mainsheetsister

Astronomy Anarchy

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I refuse to use such a term as "supermoon"

 

In my opinion, it is one of many media-created terms that represent the dumbing-down of society in general and of science in particular.

 

It's called perigee, ffs.

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I refuse to use such a term as "supermoon"

 

In my opinion, it is one of many media-created terms that represent the dumbing-down of society in general and of science in particular.

 

It's called perigee, ffs.

Yet you are quite happy to use other terms that less than .005 % of the population will understand such as Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

 

It's good enough for NASA:- http://moon.nasa.gov/newsdisplay.cfm?Subsite_News_ID=44049&SiteID=6&iSiteID=1

 

Whatever floats your boat.

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I have followed your posts since this thread began and found it very informative. I can now see how you behave when you get it wrong. I don't think I'll bother following this thread anymore.

 

PMS on top of a full moon? - nasty.

 

p.s. Clear sky. Binoculars. SUPERMOON just off the horizon & huge. Brilliant.

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I refuse to use such a term as "supermoon"

 

In my opinion, it is one of many media-created terms that represent the dumbing-down of society in general and of science in particular.

 

It's called perigee, ffs.

 

Love this thread.

 

Thanks for sharing.

 

I miss the long nights on the ocean, watching the amazing sky...

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Neptune at Opposition on September 1.

 

 

The blue giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

When a planet is at Opposition, it is directly overhead at midnight, and if a line were drawn between that planet and the Sun, Earth would be a point on that line.

 

Neptune will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Neptune.

 

Due to its extreme distance from Earth, it will only appear as a tiny blue dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

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Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation on September 4.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 27 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

 

Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

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New Moon and Partial Solar Eclipse on September 13.




The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.



When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.



This phase occurs at 06:41 UTC.



This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.




Eclipses of the Sun can only occur in the daytime when the Moon is New, and the entire event can last up to about 7 minutes.



A partial solar eclipse occurs when the Moon covers only a part of the Sun, sometimes resembling a bite taken out of a cookie.



A partial solar eclipse can only be safely observed with a special solar filter or by looking at the Sun's reflection.



The partial eclipse will only be visible in southern Africa, Madagascar, and Antarctica.


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These guys created a scale model of the solar system in a dry lakebed in Nevada.

 

Earth is the size of a marble, and the entire model is 7 miles wide.

 

Pretty cool shit.

 

 

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September Equinox on September 23.

 

 

The September equinox occurs at 08:21 UTC.

 

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

 

This is also the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

Please get your terminology right.

 

The Sun's GP is on the equator at that time.

 

GP = geographic position.

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The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

Please get your terminology right.

 

The Sun's GP is on the equator at that time.

 

GP = geographic position.

 

 

I understood her to say that. General audience here.

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The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

Please get your terminology right.

 

The Sun's GP is on the equator at that time.

 

GP = geographic position.

 

I understood her to say that. General audience here.

 

So don't you think that a "General audience" knows what a super moon is?

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Night's getting longer, so you can catch the pre-dawn sky a little later and it's still dark enough for good sky.

Venus is as bright as a torch low in the east, because she's close, on the same side of the sun as us these days. So she shows as a crescent, but a really bright one. When she is "full" she's on the other side of the sun and therefore about triple the distance from us as now. So unlike the Moon, "full" Venus is far dimmer than crescent Venus

Also nearby is Sirius, the brightest star. Look upwards and there's Orion, whose "belt" points downward to Sirius.


The evening sky in summer (to me at least, in the city where dimmer bodies are blotted out) is more boring, mostly just the "summer triangle" of Vega, Altair, and Deneb, straight up. But the morning sky before twilight is the bomb.

Way more here:

http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essent...saturn-mercury

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So don't you think that a "General audience" knows what a super moon is?

 

No. I had to look it up. The technical name is the perigee-syzygy of the Earth-Moon-Sun system. No "General Audience" would know that either.

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Yup. I will be out in Gambier Is. Sunday evening thru Tuesday away from the light pollution of the big city. Hope to do some shots that night and it's my b-day on Monday.

 

Looking forward to both events.

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surprised noone has mentioned it,

September 27 / September 28, 2015 Total Lunar Eclipse

 

 

No shit. I wasn't paying attention. Blood Moon huh? More reason to set my real camera gear.

 

Thank you Dreaded.

check here for more details... 1/2 of europe and 1/2 N. America will see a full total eclipse

 

 

http://www.timeanddate.com/eclipse/lunar/2015-september-28

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Full Moon and Total Lunar Eclipse on September 27 or 28 (depending on your time zone).

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 02:50 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Corn Moon because the corn is harvested around this time of year.

 

This moon is also known as the Harvest Moon.

 

The Harvest Moon is the full moon that occurs closest to the September equinox each year.

 

The Moon is at perigee, its closest approach to the Earth, and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.

 

At a distance of 356,877 kilometers (221,753 miles), this will be the closest full moon of the year.

 

 

A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely through the Earth's dark shadow, or umbra.

 

During this type of eclipse, the Moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color.

 

A lunar eclipse can last up to four hours, and can only occur when the Moon is Full.

 

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of North and South America, Europe, Africa, and western Asia.

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You're most welcome.

 

Patchy clouds here, but we were able to see the moment when totality began as the moon slipped entirely into Earth's shadow.

 

Love to you and Joan.

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I'm touting the predawn sky again:

 

Looking upward from low in the east, lined up are Jupiter, Mars, Venus, Moon. Nice.

 

Next few mornings, the Moon wil move down through those planets as its crescent wanes, worth a look.

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Saw that this morning walking the wife out to leave for work. Beautiful.

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Early evening sky on Thursday...

 

Beginning in the evening hours of Oct. 8 and continuing through Oct. 9, the peak of the Draconid meteor shower will become visible to eager stargazers.

The Draconids are one of the more unique and unheralded meteor showers that occur throughout the year. What sets them apart from other events is that the best time to view them is around nightfall, as opposed to the predawn hours, according to Earthsky.

 

Due to their location near the head of the constellation Draco the Dragon in the northern sky, Draconids are best viewed from the Northern Hemisphere, Earthsky states.

 

http://www.msn.com/en-us/weather/topstories/first-of-two-october-meteor-showers-to-peak-thursday-as-draconids-shimmer-in-the-night-sky/ar-AAfcPPo?li=AAa0dzB&ocid=mailsignout

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Thanks ho, if I may call you that. :P

 

Been bummed with the others, a nice cocktail and the zero gravity chair and I'm set.

I might try out my GoPro 4 Silver and see what I can capture.

 

Shit, i justed looked at that map, on the edge of poor and fair.

 

At least I'm way out in the hills away from lights.

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Draconids Meteor Shower on October 8.

 

 

The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900.

 

The Draconids is an unusual shower in that the best viewing is in the early evening instead of early morning like most other showers.

 

The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 8th.

 

The second quarter moon will block out all but the brightest meteors this year.

 

If you are patient, you may be able to spot a few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be in the early evening from a dark location far away from city lights.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Sis, the Moon sets around 3 or 4pm, so early evening viewing might be good, jah?

 

 

PS morning sky is still great, crescent Moon right near Venus.

 

 

 

PPS: "Stupid human trick" that might be useful in stargazing, or on the water:

 

your fist at arm's length, with thumb "on top", describes an arc of about 10 degrees. So one fist equals 40 minutes of celestial movement. Moon loses about 50 minutes a night on other sky bodies, so about 12 degrees, so kinda one fist.

Also useful is "horizontal" or sideways fist, if you want to get a meatball estimate of some target's angle off your bow

 

I know all this 'cause I'm an English major.

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Sis, the Moon sets around 3 or 4pm, so early evening viewing might be good, jah?

 

 

PS morning sky is still great, crescent Moon right near Venus.

 

 

 

PPS: "Stupid human trick" that might be useful in stargazing, or on the water:

 

your fist at arm's length, with thumb "on top", describes an arc of about 10 degrees. So one fist equals 40 minutes of celestial movement. Moon loses about 50 minutes a night on other sky bodies, so about 12 degrees, so kinda one fist.

Also useful is "horizontal" or sideways fist, if you want to get a meatball estimate of some target's angle off your bow

 

I know all this 'cause I'm an English major.

To clarify. that is 40 minutes of time you are referring to?

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Sis, the Moon sets around 3 or 4pm, so early evening viewing might be good, jah?

 

 

PS morning sky is still great, crescent Moon right near Venus.

 

 

 

PPS: "Stupid human trick" that might be useful in stargazing, or on the water:

 

your fist at arm's length, with thumb "on top", describes an arc of about 10 degrees. So one fist equals 40 minutes of celestial movement. Moon loses about 50 minutes a night on other sky bodies, so about 12 degrees, so kinda one fist.

Also useful is "horizontal" or sideways fist, if you want to get a meatball estimate of some target's angle off your bow

 

I know all this 'cause I'm an English major.

To clarify. that is 40 minutes of time you are referring to?

 

 

Yeah, clock time not lat not long "minutes" . sorry shoulda been clearer.. Everything up there moves 15 degrees per hour from Earth's roatation, so 2/3 of an hour, or 40 minutes, is ten degrees..

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Sis, the Moon sets around 3 or 4pm, so early evening viewing might be good, jah?

 

 

PS morning sky is still great, crescent Moon right near Venus.

 

 

 

PPS: "Stupid human trick" that might be useful in stargazing, or on the water:

 

your fist at arm's length, with thumb "on top", describes an arc of about 10 degrees. So one fist equals 40 minutes of celestial movement. Moon loses about 50 minutes a night on other sky bodies, so about 12 degrees, so kinda one fist.

Also useful is "horizontal" or sideways fist, if you want to get a meatball estimate of some target's angle off your bow

 

I know all this 'cause I'm an English major.

To clarify. that is 40 minutes of time you are referring to?

 

Yeah, clock time not lat not long "minutes" . sorry shoulda been clearer.. Everything up there moves 15 degrees per hour from Earth's roatation, so 2/3 of an hour, or 40 minutes, is ten degrees..

 

Well aware of that mate. I taught celestial navigation. But a lot of readers probably didn't know the difference between minutes of angle vs minutes of time.

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Well, for their benefit, then. I believe the mention of "50 minutes a night, or about 12 degrees,," indicates minutes of time, not angle, to the average bear.

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Well, for their benefit, then. I believe the mention of "50 minutes a night, or about 12 degrees,," indicates minutes of time, not angle, to the average bear.

OK. Your way.

 

I just remember the confusion amongst the beginners at nav class. Took a little time for them to grasp the difference.

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Well, for their benefit, then. I believe the mention of "50 minutes a night, or about 12 degrees,," indicates minutes of time, not angle, to the average bear.

OK. Your way.

 

I just remember the confusion amongst the beginners at nav class. Took a little time for them to grasp the difference.

 

 

Understood. I grew up caring more about tide than Moon, so the 50-odd minutes per day was always clock minutes to me, rather than angle.

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Uranus at Opposition on October 11.

 

 

The blue-green planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

 

When a planet is at Opposition, it is directly overhead at midnight, such that if a line was drawn between that planet and the Sun, Earth would be a point on the line.

 

This is the best time to view Uranus.

 

Due to its distance, it will only appear as a tiny blue-green dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

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Cool!! Your little tidbits are always interesting!!

 

Now go find us a humongous comet to fill half the sky!! I feel ripped off that Haley's was a bust this lap and none of the others has even been easy to see.

 

College kids in the northern hemisphere have never seen a comet

 

We could see Hale-Bop from my boat shop

 

Maybe Catalina will surprise us.

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New Moon on October 13.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 00:06 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation on October 16.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 18.1 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

 

Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

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Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation on October 16.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 18.1 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

 

Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

 

Cool, but may be a hard chance for us city dwellers. And above it will be Mars and Jupiter close together, and Venus above that. The predawn sky has been excellent this fall.

 

We were out on Lake Pontchartrain last night for the Wednesday beercan race, in nearly zero air. But beautiful sunset, and pretty first-sliver crescent Moon, setting just after the Sun did.

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Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation on October 16.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 18.1 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

 

Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

 

Cool, but may be a hard chance for us city dwellers. And above it will be Mars and Jupiter close together, and Venus above that. The predawn sky has been excellent this fall.

 

We were out on Lake Pontchartrain last night for the Wednesday beercan race, in nearly zero air. But beautiful sunset, and pretty first-sliver crescent Moon, setting just after the Sun did.

 

 

Nice.

 

Try as I might, I have never seen Mercury either. I live in a wide valley with some significant light pollution thanks to a nearby Proctor and Gamble warehouse.

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Orionids Meteor Shower on October 21-22.

 

 

The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times.

 

The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7.

 

It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22.

 

The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight leaving fairly dark skies for what should be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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The conjunction of Venus, Jupiter, and Mars is approaching on 10/27. Took a peek this morning 5:00 AM Pacific in the eastern sky. All three of them visible in a line along the ecliptic, Venus on top, Jupiter in the middle, and Mars on the bottom. I could see the bands across the face of Jupiter and 4 moons. Venus is featureless due to its permanent cloud cover. Unfortunately before I could look at Mars, clouds rolled in blocking the view plus it was getting light.

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Beautiful yesterday morning from the foothills east of Sac. Clear sky.

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Orionids Meteor Shower on October 21-22.

 

 

The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times.

 

The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7.

 

It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22.

 

The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight leaving fairly dark skies for what should be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 

Well I was out there last night after midnight and I didn't see doodley

 

Stupid sky <_<

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Beautiful view of Venus and Mars just before sunrise this morning.

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Yeah pre dawn sky in the East has been killer good all Fall.

 

 

Wait, make that "wicked good", I'm from Boston originally.

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Was in New Jersey last night and watched the Space Station cross the sky from North West to South East...Really cool.

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Venus at Greatest Western Elongation and Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter on October 26.




The planet Venus reaches greatest eastern elongation of 46.4 degrees from the Sun.



This is the best time to view Venus since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.



Look for the bright planet in the eastern sky before sunrise.



A conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will take place on October 26.



The two bright planets will be visible within 1 degree of each other in the early morning sky.



Look to the east just before sunrise for this impressive planetary pair.


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Full Moon on October 27.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 12:05 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Hunters' Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt.

 

This moon has also been known as the Travel Moon and the Blood Moon.

 

This is the third and last time for 2015 that the Moon will be Full while it is at perigee, its closest approach to the Earth.

 

Some claim that when the Moon is at perigee, it may appear slightly larger and brighter than usual.

 

However, when looking at the Moon in the sky without anything to compare it to, it is not likely that any difference in size or brightness will be noticeable.

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Yeah pre dawn sky in the East has been killer good all Fall.

Greate thisse morning to.......... :)

Full Moon on October 27.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 12:05 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Hunters' Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt.

 

This moon has also been known as the Travel Moon and the Blood Moon.

 

This is the third and last time for 2015 that the Moon will be Full while it is at perigee, its closest approach to the Earth.

 

Some claim that when the Moon is at perigee, it may appear slightly larger and brighter than usual.

 

However, when looking at the Moon in the sky without anything to compare it to, it is not likely that any difference in size or brightness will be noticeable.

Cosmo's Moone! :)

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Venus at Greatest Western Elongation and Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter on October 26.

 

 

The planet Venus reaches greatest eastern elongation of 46.4 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Venus since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

 

Look for the bright planet in the eastern sky before sunrise.

 

A conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will take place on October 26.

 

The two bright planets will be visible within 1 degree of each other in the early morning sky.

 

Look to the east just before sunrise for this impressive planetary pair.

 

 

 

Venus at Greatest Western Elongation and Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter on October 26.

 

 

The planet Venus reaches greatest eastern elongation of 46.4 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Venus since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

 

Look for the bright planet in the eastern sky before sunrise.

 

A conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will take place on October 26.

 

The two bright planets will be visible within 1 degree of each other in the early morning sky.

 

Look to the east just before sunrise for this impressive planetary pair.

 

I saw them early this morning around 5am.........nice

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Conjunction of Venus, Mars, and Jupiter on October 28.

 

 

A rare, 3-planet conjunction will be visible on the morning of October 28.

 

The planets Venus, Mars, and Jupiter will all form a triangle in the early morning sky.

 

Jupiter and Venus will be only one degree apart with Mars just a few degrees to the east.

 

Look to the east just before sunrise for this spectacular event.

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Conjunction of Venus, Mars, and Jupiter on October 28.

 

 

A rare, 3-planet conjunction will be visible on the morning of October 28.

 

The planets Venus, Mars, and Jupiter will all form a triangle in the early morning sky.

 

Jupiter and Venus will be only one degree apart with Mars just a few degrees to the east.

 

Look to the east just before sunrise for this spectacular event.

 

 

Clouds from the big Patricia system finally cleared away, saw the trio this morning, a knockout. Plus full Moon setting.

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Taurids Meteor Shower on November 5-6.

 

 

The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour.

 

It is unusual in that it consists of two separate streams.

 

The first is produced by dust grains left behind by Asteroid 2004 TG10.

 

The second stream is produced by debris left behind by Comet 2P Encke.

 

The shower runs annually from September 7 to December 10.

 

It peaks this year on the the night of November 5.

 

The second quarter moon will block out all but the brightest meteors this year.

 

If you are patient, you may still be able to catch a few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Taurus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Conjunction of Venus, Mars, and Jupiter on October 28.

 

 

A rare, 3-planet conjunction will be visible on the morning of October 28.

 

The planets Venus, Mars, and Jupiter will all form a triangle in the early morning sky.

 

Jupiter and Venus will be only one degree apart with Mars just a few degrees to the east.

 

Look to the east just before sunrise for this spectacular event.

 

 

Clouds from the big Patricia system finally cleared away, saw the trio this morning, a knockout. Plus full Moon setting.

 

 

 

The next couple or three mornings (Th, Fri, Sat), look east before first light, for the waning crescent Moon making its way down through this three-planet combo. Should be pretty, just as it was 28 days before.

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New Moon on November 11.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 17:47 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Leonids Meteor Shower on November 17-18.

 

 

The Leonids is an average shower, producing up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen.

 

That last of these occurred in 2001.

 

The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1865.

 

The shower runs annually from November 6-30.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the 17th and morning of the 18th.

 

The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight leaving fairly dark skies for what could be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on November 25.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 22:44 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Beaver Moon because this was the time of year to set the beaver traps before the swamps and rivers froze.

 

It has also been known as the Frosty Moon and the Hunter's Moon.

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Conjunction of the Moon and Venus on December 7.

 

 

A conjunction of the Moon and Venus will take place on the morning of December 7.

 

The crescent moon will come with 2 degrees of bright planet Venus in the early morning sky.

 

Look to the east just before sunrise.

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Who the fuk gets up that early??? :P

 

I really appreciate all the info you put in here Christine, but could you please give me a couple a things to see....say, about 10pm to midnight from the hot tub.... :D

 

It could even be 2am-4am after a few stingers. :o

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Who the fuk gets up that early??? :P

 

I really appreciate all the info you put in here Christine, but could you please give me a couple a things to see....say, about 10pm to midnight from the hot tub.... :D

 

It could even be 2am-4am after a few stingers. :o

 

I'll try to accommodate, seeing as how I am omnipotent and all...

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Well, I was up early, meaning just before daylight, and waning crescent Moon and Venus were almost together. Pretty.

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Conjunction of the Moon and Venus on December 7.

 

 

A conjunction of the Moon and Venus will take place on the morning of December 7.

 

The crescent moon will come with 2 degrees of bright planet Venus in the early morning sky.

 

Look to the east just before sunrise.

I saw this and thought there had to be some sort of significance...

 

said to myself, self, the resident SA astronomer will know! Thanks for your celestial insight!

 

BTW, The first full moon on Christmas in 30 years...

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New Moon on December 11.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 10:29 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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"While sky shows tend to be overhyped, the Geminid meteor shower that will peak this Sunday and Monday is supposed to be one of the most promising of the year with roughly 50 shooting stars per hour, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported.

 

Here's when and how to watch the 2015 Geminid meteor shower and photos from last year's stellar phenomenon.

 

What's in a name? The upcoming meteor shower is named Geminid because it radiates from the Gemini twin stars Castor and Pollux, Forbes reported. The waxing crescent moon, a less-than-half-illuminated moon that's in its growing phase, should set early, leaving the sky dark for prime viewing opportunity, according to EarthSky.

 

"The December Geminids are a particularly reliable and prolific shower, one of the finest of the year," reads a statement on EarthSky's guide.

 

How to watch: The sky show should be in full effect between 10 p.m. on Sunday through 6 a.m. on Monday, the Post-Gazette reported, but optimal viewing will happen after midnight. According to EarthSky, peak viewing will occur at 2 a.m. local time regardless of location.

 

Contrary to popular belief, the meteor shower can't just be seen from its radiant point, but from anywhere throughout the sky, according to EarthSky, but the Geminid meteors will appear to trace back to the Gemini constellation.

 

EarthSky recommends waiting at least an hour to spot the meteor shower as it takes the eye at least 20 minutes to adapt to the dark enough to spot it."

 

http://news.yahoo.com/geminid-meteor-shower-2015-peak-164032321.html

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Geminids Meteor Shower on December 13-14.

 

 

The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers.

 

It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982.

 

The shower runs annually from December 7-17.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th.

 

The crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for what should be an excellent show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Yeah well, that's a good one for the hot tub except it's been bloody fucking raining (and some snow) for 2 solid weeks now. Haven't seen stars or the moon so long I forget what they look like....

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I think it was clear here, but I completely forgot to look up.

 

Our golden retriever, Hallie, was attacked by another neighborhood dog yesterday afternoon, and we had to take her to the emergency vet to have the wound in her abdomen stitched and stapled. She couldn't come upstairs where she usually sleeps since she was still gorked up from the anesthesia, so I slept on the sofa just steps away from the back door and the sky...but I spent most of the night looking down at her.

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Ursids Meteor Shower on December 21-22.

 

 

The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing about 5-10 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle, which was first discovered in 1790.

 

The shower runs annually from December 17-25. It peaks this year on the the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd.

 

This year the waxing gibbous moon will be bright enough to hide most of the fainter meteors.

 

If you are patient, you might still be able to catch some of the brighter ones.

 

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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December Solstice on December 21 or 22 (depending on your time zone).

 

 

The December solstice occurs at 04:48 UTC.

 

The South Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its southernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Capricorn at 23.44 degrees south latitude.

 

This is the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Happy winter solstice!

 

December Solstice on December 21 or 22 (depending on your time zone).

 

 

The December solstice occurs at 04:48 UTC.

 

The South Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its southernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Capricorn at 23.44 degrees south latitude.

 

This is the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Full Moon on December 25.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 11:11 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark.

 

This moon has also been known as the Moon Before Yule and the Full Long Nights Moon.

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Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation on December 29.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 19.7 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

 

Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

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Quadrantids Meteor Shower on January 3-4.

 

 

The Quadrantids is an above average shower, with up to 40 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is thought to be produced by dust grains left behind by an extinct comet known as 2003 EH1, which was discovered in 2003.

 

The shower runs annually from January 1-5.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the 3rd and morning of the 4th.

 

The second quarter moon will block out all but the brightest meteors this year, but it could still be a good show if you are patient.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Bootes, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Catch waning crescent Moon and Venus, near each other in the Eastern predawn sky, Thursday morning.

 

Good reward for getting up early.

 

 

 

Mercury and the Quarantids are a lost cause for me in the city, but the 'big stuff' is pretty..

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New Moon on January 9 or 10 (depending on your time zone).

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 01:30 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Full Moon on January 23 or 24 (depending on your time zone).

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 01:46 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Wolf Moon because this was the time of year when hungry wolf packs howled outside their camps.

 

This moon has also been know as the Old Moon and the Moon After Yule.

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Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation on February 7.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 25.6 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

 

Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

 

 

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New Moon on February 8.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 14:39 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Full Moon on February 22.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 18:20 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Snow Moon because the heaviest snows usually fell during this time of the year.

 

Since the harsh weather made hunting difficult, this moon has also been known by some tribes as the Full Hunger Moon.

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So relative to the full moon,

 

This morning I woke up to the full moon setting over lake Erie, it was beautiful.

But I got to thinking, it sure looked far to the north than I'm used to. I took out a handbearing compass and sure enough the setting moon bearing was 300 deg.

 

I've always thought I had a pretty good understanding of how our lunar and solar systems worked, but I was genuinely puzzled by how far north the moon set in February.

 

May be a dumb question, but can you astronomical geniuses (MSS) enlighten me on all things lunar orbit??

 

I'm at 41.23N 81.38W btw...

 

thx,

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So relative to the full moon,

 

This morning I woke up to the full moon setting over lake Erie, it was beautiful.

But I got to thinking, it sure looked far to the north than I'm used to. I took out a handbearing compass and sure enough the setting moon bearing was 300 deg.

 

I've always thought I had a pretty good understanding of how our lunar and solar systems worked, but I was genuinely puzzled by how far north the moon set in February.

 

May be a dumb question, but can you astronomical geniuses (MSS) enlighten me on all things lunar orbit??

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