay, reaching past High Cape, Alder & Merritt Points, Bonar Head, Oxford and Black Points, gaining Cranberry Point to enter Sydney Harbour for a close reach 6 nm up into the Northwest Arm to a finish in front of the historic Northern Yacht Club at North Sydney.

Leg Four: The Cape Smoky Cup, about 30 nm, starts on July 17th off of Northern Yacht Club at North Sydney. After the start the fleet will turn downwind for a 7 nautical mile run past the communities of North Sydney and Sydney Mines, past Indian Beach and Swivel Point, to round a mark off of Cranberry Point, reentering the Atlantic Ocean and the Canso Strait for a run over 22 nm “Down North” along the coast of Cape Breton past St Annes Harbour, the Bird Islands, the North Shore, Little River and Breton Cove, Skir Dhu and Wreck Cove toward the bold 850 foot high headland of Cape Smoky and the Cape Breton Highlands in the distance. On rounding the Cape the fleet will turn to the west to enter South Bay Ingonish for a finish off South Ingonish Harbour.

Leg Five: The historic Cibou Cup, about 35 nm, starts on the morning of Saturday, July 18th in South Bay Ingonish. After the start the fleet will turn to run out again past Cape Smoky into the Cabot Strait and make their course for Spanish Bay and Sydney Harbor to the south. On entering the harbor the fleet will sail past the old lighthouse at Low Point to round South Bar for a reach up the South Arm past Point Edward and the communities of Whitney Pier and downtown Sydney to a finish off of the Dobson Yacht Club at Dobson’s Point in Westmount.

RTC-6-Page-Brochure-2015-1.jpg

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Race the Cape 2015 Notice of Race (NOR ) is up and Registration for 2015 is now Open!

 

Now that the Holidays are behind us and spring is just around the corner (we hope!), are you starting to think about where you would like to Sail in 2015? We are only six months away from seeing the sails fly in Cape Breton for the 3rd Race the Cape point to point sailing race.

Put us in your racing schedule for next summer and get yourself, your boat and your crew here. They will love you for it!

The Notice of Race (NOR) for Race the Cape is now online here: NOR

…and we are now taking registrations. Please visit our registration page here, to complete the required forms.

http://www.racethecape.com

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Brian Todd will be our PRO for Race the Cape 2015!


We are pleased to announce that our Principal Race Officer (PRO) for Race the Cape 2015 will be Brian Todd of Glen Haven, NS. Brian is already well known to Canadian and especially Nova Scotian sailors.


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Back in 2012 Brian was awarded the Sail Nova Scotia Sailor of the Year for his a significant contribution to the sport. Brian was a coach with both the national and provincial sailing teams, working with Sail Nova Scotia and Sail Canada for over 12 years, leading the Canadian sailing team to gold and bronze medals at the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games. London was his second Paralympic Games.


He also has coached windsurfing and skiing and has coached at one Olympic Games, five Canada Games and one Pan Am Games. Brian’s athletes have won medals at all the sailing Games he has coached except the 1984 Olympics.


Brian is currently a Vice President of the International Association for Disabled Sailing and a member of the IFDS Executive Committee.


When there is no wind for sailing, Brian loves cycling. As an athlete, Brian sailed in the Finn class and was a national team member from 1973-76.

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Reaching out to the organizers to see if they would allow an F18 "exhibition" fleet of a couple boats plus support RIB... would love to get some local distance racing in ;-)

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Reaching out to the organizers to see if they would allow an F18 "exhibition" fleet of a couple boats plus support RIB... would love to get some local distance racing in ;-)

NOTICE OF RACE

1 RULES

1.1 The race will be governed by the Racing Rules of Sailing 2013-2016 and the prescriptions of Sail Canada.

1.2 If there is a conflict between this Notice of Race and the Sailing Instructions (SI), the SI will take precedence.

1.3 Classified as a Category 4 Yacht Race.

1.4 The International Sailing Federation - Off Shore Special Regulations (OSR) to Category 4 Monohulls at, ISAF OSR - Extract for Race Category 4 Monohulls JANUARY 2014 - DECEMBER 2015 Incorporating Amendments Effective 1st January 2015; www.sailing.org/specialregs (Category 4 Monohulls) - including Sail Canada prescriptions; http://www.sailing.ca/special-regulations-s15804will apply with the following modifications:

1.3 & 1.4 are going to be a problem for an 18' Catamaran. I can't see how you are going to be able to get all the required equipment on one of those, especially things like lifelines.

 

This one is a problem too:

 

3 ELIGIBILITY AND ENTRY

3.1 The regatta is open to all mono-hull handicap yachts which have a current Sail Nova Scotia Data Sheet on record; www.sailnovascotia.ca/phrf-ns-ratings-of-yachts.html and to yachts out of province that have a PHRF handicap certificate on file from their governing association. Should there be a difference in handicaps between governing associations, a boat’s handicap will be adjusted to conform to the Sail Nova Scotia database. The OA may limit the number of entrants.

 

The 75 nm of off shore racing included in this year's Race the Cape 2015, while near coastal will still take the boats about 8 nm from shore at times. I think the OA is going to be very nervous about sanctioning participation from boats that can't meet the International Sailing Federation - Off Shore Special Regulations (OSR) to Category 4 Monohulls.

 

http://www.racethecape.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/NOR_RACE-the-CAPE_2015.pdf

 

Have you studied the courses? Do you have a good understanding of what you might be getting yourself into? I just want to know if you have thought this one out.

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Where in the world is this Race the Cape 2015 being held you ask?

 

Well, it is taking place on Cape Breton Island, on Canada's Atlantic coast. Much of the race will be in and through the world renowned Bras d'Or Lakes featured in this new video, just released.

 

Here, for your viewing pleasure...

 

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cape-fear.jpg


Looking for a distinctive nautical challenge this summer? Want to embark on an adventure that will test your sailing abilities, at times, moment by moment? From July 18th – 24th experience an exhilarating odyssey through one of sailing’s best kept secrets, the Bras d’Or Lakes and coastal Cape Breton Island: RACE THE CAPE 2016!



Race the Cape is an event, a sailing regatta, for boaters, their crews, their families, and their friends.


Race the Cape is seven days of challenging point-to-point sail racing, both inland and coastal ocean, broken into five legs of up to 40 nautical miles through the island’s amazing Bras d’Or Lakes and along Cape Breton Island’s rugged Atlantic coast.


“The style of Race the Cape is what appealed to us,” says skipper Colin Mann. From just outside Lunenburg, NS, he and his crew from the J/92 Poohsticks, took home the top prize at Race the Cape in 2015. Mann says they were looking for a new challenge.


“We’d raced the same boat for twenty years and we wanted to try something different to celebrate that,” says Mann. “And none of us had sailed the Bras d’Or Lakes before.”


By style, Mann is referencing the five distinct point-to-point races that make up Race the Cape 2016. Long races, up to 40 nautical miles, changing conditions and new destinations each evening. Sailing in both inland sea and rugged coastal waters, the journey starts at the St.Peter’s Canal, continuing into East Bay, then Baddeck, Sydney, up to the Highlands in Ingonish, ending in North Sydney.


Mann says what surprised him was the extent of the Bras d’Or Lakes — and its variability.


“Part of what makes it challenging and interesting, in a good way, is the range of conditions,” says Mann. “At times there’s completely flat water, very little wind. Then you find little zephyrs and you try to catch enough of those to get a lead.” Then, he says, minutes later, it’s a different story. “Wind can hit at 25 knots and we need to change gears a lot.”


It’s the fourth year for the sailing regatta, covering 175 nautical miles. The high calibre competition sees upwards of 40 boats vying for the finish line each day of the race with prizes awarded at the evening banquets.


Dr. John Kirkpatrick with his C&C 37+ Flashpoint is another seasoned sailor. He was pleased the leg into the Highlands was added in 2015 and is back for 2016 — and acknowledges the hard-work of the committee and volunteers.


“They’re excellently organized races,” says Kirkpatrick. “Everything from help docking the boats to the volunteer’s high energy and warmth, and the sponsors, each community goes all out.”


This moment from last year stands out for him. “Leaving Ingonish the winds were just right for a downwind spinnaker start,” says Kirkpatrick. “And with all the boats fairly close together, it made for an exciting moment, both for those of us on the water and those watching from the shoreline.”


Registrations have been strong, with, to date, three boats now coming up from the USA (ranging from the J/24 Mutinous Dogs out of Texas to the 48’ Hans Christian Offshore Explorer 4750 Sea Dog from New Jersey …who let the dogs out?) to join the mostly Canadian fleet.


So if the daredevil in you seeks a race that will shake things up, immerse you in stunning beauty and yet is supported by down-home hospitality, get your registration in for Race the Cape now. July 18th – 24th — don’t miss out. Spread your sails and jump into the heart of the action.


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Race the Cape 2016! Through Cape Breton's amazing Bras d'Or Lakes and back by popular demand are the coastal/ocean legs to Ingonish!

 

Boating-CB-and-Race-the-Cape-Brochure-MA

 

Race the Cape is an event, a sailing regatta, for boaters, their families, and friends that unfolds over a week each July on Cape Breton Island. Race the Cape is seven days of challenging point-to-point sail racing, both inland and coastal ocean, broken into five legs of up to 40 nautical miles through the island’s amazing Bras d’Or Lakes and along Cape Breton Island’s rugged Atlantic coast leading to the Cape Breton Highlands. Race the Cape is an International Sailing Federation – Off Shore Special Regulations (OSR) Category 4 Race, sailed during daylight hours. There are both Spinnaker and Non-Spinnaker Divisions.

 

New to Race the Cape in 2015 was a Cruising Class to include non-competitive cruisers looking to get in on the action. Sailboats and powerboats are welcome to follow along and watch the fierce, but friendly, competition unfold before them while taking in the beauty of the Bras d’Or Lake.

 

The Location: The Bras d’Or is a 450 square mile inland sea; connected to the Atlantic Ocean through natural channels, with deep salt water, virtually no fog, little tide influence, and few navigational hazards. Prevailing July winds are SW at 10 – 15 knots, typically rising to 15 – 20 knots in the afternoons with gusts to 20 to 25 knots as the waters narrow between the long ridges of hills and low mountains (600 to 1000 feet high) that define the channels. An exceptionally windy July day will see gusts to 30 or even 35 knots in these channels. In July, Bras d’Or water temperatures are usually in the 70’s.

Check us out! www.racethecape.ca/the-race

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For any of our Halifax Anarchists, JOIN US for RACE THE CAPE NIGHT in HALIFAX!

where - Durty Nelly's, Corner of Argyle and Sackville Streets
when - Thursday, April 21, 7 - 9pm

Drop by to get the latest information on this year's Race, along with some delicious appetizers and a taste of famous Cape Breton hospitality!

 

 

Race-the-Cape-Invite-Halifax.jpg

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