mainsheetsister

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Leonids Meteor Shower on November 16-17

The Leonids is an average shower, producing an average of up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak.
This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen.
That last of these occurred in 2001.
The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1865.
The shower runs annually from November 6-30.
It peaks this year on the night of the 16th and morning of the 17th. Unfortunately the glare from the full moon will block many of the meteors this year, but if you are patient you should still be able to catch quite a few good ones.
Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.
Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 

 

 

 

Full Moon on November 17.

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.
This phase occurs at 15:16 UTC.
This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Beaver Moon because this was the time of year to set the beaver traps before the swamps and rivers froze.
It has also been known as the Frosty Moon and the Hunter's Moon.

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Comet ISON's Closest Approach to the Sun on November 28.

Newly discovered Comet ISON (International Scientific Optical Network) will make its closest approach to the Sun on November 28.


If the comet survives its close encounter with the sun, it will be visible in the early morning and early evening sky and could be nearly as bright as the full Moon.


Some astronomers estimate that it could even be bright enough to be seen during daylight hours, and some are calling it the comet of the century.

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thanks for the reminder!

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Comet ISON's Closest Approach to the Sun on November 28.

 

Newly discovered Comet ISON (International Scientific Optical Network) will make its closest approach to the Sun on November 28.

 

If the comet survives its close encounter with the sun, it will be visible in the early morning and early evening sky and could be nearly as bright as the full Moon.

 

Some astronomers estimate that it could even be bright enough to be seen during daylight hours, and some are calling it the comet of the century.

 

startin' Dec 3 for NA..

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mars-lgn.jpg

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Comet ISON has apparently been largely destroyed by the Sun's radiation and gravity.

 

http://news.yahoo.co...-002459536.html

 

My parents attempts to teach me manners was a complete bust. Let me bring my uncalled for political opinions to interrupt this otherwise fun thread.

fixed

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New Moon on December 3.

 

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 00:22 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

 

But not Comet ISON, because it finally fizzled out for good.

 

Bummer...

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Fragments of Comet ISON did make it past the sun initially, but the latest observations indicate that there's nothing left anymore.

 

 

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Start watching for the Geminids Meteor Shower!

 

The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers.

 

It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982.

 

The shower runs annually from December 7-17.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th.

 

The waxing gibbous moon will block out some of the meteors this year, but the Geminids are so bright and numerous that it should still be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on December 17.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 09:28 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark.

 

This moon has also been known as the Moon Before Yule and the Full Long Nights Moon.

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December Solstice on December 21.

 

The December solstice occurs at 17:11 UTC.

 

The South Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its southernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Capricorn at 23.44 degrees south latitude.

 

This is the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Ursids Meteor Shower on December 21-22.

 

The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle, which was first discovered in 1790.

 

The shower runs annually from December 17-25.

 

It peaks this year on the the night of the 21st.

 

This year the second quarter moon will be bright enough to hide all but the brightest meteors.

 

If you are patient, you might still be able to catch a few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Ursids Meteor Shower on December 21-22.

 

The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle, which was first discovered in 1790.

 

The shower runs annually from December 17-25.

 

It peaks this year on the the night of the 21st.

 

This year the second quarter moon will be bright enough to hide all but the brightest meteors.

 

If you are patient, you might still be able to catch a few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 

While walking the dog an hour or so ago, the husband and I saw a fireball...a meteor brighter than Venus...have never seen one before. Bitchin!

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New Moon on January 1.

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 11:14 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

 

 

 

 

Happy New Year!

 

Hope 2014 is filled with all that makes you happy!

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for any of you that like to track such things...

 

 

http://www.heavens-above.com/

 

go under configuration and change your location...

 

there's been some really bright passovers by the ISS over dallas... another one tonight... the larger a negative number the brighter it will be -4 > -1

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for any of you that like to track such things...

 

 

http://www.heavens-above.com/

 

go under configuration and change your location...

 

there's been some really bright passovers by the ISS over dallas... another one tonight... the larger a negative number the brighter it will be -4 > -1

Has anyone fiddled with this? I can't get the sky chart to reflect my viewing location. I can change my location on the map

but that still gives me a view of the southern sky from the coast of Africa.

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for any of you that like to track such things...

 

 

http://www.heavens-above.com/

 

go under configuration and change your location...

 

there's been some really bright passovers by the ISS over dallas... another one tonight... the larger a negative number the brighter it will be -4 > -1

Has anyone fiddled with this? I can't get the sky chart to reflect my viewing location. I can change my location on the map

but that still gives me a view of the southern sky from the coast of Africa.

 

 

you did hit update at the bottom of the "select location" screen.. right?

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You too, MSS.

 

And thanks for keeping the bat-shit crazy spirit alive.

 

 

Happy New Year to all, especially MSS for the astro updates.

 

 

Glad you enjoy it. Astronomy is the best free entertainment in the Universe!

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Quadrantids Meteor Shower on January 2-3.

 

 

The Quadrantids is an above average shower, with up to 40 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is thought to be produced by dust grains left behind by an extinct comet known as 2003 EH1, which was discovered in 2003.

 

The shower runs annually from January 1-5.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the 2nd and morning of the 3rd.

 

The thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for what could be an excellent show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Bootes, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Once the broad crescent of bad weather in the east moves farther east, we should have clear sky to look at--and really cold temps, even down south here.

 

Bootes the constellation (from which the meteors emanate as Sis told us) doesn't rise til late evening, hence midnight or after for viewing, so you look eastward. the principal star is Arcturus and as long as you're out there, here's how us idiots locate it-- find the Big Dipper, then follow the curved arc of its handle a couple or three handle lengths til you see a lone bright star--Arcturus. Hence the idiot's jingle, "follow the arc to Arcturus" then "speed on down to Spica", which latter is the next slightly dimmer star in that long "arc". So you'll know you're looking at Bootes, anyway/

 

More idiot's tricks--Orion will be prominent, his belt points (way) down to Sirius (brightest star in the sky), and up to Aldebaran (sounds like the good planet the Death Star blew up in the original Star Wars flick, to shock Princess Lea), and then farther upward to the Pleiades (the Seven Sisters, almost looks like a tiny dipper).

 

And bright Jupiter is not far from Orion. Unlike Sirius and the other stars, being a planet it doesn't twinkle.

 

I'm done. That's all the cheap tricks I know. Good viewing, dress warm..

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Jupiter at Opposition on January 5.

 

The giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons.

 

A medium-sized telescope should be able to show you some of the details in Jupiter's cloud bands.

 

A good pair of binoculars should allow you to see Jupiter's four largest moons, appearing as bright dots on either side of the planet.

 

 

 

Happy New Year to you, too, gina!

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northern lights alert

 

The first northern lights display of 2014 is on tap for the United States Wednesday night into Thursday morning.

A strong, Earth-facing coronal mass ejection, or CME, occurred Tuesday which set the stage for a bright display across the northern half of the U.S., according to Expert Meteorologist Mark Paquette.

The more directly a flare faces the Earth, the better the chances are for a strong aurora to be visible.

The Northeast should provide mostly clear skies throughout the event.

"Anyone in the suburbs of Boston, New York City, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., or Philadelphia has a chance at seeing this," Paquette said.

 

 

300x140_01081627_hd28.jpg

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In high school, my best friend and I were big fans of the Pogo comics. Every time I think of the term "aurora borealis," I invariably recite this in my head:

 

 

Oh roar a roar for Nora,

Nora Alice in the night

For she has seen Aurora

Borealis buring bright.

A furore for our Nora!

And applaud Aurora seen!

Where, throughout the summer, has

Our Borealis been?

 

 

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mainsheetsister, on 03 Jan 2014 - 07:46, said:

Jupiter at Opposition on January 5.

 

The giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons.

 

A medium-sized telescope should be able to show you some of the details in Jupiter's cloud bands.

 

A good pair of binoculars should allow you to see Jupiter's four largest moons, appearing as bright dots on either side of the planet.

 

 

Cool stuff. Got a great view with 15x70 binocs on a tripod while on the beach in Florida a week ago. Only saw three of the largest moons. The other must have been occluded by Jupiter at the time. Also had a good look at the Great Nebula in Orion. Sure helps to get away from all the damn light pollution.

 

 

 

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Full Moon on January 16.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 04:52 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Wolf Moon because this was the time of year when hungry wolf packs howled outside their camps.

 

This moon has also been know as the Old Moon and the Moon After Yule.

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Mystery on Mars: Scientists baffled after rock suddenly appears out of nowhere in front of Opportunity rover

Hoo boy, I can hear Art Bell's Tin Hatters now.

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Mystery on Mars: Scientists baffled after rock suddenly appears out of nowhere in front of Opportunity rover

Hoo boy, I can hear Art Bell's Tin Hatters now.

 

I betcha it was these little fuckers...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=827OGkGn_Kk

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While you were sleeping, a supernova was spotted "practically next door" and it is, to paraphrase Joe Biden, a big freaking deal.

 

inSCIder

 

"The stellar explosion occurred in the galaxy Messier 82 (M82), about 12 million light years from Earth. This means the star exploded nearly 12 million years ago and we're just seeing it. University College London claimed to be one of the first to spot the supernova, one of the closest since the 1980s.

 

Visible with a good pair of binoculars."

 

 

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New Moon on January 30.

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 21:38 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

 

This is the second new moon of the calendar month.

 

Such an occurrence can be called a black moon, although this term describes at least four different astronomical events related to the moon.

 

To some, the black moon is considered to be a special time when any rituals, spells, or other workings are considered to be more powerful and effective.

 

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Full Moon

 

On February 14, the Moon will rise in the east as the Sun is setting in the west.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 23:53 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Snow Moon because the heaviest snows usually fell during this time of the year.

 

Since hunting is difficult, this moon has also been known by some tribes as the Full Hunger Moon.

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A unique view of the Milky Way...all the way from Mars!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BgEB1jQCQAA7tTx.jpg

 

 

(stolen from twitter)

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New Moon on March 1

 

The New Moon rises in the east at dawn, and the night side of the Moon faces Earth all day.

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 08:00 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Any thought as to the best value in a telescope?

 

it depends... how much you want to spend? just to show the kids the stars, get bino's and a tripod..

 

and if you just happened to recently steal $1billion of bitcoins.. I recommend a setup like

 

 

http://www.opticsplanet.com/fujinon-binocular-telescope-25x150-em-sx-wo-mount-45-angle.html

opplanet-fujinon-binocular-telescope-25x

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First Quarter Moon on March 8

 

The First Quarter Moon rises around noon and sets around midnight.

 

The First Quarter Moon will be at its highest point in the sky around sunset.

 

From Earth, it appears that half of the disc of the moon is illuminated by the sun because the moon, the Earth, and the sun have formed a right angle with one another.

 

On Earth, neap tides will occur, such that high tides are not as high and low tides are not as low due to the opposing effects of the gravity of the sun and the moon pulling on the waters of Earth's oceans.

 

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Full Moon on March 16.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

When the Moon is full, it rises around sunset, is directly overhead around midnight, and sets around sunrise.

 

This phase occurs at 17:08 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Worm Moon because this was the time of year when the ground would begin to soften and the earthworms would reappear.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Crow Moon, the Full Crust Moon, and the Full Sap Moon.

 

On Earth, spring tides will occur, such that high tides will be very high and low tides will be very low, due to the combined effects of the Moon and the Sun pulling in opposite directions on the waters of Earth's oceans.

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March Equinox on March 20.

 

The March equinox occurs at 16:57 UTC.

 

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

 

This is also the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Occultation of Regulus on March 20.

 

An extremely rare event will take place on the morning of Thursday, March 20.

 

An asteroid known as 163 Erigone will pass in front of the bright star Regulus in the constellation of Leo, causing the star to disappear.

 

This event will be visible along a 45-mile-wide path and is predicted to begin at 2:07 a.m. EDT.

 

The asteroid’s shadow will move on a southeast-to-northwest path that will extend from New York, New York to Oswego, New York, and will continue northwest into Ontario, Canada.

 

For those in the center of this path, the star will remain invisible for 12 seconds.

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March Equinox on March 20.

 

The March equinox occurs at 16:57 UTC.

 

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

 

This is also the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

 

And you can balance eggs on their ends!

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Who saw Moon and Venus together, just before first light?

 

Knockout.

 

Then the clouds came (Galveston shore where u was , anyway.

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New Moon on March 30.

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 18:45 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

 

On Earth, spring tides will occur, such that high tides will be very high and low tides will be very low, due to the combined effect of the Moon and the Sun pulling in the same direction on the waters of Earth's oceans.

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If you're willing to stay up into the wee hours of the morning on Tuesday April 15th, you will be able to see a total lunar eclipse if you live in North or South America and the sky is clear. The eclipse will begin around 1:00 AM and totality is set to occur between 3:07 AM and 4:25 AM Eastern Time

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First Quarter Moon on April 7.



The First Quarter Moon rises at midday, will be directly overhead at sunset, and sets at midnight.



From Earth, it appears that half of the disc of the moon is illuminated by the sun because the moon, the Earth, and the sun have formed a right angle with one another.



On Earth, neap tides will occur, such that high tides are not as high and low tides are not as low due to the opposing effects of the gravity of the sun and the moon pulling on the waters of Earth's oceans.



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Mars at Opposition on April 8.

 

The red planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

Mars will be directly overhead at midnight.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Mars.

 

A medium-sized telescope will allow you to see some of the dark details on the planet's orange surface.

 

You may even be able to see one or both of the bright white polar ice caps.

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Full Moon and Total Lunar Eclipse on April 15.



The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.



This phase occurs at 07:42 UTC.



When the Moon is full, it rises as the sun goes down, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets as the sun rises.



This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the first spring flowers.



This moon has also been known as the Sprouting Grass Moon and the Growing Moon.




A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely through the Earth's dark shadow, or umbra.



During this type of eclipse, the Moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color.



A lunar eclipse can only occur when the Moon is full, and can last up to four hours.



Lunar eclipses can occur two or three times a year.



This eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America, South America, and Australia.



(NASA Map and Eclipse Information)



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A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely through the Earth's dark shadow, or umbra.

 

During this type of eclipse, the Moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color.

 

A lunar eclipse can only occur when the Moon is full, and can last up to four hours.

 

Lunar eclipses can occur two or three times a year.

 

This eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America, South America, and Australia.

 

(NASA Map and Eclipse Information)

 

Should be quite a show, especially for us Seppos. Thanks, MSS.

 

BTW: Drudge is reporting that there will be 4 extraordinary total lunar eclipses starting Apr 15. "The blood moons are part of a tetrad, a set of complete and consecutive lunar eclipses that will begin on April 15 and continue in roughly six-month intervals until October 2015. All of them are visible for all or parts of the USA."

 

This could foretell something horrific, like a Celine Dion World Tour.

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Lyrids Meteor Shower Peaks April 22-23.

 

 

The Lyrids is an average shower, usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher, which was discovered in 1861.

 

The shower runs annually from April 16-25.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the night of the 22nd and morning of the 23rd.

 

These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds.

 

The last quarter moon will be a slight problem this year, blocking the less bright meteors from view.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Last Quarter Moon on April 22.



The Last Quarter Moon rises around midnight, will be at its highest point in the sky around sunrise, and sets around noon.



From Earth, it will appear that half of the disc of the moon is illuminated by the sun because the moon, the Earth, and the sun have formed a right angle with one another.



On Earth, neap tides will occur, such that high tides are not as high and low tides are not as low due to the opposing effects of the gravity of the sun and the moon pulling on the waters of Earth's oceans.


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yeah, we have quarter-moons, though not "half" moon. Technically, full Moon is only half-lit. Semantics..

 

Will watch for Lyrids, though cloudy here.

 

 

And now for something totally different--

 

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/starmap-3d+-stargazing-astronomy/id351986992?mt=8

 

From todays SA front page, I just spent the three bucks, it's way cool for this sky amateur. just point, and see, and read. woo hoo...

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New Moon and Annular Solar Eclipse on April 29.



The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth because the Moon's dark side is facing the Earth.



When the Moon is New, it rises with the sun in the morning, is directly overhead at midday, and sets with the sun in the evening.



This phase occurs at 06:14 UTC.



This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.




An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon is too far away from the Earth to completely cover the Sun.



This results in a ring of light around the darkened Moon.



The Sun's corona is not visible during an annular eclipse.



A solar eclipse can only occur when the Moon is New because the Moon is between the Earth and the Sun, and the Moon's shadow is cast upon the Earth.



A solar eclipse can last up to 7 minutes and 40 seconds.



Solar eclipses can occur 4 to 5 times per year.



The path of the eclipse will begin off the coast of South Africa and move across Antarctica and into the east coast of Australia.



NASA Map and Eclipse Information


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Crescent Moon and Jupitah...

 

Near each other tonight and Sunday night:

 

http://earthsky.org/tonight

 

 

Chekke ette outte.. ;-)

 

 

good sky and 100% great weather down here for Jazz Fest, last weekend and again this. Woo hoo.

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Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower on May 5-6.

 

 

The Eta Aquarids is an above average shower, capable of producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

Most of the activity is seen in the Southern Hemisphere.

 

In the Northern Hemisphere, the rate can reach about 30 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet Halley, which has known and observed since ancient times.

 

The shower runs annually from April 19 to May 28.

 

It peaks this year on the night of May 5 and the morning of the May 6.

 

The first quarter moon will set just after midnight leaving fairly dark skies for what should be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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