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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
mainsheetsister

Astronomy Anarchy

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New Moon on March 28.

 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

 

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

 

This phase occurs at 02:58 UTC.

 

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-06/stargazing-live-four-planets-discovered-in-new-solar-system/8423142

 

One for Mainsheetsister

 

Stargazing Live viewers find four-planet solar system via crowd-sourcing project

Australian volunteer citizen scientists have found four previously unknown planets orbiting a nearby star thanks to a crowd-sourcing project aired on the ABC's Stargazing Live.

The four "Super Earth" planets are about double the size of Earth and are orbiting a star in the Aquarius constellation 600 light years away, said Dr Chris Lintott, the principal investigator of Zooniverse.

On Tuesday night, Stargazing Live viewers were called on to hunt exoplanets by trawling through observations of about 100,000 stars via a project on the Zooniverse website, which shows recently downloaded data from the Kepler Space Telescope.

What they found excited astronomers.

In 48 hours dozens of candidates were discovered, and four planets were confirmed to be orbiting a star in our interstellar neighbourhood, Dr Lintott said.

The star's planets were "crammed together" and indicated there may be more planets further from the star, he said.

"They're all much closer to the star than even Mercury is to the Sun," he said.

"The closest of them whips around in just three-and-a-half days, so a year is only three-and-a-half days long."

More than 7,000 volunteers classified over 1.5 million points of interest as part of the Exoplanet Explorers project, led by Dr Ian Crossfield from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Dr Lintott said he was excited to see the impact of just two days of crowd-sourcing data.

"From experience we're talking the equivalent of a single astronomer working for a couple of years straight, no coffee breaks, no nipping to the loo [to complete this data]," he said.

Stargazing Live host Professor Brian Cox said he could not be more excited about the discovery.

"In the seven years I've been making Stargazing Live this is the most significant scientific discovery we've ever made. The results are astonishing," he said.

The four discovered planets are most likely rocky and far too hot to support human life, Dr Lintott said.

But he said the discovery was important scientifically because it was one of only one or two other systems he knew of where planets were packed together and it might tell astronomers more about how planets form.

Citizen scientists to be listed as co-authors on paper

Scientists are trying to contact all of the discoverers of the new solar system, with the volunteers who classified the system's data to be listed as co-authors on a scientific paper about the discovery.

"We're just trying to get in touch with them now," Dr Lintott said.

"Lots of Australians will be waking up to a message in their inbox saying they've discovered an exciting planet."

NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has led to the discovery of thousands of exoplanets by measuring the brightness of faraway stars.

When a planet passes in front of the star, the star briefly dims or "blinks".

"So what we're actually looking for is a repeated pattern of blinks," Dr Lintott said.

"It's that pattern of blinks that tells us that something is in orbit around it."

The Exoplanet Explorers project is the first time citizen scientists have been able to collaborate and classify "fresh" data from Kepler, as opposed to other projects that use archival data, Dr Lintott said.

"[The data] came down from Kepler via NASA's deep space network in Canberra just a few weeks ago, and so this is almost real-time intervention," Dr Lintott said.

"If we can get that going that's exciting. It means we can get discoveries faster but it also means we can follow up on discoveries faster.

"So I'm very encouraged that, at least with the help of the ABC, it's possible to get through large amounts of data very quickly."

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Jupiter at Opposition on April 7.

 

 

The giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

 

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

 

When at Opposition, a planet is opposite the Sun as seen from Earth, and is directly overhead at midnight.

 

This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons.

 

A medium-sized telescope should be able to show you some of the details in Jupiter's cloud bands.

 

A good pair of binoculars should allow you to see Jupiter's four largest moons, appearing as bright dots on either side of the planet.

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That ^^ is frickin awesome!

Not sure if you can watch this even with VPN..but it's very good..there's three episodes and a bunch of extras

http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/stargazing-live/DO1616H001S00

http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/stargazing-live/DO1616H002S00

http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/stargazing-live/DO1616H003S00

 

:)

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Note, at about 16m in the first episode they interview some indigenous star experts..who talk about their culture and names for consellations. Something I was trying to find for you a while ago. :)

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That ^^ is frickin awesome!

Not sure if you can watch this even with VPN..but it's very good..there's three episodes and a bunch of extras

http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/stargazing-live/DO1616H001S00

http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/stargazing-live/DO1616H002S00

http://iview.abc.net.au/programs/stargazing-live/DO1616H003S00

 

:)

 

 

Can't watch via these links, since I'm not in Australia, but I found it on YouTube. Will watch when I get the chance! Thanks!

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Full Moon on April 11.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 06:08 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the first spring flowers.

 

This moon has also been known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Growing Moon, and the Egg Moon.

 

Many coastal tribes called it the Full Fish Moon because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

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Full Moon on April 11.

 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

 

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

 

This phase occurs at 06:08 UTC.

 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the first spring flowers.

 

This moon has also been known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Growing Moon, and the Egg Moon.

 

Many coastal tribes called it the Full Fish Moon because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

 

It's amazing how many try but only one makes it. The Tuna 20 is a great Shad spawn.

 

http://sailboatdata.com/view_designer.asp?designer_id=144

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Lyrids Meteor Shower on April 21-22.

 

 

The Lyrids is an average shower, usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

 

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher, which was discovered in 1861.

 

The shower runs annually from April 16-25.

 

It peaks this year on the night of the night of the 21st and and morning of the 22nd.

 

These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds.

 

The crescent moon should not be too much of a problem this year.

 

Skies should still be dark enough for a good show.

 

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

 

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Well, it's a bit early to bring this up, but if you are planning travel in late August, on the 21st a total solar eclipse will cross the US, entering at South Carolina, and exiting at Oregon.

 

Much more here:

http://eclipse2017.org/blog/2016/11/27/how-fast-is-the-shadow-moving-across-the-us-during-the-eclipse/

 

When I was a kid, we had one in Marblehead Mass (1959 I believe) but cloudy. It got very dark, then light again, not long after sunrise, while we were all out by the harbor.

 

It moves fast, between 1500-2000mph, and totality lasts no more than about two minutes--less if you're not in the middle of the "road"

 

I know this 'cause I'm an English major, and looked at the app.

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Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower on May 6-7.

 

The Eta Aquarids is an above average shower, capable of producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

Most of the activity is seen in the Southern Hemisphere.

In the Northern Hemisphere, the rate can reach about 30 meteors per hour.

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet Halley, which has known and observed since ancient times.

The shower runs annually from April 19 to May 28.

It peaks this year on the night of May 6 and the morning of the May 7.

The waxing gibbous moon will block out many of the fainter meteors this year.

But if you are patient, you should be able to catch quite a few of the brighter ones.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on May 10.

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

This phase occurs at 21:42 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance.

This moon has also been known as the Full Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

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The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 25.8 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon i

Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation on May 17. 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 25.8 degrees from the Sun.

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

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New Moon on May 25.

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This phase occurs at 19:45 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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1 hour ago, mainsheetsister said:

New Moon on May 25.

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This phase occurs at 19:45 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Its also the start of Ramadan, Inshallah.

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2 hours ago, sailingk8 said:

Why can't it be large planets around a small star?

Did you read it? Since there isn't any pattern to it and it seems random, it can't be planets.

 

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41 minutes ago, DaveK said:

Did you read it? Since there isn't any pattern to it and it seems random, it can't be planets.

 

I did read it and read the report when they first claimed alien structures previously. I still don't get why it couldn't be multiple planets with odd ellipticals. 

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Venus at Greatest Western Elongation on June 3. 

 

The planet Venus reaches greatest eastern elongation of 45.9 degrees from the Sun.

This is the best time to view Venus since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

Look for the bright planet in the eastern sky before sunrise.

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Full Moon on June 9. 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 13:10 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Strawberry Moon because it signaled the time of year to gather the ripening fruit.

This moon has also been known as the Full Rose Moon and the Full Honey Moon.

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Tonight, on a borrowed 34' plastic classic, with friends, an evening sail out on the lake to see sunset 2000 and Full Honey/Strawberry/Rose moonrise, 2010.

Nice weather, way better than Friday night TV, and a much bigger screen..

 

Sis, we shall drink a toast at moonrise to you and Mainsheetgirl.

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Saturn at Opposition on June 15. 

 

The ringed planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons.

A medium-sized or larger telescope will allow you to see Saturn's rings and a few of its brightest moons.

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June Solstice on June 21. 

The June solstice occurs at 04:24 UTC.

The North Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its northernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Cancer at 23.44 degrees north latitude.

This is the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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New Moon on June 24. 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This phase occurs at 02:31 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Full Moon on July 8 or 9 (depending on your time zone). 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 04:07 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year.

This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.

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New Moon on July 23. 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This phase occurs at 09:46 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Yo Sister,  August 21 eclipse. Where you going to be ?

Me and the wife will be up in Oregon north of Bend for no other reason than just to be there.

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On 7/26/2017 at 9:56 PM, Dorado said:

Yo Sister,  August 21 eclipse. Where you going to be ?

Me and the wife will be up in Oregon north of Bend for no other reason than just to be there.

No special plans.  

My mother had open heart surgery last week to fix an aortic aneurysm, and I'm helping my dad take care of her as long as they need help, so I haven't thought that far ahead.

The sun and moon are doing their thing, and I'm busy doing mine.

Have fun in Oregon.  Sounds like lots of folks will be there. 

Bend is pretty great.  I spent a night there on my trip to Ancient Mariner's 50th wedding anniversary party two summers ago.  

I miss him.

Enjoy your time in the Moon's shadow, Dorado.

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Wife and I are headed north of Boise, same named town as where we live in California so hooked up with some locals for a spot of dirt to park our trailer. Should be epic. Rumor has it the main highways will be chock a block coming and going. Using smallish back roads and leaving plenty of time for prospecting along the way. 

Funny story, two weekends ago we visited sister's wife, they were evacuated for the Detwiler Fire near Yosemite, anyway we talked our way into the evac zone and stayed at the house. All dark as power was out, hot night and the ISS was due to fly over so we watched and waited. Beautiful flyover, with comments of "I've never seen that before" being a good reward. Afterwards I was commenting on seeing "plasma flashes" or the reflection off of the solar panels on satellites when I said, "ok, I want to see a big meteorite with a sparkly tail in green". Not 30 minutes later we get this spectacular meteorite travel right across our field of view, yep, sparkly tail, nope, not green. Special night. 

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  • Full Moon and Partial Lunar Eclipse on August 7. 

  •  

  • The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

  • When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

  • This phase occurs at 18:11 UTC.

  • This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Sturgeon Moon because the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes and other major lakes were more easily caught at this time of year.

  • This moon has also been known as the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

  •  

  • A partial lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth's partial shadow, or penumbra, and only a portion of it passes through the darkest shadow, or umbra.

  • During this type of eclipse a part of the Moon will darken as it moves through the Earth's shadow.

  • The eclipse will be visible throughout most of eastern Africa, central Asia, the Indian Ocean, and Australia. 

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Perseids Meteor Shower on August 11-12. 

 

The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862.

The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors.

The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24.

It peaks this year on the night of August 11 and the morning of August 12.

The waning gibbous moon will block out many of the fainter meteors this year, but the Perseids are so bright and numerous that it should still be a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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we had a decent show last night, not many meteors, but the ones we had were incredibly bright, even through the light cloud cover over Sydney.

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  • New Moon and Total Solar Eclipse on August 21. 

  •  

  • The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

  • When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

  • This phase occurs at 18:30 UTC.

  • This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

  •  

  • A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon completely blocks the Sun, revealing the Sun's beautiful outer atmosphere known as the corona.

  • The total eclipse will be visible in parts of Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina before ending in the Atlantic Ocean.

  • A partial eclipse will be visible in most of North America and parts of northern South America.

  •  

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Neptune at Opposition on September 5. 

 

The blue giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

Neptune will be directly overhead at midnight.

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

This is the best time to view and photograph Neptune.

Due to its extreme distance from Earth, it will only appear as a tiny blue dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

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Full Moon on September 6. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 07:03 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Corn Moon because the corn is harvested around this time of year.

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New Moon on September 20. 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This phase occurs at 05:30 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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September Equinox on September 22. 

 

The September equinox occurs at 20:02 UTC.

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

This is also the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Full Moon on October 5. 

 

Moon will be directly opposite the Earth from the Sun and will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 18:40 UTC. 

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Hunters Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt.

This moon has also been known as the Travel Moon and the Blood Moon.

This moon is also known as the Harvest Moon.

The Harvest Moon is the full moon that occurs closest to the September equinox each year.

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Thisse mornieng wase beatifulle.  Startted walkling withe britte fulle moone backelitteng wispey cloudes, then wached  dramactic sunrise with yellowes, orangeise,a nd picks.  Verrey loveley way starte the daye.             :)

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FUCKIN RAC-COON MOON

Hunter'z Moon ........... Eye Can Sea Dat

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Draconids Meteor Shower on October 8. 

 

The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour.

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900.

The Draconids is an unusual shower in that the best viewing is in the early evening instead of early morning like most other showers.

The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 8th.

Unfortunately, the nearly full moon will block all but the brightest meteors this year.

If you are extremely patient, you may be able to catch a few good ones.

Best viewing will be in the early evening from a dark location far away from city lights.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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New Moon on October 19. 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This phase occurs at 19:12 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Uranus at Opposition on October 19. 

 

The blue-green planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

Uranus will be directly overhead at midnight.

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

This is the best time to view Uranus.

Due to its distance, it will only appear as a tiny blue-green dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

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