mainsheetsister

Astronomy Anarchy

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Heads up for meteors this weekend!

The Lyrids Meteor Shower is an average shower, usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher, which was discovered in 1861. The shower runs annually from April 16-25. It peaks this year on the night of the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd. These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds. The nearly full moon on April 25 will be a problem this year, blocking out all but the brightest meteors. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra, but can appear anywhere in the sky.


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Last year we got the special surprise with the Sutter's Mill meteorite coming down on the 22nd. Wife and I heard it break up over our heads. Weird noise.

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Full Moon and Partial Lunar Eclipse on 25 April.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth. This phase occurs at 19:57 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the first spring flowers. This year, it is also known in the Northern Hemisphere as the Paschal Full Moon because it is the first full moon of the spring season.

 

The partial lunar eclipse will occur when the Moon passes through part of the Earth's shadow, or penumbra, and only a portion of it passes through the darkest shadow, or umbra. During this type of eclipse a part of the Moon will darken as it moves through the Earth's shadow.

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of Africa, Europe, Asia, and Australia.

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Next she'll claim the Earth is round, I just don't know what to make of this.

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Next she'll claim the Earth is round, I just don't know what to make of this.

 

Blasphemy!

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Saturn at Opposition on 28 April

The ringed planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons. A medium-sized or larger telescope will allow you to see Saturn's rings and a few of its brightest moons.

 

To view the solar system's second largest planet, look directly overhead at midnight.

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Anything further on the Russki meteorite?

 

Last I heard, they had found a few dime size fragments and increased the original weight by several orders of magnitude....

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Although not yet officially endorsed by the International Astronomical Union, it appears that names have been chosen for P4 and P5, the two moons most recently discovered orbiting dwarf planet Pluto.

 

 

 

(...drum roll please...)

 

 

 

 

Vulcan (endorsed by William Shatner via Twitter in honor of Mr. Spock) and Cerberus/Kerberos (spelling yet to be decided) will soon join Pluto's three other named natural satellites, Charon, Hydra, and Nix.

 

Traditionally, the names of Pluto's moons are to be associated with the underworld in Greco-Roman mythology.

 

 

 

http://cosmiclog.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/04/23/17879795-scientists-go-with-peoples-choice-for-pluto-moons-vulcan-cerberus

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Sis, you're a sky girl! Cool.

 

Best free show in town....especially out on the water with no other bright lights to dim the show.

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Sis, you're a sky girl! Cool.

 

Best free show in town....especially out on the water with no other bright lights to dim the show.

 

Yes, I want to be an astronomer when I grow up.

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4-5 May

 

Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower!

 

The Eta Aquarids is an above average shower, capable of producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

Most of the activity is seen in the Southern Hemisphere.

 

In the Northern Hemisphere, the rate can reach about 30 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet Halley, which has known and observed since ancient times.

 

The shower runs annually from April 19 to May 28. It peaks this year on the night of May 4 and the morning of the May 5.

 

The last quarter moon will block out some of the less bright meteors this year but you should still be able to see quite a few good ones if you are patient.

 

Best viewing will be after midnight, after the setting of the last quarter moon.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Thanks. It seems we look generally southeast, not too long before first light.

 

Oh, and you need clear sky.....

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4-5 May

 

Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower!

 

The Eta Aquarids is an above average shower, capable of producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

Most of the activity is seen in the Southern Hemisphere.

 

In the Northern Hemisphere, the rate can reach about 30 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet Halley, which has known and observed since ancient times.

 

The shower runs annually from April 19 to May 28. It peaks this year on the night of May 4 and the morning of the May 5.

 

The last quarter moon will block out some of the less bright meteors this year but you should still be able to see quite a few good ones if you are patient.

 

Best viewing will be after midnight, after the setting of the last quarter moon.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 

Oops...last quarter moon rises around midnight.

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9-10 May (depending on your time zone)

 

New Moon

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

This phase occurs at 00:28 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

 

 

Annular Solar Eclipse

 

An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon is too far away from the Earth to completely cover the Sun.

This results in a ring of light around the darkened Moon.

The Sun's corona is not visible during an annular eclipse.

The path of the eclipse will begin in western Australia and move east across the central Pacific Ocean.

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9-10 May (depending on your time zone)

 

New Moon

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

This phase occurs at 00:28 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

 

 

Annular Solar Eclipse

 

An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon is too far away from the Earth to completely cover the Sun.

This results in a ring of light around the darkened Moon.

The Sun's corona is not visible during an annular eclipse.

The path of the eclipse will begin in western Australia and move east across the central Pacific Ocean.

is that time 00:28 UTC on the 10th May?

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9-10 May (depending on your time zone)

 

New Moon

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

This phase occurs at 00:28 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

 

 

Annular Solar Eclipse

 

An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon is too far away from the Earth to completely cover the Sun.

This results in a ring of light around the darkened Moon.

The Sun's corona is not visible during an annular eclipse.

The path of the eclipse will begin in western Australia and move east across the central Pacific Ocean.

is that time 00:28 UTC on the 10th May?

correct

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24/25 May - Full Moon and Penumbral Lunar Eclipse.

 

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

This phase occurs at 04:25 UTC on 25 May.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance.

This moon has also been known as the Full Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

 

 

A penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth's partial shadow, or penumbra.

During this type of eclipse the Moon will darken slightly but not completely.

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America, South America, western Europe, and western Africa.

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at sunset May 26th, three planets, Mercury, Venus , & Jupiter will be within 3 degrees of each other..

 

gonna have to set the big scope up in the yard for this one!

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wait for it....wait for it....

 

On 28 May...

 

The Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter.

 

Conjunctions are rare events where two or more objects will appear extremely close together in the night sky.

The two bright planets will be within 1 degree of each other in the evening sky.

The planet Mercury will also will also be visible nearby.

Look to the west near sunset.

 

That's some cool shit! And for free! Just look up...

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It's not exactly astronomy, more the opposite - photos from the Space Station taken by Chris Hadfield. Some interesting stuff if you are into photography and some beautiful images of earth. The Space Oddity is quite cool as well. He has a decent voice.

 

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/blogs/earthmatters/2013/05/14/my-15-favorite-commander-hadfield-photos/

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It's not exactly astronomy, more the opposite - photos from the Space Station taken by Chris Hadfield. Some interesting stuff if you are into photography and some beautiful images of earth. The Space Oddity is quite cool as well. He has a decent voice.

 

http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/blogs/earthmatters/2013/05/14/my-15-favorite-commander-hadfield-photos/

 

I was following Hadfield on Facebook, where he was posting photos a few times a day.

 

Kinda sorry that he's back on the planet.....

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wait for it....wait for it....

 

On 28 May...

 

The Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter.

 

Conjunctions are rare events where two or more objects will appear extremely close together in the night sky.

The two bright planets will be within 1 degree of each other in the evening sky.

The planet Mercury will also will also be visible nearby.

Look to the west near sunset.

 

That's some cool shit! And for free! Just look up...

I wonder when its going to be in the southern sky?....

And I reckon Hadfield would be as glad as we are sad he's back. At least.

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wait for it....wait for it....

 

On 28 May...

 

The Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter.

 

Conjunctions are rare events where two or more objects will appear extremely close together in the night sky.

The two bright planets will be within 1 degree of each other in the evening sky.

The planet Mercury will also will also be visible nearby.

Look to the west near sunset.

 

That's some cool shit! And for free! Just look up...

I wonder when its going to be in the southern sky?....

And I reckon Hadfield would be as glad as we are sad he's back. At least.

 

Wouldn't the conjunction be visible in the evening sky wherever you are on the planet at whatever time evening happens to be?

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wait for it....wait for it....

 

On 28 May...

 

The Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter.

 

Conjunctions are rare events where two or more objects will appear extremely close together in the night sky.

The two bright planets will be within 1 degree of each other in the evening sky.

The planet Mercury will also will also be visible nearby.

Look to the west near sunset.

 

That's some cool shit! And for free! Just look up...

I wonder when its going to be in the southern sky?....

And I reckon Hadfield would be as glad as we are sad he's back. At least.

 

Wouldn't the conjunction be visible in the evening sky wherever you are on the planet at whatever time evening happens to be?

IIRC, one's view of the night sky depends upon where they are on the planet, and of course upon how many drinks one has had :P

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Tonight is the triple for those with a clear view of the low western sky at sunset.

 

"Three planets will perform a rare celestial dance in the sunset sky tonight (May 26), a cosmic show that stars Jupiter, Venus and Mercury."

 

http://news.yahoo.com/rare-3-planet-sight-tonight-see-jupiter-mercury-143621071.html

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8 June

 

New Moon.

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth. This phase occurs at 15:56 UTC. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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June 12

 

Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation.

 

The planet Mercury will be at its furthest angle from the Sun, known as greatest elongation.

It will be at its highest point in the night sky after sunset.

This is the best time to try to view Mercury since it stays so close to the Sun and doesn't usually climb very high above the horizon.

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+1

 

I'm in.

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ijix.jpg

 

In honor of MSG and MSS, we should all go super bat shit crazy.

 

 

So I have been told I am crazier than a crack house rat... guess I'll have to tone it down little for the occasion.

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ijix.jpg

 

In honor of MSG and MSS, we should all go super bat shit crazy.

 

Bitchin!

 

...and not to burst this magical bubble, but the moon's orbit is elliptical, and so this "super moon" shit happens every year....

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Full Moon on 23 June

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 11:32 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Strawberry Moon because it signaled the time of year to gather ripening fruit. It also coincides with the peak of the strawberry harvesting season.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Rose Moon and the Full Honey Moon.

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Bitchin!

 

...and not to burst this magical bubble, but the moon's orbit is elliptical, and so this "super moon" shit happens every year....

 

Sssssshhhhhhhhh....

 

You'll harsh my moon howlin' mellow. :rolleyes:;)

 

Due to all the other wobbly bits tumbling about the sun, about 5 or so years ago, a perigee full moon was as close to the earth as it had been in a hundred plus years.

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8 July

 

New Moon

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

This phase occurs at 07:14 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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MSS, what's the latest on the Nov 13 comet? The real projections? The Comet of the Century -- or another over-hyped fizzle?

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MSS, what's the latest on the Nov 13 comet? The real projections? The Comet of the Century -- or another over-hyped fizzle?

 

Dunno.

 

Comet PANSTARRS turned out to be somewhat of a dud back in April.

 

I hope Comet ISON is fabulous, but....

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Just announced by International Astronomical Union:

 

Kerberos and Styx are the official names of P4 and P5, the two most recently discovered moons of Pluto. They orbit the dwarf planet with Charon, Hydra, and Nix.

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July 22 - Full Moon.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 18:15 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year. This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.

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July 22 - Full Moon.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 18:15 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year. This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.

 

 

But the stars are in your eyes.......................

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July 22 - Full Moon.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 18:15 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year. This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.

damn...wish i would still be in the mountains for that.

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July 22 - Full Moon.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 18:15 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year. This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.

 

 

But the stars are in your eyes.......................

 

Sweet thought, thank you....but I am a certifiable lunatic.

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July 27-28

 

Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower!

 

The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht.

 

The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23. It peaks this year on the night of July 27 and morning of July 28.

 

The second quarter moon will block out most of the faint meteors, but you should still be able to catch quite a few good ones if you are patient.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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July 27-28

 

Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower!

 

The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht.

 

The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23. It peaks this year on the night of July 27 and morning of July 28.

 

The second quarter moon will block out most of the faint meteors, but you should still be able to catch quite a few good ones if you are patient.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Was a bit offshore Saturday night on an overnight sail. Great show before the moon rose around midnight.

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I saw a moderately bright shooter almost due north. going east to west around ten pm on the 30th.

 

Was it part of D.A. M.S.???

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I saw a moderately bright shooter almost due north. going east to west around ten pm on the 30th.

 

Was it part of D.A. M.S.???

 

Could be.....meteors are visible all the time...dust and debris from space enters Earth's atmosphere constantly.

 

Meteor showers occur at regular times of year as Earth passes through the debris left behind in the orbital path of a comet.

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August 6 - New Moon.

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 21:51 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Perseids Meteor Shower peaks on August 11-12.

 

The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862.

 

The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors. The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24. It peaks this year on the night of August 11 and the morning of August 12.

 

The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight leaving dark skies for what should be an excellent show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 

Seems that the Perseids are already putting on a good show this year, with several fireballs already observed. A fireball is any meteor brighter than Venus, which is the third brightest object that we can see in the sky.

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Full Moon on August 21

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 01:45 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Sturgeon Moon because the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes and other major lakes were more easily caught at this time of year.

 

This moon has also been known as the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

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September 8 - Conjunction of the Moon and Venus and Saturn!



The Moon will pass within about a half of a degree from the the planet Venus. The two planets will pass within 3 degrees of each other.



The thin crescent moon will be at magnitude -10.4, Venus will be at magnitude -4.5, and Saturn will be at magnitude -1.1.



Look low in the western sky in the early evening. The trio will be visible for about 2 hours after sunset.




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September 8 - Conjunction of the Moon and Venus and Saturn!

 

The Moon will pass within about a half of a degree from the the planet Venus. The two planets will pass within 3 degrees of each other.

 

The thin crescent moon will be at magnitude -10.4, Venus will be at magnitude -4.5, and Saturn will be at magnitude -1.1.

 

Look low in the western sky in the early evening. The trio will be visible for about 2 hours after sunset.

 

thank you, may moonbeams light your way...

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Kinda explains alot....surely.... :wacko:

 

i mean I have had every crazy woman from the area in the door.......not normal programming.

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What an awesome sight that was. My 14 year-old son was bitching when I woke him to see it. One minute after it was over, he can't stop talking about how cool it was.

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Full Moon on September 19.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 11:13 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Corn Moon because the corn is harvested around this time of year. This moon is also known as the Harvest Moon. The Harvest Moon is the full moon that occurs closest to the September equinox each year.

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September Equinox on September 22.

 

The September equinox occurs at 20:44 UTC.

 

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

 

This is also the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Uranus at Opposition on October 3.

 

The blue-green planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Uranus.

 

Uranus is just over 18 au from Earth. Due to its distance, it will only appear as a tiny blue-green dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

And yes, you can giggle. I said Uranus.

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Funny how they can detect water in the Martian soil but still can't find any intelligence in Washington.

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Draconids Meteor Shower on October 7-8

 

The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900.

 

The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 7th and morning of the 8th.

 

The thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for optimal observing.

 

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation on October 9.



The planet Mercury will be at its furthest angle from the Sun, known as greatest elongation.



It will be at its highest point in the night sky after sunset.



This is the best time to try to view Mercury since it stays so close to the Sun and doesn't usually climb very high above the horizon.


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greatest elongation.

 

sondes dirtey :)

 

...and this is why I want to be a astronomer when I grow up.

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Full Moon and Penumbral Lunar Eclipse on October 18.

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

This phase occurs at 23:38 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Hunters Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt. This moon has also been known as the Travel Moon and the Blood Moon.

This will also be the smallest full moon of the year because it will be near apogee, its farthest point from the Earth.

A penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth's partial shadow, or penumbra.

During this type of eclipse the Moon will darken slightly but not completely.

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of the world except for Australia and extreme eastern Siberia.

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Orionids Meteor Shower peaks on October 21-22.

 

The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times.

 

The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7.

 

It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22.

 

The waning gibbous moon will block some of the meteors this year, but the Orionids tend to be fairly bright so it could still be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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While you are gazing at Orionids, don't ignore the goodies in the rest of the sky..

 

The predawn sky is dark pretty late these last days of Daylight Savings time, and worth a look straight up.


Moon and very bright Jupiter next to each other. And Orion nearby, so bright Sirius and Jupiter are the "bright lights" with the other "pretty bright" stars of Orion (Rigel, and "Beetlejuice" (Betelgeuse); and then Procyon, Capella, Castor and Pollux, and Aldebaran, all of them around Orion in a kind of circle.

Woo hoo, now you know 8 of the brightest stars. Of the 25 brightest, only about half are "up" at any given time, so this is a majority of them. you can now impress others with your star knowledge..

 

(tip: Orion's belt points "up" to Aldebaran, and "down" to Sirius, so you can locate them easily, and bullshit others about where the others are (Castor and Pollux are dimmer, and "twins" next to each other, leaving only Procyon and Capella, no one will know if you mix them up)

 

Right, Sis? You can win drink bets on this stuff (is that a bright idea at 5am?)

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I get up for work at 5, and the dog and I go outside right away.

 

The stars of Orion's Belt and all the others look like jewels...it is astounding!

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Yeah, for the "normal" sky without meteors or comets, this is like the grand finale at a fireworks display, all the best stuff at once.

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