mainsheetsister

Astronomy Anarchy

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On 4/19/2019 at 10:18 AM, mainsheetsister said:

Full Moon on April 19. 

Good Friday , Easter is on a Lunar Calendar. 

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New Moon on May 4. 

 

The Moon will located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky.

When the moon is new, it rises at dawn, is directly overhead at midday, and sets at dusk.

This phase occurs at 22:46 UTC.

This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.

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Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower on May 6-7. 

 

The Eta Aquarids is an above average shower, capable of producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

Most of the activity is seen in the Southern Hemisphere.

In the Northern Hemisphere, the rate can reach about 30 meteors per hour.

It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet Halley, which has known and observed since ancient times.

The shower runs annually from April 19 to May 28.

It peaks this year on the night of May 6 and the morning of the May 7.

The thin crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for what should be a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon, Blue Moon on May 18.

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

This phase occurs at 21:11 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Flower Moon because this was the time of year when spring flowers appeared in abundance.

This moon has also been known as the Full Corn Planting Moon and the Milk Moon.

Since this is the third of four full moons in this season, it is known as a blue moon.

This rare calendar event only happens once every few years, giving rise to the term, “once in a blue moon.”

There are normally only three full moons in each season of the year.

But since full moons occur every 29.53 days, occasionally a season will contain 4 full moons.

The extra full moon of the season is known as a blue moon.

Blue moons occur on average once every 2.7 years.

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 Jupiter at Opposition on June 10. 

 

When at Opposition, a celestial body is opposite the sun as seen from Earth, and will be directly overhead at midnight.

The giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons.

A medium-sized telescope should be able to show you some of the details in Jupiter's cloud bands.

A good pair of binoculars should allow you to see Jupiter's four largest moons, appearing as bright dots on either side of the planet.

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Full Moon on June 17. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the moon is full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 08:31 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Strawberry Moon because it signaled the time of year to gather ripening fruit.

It also coincides with the peak of the strawberry harvesting season.

This moon has also been known as the Full Rose Moon and the Full Honey Moon.

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1 hour ago, mainsheetsister said:

Full Moon on June 17. 

It also coincides with the peak of the strawberry harvesting season.

wentte strawberrey pickeng yesterday, iy wase greate.                                                    :)

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June Solstice on June 21. 

 

The June solstice occurs at 15:54 UTC.

The North Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its northernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Cancer at 23.44 degrees north latitude.

This is the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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here..... clouds, clouds and more clouds.  at least it's raining.

I love this thread, I keep hoping for a clear night that I'm not otherwise engaged.

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For those interested,  CNN will air the 92-minute Apollo 11 documentary on Sunday, June 23rd at 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. EDT, with encores on June 29 and July 20, the latter the 50th anniversary of the first lunar landing.

https://www.space.com/apollo-documentary-television-and-space-station.html

I have watched this documentary several times, and it's outstanding! It includes a lot of never-seen-before footage, including 70mm film taken at that time.

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Saturn at Opposition on July 9. 

 

The ringed planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun.

It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long.

This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons.

A medium-sized or larger telescope will allow you to see Saturn's rings and a few of its brightest moons.

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Full Moon and .Partial Lunar Eclipse on July 16. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the moon is full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 21:38 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year.

This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.

 

 A partial lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth's partial shadow, or penumbra, and only a portion of it passes through the darkest shadow, or umbra.

During this type of eclipse a part of the Moon will darken as it moves through the Earth's shadow.

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of Europe, Africa, central Asia, and the Indian Ocean. 

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Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower on July 28-29. 

 

The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht.

The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23.

It peaks this year on the night of July 28 and morning of July 29.

The waning crescent moon will not be too much of a problem this year.

The skies should be dark enough for what could be a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Perseids Meteor Shower on August 12-13. 

 

The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862.

The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors.

The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24.

It peaks this year on the night of August 12 and the morning of August 13.

The nearly full moon will block out most of the fainter meteors this year, but the Perseids are so bright and numerous that it could still be a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on August 15. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the moon is full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 12:30 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Sturgeon Moon because the large sturgeon fish of the Great Lakes and other major lakes were more easily caught at this time of year.

This moon has also been known as the Green Corn Moon and the Grain Moon.

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 Full Moon on September 13-14 (depending on your time zone). 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the moon is full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 04:34 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Corn Moon because the corn is harvested around this time of year.

This moon is also known as the Harvest Moon.

The Harvest Moon is the full moon that occurs closest to the September equinox each year.

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On 9/14/2019 at 1:25 PM, mainsheetsister said:

The Harvest Moon is the full moon that occurs closest to the September equinox each year.

 

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September Equinox on September 23. 

 

The September equinox occurs at 07:50 UTC.

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

This is also the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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11 minutes ago, mainsheetsister said:

September Equinox on September 23. 

 

The September equinox occurs at 07:50 UTC.

The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world.

This is also the first day of fall (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

I wase awaike at that time, I diddent hearer anythinge.                                                       :)

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5 hours ago, mainsheetsister said:

It's Jupiter

Wow ! I had the binnos out to look at the moon, was thinking Venus is usually brighter. 

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Venus is brighter, but she is a daytime girl this time of year.  Sets about 7:30 pm where I am.   Jupiter doesn't set til about 10:30 

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Draconids Meteor Shower on October 8. 

 

The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour.

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900.

The Draconids is an unusual shower in that the best viewing is in the early evening instead of early morning like most other showers.

The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 8th.

The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight leaving fairly dark skies for observing.

Best viewing will be in the early evening from a dark location far away from city lights.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Stellina Smart Telescope

Stellina.jpg.987749f2cbbec40cdd3d207f5bb1dc73.jpg


I came across this article and wanted to post it here in case someone might be interested.

From Space.com
https://www.space.com/stellina-smart-telescope-review.html

A swanky new telescope offers a whole new way to observe the cosmos. With automated controls and a smartphone app instead of an eyepiece, the Stellina smart telescope takes all the hassle out of skywatching — but it comes at a hefty price.

Stellina is a fully automated astrophotography telescope about the size of a backpack. You can quickly and easily set it up anywhere, even in places with copious amounts of light pollution, like New York City. I took Stellina out for a spin, first on my rooftop in Brooklyn, New York, and then in a darker area outside of the city. I was impressed with Stellina's ability to capture decent photos of deep-space objects despite the light pollution in Brooklyn. And thanks to the telescope's portable size and simple setup, the Stellina was easy to pick up and bring along for an adventure in the wilderness outside the city.

Using Stellina requires virtually no knowledge of astronomy or how to use a telescope. All you need is a smartphone and a little patience, and you can capture stunning images of galaxies, nebulas and star clusters. When you turn this telescope on, it automatically aligns itself by looking around the sky and identifying objects in the star field. Once the initialization is complete, you simply select an object from the catalog in the Stellina app on your phone; then, kick back and relax while Stellina does all the rest of the work for you. Astrophotography doesn't get any simpler than this.0

However, Stellina does have some limitations that may not be ideal for professional astrophotographers, and at a price of $3,999, it's a pretty big investment for the casual stargazer.

Andromeda galaxy taken from Brooklyn NY

1318901928_AndromedagalaxytakenfromBrooklynNY.jpeg.6487a83128f88952415e3d151953675f.jpeg

 

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Full Moon on October 13. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the moon is full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 21:09 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Hunters Moon because at this time of year the leaves are falling and the game is fat and ready to hunt.

This moon has also been known as the Travel Moon and the Blood Moon.

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Orionids Meteor Shower on October 21-22. 

 

The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times.

The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7.

It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22.

The second quarter moon will block some of the fainter meteors this year, but the Orionids tend to be fairly bright so it could still be a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Thackes Sis!  Made youre chilli on Satturday, greatley pared downe forre 4 - 6 people.  Stille execellantte!                                   :)

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5 hours ago, mainsheetsister said:

Orionids Meteor Shower on October 21-22. 

 

The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times.

The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7.

It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22.

The second quarter moon will block some of the fainter meteors this year, but the Orionids tend to be fairly bright so it could still be a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

Thanks for all the info, does the advice of best viewing after midnight apply just to N America, because of timing issues or is it the same all around the world, purely because of reduced light pollution?  

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15 hours ago, Tunnel Rat said:

Thanks for all the info, does the advice of best viewing after midnight apply just to N America, because of timing issues or is it the same all around the world, purely because of reduced light pollution?  

It applies to the northern hemisphere, I believe.  According to my information, most meteor showers are best viewed between midnight and dawn.  

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Oooo-Ooooo,  Crescent Moon and Jupiter,  evening Halloween sky, right now!

spooky?   Or just plain pretty?  Or both?

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Taurids Meteor Shower on November 5-6. 

 

The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour.

It is unusual in that it consists of two separate streams.

The first is produced by dust grains left behind by Asteroid 2004 TG10.

The second stream is produced by debris left behind by Comet 2P Encke.

The shower runs annually from September 7 to December 10.

It peaks this year on the the night of November 5.

The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight leaving dark skies for viewing.

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Taurus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Full Moon on November 12. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the moon is full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 13:36 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Beaver Moon because this was the time of year to set the beaver traps before the swamps and rivers froze.

It has also been known as the Frosty Moon and the Hunter's Moon.

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Leonids Meteor Shower on November 17-18.

 

 The Leonids is an average shower, producing up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak.

This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen.

That last of these occurred in 2001.

The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1865.

The shower runs annually from November 6-30.

It peaks this year on the night of the 17th and morning of the 18th.

The second quarter moon will block many of the fainter meteors this year, but if you are patient you should be able to catch quite a few of the brightest ones.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Driving west for home just after dusk, Venus bright and low in the West, then Jupiter above a little towards south, and then for keener eyes, Saturn higher up in the same line, along the ecliptic.

Pretty!!   But watch the road.  This means me....

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Wow, really close now, Venus and Jupiter, just after dark.

like Castor and Pollux, but much brighter.  

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Full Moon on December 12. 

 

When the moon is full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

This phase occurs at 05:14 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Cold Moon because this is the time of year when the cold winter air settles in and the nights become long and dark.

This moon has also been known as the Full Long Nights Moon and the Moon Before Yule.

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Geminids Meteor Shower on December 13-14. 

 

The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers.

It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak.

It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982.

The shower runs annually from December 7-17.

It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th.

Unfortunately the nearly full moon will block out many of the meteors this year, but the Geminids are so bright and numerous that it could still be a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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Ursids Meteor Shower on December 21-22. 

 

The Ursids is a minor meteor shower producing about 5-10 meteors per hour.

It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tuttle, which was first discovered in 1790.

The shower runs annually from December 17 - 25.

It peaks this year on the the night of the 21st and morning of the 22nd.

The waning crescent moon should not interfere too much this year.

Skies should still be dark enough for what could be a good show.

Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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December Solstice on December 22. 

 

The December solstice occurs at 04:19 UTC.

The South Pole of the earth will be tilted toward the Sun, which will have reached its southernmost position in the sky and will be directly over the Tropic of Capricorn at 23.44 degrees south latitude.

This is the first day of winter (winter solstice) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer (summer solstice) in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Quadrantids Meteor Shower on January 3-4. 

 

The Quadrantids is an above average shower, with up to 40 meteors per hour at its peak.

It is thought to be produced by dust grains left behind by an extinct comet known as 2003 EH1, which was discovered in 2003.

The shower runs annually from January 1-5.

It peaks this year on the night of the 3rd and morning of the 4th.

The first quarter moon will set shortly after midnight, leaving fairly dark skies for what could be a good show.

Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight.

Meteors will radiate from the constellation Bootes, but can appear anywhere in the sky.

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I hope it waits until I get out west into the mountains with my telescope LOL

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2 hours ago, Charlie Foxtrot said:

Betelgeuse go Boom, bigly? 

Do they halve garbbiage gyeres in spaice to?                                                  :)

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8 hours ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

I hope it waits until I get out west into the mountains with my telescope LOL

Soon!

...In terms of tens of thousands of years.  Astronomers think in longer spans of years than we do....

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yeah, I know, they said that about Mt St Helens too ;) geologists work on a different time scale as well...  ya just never know

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On 1/3/2020 at 9:53 AM, Bump-n-Grind said:

yeah, I know, they said that about Mt St Helens too ;) geologists work on a different time scale as well...  ya just never know

Yup, when taking out the trash, I kept watch on Orion's right shoulder.  ya just never know  ;)

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Hi MSS, if you are interested in tracking our newest and nearest "constellations"...,

here is an interesting link I just came across. Hopefully our skies will be clear enough, cause a 60 satellite chain sounds like a sight.

 

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The insurnance is gonig go throuht the roofe!                                          :)

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4 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

The insurnance is gonig go throuht the roofe!                                          :)

Snaggs, cut back on the Adderall.

Speaking for a friend.

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1 minute ago, Blue Crab said:
4 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

The insurnance is gonig go throuht the roofe!                                          :)

Snaggs, cut back on the Adderall.

Speaking for a friend.

I halve beene supportieve of you, what the probelme my frende?                                     :)

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39 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

I halve beene supportieve of you, what the probelme my frende?                                   :)

Sorry Cap. I was trying to parlay your snaggalese with Trump's various speech Impediments, presumably Adderall-based, on today's speech. 

Stoned and drunk tonight. Facing Dr. Atkins manana. 

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1 minute ago, Blue Crab said:

Stoned and drunk tonight. Facing Dr. Atkins manana. 

OK by me..... partey on dude, an be excellentte to ortheres         :)

Goode lucke with the Doc.             :)

 

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2 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

I halve beene supportieve of you, what the probelme my frende?                                     :)

U2  should go get a room

 

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55 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Ha Ha Ha Fucke you to!               :)

you trying to spread yer crabs

no wonder BJ doesn't like you :o:lol::lol::lol::lol:

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Moon wase verrey brite thisse morning, sawe a shooteng star to!                               :)

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Full Moon and Penumbral Lunar Eclipse on January 10. 

 

The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be will be fully illuminated.

When the moon is full, it rises at dusk, is directly overhead at midnight, and sets at dawn.

This phase occurs at 19:23 UTC.

This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Wolf Moon because this was the time of year when hungry wolf packs howled outside their camps.

This moon has also been know as the Old Moon and the Moon After Yule.

 

A penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth's partial shadow, or penumbra.

During this type of eclipse the Moon will darken slightly but not completely.

The eclipse will be visible throughout most of Europe, Africa, Asia, the Indian Ocean, and Western Australia.

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