mainsheetsister

Astronomy Anarchy

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Leap Day on February 29.

 

 

A Leap Day is added on February 29 to keep the modern Gregorian calendar aligned with Earth's revolution around the Sun.

 

One revolution of Earth around the Sun takes 365 days, 5 hours, 48 minutes, and 45 seconds.

 

The Gregorian calendar has only 365 days in a year, so it is necessary to add a Leap Day almost every four years, otherwise after only a century, our calendar would deviate from the seasons by around 24 days.

 

Three criteria are taken into account when a Leap Day, or intercalary day, is added to the Gregorian calendar:

First, the year is evenly divisible by 4;

Second, if the year is evenly divisible by 100, it is not a Leap Year, unless;

Third, the year is also evenly divisible by 400.

 

The year 2000 was somewhat special as it was the first instance when the third criterion was used to identify a Leap Year in most parts of the world since the transition from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar in 1582.

 

 

 

 

 

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Jupiter at Opposition on March 8.

 

 

The giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

 

When a planet is at opposition, it is directly overhead at midnight, and if a line were drawn between that planet and the Sun, Earth would be a point on the line.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons.

 

A medium-sized telescope should be able to show you some of the details in Jupiter's cloud bands.

 

A good pair of binoculars should allow you to see Jupiter's four largest moons, appearing as bright dots on either side of the planet.

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New Moon and Total Solar Eclipse on March 8 or 9 (depending on your time zone).

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 01:54 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

 

 

A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon completely blocks the Sun, revealing the Sun's beautiful outer atmosphere known as the corona.

 

A solar eclipse can only occur when the Moon is New, since this is the only time that the Moon is between Earth and the Sun.

 

The path of totality will only be visible in parts of central Indonesia and the Pacific Ocean.

 

A partial eclipse will be visible in most parts of northern Australia and southeast Asia.

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Not sure if you all have seen this, but its pretty cool, been in my favs for years, a new picture every day for years. Endless desktop backgrounds. Some great stuff and hours of non violent, make you think viewing....

Enjoy.

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html

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Jupiter at Opposition on March 8.

 

 

The giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

 

When a planet is at opposition, it is directly overhead at midnight, and if a line were drawn between that planet and the Sun, Earth would be a point on the line.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons.

 

A medium-sized telescope should be able to show you some of the details in Jupiter's cloud bands.

 

A good pair of binoculars should allow you to see Jupiter's four largest moons, appearing as bright dots on either side of the planet.

 

Thanks for this. I would have missed it. Spent about 4 hours on my driveway with my baby 6" Dob. Nice viewing.

 

I definitely need to upgrade my eyeball scope and add a digital imaging to my Dob or vice-versa. Putting the cell phone up to the eyepiece only get me so far.

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March Equinox on March 20.



The March equinox occurs at 04:30 UTC.


The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.


This is also the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Moon and Jupiter, right next to each other, all night.

 

Pretty.

 

Just went outside after a meeting and saw them. Beautiful!

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Full Moon and Penumbral Lunar Eclipse on March 23.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 12:02 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Worm Moon because this was the time of year when the ground would begin to soften and the earthworms would reappear.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Crow Moon, the Full Crust Moon, the Full Sap Moon, and the Lenten Moon.

 

 

A penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth's partial shadow, or penumbra.

 

During this type of eclipse the Moon will darken slightly but not completely.

 

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of extreme eastern Asia, eastern Australia, the Pacific Ocean, and the west coast of North America including Alaska.

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New Moon on April 7.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 11:24 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Why do we call it "first quarter" 7 days from now, not "first half"? And why is it "full" Moon when half of it is dark? And not "Empty Moon" instead of "New Moon"??

 

Inconsistent. Mostly it refers to what we see from Earth, except for first and third quarters..

 

Someone should look into this... ;-)

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Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation on April 18.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 19.9 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

 

Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

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What's been interesting in the early morning sky is Saturn and Mars, hanging around the constellation Scorpio in the southern sky. To me, it's pretty, yellow Saturn and pink Mars.

 

I Googled it and the astrologers are all into this as a big happening, these are two planets who don't "like" each other it seems, quote:

 

"...Another important planetary combination that becomes a major feature of 2016 is the conjunction of Mars and Saturn. Saturn has been in Scorpio since November 2014, and remains in that sign for all of 2016. Mars enters Scorpio in the third week of February. Mars and Saturn have diametrically opposing energies. Mars is Action and is Impatient for Results; Saturn is all Caution, Pessimism, and Delay. These two planets don’t like each other, yet they will be forced to stay in close proximity for an extended period of time during 2016. The result will be a lot of tension, stress and crisis, both in world events, and in our personal lives. Normally Mars only spends 6 weeks in a sign, but this time, Mars will remain in Scorpio for 7 months. The reason is that Mars will be go through a retrograde phase in 2016, from April 17th to June 30th."

 

You can really get caught up in this stuff:

 

http://www.ktastro.com/Events/Feb_20_2016_Saturn_Mars_Conjunct.html

 

I prefer not to. I just think of them as celestial objects, and in a way as old friends. Much less drama that way.

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Lyrids Meteor Shower on April 21-22.

 

 

The Lyrids is an average shower, usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher, which was discovered in 1861.

 

The shower runs annually from April 16-25.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd.

 

These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds.

 

Unfortunately this year the glare from the full moon will block out all but the brightest meteors.

 

If you are patient, you should still be able to catch a few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on April 22.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 05:24 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the first spring flowers.

 

This moon has also been known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Growing Moon, and the Egg Moon.

 

Many coastal tribes called it the Full Fish Moon because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

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Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower on May 5-6.

 

 

The Eta Aquarids is an above average shower, capable of producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

Most of the activity is seen in the Southern Hemisphere.

 

In the Northern Hemisphere, the rate can reach about 30 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet Halley, which has known and observed since ancient times.

 

The shower runs annually from April 19 to May 28.

 

It peaks this year on the night of May 5 and the morning of the May 6.

 

The new moon will ensure dark skies this year for what could be an excellent show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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mainsheetsister...

 

Very early Wednesday morning (1:00 am), southern Va. coast, besides Mother Natures incredible fireworks display over the ocean, I noticed a unique cross pattern of stars and/or planets. It was situated right in the middle of an opening in the clouds with an incredible display of stars.

 

Anything of astronomical significance going on? Never seen anything quite like it...

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mainsheetsister...

 

Very early Wednesday morning (1:00 am), southern Va. coast, besides Mother Natures incredible fireworks display over the ocean, I noticed a unique cross pattern of stars and/or planets. It was situated right in the middle of an opening in the clouds with an incredible display of stars.

 

Anything of astronomical significance going on? Never seen anything quite like it...

 

Where was this opening in the clouds? Southern sky? Could be Saturn and Mars in Scorpio.

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New Moon on May 6.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 19:29 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Rare Transit of Mercury Across the Sun on May 9.

 

 

The planet Mercury will move directly between the Earth and the Sun.

 

Viewers with telescopes and approved solar filters will be able to observe the dark disk of the planet Mercury moving across the face of the Sun.

 

This is an extremely rare event that occurs only once every few years.

 

There will be one other transit of Mercury in 2019 and then the next one will not take place until 2039.

 

This transit will be visible throughout North America, Mexico, Central America, South America, and parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa.

 

The best place to view this event in its entirety will be the eastern United States and eastern South America.

 

 

http://xjubier.free.fr/en/site_pages/transits/ToM_2016.html

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Full Moon on May 21.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 21:15 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

 

Since this is the third of four full moons in this season, it is known as a blue moon.

 

This rare calendar event only happens once every few years, giving rise to the term, “once in a blue moon.”

 

There are normally only three full moons in each season of the year.

 

But since full moons occur every 29.53 days, occasionally a season will contain 4 full moons.

 

The extra full moon of the season is known as a blue moon.

 

Blue moons occur on average once every 2.7 years.

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Mars at Opposition on May 22.

 

 

When a planet is at Opposition, it is directly opposite the Sun as seen from Earth.

 

The red planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

Mars will be directly overhead at midnight.

 

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Mars.

 

A medium-sized telescope will allow you to see some of the dark details on the planet's orange surface.

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geeze, haven't been able to see the friggin moon here in about a month... if the clouds ever go away, i'll drag my big scope out in the yard and take a peek upwards

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Saturn at Opposition on June 3.

 

 

When a planet is at Opposition, it is directly opposite the Sun as seen from Earth.

 

The ringed planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

It will be directly overhead at midnight.

 

Saturn will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons.

 

A medium-sized or larger telescope will allow you to see Saturn's rings and a few of its brightest moons.

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Tomorrow night on the east coast...but I like to post a day ahead for the friends in Australia and such

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Full Moon and June Solstice on June 20.




The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.



When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.



This phase occurs at 11:02 UTC.



This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Strawberry Moon because it signaled the time of year to gather ripening fruit.



It also coincides with the peak of the strawberry harvesting season.



This moon has also been known as the Full Rose Moon and the Full Honey Moon.




The June solstice occurs at 22:34 UTC.



The North Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its northernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Cancer at 23.44 degrees north latitude.



This is the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.


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New Moon on July 4.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 11:01 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Full Moon on July 19.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 22:57 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.

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Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower on July 28-29.

 

 

The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht.

 

The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23.

 

It peaks this year on the night of July 28 and morning of July 29.

 

The second quarter moon will block most of the fainter meteors this year but if you are patient you should still be able to catch quite a few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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New Moon on August 2.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 20:44 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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New Moon on August 2.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 20:44 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

And probably not the best time to go night swamp kayaking. ;)

 

I'll get out the binoculars. Thanks for the fun facts.

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Perseids Meteor Shower on August 11-12.

 

 

The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

This year's show should be exceptional, with up to 200 meteors per hour at times.

 

It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862.

 

The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors.

 

The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24.

 

It peaks this year on the night of August 11 and the morning of August 12.

 

The waxing gibbous moon will set shortly after midnight, leaving fairly dark skies for should be an excellent early morning show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Perseids Meteor Shower on August 11-12.

 

 

The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

This year's show should be exceptional, with up to 200 meteors per hour at times.

 

It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862.

 

The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors.

 

The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24.

 

It peaks this year on the night of August 11 and the morning of August 12.

 

The waxing gibbous moon will set shortly after midnight, leaving fairly dark skies for should be an excellent early morning show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

 

Heading out on the boat to anchor in a nice dark spot Thursday night, just to watch.

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Full Moon on August 18.

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 09:26 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Sturgeon Moon because the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes and other major lakes were more easily caught at this time of year.

 

This moon has also been known as the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

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Saturn, Mars, and Antares are in a vertical line in the southern sky.

 

Pretty, but since two of them are planets, and only Temporary members of Scorpius, it won't last. So have a look now.

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Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter on August 27.

 

 

A spectacular conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will be visible in the evening sky.

 

The two bright planets will be extremely close, appearing only 0.06 degrees apart.

 

Look for this impressive pairing in the western sky just after sunset.

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New Moon and Annular Solar Eclipse on September 1.




The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.



When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.



This phase occurs at 09:03 UTC.



This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.




A solar eclipse can only occur when the Moon is New.



An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon is too far away from the Earth to completely cover the Sun.



This results in a ring of light around the darkened Moon.



The Sun's corona is not visible during an annular eclipse.



The path of the eclipse will begin off the eastern coast of central Africa and travel through Gabon, Congo, Tanzania, and Madagascar before ending in the Indian Ocean.



A partial eclipse will be visible throughout most of Africa and the Indian Ocean.



NASA Map and Eclipse Information




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Neptune at Opposition on September 3.

 

 

The blue giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

When at Opposition, a planet is directly opposite the Sun as seen from Earth.

 

Neptune will appear brighter than any other time of the year.

 

It will be directly overhead at midnight and will be visible all night long.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Neptune.

 

Due to its extreme distance from Earth, it will only appear as a tiny blue dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

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Full Moon and Penumbral Lunar Eclipse on September 16.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 19:05 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Corn Moon because the corn is harvested around this time of year.

 

This moon is also known as the Harvest Moon.

 

The Harvest Moon is the full moon that occurs closest to the September equinox each year.

 

 

Penumbral Lunar Eclipse.

 

 

A Lunar Eclipse can only occur when the Moon is Full.

 

A penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth's partial shadow, or penumbra.

 

During this type of eclipse the Moon will darken slightly but not completely.

 

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of eastern Europe, eastern Africa, Asia, and western Australia.

 

 

http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/LEplot/LEplot2001/LE2016Sep16N.pdf

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Went out biking on the river levee this morning, just before first light, big full moon setting. Then brightening sky in the east pretty colors against a few clouds.

 

Nice.

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September Equinox on September 22.

 

 

The September equinox occurs at 14:21 UTC.

 

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

 

This is also the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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New Moon on October 1.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 00:11 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Draconids Meteor Shower on October 7.

 

 

The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900.

 

The Draconids is an unusual shower in that the best viewing is in the early evening instead of early morning like most other showers.

 

The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 7th.

 

The first quarter moon will block the fainter meteors in the early evening.

 

It will set shortly after midnight leaving darker skies for observing any lingering stragglers.

 

Best viewing will be in the early evening from a dark location far away from city lights.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on October 16.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

This phase occurs at 04:23 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Hunters Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt.

 

This moon has also been known as the Travel Moon and the Blood Moon.

 

The Moon will be at perigee, its closest approach to the Earth.

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Orionids Meteor Shower on October 21-22.

 

 

The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times.

 

The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7.

 

It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22.

 

The second quarter moon will block some of the fainter meteors this year, but the Orionids tend to be fairly bright so it could still be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Orionids Meteor Shower on October 21-22.

 

 

The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times.

 

The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7.

 

It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22.

 

The second quarter moon will block some of the fainter meteors this year, but the Orionids tend to be fairly bright so it could still be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Sawe to shooteng starres thisse morneng, to the weste. :)

 

Thackes Sis! :)

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New Moon on October 30.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 17:38 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Taurids Meteor Shower on November 4-5.

 

 

The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour.

 

It is unusual in that it consists of two separate streams.

 

The first is produced by dust grains left behind by Asteroid 2004 TG10.

 

The second stream is produced by debris left behind by Comet 2P Encke.

 

The shower runs annually from September 7 to December 10.

 

It peaks this year on the the night of November 4.

 

The first quarter moon will set just after midnight leaving dark skies for viewing.

 

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Taurus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on November 14.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 13:52 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Beaver Moon because this was the time of year to set the beaver traps before the swamps and rivers froze.

 

It has also been known as the Frosty Moon and the Hunter's Moon.

 

This Full Moon will occur within about 2 hours of perigee, the Moon's closest approach to Earth, and will appear up to 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than an average Full Moon.

 

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It was cloudy when I went to bed at 11..something woke me at 3am..the moon in my window?..prolly not as big as earlier..but it was very beautiful.

 

Thanks, I like your thread :)

 

Not scientific, but an interesting thing about australian aboriginal culture and the sun and moon.

Many traditions have stories of a female Sun and a male Moon.

The Yolngu say that Walu, the Sun-woman, lights a small fire each morning, which we see as the dawn.[6] She paints herself with red ochre, some of which spills onto the clouds, creating the sunrise. She then lights a torch and carries it across the sky from east to west, creating daylight. At the end of her journey, as she descends from the sky, some of her ochre paints again rubs off onto the clouds, creating the sunset. She then puts out her torch, and throughout the night travels underground back to her starting camp in the east.[4]

The Yolngu tell that Ngalindi, the Moon-man, was once young and slim (the waxing Moon), but grew fat and lazy (the full Moon). His wives chopped bits off him with their axes (the waning Moon); to escape them he climbed a tall tree towards the Sun, but died from the wounds (the new Moon). After remaining dead for three days, he rose again to repeat the cycle, and continues doing so till this day.[4] The Kuwema people in the Northern Territory say that he grows fat at each full Moon by devouring the spirits of those who disobey the tribal laws.[4][6][7]

The Yolngu also associated the Moon with the tides.[4]

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up early for jog with dog, heading west at first light. Big gorgeous yellow moon just over the trees of St. Charles Avenue

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Leonids Meteor Shower on November 16-17.

 

 

The Leonids is an average shower, producing up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen.

 

That last of these occurred in 2001.

 

The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1865.

 

The shower runs annually from November 6-30.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the 16th and morning of the 17th.

 

The waning gibbous moon will block many of the fainter meteors this year, but if you are patient you should be able to catch quite a few good ones.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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It was cloudy when I went to bed at 11..something woke me at 3am..the moon in my window?..prolly not as big as earlier..but it was very beautiful.

 

Thanks, I like your thread :)

 

Not scientific, but an interesting thing about australian aboriginal culture and the sun and moon.

Many traditions have stories of a female Sun and a male Moon.

The Yolngu say that Walu, the Sun-woman, lights a small fire each morning, which we see as the dawn.[6] She paints herself with red ochre, some of which spills onto the clouds, creating the sunrise. She then lights a torch and carries it across the sky from east to west, creating daylight. At the end of her journey, as she descends from the sky, some of her ochre paints again rubs off onto the clouds, creating the sunset. She then puts out her torch, and throughout the night travels underground back to her starting camp in the east.[4]

The Yolngu tell that Ngalindi, the Moon-man, was once young and slim (the waxing Moon), but grew fat and lazy (the full Moon). His wives chopped bits off him with their axes (the waning Moon); to escape them he climbed a tall tree towards the Sun, but died from the wounds (the new Moon). After remaining dead for three days, he rose again to repeat the cycle, and continues doing so till this day.[4] The Kuwema people in the Northern Territory say that he grows fat at each full Moon by devouring the spirits of those who disobey the tribal laws.[4][6][7]

The Yolngu also associated the Moon with the tides.[4]

cool...

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Good time of year for sky watching.

 

Evening, Venus is prominent in the west just after dark.

 

Morning, Jupiter prominent in the East just before first light. Nearby is Spica, look to your left for the Big Dipper, whose handle curve leads you to Arcturus, then Spica ("follow the arc to Arcturus, then speed on over to Spica")

 

And Orion is visible most of the night. If you learn Betelgeuse and Rigel at Orion's corners, plus the "outer" stars around Orion (Sirius, Aldebaran, Procyon, Capella, Castor, Pollux), and the "follow the arc" stars, you are well on your way to knowing half of the 25 brightest stars in the sky. And since you only see half the sky at one time anyway, folks will think you're a star-genius.

 

Add the tortilla on the clothespin over San Diego, and you're friggin' Einstein....

 

 

;-)

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New Moon on November 29.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 12:18 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Mercury at Greatest Eastern Elongation on December 11.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest eastern elongation of 20.8 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

 

Look for the planet low in the western sky just after sunset.

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Geminids Meteor Shower on December 13-14.

 

 

The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers.

 

It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982.

 

The shower runs annually from December 7-17.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th.

 

The nearly full moon will block out many of the fainter meteors this year, but the Geminids are so bright and numerous that it could still be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on December 14.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

This phase occurs at 00:06 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark.

 

This moon has also been known as the Full Long Nights Moon and the Moon Before Yule.

 

The Moon will be at perigee, its closest approach to the Earth, and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.

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It never rains on a full moon around me. I am plagued by the search light characteristics of a full moon..... On the other hand..... It almost always is either cloudy, or raining, or snowing when a meteor shower, or Aurora borealis is happening.

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December Solstice on December 21.

 

 

The December solstice occurs at 10:44 UTC.

 

The South Pole of the Earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its southernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Capricorn at 23.44 degrees south latitude.

 

This is the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Ursids Meteor Shower on December 21-22.

 

 

The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing about 5-10 meteors per hour.

 

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle, which was first discovered in 1790.

 

The shower runs annually from December 17-25.

 

It peaks this year on the the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd.

 

The second quarter moon will block many of the fainter meteors.

 

But if you are patient, you might still be able to catch a few of the brighter ones.

 

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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New Moon on December 29.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 06:53 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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New Moon on December 29.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 06:53 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Made niew moone coockies laste nite, chocolatte cacke coockies withe choc chipps........ :)

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Quadrantids Meteor Shower on January 3-4.

 

 

The Quadrantids is an above average shower, with up to 40 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is thought to be produced by dust grains left behind by an extinct comet known as 2003 EH1, which was discovered in 2003.

 

The shower runs annually from January 1-5.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the 3rd and morning of the 4th.

 

The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight leaving fairly dark skies for what could be a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Bootes, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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I don't want to get ahead of your excellent series of celestial sights, but now is the time to prepare for the Total Solar eclipse happening August 21st, 2017. Already in Oregon and Idaho (and probably many other states) all available hotel rooms have been booked in the cities near the path. Make your plans now!

 

Excellent site: http://www.eclipse2017.org/2017/path_through_the_US.htm

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I don't want to get ahead of your excellent series of celestial sights, but now is the time to prepare for the Total Solar eclipse happening August 21st, 2017. Already in Oregon and Idaho (and probably many other states) all available hotel rooms have been booked in the cities near the path. Make your plans now!

 

Excellent site: http://www.eclipse2017.org/2017/path_through_the_US.htm

 

While that's nifty and all, one should be aware that a solar eclipse occurs for a maximum of 7 minutes and 40 seconds. Other than that, have fun in the PNW!

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I don't want to get ahead of your excellent series of celestial sights, but now is the time to prepare for the Total Solar eclipse happening August 21st, 2017. Already in Oregon and Idaho (and probably many other states) all available hotel rooms have been booked in the cities near the path. Make your plans now!

 

Excellent site: http://www.eclipse2017.org/2017/path_through_the_US.htm

 

While that's nifty and all, one should be aware that a solar eclipse occurs for a maximum of 7 minutes and 40 seconds. Other than that, have fun in the PNW!

 

you keepe us grounded in realltey, thack you. :)

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I don't want to get ahead of your excellent series of celestial sights, but now is the time to prepare for the Total Solar eclipse happening August 21st, 2017. Already in Oregon and Idaho (and probably many other states) all available hotel rooms have been booked in the cities near the path. Make your plans now!

 

Excellent site: http://www.eclipse2017.org/2017/path_through_the_US.htm

 

While that's nifty and all, one should be aware that a solar eclipse occurs for a maximum of 7 minutes and 40 seconds. Other than that, have fun in the PNW!

 

you keepe us grounded in realltey, thack you. :)

 

 

Right back at you.

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Full Moon and Venus at Greatest Eastern Elongation on January 12.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 11:34 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Wolf Moon because this was the time of year when hungry wolf packs howled outside their camps.

 

This moon has also been know as the Old Moon and the Moon After Yule.

 

 

The planet Venus reaches greatest eastern elongation of 47.1 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Venus since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the evening sky.

 

Look for the bright planet in the western sky after sunset.

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Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation on January 19.

 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 24.1 degrees from the Sun.

 

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

 

Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

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As long as you're already out before sunrise, look south for the "Jupiter and Spica" show, with temporary guest star Moon, passing by for a couple of nights.

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