mainsheetsister

Astronomy Anarchy

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The new Comet Lovejoy should glow at 4th magnitude in the second and third weeks of January, when it will be nicely placed high in the moonless dark for your binoculars or telescope. It'll be dimly visible to the unaided eye under dark-sky conditions — if you know exactly where to look!

 

 

Lovejoy2-550px.gif

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The new Comet Lovejoy should glow at 4th magnitude in the second and third weeks of January, when it will be nicely placed high in the moonless dark for your binoculars or telescope. It'll be dimly visible to the unaided eye under dark-sky conditions — if you know exactly where to look!

 

 

Lovejoy2-550px.gif

 

 

spotted it last night with the bino's ... just a faint fuzzy ball with all the moonlight, no definition to be seen...

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I can't compete with meteor showers or comets, but next morning or two the waning Moon and Venus will be close by each other, see it late evening or in the morning before first light.

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Moon and Jupiter (not Venus, my bad) were pretty at 6am when a friend and I went for a morning jog and I nearly froze my face off upwind (26F is very cold for New Orleans) but wasn't too cold otherwise.

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New Moon on January 20.

 

When the Moon is new, it rises as the sun rises, is directly overhead at midday, and sets as the sun goes down.
The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun, and it will be in the sky during the daylight hours, but it will not be visible from Earth because the illuminated side of the moon will be facing away from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 13:14 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Full Moon on February 3.

 

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

The Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and the fully illuminated side of the Moon will be facing the Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 23:09 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Snow Moon because the heaviest snows usually fell during this time of the year.

 

Since hunting is difficult, this moon has also been known by some tribes as the Full Hunger Moon.

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Jupiter at Opposition on February 6.

 

 

When at opposition, a planet will be opposite the Sun in the sky, and will be directly overhead at midnight.

 

A planet at opposition is at its closest approach to Earth, and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun as seen from Earth.

 

The largest of the eight planets, Jupiter has at least 63 known moons, and the planet gives off more energy than it receives from the Sun.

 

Astronomers believe that if Jupiter were more massive, it would have become a star.

 

Jupiter is famous for The Great Red Spot, a huge storm system that was first observed over 400 years ago when the telescope was invented.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons.

 

A medium-sized telescope should be able to show you some of the details in Jupiter's cloud bands.

 

A good pair of binoculars should allow you to see Jupiter's four largest moons, appearing as bright dots on either side of the planet.

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New Moon on February 18.

 

When the Moon is new, it rises as the sun rises, is directly overhead at midday, and sets as the sun goes down.
The Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun, and it will be in the sky during the daylight hours, but it will not be visible from Earth because the illuminated side of the moon will be facing away from Earth.

 

This phase occurs at 23:47 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Can Mars and Venus ever get close to each other?

 

 

Well, yes. Check it out, low in the west just after dark, big bright Venus with little pink Mars just above her.

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Conjunction of Venus and Mars.

 

 

A conjunction of Venus and Mars will be visible on February 22.

 

The two bright planets will be visible within only half a degree of each other in the evening sky.

 

Although these two planets are our nearest celestial neighbors, they are actually quite far from one another.

 

Venus, at a distance of 3.2 light-minutes from the sun, is closer to the sun than Earth, while light from the sun takes 12.6 light-minutes to reach Mars.

 

By contrast, Earth is 8.3 light-minutes from the sun.

 

Look for this impressive sight in the west just after sunset.

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Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation on February 24.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 26.7 degrees from the Sun at 19:00 UT.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

 

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Any possibility that a solar sail can develop apparent solar wind? Like with gravity slingshots....

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Full Moon on March 5.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 18:06 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Worm Moon because this was the time of year when the ground would begin to soften and the earthworms would reappear.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Crow Moon, the Full Crust Moon, the Full Sap Moon, and the Lenten Moon.

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Dawn at Ceres on March 6.

 

 

Following its orbit of the asteroid Vesta, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft will encounter the dwarf planet Ceres on March 6.

 

Ceres is the largest celestial body in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

 

Ceres is 590 miles (950 kilometers) in diameter and is about the size of Texas.

 

Ceres has officially been classified by the International Astronomical Union as a dwarf planet, which puts it in the same category as Pluto, Haumea, MakeMake, and Eris.

 

According to the IAU, a dwarf planet is a celestial body that orbits the sun, has enough mass so that it is nearly round, but has not cleared the neighborhood around its orbit, and is not a natural satellite of a planet.

 

Under these parameters, it is believed that there may be at least 300 other celestial bodies in the solar system that fit this description, however only five have been officially recognized by the IAU as dwarf planets.

 

Dawn will spend several months studying Ceres and will send back the first close-up images of a dwarf planet in our solar system.

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March Equinox on March 20.

 

 

The March equinox occurs at 22:45 UTC.

 

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

 

This is also the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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New Moon on March 20.

When the Moon is new, it is on the same side of the Earth as the Sun.
The New Moon rises as the sun rises, is directly overhead at midday, and sets as the sun goes down.
Since the illuminated side of the Moon will be facing away from the Earth during the daylight hours, it will not be visible in the sky.

This phase occurs at 09:36 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Total Solar Eclipse on March 20.

A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon completely blocks the Sun, revealing the Sun's beautiful outer atmosphere known as the corona.

A solar eclipse can only occur when the Moon is New, since it is only possible for the Moon's shadow to be cast upon the Earth when the Moon is between Earth and the Sun.

The event can last up to 7 minutes and 40 seconds.

The path of totality for this eclipse will be limited to the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans between Greenland and northern Russia.
(NASA Map and Eclipse Information)

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Thing I like about solar eclipses

 

At least they are for the most part at a decent hour :-)

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Full Moon and Total Lunar Eclipse on April 4.




The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.



When the Moon is full, it rises at sunset, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.



This phase occurs at 12:05 UTC.



This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the first spring flowers.



This moon has also been known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Growing Moon, and the Egg Moon.



Many coastal tribes called it the Full Fish Moon because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.




A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely through the Earth's dark shadow, or umbra.



A lunar eclipse can only occur when the Moon is full, and the event can last up to four hours.



During this type of eclipse, the Moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color.



The eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America, South America, eastern Asia, and Australia.




http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/LEplot/LEplot2001/LE2015Apr04T.pdf


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New Moon on April 18.

 

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and its illuminated side will be facing away from Earth during Earth's daylight hours.

 

The New Moon is not visible in the night sky.

 

This phase occurs at 18:56 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Lyrids Meteor Shower on April 22-23.

 

 

The Lyrids is an average shower, usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher, which was discovered in 1861.

 

The shower runs annually from April 16-25.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the night of the 22nd and morning of the 23rd.

 

These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds.

 

The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight, leaving fairly dark skies for the what could be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on May 4.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 03:42 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

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Full Moon on May 4.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 03:42 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

May 4th is also Star Wars Day.:)

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Full Moon on May 4.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 03:42 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

May 4th is also Star Wars Day. :)

 

 

Yes.

 

And depending on your time zone, the full moon may actually be on May 3.

 

 

 

May the 4th be with you!

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Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower on May 5-6.

 

 

The Eta Aquarids is an above average shower, capable of producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

Most of the activity is seen in the Southern Hemisphere.

 

In the Northern Hemisphere, the rate can reach about 30 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet Halley, which has known and observed since ancient times.

 

The shower runs annually from April 19 to May 28.

 

It peaks this year on the night of May 5 and the morning of the May 6.

 

The nearly full moon will be a big problem this year blocking out all but the brightest meteors.

 

If you are patient, you should still be able to catch a few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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actually caught quite a few last night.. took my scope out in the yard to look at the moon.

and saw several while setting it up around 11:30 EDT

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Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation on May 7.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 21.2 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

 

Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

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(raises hand timidly)

 

? Mrs. mainsheetsister Ma'am ?

 

 

ummm,

 

When you get all retired & stuff, and driving a great big giant 18-wheeler truck all around the country & stuff, and being " Mrs. mainsheetsister Ma'am mothertrucker & stuff, and chewing the end off stogies & stuff, & wearing cowboygirl boots and stuff, and don't have to yell at Tommy & Billy & Jimmy for throwing paper airplanes & stuff, and don't have to stop Karen from beating the crap out of Kevin because he pulled her pigtails again & stuff,

 

 

? Would you please please please please please come around once in a while and show us about some more Astronomy stuff ?

 

 

 

 

:) , it's kinda fun.

 

Your Friend;

Mikey

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Absolutely!

 

I LOVE all of you batshit crazy bastards!

Thacke you, we love you to. :)

 

 

Wow, MSS, you almost shocked Snaggy into coherence. ;)

 

 

We love the Mainsheets, too.

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New Moon on May 18.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises in the East at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets in the West at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 04:13 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Saturn at Opposition on May 23.

 

 

The ringed planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

Saturn will be directly overhead at midnight and will be brighter than any other time of the year.

 

At Opposition, a planet is directly opposite the Sun as seen from Earth, such that if a line were drawn from that planet to the Sun, Earth would be a point on the line.

 

Like Jupiter, Saturn gives off more energy than it receives from the Sun due to chemical reactions in its massive atmosphere.

 

Saturn is the second largest planet in the solar system, and its iconic rings are made of icy particles.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons.

 

A medium-sized or larger telescope will allow you to see Saturn's rings and a few of its brightest moons.

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Full Moon on June 2.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 16:19 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Strawberry Moon because it signaled the time of year to gather ripening fruit.

 

It also coincides with the peak of the strawberry harvesting season.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Rose Moon and the Full Honey Moon.

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Venus at Greatest Eastern Elongation on June 6.

 

 

The planet Venus reaches greatest eastern elongation of 45.4 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Venus since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

 

Venus has the distinction of being the hottest planet in the solar system, with a surface temperature of 464oC.

 

Also known as Earth's twin, Venus is nearly the same size, mass, and density as Earth.

 

Look for the bright planet in the western sky after sunset.

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New Moon on June 16.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 14:05 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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NASA spacecraft finds strange lights on dwarf planet
neonvid_4291262643001.jpg?width=880&heig

As NASA's Dawn mission is closing in on dwarf planet Ceres, mission scientists are trying to unlock of the strange bright lights eminating from the surface. Michael Kofsky, USA TODAY

Michael Kofsky, Special to USA TODAY 6:08 a.m. EDT June 16, 2015
635696566304646010-AP-DWARF-PLANET-MISSI

(Photo: AP)

CONNECT 165 TWEET 11 LINKEDINCOMMENTEMAILMORE

PASADENA, Calif. -- Millions of miles away, between Mars and Jupiter, NASA's Dawn spacecraft has given NASA scientists their first glimpse of the dwarf planet Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt.

One big surprise has been a series of very bright spots in the images of Ceres' surface. Despite some Internet conspiracists' claims that the bright lights are from an alien city, Dawn mission scientists say these spots are more likely ice or salts.

The true nature of these bright areas will remain a mystery until Dawn can get closer and study the bright spots in more detail in coming months. In its closest orbit, Dawn's cameras will capture images with 36 times better detail than those it's currently transmitting. We recently sat dawn for a video interview with Dawn's top scientists at Jet Propulsion Laboratory here, who spoke about what the bright spots could mean.

They say the dwarf planet could hold clues from billions of years in the past when Ceres was warmer and may have harbored a liquid ocean beneath its surface. One of the goals of the mission will be to determine whether the world was once capable of supporting life.

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Venus at Greatest Eastern Elongation on June 6.

 

 

The planet Venus reaches greatest eastern elongation of 45.4 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Venus since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

 

Venus has the distinction of being the hottest planet in the solar system, with a surface temperature of 464oC.

 

Also known as Earth's twin, Venus is nearly the same size, mass, and density as Earth.

 

Look for the bright planet in the western sky after sunset.

 

 

Venus and Jupiter have been a pretty show, near each other in the evening sky. It will get even better over the next couple of weeks as they get closer to each other and "change places" around the end of june:

 

http://earthsky.org/tonight/watch-the-great-race-of-venus-and-jupiter-in-june-2015

 

And the next couple of nights the new crescent Moon will pass near them---a knockout. Be there..

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It's Alive! Comet Lander Philae Phones Home After Months of Silence

A European probe that made a bouncy landing on a comet last year, and then slipped into a silent hibernation, is alive again and phoning home.

The European Space Agency's Philae comet lander, which dropped onto Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from the Rosetta spacecraft last November, beamed an 85-second wake-up message to Earth via Rosetta yesterday (June 13), ESA officials announced today. It was the first signal from Philae in seven months since the probe fell silent on Nov. 15 after its historic comet landing.

 

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It's Alive! Comet Lander Philae Phones Home After Months of Silence

A European probe that made a bouncy landing on a comet last year, and then slipped into a silent hibernation, is alive again and phoning home.

The European Space Agency's Philae comet lander, which dropped onto Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from the Rosetta spacecraft last November, beamed an 85-second wake-up message to Earth via Rosetta yesterday (June 13), ESA officials announced today. It was the first signal from Philae in seven months since the probe fell silent on Nov. 15 after its historic comet landing.

 

 

This is cool! I've been following on twitter!

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June Solstice on June 21.

 

 

The June solstice occurs at 16:38 UTC.

 

The North Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its northernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Cancer at 23.44 degrees north latitude.

 

This is the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation on June 24.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 22.5 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

 

Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

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Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter on July 1.

 

 

A spectacular conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will be visible in the evening sky.

 

The two bright planets will be extremely close, appearing only 0.3 degrees apart.

 

Look for this impressive pairing in the western sky just after sunset.

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Full Moon on July 1 or 2 (depending on your time zone).

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 02:19 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.

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Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter on July 1.

 

 

A spectacular conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will be visible in the evening sky.

 

The two bright planets will be extremely close, appearing only 0.3 degrees apart.

 

Look for this impressive pairing in the western sky just after sunset.

 

 

the conjunction was sweet...

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New Horizons at Pluto on July 14.

 

 

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is scheduled to arrive at Pluto after a nine and a half year journey.

 

Launched on January 19, 2006, this will be the first spacecraft to visit Pluto.

 

New Horizons will give us our first close-up views of the dwarf planet and its five moons.

 

After passing Pluto, the spacecraft will continue on to the Kuiper belt to examine some of the other icy bodies at the edge of the Solar System.

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Here is NASA's latest high-resolution image of Pluto

 

CJ4Bo4fVEAAo2rF.jpg

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The New Horizon spacecraft shot some amazing photo's of Pluto today.

tn-p_lorri_fullframe_color.jpg

 

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That's apparently the last full-disc shot we're going to get, the rest will be close-ups. This one will go in all the textbooks from now on.

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Kind of surprising that more impact craters aren't there. Living in the Kepler Belt has to be rough.

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The moons don't look particularly pitted-up too. May be that being further out on the disk equals less stuff moving on high angle crossing paths or a "per cubic mile". Could be there is just as much stuff but since everything is more spread out, and by a factor of 100 or so...

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I've been following on Twitter @NASANewHorizons

 

Really fantastic discoveries, among them are:

 

The largish heart-shaped surface feature on Pluto is actually snow...nitrogen, carbon monoxide, or methane snow!

 

All of Pluto's 5 moons are all in an equatorial plane, as if created by one event

 

Pluto has an atmosphere, and there was some speculation that it might share an atmosphere with its largest moon, Charon. Have not heard an update on that yet...

 

And if I read this correctly, New Horizons has collected so much data during the flyby that it will take 16 months to transmit all of it back to NASA Goddard on Earth

 

Fucking Awesome!

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Kind of surprising that more impact craters aren't there. Living in the Kepler Belt has to be rough.

 

The image of Pluto in B&W allows for greater detail of its craters.

 

BTW: It's interesting how that drawing of Pluto the dog posted above, fits so well in the section of what's now called The Heart on Pluto.

 

tn-p_lorri_fullframe_bw.jpg

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150715152709-02-pluto-0715-exlarge-169.j

Un - fucking - real.

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New Moon on July 16.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 01:24 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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^^^ I can't get the quote to work, but I'm referring to the photo posted by Guitar.

 

That is some massive topography going on there! Really interesting to know how it has been formed. There do seem to be quite a large number of linear feature with two, possibly three different orientations.

 

It is difficult to tell if these are drainage features following tectonic controlled features, or just tectonic effects. There certainly seems to be active processes in progress.

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Some "Fun Facts" about Pluto and its moon

 

CJajicgUsAAzVvx.png

 

 

Here is a HD photo of Charon

 

2A8FFC2200000578-3162894-image-m-5_14369

 

 

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Great time to hot tub!!! Observation of celestial bodies is always best done naked. :D

TMI...

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From today's NASA news conference on the New Horizon Pluto mission.

 

Animated Flyover of Pluto’s Icy Mountain and Plains

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So who was alive and looking at the moon 46 years ago today? Hard to believe the United States first landed on the moon that long ago. Also hard to believe that no one born since 1939 has ever walked on it.

 

667px-Apollo_11_Lunar_Module_Eagle_in_la

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I was! I was only thirteen months old but Mom propped me up on her knee and pointed my head at the TV so I could witness the landing whether I understood what was going on or not. A totally cool move on her part- Thanks Mom! Whenever she tells this story my dad rolls his eyes, it's kind of funny.

 

As I got a little older I became a big fan of the launches because of all the awesome fire that shot out the back- to this day I'm kind of a pyro-

 

Older still and I began to grasp the science and physics involved and was awed all over again. Wish we could still do stuff of this magnitude.

 

If you want to see a very good movie about the moon landing and how it was brought to the masses get a copy of "The Dish". Tells the story of the Aussie outback astronomers that operated the giant satellite dish that received the TV signal of the first moonwalk- barely. Great flick!

 

Serge

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Interesting topography / geology going on up there. Can't wait to hear some of the ideas of what caused the mountains and the weird shapes on the Sputnik area.

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Senior in high school, was a fascinating time.

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Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower on July 28-29.

 

 

The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht.

 

The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23.

 

It peaks this year on the night of July 28 and morning of July 29.

 

The nearly full moon will block out all but the brightest meteors this year.

 

If you are patient, you should still be able to catch a quite few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on July 31.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 10:43 UTC.

 

This Full Moon is known as a Blue Moon because it is the second Full Moon in a calendar month.

 

Since the lunar month does not always coincide with the calendar month, the expression "once in a blue moon" has evolved in reference to an event which does not often occur.

 

While the color of the Full Moon on July 31 will be as it ordinarily appears, there have been times in history when the Moon has actually appeared to be blue due to atmospheric changes, especially following volcanic eruptions.

 

This occurred most notably in 1883, after the eruption of Krakatoa, and was also observed after the eruptions of Mount St. Helens, El Chichon, and Mount Pinatubo, as well as after forest fires in Canada in the 1950s.

 

This phenomenon was caused when the majority of the dust and ash particles in the atmosphere were wider than red light's wavelength of 0.7 micrometers, thus diffracting the red light and causing the Moon appear blue in color.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Perseids Meteor Shower on August 12-13.

 

 

The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862.

 

The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors.

 

The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24. It peaks this year on the night of August 12 and the morning of August 13.

 

The thin crescent moon will be no match for the bright Perseids this year so be prepared for a great show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Where the hell are you now Christine?

 

I'm in Sturgis, South Dakota.

 

Just missed the 75th Annual Bike Rally by a couple of days!

 

Took a quick side trip last night to Keystone to gawk at Mt Rushmore.

 

Headed through the Badlands this morning, then east into Minnesota.

 

I will be bonding with my inner 9-year-old today, as I visit the places where Laura Ingalls Wilder lived, my favorite childhood author.

 

I am going to pass through De Smet, South Dakota and Walnut Grove, Minnesota, then spending the night in Mankato, Minnesota.

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