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Shootist Jeff

Trimming the jib downwind

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For those of you sailing boats that leave the jib out DW, how much are you actively trimming it? Or do you just get it about right and forget about it until the gybe?

 

I know the right answer is to trim it actively DW, but what are some techniques to do so? Is it more important in lighter air or in planing conditions? What indicators (tell tells, leach of the gennaker, main, etc?) are you looking at and how do you know when it trimmed correctly?

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Due to the fact that you are pretty unlikely to move the lead position, its never going to be trimmed 100%. The key is not to over trim the jib and kill the kite.

 

In light airs drop the halyard sooner rather than later.

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Due to the fact that you are pretty unlikely to move the lead position, its never going to be trimmed 100%. The key is not to over trim the jib and kill the kite.

 

In light airs drop the halyard sooner rather than later.

 

So you're not trying to work the jib in and out in conjunction with the kite and main and rather just trimming it to some point that it won't affect the kite?

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if we have the jib up, we put the cars forward and actively trim to the leeward telltales.

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if we have the jib up, we put the cars forward and actively trim to the leeward telltales.

 

Cool, thanks. That's what I was looking for.

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Whatever you do do not over trim it, especially in the light air. That will eff up the flow near the kite and make it harder to fly. On the boats that we leave the jib up on, we generally adjust it as a second or third priority (ie check it ever 30 seconds - 1 minute to make sure it close). Unlikely to move the leads around as it is another pain in the butt to fix.

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You trim it just like a staysail - active trim but stay of the under-trimmed rather than the over-trimmed side

 

Due to the fact that you are pretty unlikely to move the lead position, its never going to be trimmed 100%. The key is not to over trim the jib and kill the kite.

 

In light airs drop the halyard sooner rather than later.

 

So you're not trying to work the jib in and out in conjunction with the kite and main and rather just trimming it to some point that it won't affect the kite?

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