mainsheetsister

Astronomy Anarchy

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New Moon on May 28.

 


The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.


This phase occurs at 18:40 UTC.


When the Moon is new, it rises at sunrise, is directly overhead at noon, and sets at sunset.


The Moon is not visible from Earth when it is new because the dark side of the Moon faces the Earth.


This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Conjunction of the Moon and Mars on June 7.

 

 

The Moon will pass within two degrees of the the planet Mars in the evening sky.

 

The gibbous moon will be at magnitude -12.2 and Mars will be at magnitude -0.8.

 

Look for both objects high in the eastern sky just after sunset.

 

The pair will be visible in the west later in the evening and will remain visible for about 6 hours after sunset.

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Conjunction of the Moon and Mars on June 7.

 

 

The Moon will pass within two degrees of the the planet Mars in the evening sky.

 

The gibbous moon will be at magnitude -12.2 and Mars will be at magnitude -0.8.

 

Look for both objects high in the eastern sky just after sunset.

 

The pair will be visible in the west later in the evening and will remain visible for about 6 hours after sunset.

ya know .....looking at the sky a bit more than usual cause of this info,way cool. Thanks

never eally paid much attention before.

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Conjunction of the Moon and Mars on June 7.

 

 

The Moon will pass within two degrees of the the planet Mars in the evening sky.

 

The gibbous moon will be at magnitude -12.2 and Mars will be at magnitude -0.8.

 

Look for both objects high in the eastern sky just after sunset.

 

The pair will be visible in the west later in the evening and will remain visible for about 6 hours after sunset.

ya know .....looking at the sky a bit more than usual cause of this info,way cool. Thanks

never eally paid much attention before.

 

Best free show in the entire universe!

 

Go outside. Look up. Often.

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Conjunction of the Moon and Mars on June 7.

 

 

The Moon will pass within two degrees of the the planet Mars in the evening sky.

 

The gibbous moon will be at magnitude -12.2 and Mars will be at magnitude -0.8.

 

Look for both objects high in the eastern sky just after sunset.

 

The pair will be visible in the west later in the evening and will remain visible for about 6 hours after sunset.

ya know .....looking at the sky a bit more than usual cause of this info,way cool. Thanks

never eally paid much attention before.

 

Best free show in the entire universe!

 

Go outside. Look up. Often.

 

I found a letter from your sister I was meant to read in 2006 today. It was tucked up in a book Catherine Mary sent me that I'd already read.

 

Classic Catherine, not a dry eye in the house here right now.

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Conjunction of the Moon and Mars on June 7.

 

 

The Moon will pass within two degrees of the the planet Mars in the evening sky.

 

The gibbous moon will be at magnitude -12.2 and Mars will be at magnitude -0.8.

 

Look for both objects high in the eastern sky just after sunset.

 

The pair will be visible in the west later in the evening and will remain visible for about 6 hours after sunset.

ya know .....looking at the sky a bit more than usual cause of this info,way cool. Thanks

never eally paid much attention before.

 

Best free show in the entire universe!

 

Go outside. Look up. Often.

 

I found a letter from your sister I was meant to read in 2006 today. It was tucked up in a book Catherine Mary sent me that I'd already read.

 

Classic Catherine, not a dry eye in the house here right now.

 

I've been thinking of her a lot lately. Her 45th birthday is coming up in a few weeks. I'm planning to send the last of her ashes up with some fireworks to mark the occasion. And get drunk, of course.

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Full Moon on June 12-13

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

When the Moon is full, it rises at sunset, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at sunrise.

 

This phase occurs at 04:11 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Strawberry Moon because it signaled the time of year to gather ripening fruit.

 

It also coincides with the peak of the strawberry harvesting season.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Rose Moon and the Full Honey Moon.

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June Solstice on June 21.

 

The June solstice occurs at 10:51 UTC.

 

The North Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its northernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Cancer at 23.44 degrees north latitude.

 

This is the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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New Moon on June 27.

 

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 08:08 UTC.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises in the east at sunrise, is directly overhead at noon, and sets in the west at sunset.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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I love this stuff...I spend lots of time in the deserts of the southwest and Baja. great stargazing out here......in fact we were up the San Telmo Rd towards the observatory on Mt Diablo, inland of Pt. Colonet on Baja, a couple of weeks ago ....pitting the Baja 500...good times...

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Full Moon on July 12.


The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.


This phase occurs at 11:25 UTC.


When the moon is full, it rises at sunset, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets when the sun rises.


This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year.


This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.

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Okay, as always I appreciate your posts and will look into the significance of the full moon on fishing. However, the note under your avatar mentions you have an interest in sarcasm so I would like to know about the Full Butt Moon....or maybe not.

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Okay, as always I appreciate your posts and will look into the significance of the full moon on fishing. However, the note under your avatar mentions you have an interest in sarcasm so I would like to know about the Full Butt Moon....or maybe not.

 

I'm sure there are some good spoonerisms in that one...some of you more cunning linguists will come up with something!

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Full Moon on July 12.
The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.
This phase occurs at 11:25 UTC.
When the moon is full, it rises at sunset, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets when the sun rises.
This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year.
This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.

 

 

watching the moon rise 9pm my time, did any of y'all catch the meteor that came streaking by? out of the east streaking fast, broke into two before it flamed out... just awesome.. very bright white...

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"Last Sliver" Moon and Venus for you earlybirds (or really latebirds).

 

You will need to out up early, just before first light (so around 5am, sorry) the next two mornings (Wednesday and Thurs) and you'll need a clear view low in the East.

If you can do all this and have clear sky, the almost-gone crescent Moon and very bright Venus will be near each other, pretty sight. They will be visible into morning twilight as they rise, then lost in the daylight as the Sun chases them up.

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my time of morning. I'll take a look. Thanks.

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New Moon on July 26.

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.


This phase occurs at 22:42 UTC.


This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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New Moon on July 26.

The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.

This phase occurs at 22:42 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Hope the sky's clear, I been meaning to drag my scope out in the yard!!

 

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Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower on July 28-29.

 

 

The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht.

 

The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23.

 

It peaks this year on the night of July 28 and morning of July 29.

 

This should be a great year for this shower because the thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for what should a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on August 10.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 18:09 UTC.

 

When the Moon is full, it rises at sunset, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at sunrise.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Sturgeon Moon because the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes and other major lakes were more easily caught at this time of year.

 

This moon has also been known as the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

 

The Moon is at perigee due to the elliptical shape of its orbit, making it the closest and largest full Moon of the year, an annual event that has come to be known as a "supermoon" by the media.

 

The truth is that it is only slightly larger and brighter than normal and most people are not really able to tell the difference.

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Perseids Meteor Shower on August 12-13.

 

 

The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862.

 

The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors.

 

The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24.

 

It peaks this year on the night of August 12 and the morning of August 13.

 

The waning gibbous moon will block out some of the meteors this year, but the Perseids are so bright and numerous that it should still be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Lucky you. We are expecting 1 to 2 inches of rain tonight.

 

The best view that I'll have of the Perseids is today's Google Doodle...

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Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter on August 18

 

Conjunctions are rare events where two or more objects will appear extremely close together in the night sky.

The two bright planets will come unusually close to each other, only a quarter of a degree, in the early morning sky.

Also, the beehive cluster in the constellation Cancer will be only 1 degree away.

This rare, double-planet event is definitely one not to miss.

Look for the bright planets in the east just before sunrise.

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New Moon on August 25.


When the Moon is new, it rises as the sun rises, is directly overhead at midday, and sets as the sun goes down.


The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth.


The Moon will be in the sky during the daylight hours, but it will not be visible from Earth because the illuminated side of the moon will be facing away from Earth.


This phase occurs at 14:13 UTC.


This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Here is the face book page of a group of people I hang out with at night. We have some great skies and some good equipment.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/KEASA-Kauai-Educational-Association-for-Science-and-Astronomy/265230216218?sk=photos_stream&ref=page_internal



“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”

― Oscar Wilde

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Here is the face book page of a group of people I hang out with at night. We have some great skies and some good equipment.

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/KEASA-Kauai-Educational-Association-for-Science-and-Astronomy/265230216218?sk=photos_stream&ref=page_internal

 

 

 

“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”

 

― Oscar Wilde

 

Liked it on the Facebook!

 

Awesome!

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Neptune at Opposition on August 29.

 

The blue giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

When a planet is at opposition, it can be seen directly overhead at midnight, and if a line were drawn between that planet and the Sun, Earth would be a point on the line.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Neptune.

 

Due to its extreme distance from Earth, it will only appear as a tiny blue dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

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Full Moon on September 8-9.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 01:38 UTC.

 

When the Moon is full, it rises at sunset, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets as the sun rises.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Corn Moon because the corn is harvested around this time of year.

 

This moon is also known as the Harvest Moon.

 

The Harvest Moon is the full moon that occurs closest to the September equinox each year.

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September Equinox on September 23.

 

 

The September equinox occurs at 02:29 UTC.

 

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

 

This is also the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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New Moon on September 24.

 

When the Moon is New, it is directly between the Earth and the Sun.

 

The New Moon is not visible from Earth because the illuminated side of the Moon faces away from Earth.

 

The New Moon rises with the sun at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets with the sun at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 06:14 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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cough, cough, if the smoke doesn't come in tonight, Star Party in my yard.

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cough, cough, if the smoke doesn't come in tonight, Star Party in my yard.

cough, cough, if the smoke doesn't come in tonight, Star Party in my yard.

Your post for tomorrow as follows:

 

 

 

We were all out in the back yard under cloud cover when I finally could see a Bright one

 

It kept getting Bigger and Brighter and BIGGER AND BRIGHTER

 

I YELLED OUT ABOVE THE ROARING AND CRACKLING NOISE " WHAT THE FUCKING IS THAT"

 

THEN IT HIT ME !!!!

 

Now that I think about it you might want to post it Today :-0

 

You are in the path of Space Bits and Chunks after all :-)

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I've been about as close to a falling meteorite that I want thank you very much. I did actually just pick up a piece of quartz rock that had the sun on it and it has a bit of gold in it. What's the odds? :)

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wasn't aware of any increased meteorite activity of late, but the other night will bobbing around in the hottub I leaned bag in one of the seats and stared up for about 10 minutes. damn if I didn't catch a couple dozen shooters... nothin big, but but was happy with quantity over quality for those few minutes!

 

haven't bothered to check any of the astronomy sites, but are we in a period of activity? MSS? any thoughts?

 

I dont think it was residuals from the 60's

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Sounds like it was a good night, B-n-G.

 

Read yesterday that within the past day or two, at least four fireballs (meteors brighter than Venus) were seen from the east coast of the US. Seeing one is not common, and four is very unusual.

 

Wish I had seen one of them!

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It was cool to find out that the Sutter's Mill Meteorites were the highest such entry velocity recorded for recovered meteorites. 64,000 mph (28.6 kph). Lots of interesting stuff came out of those rocks.

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Sounds like it was a good night, B-n-G.

 

Read yesterday that within the past day or two, at least four fireballs (meteors brighter than Venus) were seen from the east coast of the US. Seeing one is not common, and four is very unusual.

 

Wish I had seen one of them!

 

 

i have seen multiple fireballs over the years , each one was spectacular... there was one that must have been loaded with copper as it burned a very green..

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I've been about as close to a falling meteorite that I want thank you very much. I did actually just pick up a piece of quartz rock that had the sun on it and it has a bit of gold in it. What's the odds? :)

Fools gold perhaps?

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Had a few handles of Fireball around my Bar this Summer :o:o:o:o:o

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fireball7n-4-web.jpg

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I've been about as close to a falling meteorite that I want thank you very much. I did actually just pick up a piece of quartz rock that had the sun on it and it has a bit of gold in it. What's the odds? :)

Fools gold perhaps?

Chalcopryite? Nope, real stuff.

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This is a little more advance notice than usual, but I thought folks might want to plan ahead for this one.


If you have never seen a total lunar eclipse, you should try to do so at least once in your life.


Although lunar eclipses are predictable, as far astronomical events go, they are rather.....uneventful.


Personally, I am going to wait a day or two after the event for someone to post a time-lapse on YouTube so I can see the whole thing in a minute or three instead of staying awake half the night to watch.




Full Moon and Total Lunar Eclipse on October 8.



When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.



The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.



This phase occurs at 10:51 UTC.



This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Hunters Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt.



This moon has also been known as the Travel Moon and the Blood Moon.




A Total Lunar Eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely through the Earth's dark shadow, or umbra.



Lunar eclipses last about four hours, and can only occur when the Moon is Full.



During a lunar eclipse, the Moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color.



The eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America, South America, eastern Asia, and Australia.



NASA Map and Eclipse Information


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Based on your link, I'm solidly in "No Visible Eclipse" ... <mutter, mumble>

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Based on your link, I'm solidly in "No Visible Eclipse" ... <mutter, mumble>

 

Starts here around 4am, with totality at dawn.

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Uranus at Opposition on October 7.

 

 

The blue-green planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Uranus (giggle).

 

Due to its distance, it will only appear as a tiny blue-green dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

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The lunar eclipse is near totality as I post this, but it is already time to get ready for the next cool sky show...

 

 

 

Draconids Meteor Shower on October 8-9.

 

 

The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900.

 

The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 8th and morning of the 9th.

 

Unfortunately the glare from the full moon this year will block out all but the brightest meteors.

 

If you are extremely patient, you may be able to catch a few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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The lunar eclipse is near totality as I post this, but it is already time to get ready for the next cool sky show...

 

 

 

Draconids Meteor Shower on October 8-9.

 

 

The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900.

 

The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 8th and morning of the 9th.

 

Unfortunately the glare from the full moon this year will block out all but the brightest meteors.

 

If you are extremely patient, you may be able to catch a few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

think I'm gonna go anchor out for a while tonight for this one.

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Clear here, up early for a jog heading west at first, so the red/white-edged Moon led us through the trees, along the neutral ground* on St Charles Avenue.

 

Quite pretty. And the color gradation makes it look more three-dimensional. Sorta like 3-D glasses.

 

 

Sis, I hold out little hope for the Draconids, but thanks.

 

 

 

 

 

* meaning "median" anywhere else

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got up this morning , overcast... that sucked..

 

Too bad. It was spectacular.

 

We were doing speed work at a nearby HS track (starting at 5:30). Every time we rounded the first turn and came down the back stretch, there was the moon getting darker with each lap. We ended at 6:30 (time of totality) and did our stretching and calisthenics looking up at the coolest orange moon any of us ever saw.

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Orionids Meteor Shower on October 20-21.

The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.


It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times.


The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7.


It peaks this year on the night of October 20 and the morning of October 21.

This will be an excellent year for the Orionids because there will be no moon to interfere with the show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Will look, thanks.

 

We have nice clear sky now--albeit in the city...

 

 

Actually I had fun with our past full moon and waning--jogged under the red eclipse one morning, then used its light as waning full and half, to not kill or be killed biking on the otherwise very dark levee trail at 0600 by the river.

 

Then in the last crescent it was a pretty sight near Venus just before first light. As is the rest of the nearby sky with Orion and his surrounding stars.

 

 

Sky = good

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Forecast, rain. Bummer.

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was up at 5am, looked around for awhile but didn't see anything... once again a disappointment

 

 

once saw a perseid shower in late 70's - early 80's, it was like raining fireballs... truly amazing..

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New Moon and Partial Solar Eclipse on October 23.




The New Moon rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.



When the Moon is New, it is not visible from Earth because its illuminated side faces away from Earth and it is in the sky during the daylight hours.



This phase occurs at 21:57 UTC.



This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.




A Partial Solar Eclipse occurs when the Moon covers only a part of the Sun, sometimes resembling a bite taken out of a cookie.



A Solar Eclipse, whether Partial or Total, can only occur when the Moon is New, as this is the only time in the Moon's cycle of phases that the Moon comes between Earth and the Sun.



A Partial Solar Eclipse can only be safely observed with a special solar filter or by looking at the Sun's reflection.



The partial eclipse will be visible throughout most of North and Central America.



NASA Map and Eclipse Information



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South Taurids Meteor Shower on November 5-6.

 

 

The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour.

 

It is unusual in that it consists of two separate streams.

 

The first is produced by dust grains from Asteroid 2004 TG10.

 

The second stream is produced by debris left behind by Comet 2P Encke.

 

The shower runs annually from September 7 to December 10.

 

It peaks this year on the the night of November 5.

 

Unfortunately the full moon this year will block out all but the brightest meteors.

 

Those with patience may still be able to catch a few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Taurus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on November 6.

 

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 22:23 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Beaver Moon because this was the time of year to set the beaver traps before the swamps and rivers froze (that's their story, and they're sticking to it!).

 

It has also been known as the Frosty Moon and the Hunter's Moon.

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Leonids Meteor Shower on November 17-18.

 

 

The Leonids is an average shower, producing an average of up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen.

 

That last of these occurred in 2001.

 

The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1865.

 

The shower runs annually from November 6-30.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the 17th and morning of the 18th.

 

The waning crescent moon will not be much of a problem this year.

 

Skies should be dark enough for a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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How's the view from "here"? Being your night is my day ... <sigh>

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How's the view from "here"? Being your night is my day ... <sigh>

 

Same show for the whole planet, except that in the Southern Hemisphere, Leo probably isn't visible.

 

As far as the idea that meteors radiate from a certain constellation...the meteors that I have seen seem totally random...

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Saw a fireball while I was down in the Keys. White, teardrop shape, fast but not nearly so fast as a meteor. Lasted maybe 5 seconds. Much bigger than a meteor.

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New Moon on November 22.

 

 

When the Moon is New, it is directly between the Earth and the Sun.

 

The Moon is not visible from Earth when it is New, as the illuminated side of the Moon faces away from Earth.

 

The New Moon rises with the sun at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 12:32 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Full Moon on December 6.

 

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

The Full Moon rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 12:27 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark.

 

This moon has also been known as the Moon Before Yule and the Full Long Nights Moon.

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Full Moon on December 6.

 

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

 

The Full Moon rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 12:27 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark.

 

This moon has also been known as the Moon Before Yule and the Full Long Nights Moon.

I love star gazing, and I wish I could see this upcoming full moon. Unfortunately though, I made the mistake of asking the better half to replace the broken light fixture over the driveway...

Fuker installed a solar powered fixture and it's been cloudy and or raining ever since :lol:

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Had a nice run down the coast last night, nearly full moon, saw two fireballs both green. Both blew up, sending showers of sparks, no sound, thought for a moment one would crash onto Sanibel Island.

Can you tell time by the Moon's position? When the moon was at ten o'clock, when it was at its zenith I was at the southern tip of the island.

 

I've decided all my sailing/camping trips need to coincide with the full moon.

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Not as easy to tell time by the moon as it is by the sun. Each day, the moon rises and sets at a different time, and that time changes by hours each day, not by minutes as with the sun.

 

The full moon rises at sunset, then each night after as the moon wanes, it rises at least an hour later than the night before.

 

The third quarter moon rises at midnight, then as it continues to wane through the crescent phase, it rises closer to dawn, again changing by at least an hour each day.

 

The new moon rises as the sun comes up, but we don't see it at all even though it is in the sky all day because its illuminated side is facing away from Earth.

 

After the new moon, the waxing crescent rises later and later each morning until the first quarter phase, which rises at midday.

 

Then begins the waxing gibbous phase as it rises in the afternoon hours, closer to sunset each day until it is full again, and it rises as the sun goes down.

 

When it is full, it is opposite the sun in the sky, so that the side of the moon facing Earth is fully illuminated by the sun.

 

And then it begins again....

 

 

Got all that?

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"Got all that?" Sure! :blink:

 

I saw two fireballs this time out, both green. They burst and gave off showers of green sparks, a little like fireworks. What gives? I never saw anything like it as a kid and during that time I was outdoors, looking at the sky a lot!

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That's easier said than done, especially when you have two hands and four strings to pull. My luck with electricaltronical stuff has been really bad of late, besides I was just trying to judge my progress.

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That's easier said than done, especially when you have two hands and four strings to pull. My luck with electricaltronical stuff has been really bad of late, besides I was just trying to judge my progress.

 

Then just remember this: If you are out when the moon is full, it is around midnight when the moon is directly overhead.

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Geminids Meteor Shower on December 13-14.

 

The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers.

 

It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982.

 

The shower runs annually from December 7-17.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th.

 

The waning gibbous moon will block out some of the meteors this year, but the Geminids are so bright and numerous that it should still be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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December Solstice on December 21.

 

The December solstice occurs at 23:03 UTC.

 

The South Pole of the Earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its southern-most position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Capricorn at 23.44 degrees south latitude.

 

For the Northern Hemisphere, this is the first day of winter (winter solstice), and marks the longest night and shortest day of the year.

 

The Southern Hemisphere has its longest day and shortest night on its first day of summer (summer solstice).

 

 

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