mainsheetsister

Astronomy Anarchy

Recommended Posts

Just before first light, in the south-- Saturn, Mars, Jupiter...    pretty!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Full Moon, Blue Moon on March 31. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 12:37 UTC.

Since this is the second full moon in the same month, it is sometimes referred to as a blue moon.

This year is particularly unique in that January and March both contain two full moons while February has no full moon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and if you want to follow the Chinese Space station to its demise

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New Moon on April 16. 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This phase occurs at 01:58 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lyrids Meteor Shower on April 22-23. 

 

The Lyrids is an average shower, usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher, which was discovered in 1861.

The shower runs annually from April 16-25.

It peaks this year on the night of the night of the 22nd and morning of the 23rd.

These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds.

The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight, leaving dark skies for the what could be a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting, rare clear night here in the PNW, might take a gander, Bortle scale is not great in LFP however.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lyra is easy to find, it's got Vega, right?  So look almost straight up (or better still lie down and look straight "ahead") and see the "Summer Triangle", in which Vega is the brightest star, and one of the closest to us. 

Don't know if I'll see any of this in the city. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mind-blowing 1 second "video" clip from the Rosetta probe while landing on the comet:

 

I put video in quotes because the GIF was assembled from a number of stills. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One definition is "video of snow blowing on a passing comet as stars and galaxies rotate into view".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Full Moon on April 30. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 00:58 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Pink Moon because it marked the appearance of the moss pink, or wild ground phlox, which is one of the first spring flowers.

This moon has also been known as the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Growing Moon, and the Egg Moon.

Many coastal tribes called it the Full Fish Moon because this was the time that the shad swam upstream to spawn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Full Moon on May 29. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 14:19 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance.

This moon has also been known as the Full Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, mainsheetsister said:

Full Moon on May 29. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 14:19 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance.

This moon has also been known as the Full Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

Thack you againe.                                   :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New Moon on June 13. 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This phase occurs at 19:44 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2018 at 5:02 PM, Raked Aft\\ said:

Some bad ass astro photography.

 

 

Nice video, but let's see more of that wife of his. lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

June Solstice on June 21. 

 

The June solstice occurs at 10:07 UTC.

The North Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its northernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Cancer at 23.44 degrees north latitude.

This is the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saturn at Opposition on June 27. 

 

The ringed planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

When at Opposition, a planet is opposite the Sun as seen from Earth, and will be directly overhead at midnight.

This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons.

A medium-sized or larger telescope will allow you to see Saturn's rings and a few of its brightest moons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Full Moon on June 28. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 04:53 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Strawberry Moon because it signaled the time of year to gather ripening fruit.

It also coincides with the peak of the strawberry harvesting season.

This moon has also been known as the Full Rose Moon and the Full Honey Moon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hope the clouds get out of here tonight.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Full Moon and Total Lunar Eclipse on July 27. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

This phase occurs at 20:22 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year.

This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.

 

A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely through the Earth's dark shadow, or umbra.

During this type of eclipse, the Moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color.

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of Europe, Africa, western and central Asia, the Indian Ocean, and Western Australia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mars at Opposition on July 27. 

 

The red planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

This is the best time to view and photograph Mars. A medium-sized telescope will allow you to see some of the dark details on the planet's orange surface.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower on July 28-29. 

 

The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht.

The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23.

It peaks this year on the night of July 28 and morning of July 29.

The nearly full moon will be a problem this year, blocking out all but the brightest meteors, but if you are patient, you should still be able to catch a few good ones.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dont forget to look up! Perseids

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

dont forget to look up! Perseids

Hopefully will be anchored out near shore in the darkest part of the lake, as per usual.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wanted to take a look for the Green Hulk comet last night, too much smoke in the air.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New Moon and Partial Solar Eclipse on August 11. 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

This phase occurs at 09:58 UTC.

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

 

A partial solar eclipse occurs when the Moon covers only a part of the Sun, sometimes resembling a bite taken out of a cookie.

A partial solar eclipse can only be safely observed with a special solar filter or by looking at the Sun's reflection.

The partial eclipse will be visible in parts of northeast Canada, Greenland, extreme northern Europe, and northern and eastern Asia.

It will be best seen in northern Russia with 68% coverage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perseids Meteor Shower on August 12-13. 

 

The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862.

The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors.

The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24.

It peaks this year on the night of August 12 and the morning of August 13.

The thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for what should be an excellent show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I had a charter out on the Lake from 6-9pm, family with 3 young kids.  Very little to zero wind, so the sailing itself was underwhelming.   BUT with a hazy but clear sky (rare here in August), and after a pretty orange sunset, the darkness brought out a great chain of celestial dots, all in a long row.  The kids, God bless 'em, were digging it. 

From left to right, looking south:

Big Moon----bright orange Mars----dim Saturn---Bright Jupiter---medium Spica----and really bright Venus.

And astern of us,  Big Dipper ("follow the arc to Arcturus") and Polaris, so the kids could compare it with the compass (I was letting the 4 year-old steer mostly, since the wind maxed out at about 3 knots). 

Then straight up, the Summer Triangle, Vega, Altair, Deneb.

Nice.  All enjoyed it.  Thanks, Sky.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation on August 26. 

 

The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 18.3 degrees from the Sun.

This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky.

Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Full Moon on August 26. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

This phase occurs at 11:57 UTC.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Sturgeon Moon because the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes and other major lakes were more easily caught at this time of year.

This moon has also been known as the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mysterious observatory evacuation stirs alien conspiracy theories

The FBI showed up and evacuated the remote Sunspot solar observatory in southern New Mexico. Almost a week later, no one knows why.

https://www.cnet.com/news/mysterious-observatory-evacuation-stirs-alien-conspiracy-theories/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little late on this one, because I was away on a camping trip...

 

 

September Equinox on September 23. 

 

The September equinox occurs at 01:54 UTC.

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

This is also the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Full Moon on September 25. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

This phase occurs at 02:53 UTC.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Corn Moon because the corn is harvested around this time of year.

This moon is also known as the Harvest Moon.

The Harvest Moon is the full moon that occurs closest to the September equinox each year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Draconids Meteor Shower on October 8. 

 

The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour.

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900.

The Draconids is an unusual shower in that the best viewing is in the early evening instead of early morning like most other showers.

The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 8th.

This will be an excellent year to observe the Draconids because there will be no moonlight to spoil the show.

Best viewing will be in the early evening from a dark location far away from city lights.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New Moon on October 9. 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This phase occurs at 03:47 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Uranus at Opposition on October 23. 

 

The blue-green planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

This is the best time to view Uranus.

Due to its distance, it will only appear as a tiny blue-green dot in all but the most powerful telescopes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Full Moon on October 24. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 16:46 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Hunters Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt.

This moon has also been known as the Travel Moon and the Blood Moon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, nolatom said:

Very pretty this morning over the trees in the city,  just before Moonset

Yes it waes, verrey britte thisse morneng.                    :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taurids Meteor Shower on November 5-6. 

 

The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is unusual in that it consists of two separate streams.

The first is produced by dust grains left behind by Asteroid 2004 TG10.

The second stream is produced by debris left behind by Comet 2P Encke.

The shower runs annually from September 7 to December 10.

It peaks this year on the the night of November 5.

The thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for viewing.

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Taurus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leonids Meteor Shower on November 17-18. 

 

The Leonids is an average shower, producing up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak.

This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen.

That last of these occurred in 2001.

The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1865.

The shower runs annually from November 6-30.

It peaks this year on the night of the 17th and morning of the 18th.

The waxing gibbous moon will set shortly after midnight leaving fairly dark skies for what could be a good early morning show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Full Moon on November 23. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 05:40 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Beaver Moon because this was the time of year to set the beaver traps before the swamps and rivers froze.

It has also been known as the Frosty Moon and the Hunter's Moon.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just now in the east before sunrise:

Waning crescent Moon, bright Venus, and little Spica, all in a line..

Knockout.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New Moon on December 7. 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

When the Moon is New, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This phase occurs at 07:20 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Geminids Meteor Shower on December 13-14. 

 

The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers.

It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982.

The shower runs annually from December 7-17.

It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th.

The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight leaving dark skies for what should be an excellent early morning show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

December Solstice on December 21. 

 

The December solstice occurs at 22:23 UTC.

The South Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its southernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Capricorn at 23.44 degrees south latitude.

This is the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ursids Meteor Shower on December 21-22. 

 

The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing about 5-10 meteors per hour.

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle, which was first discovered in 1790.

The shower runs annually from December 17-25.

It peaks this year on the the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd.

This year the glare from the full moon will hide all but the brightest meteors.

If you are extremely patient, you might still be able to catch a few good ones.

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Full Moon on December 22. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

This phase occurs at 17:49 UTC.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark.

This moon has also been known as the Full Long Nights Moon and the Moon Before Yule.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Quadrantids Meteor Shower on January 3-4. 

 

The Quadrantids is an above average shower, with up to 40 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is thought to be produced by dust grains left behind by an extinct comet known as 2003 EH1, which was discovered in 2003.

The shower runs annually from January 1-5.

It peaks this year on the night of the 3rd and morning of the 4th.

The moon will be a thin crescent and should not interfere with what could be a good show this year.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Bootes, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Full Moon and Total Lunar Eclipse on January 20. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 05:16 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Wolf Moon because this was the time of year when hungry wolf packs howled outside their camps.

This moon has also been know as the Old Moon and the Moon After Yule.

The Moon will be at its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.

 

A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely through the Earth's dark shadow, or umbra.

During this type of eclipse, the Moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color.

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America, South America, the eastern Pacific Ocean, western Atlantic Ocean, extreme western Europe, and extreme western Africa.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter on January 22. 

 

A conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will be visible on January 22.

The two bright planets will be visible within 2.4 degrees of each other in the early morning sky.

Look for this impressive sight in the east just before sunrise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moon looks pretty awesome,   :)

from up here in Vancouver........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Through the shadows, the moon still shines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What was amazing to me was how clearly the changing light made it so clear that the moon is a ball.  The typical lunar disc or even the photographs we see diminish the volumetric sense.  Tonight was the first time that the moon clearly, visibly had mass and weight to me.  This ball, floating above us, made the nature of the universe that much more real:  Truly massive objects hovering in the void.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, mainsheetsister said:

Full Moon and Total Lunar Eclipse on January 20. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the Moon is Full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 05:16 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Wolf Moon because this was the time of year when hungry wolf packs howled outside their camps.

This moon has also been know as the Old Moon and the Moon After Yule.

The Moon will be at its closest approach to the Earth and may look slightly larger and brighter than usual.

 

A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes completely through the Earth's dark shadow, or umbra.

During this type of eclipse, the Moon will gradually get darker and then take on a rusty or blood red color.

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America, South America, the eastern Pacific Ocean, western Atlantic Ocean, extreme western Europe, and extreme western Africa.
 

in DAGO it started out Nice and Big and Bright between patches of Clouds and a thin haze

as it got to be ShowTime the open holes were few and the faint light from the eclipse could not over take the light reflected in the slight overcast

FAIL from where live :-( 

and at a Decent hour on a nice night otherwise  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, mainsheetsister said:

Conjunction of Venus and Jupiter on January 22. 

 

A conjunction of Venus and Jupiter will be visible on January 22.

The two bright planets will be visible within 2.4 degrees of each other in the early morning sky.

Look for this impressive sight in the east just before sunrise.

Sawe it, thack you.

Had immattiurre balde eagle lande in my backyarde aftere hellaciouse rain.  He wase soaked an hade to dry oute.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Image may contain: text

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, DA-WOODY said:

Image may contain: text

You gonna telle me to notte looke up gullibelle to?                                                   :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Snaggletooth said:

You gonna telle me to notte looke up gullibelle to?                                                   :)

sudda looked up

Last Night ;):)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2018 at 7:02 PM, Raked Aft\\ said:

Some bad ass astro photography.

 

 

serious rig there..  we have a professional astrophotographer in our club,  you should see his rig,    see if i can dig up a pic..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

 

Had immattiurre balde eagle lande in my backyarde aftere hellaciouse rain.  He wase soaked an hade to dry oute.

 

dang what part of the continent are you on?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

dang what part of the continent are you on?

Same ole cornere ive allwayes beene..........                   :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A police officer in Florida ran over two people lying on a dark road to watch the lunar eclipse, leading them requring hospital treatment.

 

Does this belong here or the Darwin thread or WTF Florida?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for Darwin, there are many factors to consider. i'd recommend the FL thread

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

hi def res of moon

that's cool

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ancientseawolf said:

A police officer in Florida ran over two people lying on a dark road to watch the lunar eclipse, leading them requring hospital treatment.

 

Does this belong here or the Darwin thread or WTF Florida?

take it to FA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had two telescopes,   now I have three 

driving to work noticed a dobsonian base sitting on the curb with other trash...   thought that would be good for my scope project ( turn 4 1/2" equatorial into a dobsonian)

stopped to load it,  beneath some other stuff , was the tube,  I think it's an 8"...   mirror is really dirty but that can be fixed..   got focuser and a spotting scope mount as well..

going back to look for any eyepieces in case whoever tossed it  was stupid..  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

I've had two telescopes,   now I have three 

driving to work noticed a dobsonian base sitting on the curb with other trash...   thought that would be good for my scope project ( turn 4 1/2" equatorial into a dobsonian)

stopped to load it,  beneath some other stuff , was the tube,  I think it's an 8"...   mirror is really dirty but that can be fixed..   got focuser and a spotting scope mount as well..

going back to look for any eyepieces in case whoever tossed it  was stupid..  

 

Polk around ya might find a meteorite 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites