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GeorgB

Cutless bearing removal

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There was a fair bit of play in the old cutless bearing on my boat. Initially i was going to pull the propeller shaft and remove the bearing by cutting it in half. Unfortunately, i couldn't do it without dropping the rudder. As i didn't really want to do this nor buy a strut-pro tool i decided to make my own tool to pull the bearing.

 

I thought it might be useful for someone else. The total cost of the material was 23 euros.

 

Here are a few pictures to explain...

 

post-75162-0-72131700-1368125249_thumb.jpg

 

post-75162-0-76867400-1368125287_thumb.jpg

 

The puller was built from 24mm baltic birch plywood, 12mm threaded rod, a piece of steel pipe the same length and slightly smaller outer diameter than the bearing and a few nuts and washers. One side of the puller has a hole the same size as the shaft and the other side has a hole big enough for the cutless bearing to pass through.

 

At first the plywood bent a lot and i was scared it would splinter and break but then the bearing started to slide out.

 

post-75162-0-56600700-1368125649_thumb.jpg

 

I used the same tool to install the new bearing. All in all the job took me about two hours including construction of the tool and the installation of the new bearing. I think this method is very good since there is hardly any risk of damaging the shaft strut and the propeller shaft acts as a guide for installing the new bearing.

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Something to think about. Is to have your thread stock on all 4 corners . That way the bearing won't have any chance of getting cocked a little. Great idea though.

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If nothing beyond thanks for the help,...

 

 

You spelled 'cutless' correctly. Well played and a nice golf clap to you, Sir.

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Thanks for all the comments!

 

I put the new bearing in the freezer for a few hours before installing it.

 

I should add that i drilled new holes for the threaded rod much closer to the strut than in the picture. This helped a lot since the plywood flexed less and more power was transferred to the steel pipe. I wasn't too worried about the bearing getting cocked since the prop shaft was guiding it anyway. At the start i made sure both pieces of plywood were equidistant on each side, then i just kept turning both nuts equal amounts.

 

The prop shaft came out easily after the cutless bearing was removed.

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If nothing beyond thanks for the help,...

 

 

You spelled 'cutless' correctly. Well played and a nice golf clap to you, Sir.

Cutless® is a registered trademark of Duramax Marine® LLC.

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You've helped me plan my cutless bearing replacement, a job which I think is getting close. I have one question which will seem odd to you. How did you get the forward plywood and the pipe onto the shaft without partially pulling the shaft? Or did you pull the shaft sufficiently to get those items on without having to drop the rudder?

As a matter of interest when I was installing a dripless PSS I had heaps of trouble backing the shaft out because the shaft has PropSpeed on it and it made the shaft stick in the cutless bearing. Next time I'll make sure I've cleaned the shaft first and re-apply the propSpeed when the job is finished.

Thanks for sharing your great idea.

Argus

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Yeah, i slid the shaft out enough to put the pipe and the plywood plate on it. What you could do is have two pieces of plywood with u-shapes sawed into them instead of one with a hole. That way you wont have to slide the shaft out. Nevertheless, i think you better clean the shaft aft of the strut anyway before trying to remove the cutless bearing.

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Guys,

 

Cutlass/sleeve bearings have many different fit tolerances. Some come out very easy, scary easy, and some won't even press out with a hardened steel Strut-Pro tool that is extremely thick, heavy and designed to press out bearings to 3" in diameter.. Even with high tensile grade 80 hardened steel pressing collets, massive yokes and huge draw bolts some bearings just will not press out.

 

While it is very cool that the plywood jig worked in this instance please don't be upset if it does not work on your boat. My guess, having pressed out piles of cutlass / marine sleeve bearings is that it would probably work on about 10% +/- of them. The rest will need something more robust

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Guys,

 

Cutlass/sleeve bearings have many different fit tolerances. Some come out very easy, scary easy, and some won't even press out with a hardened steel Strut-Pro tool that is extremely thick, heavy and designed to press out bearings to 3" in diameter.. Even with high tensile grade 80 hardened steel pressing collets, massive yokes and huge draw bolts some bearings just will not press out.

 

While it is very cool that the plywood jig worked in this instance please don't be upset if it does not work on your boat. My guess, having pressed out piles of cutlass / marine sleeve bearings is that it would probably work on about 10% +/- of them. The rest will need something more robust

Totally agreed on all counts, but I still think it's pretty cool that GeorgB popped out a cutlass with plywood. Talk about McGuyver-ing.

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Guys,

 

Cutlass/sleeve bearings have many different fit tolerances. Some come out very easy, scary easy, and some won't even press out with a hardened steel Strut-Pro tool that is extremely thick, heavy and designed to press out bearings to 3" in diameter.. Even with high tensile grade 80 hardened steel pressing collets, massive yokes and huge draw bolts some bearings just will not press out.

 

While it is very cool that the plywood jig worked in this instance please don't be upset if it does not work on your boat. My guess, having pressed out piles of cutlass / marine sleeve bearings is that it would probably work on about 10% +/- of them. The rest will need something more robust

Totally agreed on all counts, but I still think it's pretty cool that GeorgB popped out a cutlass with plywood. Talk about McGuyver-ing.

I agree 100%, very cool !!

 

I just don't want everyone to think this will work on every boat.

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Maine Sail, that's a good point! I used plywood because i have holesaws for wood and thick plywood was easy to for me to find. Steel would certainly be better.

 

Scuttlebuthead, i used set screws made from SS A4 (AISI 316).

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