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      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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PeterHuston

Ted Hood dies

10 posts in this topic

I see on the NYYC FB page that Ted Hood has passed away.

 

First real serious boat I sailed on was his design - the 36 foot, 27.5 one tonner centerboard "Robin". That boat drew something like three feet with the board up, I think 11 with it down. Had a retractable rudder. One of the more inventive and special boats ever.

 

Very nice guy, who advanced the state of the art of the sport, and the America's Cup.

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In Memorium - Ted Hood May 5, 1927 - June 28, 2013

 

"As skipper of the new Sparkman & Stephens designed aluminum-hulled Courageous he won the America's Cup sailing away from Australia's Southern Cross, 4-0. Three years later he campaigned Independence, the second 12-Meter he designed (the first was the 1960's Nefertiti"), against Courageous, which he had redesigned, but was runner up to Courageous and Ted Turner in the defender trials. "

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Wow, Ted was up there with Olin Stevens, etc, one of the greats of our time.

 

Fair winds, Ted.

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Wow, Ted was up there with Olin Stevens, etc, one of the greats of our time.

 

Fair winds, Ted.

Certainly one of the leading competitors to North in the 70's.

 

Seemed to fall behind fairly quickly in technology while North seemed to make continuous gains.

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Wow, Ted was up there with Olin Stevens, etc, one of the greats of our time.

 

Fair winds, Ted.

Certainly one of the leading competitors to North in the 70's.

 

Seemed to fall behind fairly quickly in technology while North seemed to make continuous gains.

 

Agree, in '77 when Lowell was going straight with what the computer told him, Ted and Robbie Doyle were still totally into the 'old fashioned' way of adding or subtracting shape to the sail, re-cutting it as needed. I think TH just trusted his intuition more than what some computer would tell him.

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A gentleman in every sense of the word.

 

Quiet, soft-spoken, self-effacing and, at least whenever media were around, seemed practically tongue-tied.

 

He had a wonderful, slightly goofy grin accompanied by conversational pauses that always left you wondering what he was really thinking.

 

Back in the old days of the Marblehead loft there was a big staff room where sailmakers, designers, floor hands, sales and admin would gather for lunch. I was invited for a bite to eat one day and enjoyed another side to FE. He was just one of the boys, conversing animately with all and sundry.

 

I arrived in the States after the Nefertiti debacle. Always wondered how Ted and his feisty co-skipper John J. "Donnie" McNamara had lasted as a team as long as they did.

 

McNamara wrote his account of the campaign in "White Sails, Black Clouds" with much of the photography from the gifted hands of Kiwi-born LIFE magazine photographer George Silk. George had a reputation for putting his viewers in the picture. One full-page pix showed FE and Don standing practically but not quite shoulder to shoulder ..... they were split by Nefertiti's bow jutting between their heads.

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Comparing Ted to Lowell is an interesting one. Ted was an artist and Lowell more of a scientist. Art worked for a while, but science won, more or less by the end of the 70's. Ted sold Hood Sails in 1982. I helped create Ted's autobiography "Ted Hood Through Hand and Eye ", written by Michael Levitt. Michael had written about Lowell earlier and so was in a good position to compare the two, so it was interesting to hear from him on that.


In working on the book, what stood out for me was the year 1959, when Ted won the NYYC Cruise with his first Robin, at a time when events like that made it to the top of sports news pages. Ted skippered, designed, built, made the sails for and built the mast for that first Robin. Pretty amazing. I guess winning the 1974 Americas Cup is most often mentioned, but to me 1959 was the amazing year. America's Cup wise, he repeated that feat in 1962 ('64) with Nefertiti and in 1977 with Independence; no victory in those years, but incredible anyhow.


He was not just a sailmaker and great sailor; he did all kinds of stuff from real estate development to marine hardware.


Finally, not sure there is anyone else in the business who so many worked for, then went out and became successful on their own, from Jim Mullen to Robbie Doyle.


Feels like a big hole is out there. I will miss him and the world will miss him too.


Rick Hood

(Ted's oldest son)

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Comparing Ted to Lowell is an interesting one. Ted was an artist and Lowell more of a scientist. Art worked for a while, but science won, more or less by the end of the 70's. Ted sold Hood Sails in 1982. I helped create Ted's autobiography "Ted Hood Through Hand and Eye ", written by Michael Levitt. Michael had written about Lowell earlier and so was in a good position to compare the two, so it was interesting to hear from him on that.
In working on the book, what stood out for me was the year 1959, when Ted won the NYYC Cruise with his first Robin, at a time when events like that made it to the top of sports news pages. Ted skippered, designed, built, made the sails for and built the mast for that first Robin. Pretty amazing. I guess winning the 1974 Americas Cup is most often mentioned, but to me 1959 was the amazing year. America's Cup wise, he repeated that feat in 1962 ('64) with Nefertiti and in 1977 with Independence; no victory in those years, but incredible anyhow.
He was not just a sailmaker and great sailor; he did all kinds of stuff from real estate development to marine hardware.
Finally, not sure there is anyone else in the business who so many worked for, then went out and became successful on their own, from Jim Mullen to Robbie Doyle.
Feels like a big hole is out there. I will miss him and the world will miss him too.
Rick Hood
(Ted's oldest son)

thanks for posting

 

sorry for ted's passing over

 

my sincere condolences to you and your family / his friends

 

jtr/msp

 

America's Cup yachtsman dies in PortsmouthPosted: Jul 02, 2013 5:56 AM PDTUpdated: Jul 02, 2013 5:56 AM PDT
By NBC 10 News

One of the big names in Rhode Island's America's Cup legacy has passed away.

Ted Hood of Portsmouth has passed away at age 86. Hood was a yachting designer, business owner and sailor all his life. He won numerous Newport-based races and came to international prominence when he won the America's Cup in 1974.

He sailed the yacht Courageous to victory over Australia's Southern Cross. Ironically, three years later, sailing "Independence," his vessel lost to Courageous in the cup trials.

Ted Hood wrote his autobiography seven years ago.

His burial will be private but according to his family, there will be a celebration of his life in Newport this summer.

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