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dylan winter

What is the best cake for us sailors?

83 posts in this topic

My old mum used to make a really heavy fruit cake

 

it was packed with calories and a goodly dash of alcohol and could be almost immortal

 

although its longenvity on board was low due to excessive consumption

 

I am now reduced to buying Genoa cake

 

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/1764636/

 

and gthere any Yankee or Aussie recommendations

 

recipes or sources gratefully accepted

 

yum yum

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Dylan:

I think my Australian Grandma used to make the same kind of fruit cake, dark and dense and very rich in flavor, almost plum pudding like. Right? I think my Grandma used to put rum in hers.

Fruit cakes in the US are light colored and not dense and not very good. They are almost a joke over here.

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Semi:

That place is in Georgia!

 

Sausage rolls, yummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm I haven't had a sausage roll in years. I'll bet I could get some in Vancouver, eh.

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Pemiccan: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemmican

 

http://www.grouprecipes.com/68395/pemican.html

 

Googling this, I find there is also a slang meaning. I don't mean that.

 

Of course, maybe you really meant "cake", and not immortal emergency provisions.

 

 

cake is what I meant

 

not dried meat

 

lads lads - let's have some focus

 

this is the classic heavy fruit cake

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/celebration_cake_61952

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I dunno.... that plum pudding is pretty good in my book. Along with some nice rich hard sauce as well!

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What does she mean by more brandy for "feeding the cake"? Maybe that's a typo. Maybe she meant feeding the chef.

I printed that recipe out. I'm going to try it.

I assume "black treacle" is the same as black molasses.

"Free range eggs"? Oh yeah, that wil make a big difference. A chook is a chook.

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What does she mean by more brandy for "feeding the cake"? Maybe that's a typo. Maybe she meant feeding the chef.

I printed that recipe out. I'm going to try it.

I assume "black treacle" is the same as black molasses.

"Free range eggs"? Oh yeah, that wil make a big difference. A chook is a chook.

 

 

keep putting in that brandy

 

and molasses will cut it

 

missing my mum now

 

welling up

 

D

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Dylan -

 

A properly concocted rum cake is a moist bunch of heavenly goodness. Firm enough to handle, yet easily dissolved without much chewing - it's a perfect comfort dessert. (if Creme Brulee' or Tiramisu aren't on the menu, of course).

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Semi:

That place is in Georgia!

 

Sausage rolls, yummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm I haven't had a sausage roll in years. I'll bet I could get some in Vancouver, eh.

Next time you are on the right coast, let me know. Swmbo could be bribed into some sausage tools and maybe a plum pud if you ask nicely.

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Back when I was doing canoe trips with the boy scouts, they had a thing called 'Hudson Bay Bread'. It was really dense, and somewhat indestructible, but not as sweet as a cake. More like what passes for 'granola bars' these days, a piece the size of a deck of cards was pretty much a whole meal.

 

Here's one recipe I found while searching (can't vouch if it's the same as I remember)

http://www.boyscouttrail.com/content/recipe/hudson_bay_bread-1380.asp

 

But I'm sure you could consider this a starting point, and add spices (read:alcohol) to taste.

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Hardtack...and if you can't eat it you can always use it as a weapon.

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Easy answer- Smith Island Cake. A favorite on the Chesapeake.

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I'd have to go with a devilishly dense and rich flourless chocolate torte. It is decadent enough to satisfy your sweet tooth, dense enough to hold up well under rough conditions, you can add almond slivers for extra protein, the dark chocolate has antioxidants, ad I'm sure you could concoct a bourbon glaze to go with it to fulfill your alcohol food group....and it's just damn delicious!

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Mrs Leka has a great heavy fruit cake recipe.

Its been developed from a traditional Xmas pudding, but is more cake like (if that makes sense)

 

She always made one for the Hobart races, and it was a real treat to open it and smell the Bundaberg rum on a late night watch.

 

I will see if she has it written out and will post it here.

 

Bob, I beleive 'feeding the cake' means adding more alcohol after the cake has been made.

Mrs Leka adds some every few days to let it soak in more.

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Let me look for it, but I have a recipe I recieved from a friend's mom for her Jamaican Christmas cake. There is fruit, rum, and deliciousness in it.

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What's a cake without a bacon weave on it???

 

- the cake making starts around 3 minutes in, prior to that they are just collecting ingredients.

 

(don't know how to embed a youtube video...)

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My mom used to make a very dense oat cake with coarse cut oats, brown sugar and butter, baked for about 25 minutes I believe. It was not super sweet but very tasty and great for breakfast or an evening snack with tea before taking night watch. I have not had any in a very long time...

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What's a cake without a bacon weave on it???

 

- the cake making starts around 3 minutes in, prior to that they are just collecting ingredients.

 

(don't know how to embed a youtube video...)

 

 

Just paste the URL right into the body.

 

 

We have a genuine Yorkshire-style Christmas fruit cake, whole, in our pantry. I don't think we have finished 2011's yet so 2012 can steep in the rum.

It is a wonder of fruity taste, topped with almond icing, and wrapped in a cheesecloth soaked in rum.

The perfect dessert for any party featuring roast boar and truffles.

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My (German) Mom made (knock on wood - still makes!) this outrageous semi-blond holiday nut bread using that most traditional of German nuts - pecans - and that most traditional of German spirits - Maker's Mark or Wild Turkey - bourbon, with raisins, currants, etc. that were presoaked in *the* German brandy, Asbach-Uralt. None of that candied citron crap. This was, to this date, the only baked good that ever made me blow a strong positive on lab-grade BAC testing equipment.

 

And then there's this traditional German topping known as Rumtopf; take a brown jug and dump in whatever soft fruit come in season - strawberries, blackberries, blueberries (hey, they're in NH), etc. Cover with 151. Add peaches, plums, and that NH classic, pineapple, when in season. Cover with 151. Let soak for at least 1 year. Liberally douse ice cream, pound cake, corn flakes, muesli, whatever, for a true breakfast, lunch, or dessert treat.

 

And we were happy. Christmas is only 8 months away!

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Rum Cake...

this. bundt cake with vanilla pudding and mount gay rum with a mount gay rum and sugar glaze. good any time of year.

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Many, many years ago when I was working and contracting on the side our materials supplier would send out a Xmas fruit cake. The first time I got one I thought it was some sort of joke. Tried it anyway and damn those were good. Starting looking forward to them every year. I was the only one eating it and it would last a month or so. It would be great on a boat.

 

I think it was this company:

http://www.collinstreet.com/pages/online_bakery/all_deluxe_fruitcakes

 

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Let me look for it, but I have a recipe I recieved from a friend's mom for her Jamaican Christmas cake. There is fruit, rum, and deliciousness in it.

 

ohpleaseohpleaseohpleaseohplease.

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We always bake a cake on our summer vacation cruise. Done on a single burner alcohol stove. 2 pots with nuts as spacers. This one had chopped plums, raisins, and rum. Good way to spend an afternoon at anchor. Reading, checking the progress of the cake, sipping rum.

post-41483-0-23500100-1367326068_thumb.jpg

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Semi:

That place is in Georgia!

 

Sausage rolls, yummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm I haven't had a sausage roll in years. I'll bet I could get some in Vancouver, eh.

 

It's only about 10 miles from here, what do you want? I could make a cake run!

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I expect you to deliver said torte as compensation for my survey, electrical and engineering services recently provided. ^_^

 

 

I'd have to go with a devilishly dense and rich flourless chocolate torte. It is decadent enough to satisfy your sweet tooth, dense enough to hold up well under rough conditions, you can add almond slivers for extra protein, the dark chocolate has antioxidants, ad I'm sure you could concoct a bourbon glaze to go with it to fulfill your alcohol food group....and it's just damn delicious!

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My (German) Mom made (knock on wood - still makes!) this outrageous semi-blond holiday nut bread using that most traditional of German nuts - pecans - and that most traditional of German spirits - Maker's Mark or Wild Turkey - bourbon, with raisins, currants, etc. that were presoaked in *the* German brandy, Asbach-Uralt. None of that candied citron crap. This was, to this date, the only baked good that ever made me blow a strong positive on lab-grade BAC testing equipment.

 

And then there's this traditional German topping known as Rumtopf; take a brown jug and dump in whatever soft fruit come in season - strawberries, blackberries, blueberries (hey, they're in NH), etc. Cover with 151. Add peaches, plums, and that NH classic, pineapple, when in season. Cover with 151. Let soak for at least 1 year. Liberally douse ice cream, pound cake, corn flakes, muesli, whatever, for a true breakfast, lunch, or dessert treat.

 

And we were happy. Christmas is only 8 months away!

 

My grandmother who was full blooded German made the same bread known as Weihnachten stollen, and definitely a favorite.

 

My grandfather who was Swede, preferred a heavy brandied fruit cake. After the cake is cooked with the brandied fruit and nuts, brandy is poured over the cake, and the cake is wrapped in wax paper and put in the cellar to defuse the brandy into the cake. The cakes are turned every day for a couple weeks to let the brandy defuse thoroughly throughout the cake. These cakes are about as heavy as a light brick. One slice leads to another and so forth. My wife used to make these regularly before Christmas as well, to hand out to family and friends.

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My English Gran made a similar heavy fruitcake for Chrissy every year and would send it to us in Oz...too expensive to send airmail, so it would come surface mail which meant she had to ship it around October I reckon...I remember it would come wrapped up inside waxed paper inside a tin which was then wrapped in a layer of heavy brown paper tied with string...amazingly the whole package would always be in great shape, I guess they just don't ship like they used to.

The cake was heavy on the fortified spirits, and would have a layer of marzipan under the icing...we'd only eat small slices it was so rich, usually lasted 'til we went back to school in February...fuckin' pollen is bad here right now...

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I expect you to deliver said torte as compensation for my survey, electrical and engineering services recently provided. ^_^

 

 

I'd have to go with a devilishly dense and rich flourless chocolate torte. It is decadent enough to satisfy your sweet tooth, dense enough to hold up well under rough conditions, you can add almond slivers for extra protein, the dark chocolate has antioxidants, ad I'm sure you could concoct a bourbon glaze to go with it to fulfill your alcohol food group....and it's just damn delicious!

But I thought I was banned from bringing you any more chocolaty confections....I have a fresh batch of Kale chips I was going to bring down ^_^

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Whiskey Cake - though I use bourbon

 

 

1 cup sugar

1 cup brown sugar, pac ked

1 cup butter, softened

3 eggs

3 c ups sifted cake flour [i use all purpose flour]

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon mace

1 c up 100 proof bourbon whiskey [i use 86 proof if 100 isn't available]

2 c ups pecans, chopped [i use 8 ounces by weight]

 

Preheat oven to 250. Combine the sugars and cream with butter. Add well-beaten eggs. Sift flour,

baking powder and mace; add alternately with whiskey. Add nuts. Bake in well greased or

paper-lined tube pan for 2 1/2 - 3 hours. Thec ake should have a moist, crumbly texture similar to a mac

aroon. Wrap in foil and store in a cool place. (Do not freeze.) The cake

cuts easier [sic ] when cold, but should be served at room temperature. It will keep for 2

weeks or longer. Slices about 1/2 inch thick are best.

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well done lads

 

lots of fruit

 

lots of alacohol

 

well matured and preferably made by some-one's mum

 

sob!

 

Dylan

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Great thread Dylan, this has potential.

 

Fresh back from the Cyclades, how about Baklava???

 

Yummy, sweet, dense, keeps well.

 

Only down-side is the lack of booze in the creating, but I bet we could sort that.

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This was our (Jamaican) wedding cake. I rebake it every year for our anniversary.

 

Note that this recipe makes two fair-sized cakes, which is enough to keep the entire eastern seaboard of the US alive for a month.

 

 

 

1 pound raisins; minced
1 pound prunes, pitted; minced
1 pound currants, dried; minced
1 pound cherries, glace; minced
6 ounces lemon peel, glace; minced
6 ounces orange peel, glace; minced
3/4 liter Passover wine
3/4 liter rum, dark
2 pounds sugar, dark brown
4 1/4 cups cake flour
4 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, grated
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 cups butter, sweet; softened
10 large eggs
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cup almond paste; if desired

 

PREPARATION:In a large bowl, mix all the fruits thoroughly with the wine and the rum; let the fruit macerate, covered, at room temperature for at least two weeks, three or four is recommended.

In a heavy skillet combine one pound of the brown sugar and 1 cup water. Bring to a boil over moderate heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved, and gently boil the syrup, swirling the skillet occasionally, for a few minutes, or until it is reduced to 1-3/4 cups.

Let the syrup cool; reserve.

Sift the flour, baking powder, cinnamon and nutmeg together into a bowl. In the large bowl of an electric mixer cream together the remaining brown sugar and the butter until it is fluffy; then beat in the eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition.

Beat in the vanilla, the flour mixture, and 1-1/3 cups of the burnt sugar syrup, reserving the remaining syrup for another use.

In another large bowl, combine well the flour mixture and the fruit mixture and divide the batter between two buttered and floured 10" springform pans. Bake the cakes in the middle of a preheated 350F. oven for two hours, or until a tooth pick inserted in the centers comes out with some crumbs adhering to it. (The centers of these cakes will be quite moist.)

Let the cakes cool in the pans on a rack, remove the sides and bottoms of the pans, and wrap the cakes in foil or wax paper. Let the cakes stand at room temperature for a week. They will condense.

Roll out half the almond paste between sheets of plastic wrap to form a 10" round and remove the top sheet of plastic wrap. Fit the almond paste layer over one cake, trimming the edge if necessary, and remove the other sheet of plastic wrap. Roll out and fit the remaining almond paste onto the remaining cake in the same manner.

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Slim:

I printed out your recipe. I'm going to try that. I think I'll use brandy. Do you think that will work?

This thread has given me some new kitchen challenges. I'm not a desert kind of guy but if it has whiskey in it I'm game.

I think this cake making is sort of a high energy undertaking and I'm all about high energy.

 

post-2980-0-94123700-1367351719_thumb.jpg

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I don't see why not, Bob. I got that recipe from my dad. I make it for Christmas every year.

 

Today in the mail I got two books from him, from his collection - Willam Atkin - Of Yachts and Men and The Compleat Cruiser - Herreshoff.

 

The Atkin volume is inscribed from my mom to my dad, dated 1958. They would have been 23, and they are both still around - I'm lucky.

 

Slim

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Oh Bob... look at that recipe again - it takes a month and a half to bake that cake. Works out to a nice low rate of energy expendature.

 

The whole thing is starting to sound like that joke that circulates every December:

Best Rum Cake Ever:

 

1 or 2 quarts rum
baking powder
1 C butter
1 tsp soda
1 tsp sugar
lemon juice
2 large eggs
brown sugar
1 C dried fruit
nuts

Before you start, sample the rum to check for quality. Good, isn't it? Now go ahead. Select a large mixing bowl, measuring cup, etc. Check the rum again. It must be just right. To be sure rum is of the highest quality, pour one level cup of rum into a glass and drink it as fast as you can. Repeat. With an electric mixer, beat 1 cup butter in a large fluffy bowl. Add 1 seaspoon of thugar and beat again. Meanwhile, make sure that the rum is of the finest quality--try another cup. Open second quart, if necessary. Add 2 large leggs, 2 cups fried druit and beat till high. If druit gets stuck in beaters, just pry it loose with a drewscriver. Sample the rum again, checking for conscisticity. Next sift 3 cups of pepper or salt (it really doesn't matter which). Sample the rum again. Sift 1/2 pint lemon juice. Fold in chopped butter and strained nuts. Add one babblespoon of brown thugar, or whatever color you can find. Wix mell. Grease oven and turn cake pan to 350 gredees. Now pour whole mess into the coven and ake. Check the rum again, and bo to ged.

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I say just got the store and buy a cake. Easy and quick....

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...

 

My grandmother who was full blooded German made the same bread known as Weihnachten stollen, and definitely a favorite.

 

My grandfather who was Swede, preferred a heavy brandied fruit cake. After the cake is cooked with the brandied fruit and nuts, brandy is poured over the cake, and the cake is wrapped in wax paper and put in the cellar to defuse the brandy into the cake. The cakes are turned every day for a couple weeks to let the brandy defuse thoroughly throughout the cake. These cakes are about as heavy as a light brick. One slice leads to another and so forth. My wife used to make these regularly before Christmas as well, to hand out to family and friends.

 

Exactly - that's the way it was made until we discovered the nut, dried fruit and bourbon version - both got wrapped in cheesecloth and soaked every couple of days in the liquor of choice to infuse the cake, for a few months before Weihnachten (well, we actually started Quality Control duty around the first Advent). I think the big improvement was the elimination of the candied citron crap, and for some reason the good bourbon went well with the pecans.

 

Now when the subject cake got a little too close to the candles on the tree... ;^)

 

Just visited the folks last week in Anna Maria FL; there's a whole gang of neighbors in their 80's that gather on the beach for their sundowners every evening. Gotta respect the tradition!

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Great thread Dylan, this has potential.

 

Fresh back from the Cyclades, how about Baklava???

 

Yummy, sweet, dense, keeps well.

 

Only down-side is the lack of booze in the creating, but I bet we could sort that.

 

Somehow drowning a pastry in Ouzo sounds wrong...

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Mrs Leka has a great heavy fruit cake recipe.

Its been developed from a traditional Xmas pudding, but is more cake like (if that makes sense)

 

She always made one for the Hobart races, and it was a real treat to open it and smell the Bundaberg rum on a late night watch.

 

I will see if she has it written out and will post it here.

 

Bob, I beleive 'feeding the cake' means adding more alcohol after the cake has been made.

Mrs Leka adds some every few days to let it soak in more.

 

Boiled Fruit Cake

250g margarine or butter
I cup caster sugar
1 cup plain flour, sifted
1 cup self raising flour, sifted
1 cup water
1 tspn bi-carb soda
1 tspn mixed spice
1 tspn vanilla essence
1/2 cup brandy (or any alcohol)
3 eggs, lightly beaten
1 cup chopped dates
500g mixed fruit ( you can also add glace cherries if desired)
In a large saucepan slowly cook together marg/butter, sugar, mixed fruit, dates, mixed spice, vanilla essence and water.
When marg/butter and sugar has melted bring to boil, remove from stove and gradually add flour mixing well, then add eggs, bi-carb and brandy, mix well.
Grease and line cake tin with 2 layers of brown paper, including sides (like the old school lunch bags!!), and grease again.
You can also use parchment paper.
Bake in pre-heated moderate oven (about 160C) for approx 11/2 - 2 hours. Allow to cool in tin then turn out and wrap in a cloth and store in an air tight container.
If baking for Christmas its best done about 1 month before and about once a week add a little more brandy with a pastry brush.
Or you can cut it straight away.......... :-)
This cake also makes a nice Christmas pudding, serve warm with brandy custard.
Oishi - dess (very delicious)

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Google Logan Bread. It will stave off starvation.

 

Nice, a make-at-home Cliff Bar.

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Cheesecake ...

 

Cheesecake4.jpg

 

I gotta say I didn't imagine a thread on Sailing Anarchy about cake would have legs....

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In my navy days, I would spend hours at General Quarters (battle stations) in the main gun director of a destroyer. We had some delicious battle rations which included a high protein, high energy sweet cake that was manufactured and wrapped in olive drab waxed paper in 1946 (this was 1970). A chunk the size of a Reese's Peanut Butter Cup would keep you going for three hours, although your jaw muscles and saliva glands would be quite fatigued.

 

So, flavorful, energy-filled and a long shelf life.

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I made some logan bread from a recipe with 1/3 regular flour, 1/3 ww, 1/3 oatmeal, mixed raisin/cran/??? from Trader Joes,no egg, and pecan bits instead of almonds. It turned out great, not at all like a heavy slab of Cliff bar I was expecting . Quite acceptable for normal breakfast, no one would think 'survival rations' unless you told them. I guess we will see if I eat it all before it spoils. Or I could wrap a couple of chunks and store to see how long before they go moldy.

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Semi:

That place is in Georgia!

 

Sausage rolls, yummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm I haven't had a sausage roll in years. I'll bet I could get some in Vancouver, eh.

Aussie pie shop just opened on 17th St., Costa Mesa. I'll try a sausage roll tomorrow and report back.

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Semi:

That place is in Georgia!

 

Sausage rolls, yummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm I haven't had a sausage roll in years. I'll bet I could get some in Vancouver, eh.

You can't get sausage rolls in the States? They are available everywhere here - you just have to find the good ones - lots of cheap, small ones out there. Fake veggy ones are around too.

 

Next you'll be saying that you can't get HP sauce down there.

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Semi:

That place is in Georgia!

 

Sausage rolls, yummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm I haven't had a sausage roll in years. I'll bet I could get some in Vancouver, eh.

You can't get sausage rolls in the States? They are available everywhere here - you just have to find the good ones - lots of cheap, small ones out there. Fake veggy ones are around too.

 

Next you'll be saying that you can't get HP sauce down there.

 

http://www.4and20pastycompany.com/

 

I stop at this place every time I'm down there. Old Limey from London runs the place with his wife. Good folks and great pastys and sausage rolls.

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In my navy days, I would spend hours at General Quarters (battle stations) in the main gun director of a destroyer. We had some delicious battle rations which included a high protein, high energy sweet cake that was manufactured and wrapped in olive drab waxed paper in 1946 (this was 1970). A chunk the size of a Reese's Peanut Butter Cup would keep you going for three hours, although your jaw muscles and saliva glands would be quite fatigued.

 

So, flavorful, energy-filled and a long shelf life.

I remember those and they were indeed chewy...I recall there were three different types, one was a pound cake that held up quite well, too, after all those years.

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Inspired by this thread, Mother's Day cake at our house is going to be Spanish Bar Cake. Both my wife and myself remember our mothers buying it from the Bond Bread Man (who sold door-to-door). Online references cite A&P or other grocery chains.

 

The cake is a fairly dense spice cake with raisins. White icing. Some online recipes suggest cream cheese frosting, some suggest butter cream.

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if longevity and alcohol content is the goal nothing beats American ingenuity. Stuff a dozen Twinkies into a bottle of Sailor Jerry. or a bottle of Sailor jerry into a dozen Twinkies- whichever works best for you.

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Semi:

That place is in Georgia!

 

Sausage rolls, yummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm I haven't had a sausage roll in years. I'll bet I could get some in Vancouver, eh.

You can't get sausage rolls in the States? They are available everywhere here - you just have to find the good ones - lots of cheap, small ones out there. Fake veggy ones are around too.

 

Next you'll be saying that you can't get HP sauce down there.

Round here, we don't cotton to no "fake veggie" sausage rolls. Must be a west coast thing.

We have a local bakery that does something seriously Canadian- Schneider's meat pie rolls. Mash up original recipe Schneider's meat pies (the ground beef and veal and whatever, dont ask, dont tell flavour) roll them into a roll , wrap them in pastry....and then deep fry them. served with HP sauce. In packets. They also do off-the-chain pasties and samosas.

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if longevity and alcohol content is the goal nothing beats American ingenuity. Stuff a dozen Twinkies into a bottle of Sailor Jerry. or a bottle of Sailor jerry into a dozen Twinkies- whichever works best for you.

 

Oh yeah - Sailor Jerry's - the favorite libation of the urban outdoorsmen of Key West.

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Inspired by this thread, Mother's Day cake at our house is going to be Spanish Bar Cake. Both my wife and myself remember our mothers buying it from the Bond Bread Man (who sold door-to-door). Online references cite A&P or other grocery chains.

 

The cake is a fairly dense spice cake with raisins. White icing. Some online recipes suggest cream cheese frosting, some suggest butter cream.

 

Ta-Da!

 

post-5724-0-90366600-1368391814_thumb.jpg

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Inspired by this thread, Mother's Day cake at our house is going to be Spanish Bar Cake. Both my wife and myself remember our mothers buying it from the Bond Bread Man (who sold door-to-door). Online references cite A&P or other grocery chains.

 

The cake is a fairly dense spice cake with raisins. White icing. Some online recipes suggest cream cheese frosting, some suggest butter cream.

 

 

Lemon pound cake here today....after our dinner of barbequed salmon, baked potatoes, asparagus, green salad, fruit salad and butter rolls.

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Tonight we're having Angel Food Cake with zits. It's a long way from rum cake.

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Tonight we're having Angel Food Cake with zits. It's a long way from rum cake.

 

So that's Canadian for strawberries and whipped cream, eh....

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Tonight we're having Angel Food Cake with zits. It's a long way from rum cake.

 

So that's Canadian for strawberries and whipped cream, eh....

 

No, it's what the USAnians call "Confetti", it's a cake mix with bits of coloured plastic or something in it. My wife calls it cake with zits. I'm not proud, I'll eat it. Topped with vanilla frozen yogurt and home-made hot chocolate sauce, it was damn fine.

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Possibly a similar product to what we call 'hundreds and thousands'?

Also used for cakes.

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Possibly a similar product to what we call 'hundreds and thousands'?

Also used for cakes.

 

I made a box cake for which the supplied confetti was little flat circles of colored sugar. "Hundreds and thousands" are little rods (I think, subject to correction).

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Possibly a similar product to what we call 'hundreds and thousands'?

Also used for cakes.

 

I made a box cake for which the supplied confetti was little flat circles of colored sugar. "Hundreds and thousands" are little rods (I think, subject to correction).

 

The correct New England terminology for the little sugar & wax rods is "jimmies". Sometimes called "sprinkles" or "shots" by the unwashed. :P

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Possibly a similar product to what we call 'hundreds and thousands'?

Also used for cakes.

 

I made a box cake for which the supplied confetti was little flat circles of colored sugar. "Hundreds and thousands" are little rods (I think, subject to correction).

 

The correct New England terminology for the little sugar & wax rods is "jimmies". Sometimes called "sprinkles" or "shots" by the unwashed. :P

 

I would by no means consider Wikipedia an unimpeachable authority on such a regional matter, but for what it's worth, here is their views;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprinkles

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1000 hits on a thread about cakes

 

lads, lads, lads the late spring must be getting to you

 

just had hail here, wearing two fleeces

 

and 670 people have now looked at the cake eating film

 

bloody nora

 

D

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As the requisite rum-soaking time had passed, I baked the cake over the weekend.

 

The house still smells like hot rum.

Better than christmas.

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