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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

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I agree with yl75 and oioi that he was actually sailing on starboard tack. Maybe VG site wanted to say that the port side was down. I didn't look into tracker immediately. And it looks like he was sailing directly downwind for a while after 9:30 UTC.

But the damage is till confusing and arguable. What is the top of the housing? I assume it is the inner end that is in the middle of the boat and where the trimming lines come out. Ports on the side are rather lower parts. Or is it top-side of the housing from one end to the other?

 

EDIT: They updated the English text as well. Now it states as starboard tack.

 

Funny, on my side it still says he was on port tack ! :) :

jossegitana-en.jpeg

(probably some "cloud" delays or something)

 

Oh I guess you meant the VG English site, indeed it says starboard for me now as well, and that he gybed :

jossevgen.jpeg

 

 

 

Which was also the case in the VG French version first publication (if I remember well, certain for the gybe), a bit of a mess :)

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Thanks to those who are hurdling the language barriers to get us the news. Any hint where he will likely head for repairs/ shelter? Albany?

 

Latest sked has Alex making up a bit of time, so still interesting at the front of the train they're riding. Alex, though, looks to be into the higher winds and will probably not be able to ride the flatter water.

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Here is my take and as such it is totally debatable ;)

 

They said he made a "planté" which in French would read as a "nose-dive and stop", where you even rise the aft section of the boat above water (remember that Cowes Week Pic)

 

The foil then took the brute force of water on its upper horizontal surface (now closer to vertical), this pushed the foil backwards exactly as if - with the yacht horizontal - it was pushed downwards,

This is exactly reverse of the efforts it is designed for.

 

The foil forced on the upper (now forward) case wall and wedge, foil trimming mechanism was torn

 

FWIW

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Thanks to those who are hurdling the language barriers to get us the news. Any hint where he will likely head for repairs/ shelter? Albany?

 

Latest sked has Alex making up a bit of time, so still interesting at the front of the train they're riding. Alex, though, looks to be into the higher winds and will probably not be able to ride the flatter water.

 

I would guess that he should be able to get the foil inside (using some purchase or something from inside the boat), but he might not be able to use it anymore ...

 

One who is seriously getting some ground lately is JP Dick, 23.2 nm last sched (and he must be quite pissed off about his crossing the ice line blunder, so trying to "repair"...)

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Here is my take and as such it is totally debatable ;)

 

They said he made a "planté" which in French would read as a "nose-dive and stop", where you even rise the aft section of the boat above water (remember that Cowes Week Pic)

 

The foil then took the brute force of water on its upper horizontal surface (now closer to vertical), this pushed the foil backwards exactly as if - with the yacht horizontal - it was pushed downwards,

This is exactly reverse of the efforts it is designed for.

 

The foil forced on the upper (now forward) case wall and wedge, foil trimming mechanism was torn

 

FWIW

 

This or maybe just the kinetic energy of the foil during the shock made it go outside even more

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Here is my take and as such it is totally debatable ;)

 

They said he made a "planté" which in French would read as a "nose-dive and stop", where you even rise the aft section of the boat above water (remember that Cowes Week Pic)

 

The foil then took the brute force of water on its upper horizontal surface (now closer to vertical), this pushed the foil backwards exactly as if - with the yacht horizontal - it was pushed downwards,

This is exactly reverse of the efforts it is designed for.

 

The foil forced on the upper (now forward) case wall and wedge, foil trimming mechanism was torn

 

FWIW

Plante would be close to a pitchpole

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Thanks to those who are hurdling the language barriers to get us the news. Any hint where he will likely head for repairs/ shelter? Albany?

 

Latest sked has Alex making up a bit of time, so still interesting at the front of the train they're riding. Alex, though, looks to be into the higher winds and will probably not be able to ride the flatter water.

 

I would guess that he should be able to get the foil inside (using some purchase or something from inside the boat), but he might not be able to use it anymore ...

 

One who is seriously getting some ground lately is JP Dick, 23.2 nm last sched (and he must be quite pissed off about his crossing the ice line blunder, so trying to "repair"...)

 

 

Yes, JPD has been having the best run, but I think the sea state ahead of him will block his chance at the 536 nm record.

Looks like Armel's course might show him playing the .5 ocean current (data is 48 hrs out of date):

post-63767-0-22438000-1480958995_thumb.png

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If Seb was pitchpoling, it would reverse the intended load on the foil if the bow was buried deep enough. The foil may have helped stop him from pitchpoling??

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SJ seems to be between a rock and a hard place. Projecting 8 hours out on SE course he runs into the Ice limit while it is still blowing a stink. I would think that sailing on starboard he's not using the foil and if it's damaged it is creating drag and more pressure on the hull, but that beats getting the shit kicked out of you. If he gybes by the ice line its another 8 hours in the stink, but at least on his good foil.

My best thoughts for his safety at this time and no more damage is done.

 

yikes

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So, both foils were extended and the port foil got loose and slammed inwards.

 

 

Hmmm. I wonder if that was extended for extra righting moment; if so it seems the housing etc is not designed for forces in that direction (to be expected). Real shame, but more to the point hope he's safe over the next 24hrs or so - weather looks to be getting really nasty down there and that must be super-stressful in a damaged boat.

the damaged foil was Not extended when crash happen, coz of the bow crash, the foil extend by itself and damaged the retraction system. Incidently the foil was near to collapse out of the boat.

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Here is my take and as such it is totally debatable ;)

 

They said he made a "planté" which in French would read as a "nose-dive and stop", where you even rise the aft section of the boat above water (remember that Cowes Week Pic)

 

The foil then took the brute force of water on its upper horizontal surface (now closer to vertical), this pushed the foil backwards exactly as if - with the yacht horizontal - it was pushed downwards,

This is exactly reverse of the efforts it is designed for.

 

The foil forced on the upper (now forward) case wall and wedge, foil trimming mechanism was torn

 

FWIW

Plante would be close to a pitchpole

 

Yes of course, thanks, missed the word at that point

 

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SJ seems to be between a rock and a hard place. Projecting 8 hours out on SE course he runs into the Ice limit while it is still blowing a stink. I would think that sailing on starboard he's not using the foil and if it's damaged it is creating drag and more pressure on the hull, but that beats getting the shit kicked out of you. If he gybes by the ice line its another 8 hours in the stink, but at least on his good foil.

 

My best thoughts for his safety at this time and no more damage is done.

 

 

+ 1, yes

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About the only useful think about the VG tracker is that it has a slider and you can see prior positions and weather (feature request?). Might help with the port/starboard debate- I think he was humming along on port when it occur b/c that is where the line starts to squiggle around. Hope for his safety.

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About the only useful think about the VG tracker is that it has a slider and you can see prior positions and weather (feature request?). Might help with the port/starboard debate- I think he was humming along on port when it occur b/c that is where the line starts to squiggle around. Hope for his safety.

 

 

No, all the versions are now converging to the fact he was on starboard tack when it happened, as well as the tracker line which shows he gybed to port (heading North East) after the incident, now he is back to starboard on a very broad reach, so I guess he already managed to bring (and secure) the port foil inside (retracted).

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Oh shit - Seb is one I was cheering for after HB :( A good thing he wasn't injured

 

I am cheering for the foilers in general.

 

oceanwwgg - I'm thinking along similar lines, but I think a wicked broach would have also been involved - one close to him being flattened with the oncoming wave that he surfed down. Is it possible for a leeward foil to suddenly generate downward loads with a sudden heel and while ploughing into a wave in front?

 

I think another scenario is he is another victim of a ufo :( A heavy broach would not be involved, but could cause a direct nose dive and huge loads on the foil involved ripping the foil out of it's mounting system. With no time to change the canting keel, a big stack would have been involved forcing an accidental gybe. Any word of the foil itself?

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I found this on the same website that had the damage news. I highlighted one line that I found profound in its translation from the original french. At this point is is beyond imagining the emotions and physical elements he is under. In one regard it is thankful these boats have such extensive communication abilities for at this moment , knowing that one could reach out to people would be a rock to hold onto. I realize these guys are made of tougher stuff, but listening to Alex talk about his conditions, that fellow with his boat on the side, there is a breaking point.

IN FULL SWING

VENDÉE GLOBE 2016-2017 MONO60 EDMOND DE ROTHSCHILD SÉBASTIEN JOSSE

The Indian woke up. In the midst of a depression he had been observing for a few days, Sébastien Josse currently sails in 25 to 30 knots of wind, bordering the ice exclusion zone. Less than 600 miles from the longitude of Cape Leeuwin (southwestern point of Australia), conditions will continue to harden. The road is badly paved for the skipper of the Mono60 Edmond de Rothschild.

Joined this morning by the racing race of the Vendée Globe in Paris, Sébastien admitted that bad weather is part of the race and that we must strive to manage the situation as a good sailor. "We're starting to get into the thick of it with the lows we have not seen until now ... but now, it is around the world, the Vendée Globe! "Does it advance before describing the mood:" I have 25-30 knots of wind with four meter swell. The program of the day is to manage the depression as best as possible, to pay attention to the ice zone also that must be negotiated. There is no escape and I try to get in between. Today, I expect ... to make the boat (laugh)! The wind will rise, I will reduce the canvas and certainly bumper. "At mid-day on Monday, the skipper had indeed jibed, a highly delicate maneuver in such a wind force that demand the highest concentration and a sacred peace.

All - almost - without exception

The skipper actually got into the thick of the subject last night already with up to 40 knots of wind. And in front of it is always the great "escape". Armel Le Cléac'h has just cut the longitude of Cape Leeuwin, while Alex Thomson, who admits to having raised his foot a bit, now points 100 miles behind. If these two leaders always align high average speeds, they have not yet had to negotiate a strong gale. However, much of the fleet has gone through these days, from the South Atlantic to the Indian Ocean. This first big testing has led to some stylistic and also in some more damage, fortunately minor and the mast of Spirit of Yukoh, followed by the abandonment of his skipper Kojiro Shiraishi Japanese.

A first night in the storm and another to come

At the moment, it is Sébastien Josse who suffers, alone, the strongest of the depression with another 12 to 24 hours delicate. "I am in depression: last night I sailed under three reefs (in the mainsail) and J3 (the smaller headsails).There I am still in bad weather with 30 knots average. At this moment, I am under staysail and two reefs in the mainsail. We'll reduce it later. Last night I was reaching, while there, there will be 40 knots of wind but downwind. I am already in the state of mind of a guy who is in strong wind, the biggest is to come but in a different orientation: this night I was at 80 degrees of the wind with 35 knots and, Next night, I will be at 140 degrees of wind with 40 knots, and maybe even more, at the height of the depression. "

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Good God! Horrendous stuff. Hell of a test.

 

I wonder if Sebastian Destremau is prepared for this?

 

Good point. And Romain. So far Sam's comments have been cautiously upbeat, but have been watching for more of her experienced perspective on these conditions.

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Virbac seems to be optimized for the gnarly stuff and less for the tradewind reaching. He looks so much stronger than he did coming down the Atlantic.

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Does "puts his race on hold" have any official meaning, or does it just mean he's going to focus more on safety than on progression down-course for now, with the potential for retirement looming if the situation gets worse?

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Does "puts his race on hold" have any official meaning, or does it just mean he's going to focus more on safety than on progression down-course for now, with the potential for retirement looming if the situation gets worse?

 

Nothing official about suspending racing in the SI or NOR that I've seen, so you're probably right about the latter.

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SJ seems to be between a rock and a hard place. Projecting 8 hours out on SE course he runs into the Ice limit while it is still blowing a stink. I would think that sailing on starboard he's not using the foil and if it's damaged it is creating drag and more pressure on the hull, but that beats getting the shit kicked out of you. If he gybes by the ice line its another 8 hours in the stink, but at least on his good foil.

 

My best thoughts for his safety at this time and no more damage is done.

 

 

+ 1, yes

 

 

Seb is getting the hell out of there to the SE, that low will be upon him in the coming hours. Tricky. Only +/- 60 nm searoom left to the ice limits if he keeps his current course. Sea state is bad and quickly deteriorating. And will stay that way for half a day or more. In the center of the low 48 kt wind forecasted, excluding wind gusts. The roaring forties at their worst. Fingers crossed that no more damage will be done!

post-49019-0-59980200-1480963561_thumb.png

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SJ seems to be between a rock and a hard place. Projecting 8 hours out on SE course he runs into the Ice limit while it is still blowing a stink. I would think that sailing on starboard he's not using the foil and if it's damaged it is creating drag and more pressure on the hull, but that beats getting the shit kicked out of you. If he gybes by the ice line its another 8 hours in the stink, but at least on his good foil.

 

My best thoughts for his safety at this time and no more damage is done.

 

 

+ 1, yes

 

 

Seb is getting the hell out of there to the SE, that low will be upon him in the coming hours. Tricky. Only +/- 60 nm searoom left to the ice limits if he keeps his current course. Sea state is bad and quickly deteriorating. And will stay that way for half a day or more. In the center of the low 48 kt wind forecasted, excluding wind gusts. The roaring forties at their worst. Fingers crossed that no more damage will be done!

 

 

 

Those are the key words. Wind gusts of 10+ for 20 seconds or so are going to be really brutal!

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SJ seems to be between a rock and a hard place. Projecting 8 hours out on SE course he runs into the Ice limit while it is still blowing a stink. I would think that sailing on starboard he's not using the foil and if it's damaged it is creating drag and more pressure on the hull, but that beats getting the shit kicked out of you. If he gybes by the ice line its another 8 hours in the stink, but at least on his good foil.

 

My best thoughts for his safety at this time and no more damage is done.

 

 

+ 1, yes

 

 

Seb is getting the hell out of there to the SE, that low will be upon him in the coming hours. Tricky. Only +/- 60 nm searoom left to the ice limits if he keeps his current course. Sea state is bad and quickly deteriorating. And will stay that way for half a day or more. In the center of the low 48 kt wind forecasted, excluding wind gusts. The roaring forties at their worst. Fingers crossed that no more damage will be done!

 

 

 

Perhaps "putting his racing on hold" includes not worrying about violating the ice limit, especially if someone shoreside can give him reasonable confidence that there isn't ice immediately on the other side of it. He could always go back and re-start from that spot, a la JPD, if/when he feels safe doing so.

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For Josse, reading the French version, I think Oioi is right.

 

He did a near pitchpole ("Planté") and the port foil took a load where it was pulled OUT of its case.

It did so with such violence, that the upper stop, inside the boat, to make sure that the foil does not come completely out, broke!

 

It means that the foil could potentially come out way more than designed, and therefore generate loads on the foil trunk way above what it was designed for. It could tear appart the foil trunk and therefore make a big hole on the side of the boat...

 

My 2 cents worth.

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In the club of the "I hit something", we now have to add Romain Attanasio, the partner of Sam Davis, on Famille Mary - Etamine du Lys.

 

He hit something and damaged both rudders. He crash jibe after the hit, but got everything sorted out and is now heading to Cape Town. He says that the Starboard rudder is "half broken" and that the port rudder is "much worse". However, he is not giving up yet.

He has a spare rudder, and he is going to try to find a bay where to anchor, and try to make a repair on his own. My guess is he basically has to make one rudder out of 2 and used his spare... Piece of cake.... Rrrrright...

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Perhaps "putting his racing on hold" includes not worrying about violating the ice limit, especially if someone shoreside can give him reasonable confidence that there isn't ice immediately on the other side of it. He could always go back and re-start from that spot, a la JPD, if/when he feels safe doing so.

 

^ That's how I read it. Head south for a few hours to avoid the worst of it, and don't worry about the AEZ.

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Perhaps "putting his racing on hold" includes not worrying about violating the ice limit, especially if someone shoreside can give him reasonable confidence that there isn't ice immediately on the other side of it. He could always go back and re-start from that spot, a la JPD, if/when he feels safe doing so.

^ That's how I read it. Head south for a few hours to avoid the worst of it, and don't worry about the AEZ.

for me too, it means first priority is to save/fix the boat & security, he isn't anymore in racing mod for the coming hours.

cross fingers seb deal well with the hairy low and fix the f...g foil

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Perhaps "putting his racing on hold" includes not worrying about violating the ice limit, especially if someone shoreside can give him reasonable confidence that there isn't ice immediately on the other side of it. He could always go back and re-start from that spot, a la JPD, if/when he feels safe doing so.

^ That's how I read it. Head south for a few hours to avoid the worst of it, and don't worry about the AEZ.

for me too, it means first priority is to save/fix the boat & security, he isn't anymore in racing mod for the coming hours.

cross fingers seb deal well with the hairy low and fix the f...g foil

 

...and he's slowed his boat right down too.

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SJ seems to be between a rock and a hard place. Projecting 8 hours out on SE course he runs into the Ice limit while it is still blowing a stink. I would think that sailing on starboard he's not using the foil and if it's damaged it is creating drag and more pressure on the hull, but that beats getting the shit kicked out of you. If he gybes by the ice line its another 8 hours in the stink, but at least on his good foil.

 

My best thoughts for his safety at this time and no more damage is done.

 

 

+ 1, yes

 

 

Seb is getting the hell out of there to the SE, that low will be upon him in the coming hours. Tricky. Only +/- 60 nm searoom left to the ice limits if he keeps his current course. Sea state is bad and quickly deteriorating. And will stay that way for half a day or more. In the center of the low 48 kt wind forecasted, excluding wind gusts. The roaring forties at their worst. Fingers crossed that no more damage will be done!

 

 

 

Perhaps "putting his racing on hold" includes not worrying about violating the ice limit, especially if someone shoreside can give him reasonable confidence that there isn't ice immediately on the other side of it. He could always go back and re-start from that spot, a la JPD, if/when he feels safe doing so.

 

Thanks for pointing it out. I thought that as I played with the tracker, but didn't want to put it out in my initial thoughts. The safest path would be almost straight at the ice line, then blow past it. The low would be past within 10-11 hours and he'd be at worst 23 miles inside. it also looks like right at the line it would be more manageable if he didn't want to cross. In 9 hours he roughly gets to the line if he stays the same course, 10 puts him inside by only 12 and by then the worst is past.

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Fross was faster

 

"That will buff out."

 

Fuses children, fuses. That is why we invented them real fast.

 

Actually, if the burning happens on the panels side of the solar controllers, then fuses won't help. Because the max current on that side is what the panels can produce...so if you fuse for that then it blows out when the panels are doing what they're supposed to. So, a short or fault on the panels side just slowly cooks away whatever it's shorting to.

 

However on the battery side of the controllers fuses are mandatory, as the power of the battery will drive enough current to blow the fuse if there's a short on that side.

 

I was psyched when I got to Les Sables a found that Conrad had recently installed some Solbian solar panels...then bummed to find out they were wired to a single controller (apparently in series, vs in parallel, as he has 4 x 9v panels). If I'd had a more time I would have set him up with Genasun GVB "boost" controllers, one per panel. That way when one or more panels are shaded by the boom, the other panels will still provide power.

 

Thankfully, the regeneration from his Oceanvolt electric motor gives him plenty of power, so the solar is (or was) just a backup.

 

 

Yeah, the bypass mentioned in the first report threw me for a loop.

In the picture with the burn marks is a Genasun controller, looks to me like GVB-8-Li, custom voltage. Either the second one [see below], or a spare. For those playing along at home, these are internally fused on the battery side. For Lithium batteries a specific fuse with higher voltage rating is supplied and supposed to be used. I wonder how many miss that in the fine print when they need a replacement.

Listening to today's interview with Conrad.

 

He said that the cause was one of his solar charge controllers. A bit hard to understand, he had two controllers and is now down to a partial solar system.

So he probably had one controller for the Solar Sail, another for the fixed panels. Cause or effect? Hard to tell and not too important at this stage.

 

 

He lost the big Gennanker, the go to sail in the Southern Ocean..

 

 

Overall perhaps a reminder to keep essential stuff separated from the rest in case things go wrong.

 

 

 

Sébastien Josse / Gitana

I'll wonder what kind of foil modifications will be made across the fleet once this edition is over.

It is easy to read the situation as not being able to retract the foil, and not being able to dump it either. Which sounds like a recipe for disaster to me. I hope the he got the foil under control before the weather hit.

 

Putting the race on hold. - I also interpret that as a message to the public that he'll slow down and follow whatever course is best to keep his boat together.

We'll see more in a few minutes when the next report is in.

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I've noticed that every video I've seen from the boats, NOBODY is clipped on. Even when Alex was being filmed by the heli and water was washing over the cabin top, he was walking about like the boat was at the dock. Granted these guys are in a whole other class of sailors.... but there are times I would think they'd be tethered.

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After played around with open cpn I got the ice exclusion zones up and running up to 180 East.

Automated the import of the boat positions and weather routing waypoints.

 

The results with proxy synchrone polars, GFS, towards a virtual waypoint just west of 180 degrees East, north of ice limit 37. Just 2 hours difference between Armel and Alec projected after 2.500 nm sailing..

 

Btw Yann has 41 kt max wind forecasted.

 

Alex 7%/93% port / sb tack

post-49019-0-04220000-1480968425_thumb.png

post-49019-0-10023000-1480971802_thumb.png

post-49019-0-51535300-1480971985_thumb.png

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Latest sked has Alex making up a bit of time, so still interesting at the front of the train they're riding. Alex, though, looks to be into the higher winds and will probably not be able to ride the flatter water.

Poooort! That's probably the title of his next message. He seems to do better on port. Could it be his polars and routing on stbd are messed up, or should he bust off the other foil? I suspect it's just weather differences.

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I've noticed that every video I've seen from the boats, NOBODY is clipped on. Even when Alex was being filmed by the heli and water was washing over the cabin top, he was walking about like the boat was at the dock. Granted these guys are in a whole other class of sailors.... but there are times I would think they'd be tethered.

I think at the speeds they are doing if they fell overboard they would not be able to pull them self back on board, way too much power in the water. I imagine the thought of being bounced along behind the boat for a period is worse than the though of a quicker ending.

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Conrad seems to be back on pace. Bet that frying electrics smell is getting tiresome by now. Go Kiwi.

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Next gen HB will have both foils busted off and instructions to sail the boat at 50+ degrees angle of heel

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AT back on fire again. 10 miles in last sched. 4 kts faster. Seem he likes it rough!

And some know when to back off.

 

 

I don't think its about I think knowing when to back off more about knowing when he is able to push. HB has significantly more load sensors than any one else so is probably able to push closer to the limit in the bigger breeze

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AT Is probably the worst bloke you could give load sensors too - chasing the lights in his case probably would take most of us well eyond that queasy nervousness that tells you to lift off the gas.

 

in any case, give it twelve hours and hell be over to staaaaaaarboard methinks .

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AT back on fire again. 10 miles in last sched. 4 kts faster. Seem he likes it rough!

And some know when to back off.

 

 

I don't think its about I think knowing when to back off more about knowing when he is able to push. HB has significantly more load sensors than any one else so is probably able to push closer to the limit in the bigger breeze

 

 

 

 

Agreed, so why did he go with the electric shocking watch when he has all of those load sensor alarms ringing in his ear all the time?

 

BTW, this is so much fun to watch, play and read about every day, the Vendee Globe team doing a fantastic job. BTW, I love what AT said, I am exhausted but well fed! Good on him! Wishing all these boys a safe passage and Gods speed.

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After played around with open cpn I got the ice exclusion zones up and running up to 180 East.

Automated the import of the boat positions and weather routing waypoints.

 

The results with proxy synchrone polars, GFS, towards a virtual waypoint just west of 180 degrees East, north of ice limit 37. Just 2 hours difference between Armel and Alec projected after 2.500 nm sailing..

 

Btw Yann has 41 kt max wind forecasted.

 

Alex 7%/93% port / sb tack

 

What do you mean by "proxy synchrone polars" ? polars deduced from the data points given by the VG site ?

An thanks a lot for these runs !

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Fross was faster

 

"That will buff out."

 

Fuses children, fuses. That is why we invented them real fast.

 

Actually, if the burning happens on the panels side of the solar controllers, then fuses won't help. Because the max current on that side is what the panels can produce...so if you fuse for that then it blows out when the panels are doing what they're supposed to. So, a short or fault on the panels side just slowly cooks away whatever it's shorting to.

 

However on the battery side of the controllers fuses are mandatory, as the power of the battery will drive enough current to blow the fuse if there's a short on that side.

 

I was psyched when I got to Les Sables a found that Conrad had recently installed some Solbian solar panels...then bummed to find out they were wired to a single controller (apparently in series, vs in parallel, as he has 4 x 9v panels). If I'd had a more time I would have set him up with Genasun GVB "boost" controllers, one per panel. That way when one or more panels are shaded by the boom, the other panels will still provide power.

 

Thankfully, the regeneration from his Oceanvolt electric motor gives him plenty of power, so the solar is (or was) just a backup.

 

 

Yeah, the bypass mentioned in the first report threw me for a loop.

In the picture with the burn marks is a Genasun controller, looks to me like GVB-8-Li, custom voltage. Either the second one [see below], or a spare. For those playing along at home, these are internally fused on the battery side. For Lithium batteries a specific fuse with higher voltage rating is supplied and supposed to be used. I wonder how many miss that in the fine print when they need a replacement.

Listening to today's interview with Conrad.

 

He said that the cause was one of his solar charge controllers. A bit hard to understand, he had two controllers and is now down to a partial solar system.

So he probably had one controller for the Solar Sail, another for the fixed panels. Cause or effect? Hard to tell and not too important at this stage.

 

 

He lost the big Gennanker, the go to sail in the Southern Ocean..

 

 

Overall perhaps a reminder to keep essential stuff separated from the rest in case things go wrong.

 

 

 

Sébastien Josse / Gitana

I'll wonder what kind of foil modifications will be made across the fleet once this edition is over.

It is easy to read the situation as not being able to retract the foil, and not being able to dump it either. Which sounds like a recipe for disaster to me. I hope the he got the foil under control before the weather hit.

 

Putting the race on hold. - I also interpret that as a message to the public that he'll slow down and follow whatever course is best to keep his boat together.

We'll see more in a few minutes when the next report is in.

 

Yeah, I didn't see that pic until afterwards. A shore crew told me in Les Sables that he thought they didn't have Genasun controllers, and I never looked myself, so once again assuming something results in bad info.

 

In any case, if the internal circuit boards of the controllers get wet, it's not good (meltdown). As it says in the manual they're supposed to be in a dry place (hard thing to find on an IMOCA, I know). Or, at least mount then with the terminal ends facing down so the wires have a drip loop. So bummed that Conrad got held up so much. He sure did a good job sorting the mess out, and recorded much of the process while he did it. Impressive.

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not sure if they need to be, you can bet they're clipped in when putting in reefs or forward of the mast.

When you are floating in the cold sea and watching your boat sailing itself away from you! That is when you will know for sure whether or not you needed to be clipped on!

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After played around with open cpn I got the ice exclusion zones up and running up to 180 East.

Automated the import of the boat positions and weather routing waypoints.

 

The results with proxy synchrone polars, GFS, towards a virtual waypoint just west of 180 degrees East, north of ice limit 37. Just 2 hours difference between Armel and Alec projected after 2.500 nm sailing..

 

Btw Yann has 41 kt max wind forecasted.

 

Alex 7%/93% port / sb tack

 

What do you mean by "proxy synchrone polars" ? polars deduced from the data points given by the VG site ?

An thanks a lot for these runs !

 

 

I mean that the virtual loup de mer polars which I use, are not tweaked for the better performance bij Alex and Armel.

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AT back on fire again. 10 miles in last sched. 4 kts faster. Seem he likes it rough!

And some know when to back off.

 

 

I don't think its about I think knowing when to back off more about knowing when he is able to push. HB has significantly more load sensors than any one else so is probably able to push closer to the limit in the bigger breeze

 

 

I don't think it is that. I think HB is just a better design with a better sail plan for those conditions. Clearly there are also conditions when the BP package works better than HB. It's the nature of not having one design boats.

 

Also, there is a significant unknown factor for rest and recovery. We have no idea how often even the guys in front know they need to make a sail change and say, I'm just too tired. I'll wait until daybreak. Maybe this only happens once every 10 days? I have no idea, but I'm sure it happens, even too the best, and they may give up 10-20nm in an update, but then come back significantly refreshed and hammering on the next sched. It's such a long race. It can't be judged in 4 hour increments. 100nm separation after 29 days. It's nothing. JPD gained 100nm on Yann in the last 24 hours and Yann wasn't messing around.

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Twitter Video of Destremau starting his engine https://twitter.com/VendeeGlobe/status/805759271870660608

 

Vendée Globe@VendeeGlobe 1h

1 hour agoView translation

 

Sébastien Destremau a trouvé la solution pour démarrer son moteur ! Bravo à lui et merci à @desjoyeaux ! @teamfaceocean #TFFO #VG2016

Translated from French by BingWrong translation?

 

Sébastien Destremau has found the solution to start his engine! Congrats to him and thanks to @desjoyeaux! @teamfaceocean #TFFO #VG2016

 

 

Two questions here with the Destremau's jump start:

 

His diesel too big to put a hand crank on it?

 

The line leads to the clew on his headsail? Dump the sheet and pulls the line leading to engine?

 

Thought someone here said Mich Des used his boom, tightened up close-hauled and then popped the mainsheet.

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Anyone know for certain if EDR has its foils contained in a crash box?

Probably. But he sure is close to the ice limit with a huge swell and 35 sustained.

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Anyone know for certain if EDR has its foils contained in a crash box?

Probably. But he sure is close to the ice limit with a huge swell and 35 sustained.

 

It's the Australian rescue reach limit, and when Coville sailed there not so long ago, the ice was much further south.

Ice or no ice, better to be closer if it's a bit worse than just the foil ...

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Twitter Video of Destremau starting his engine https://twitter.com/VendeeGlobe/status/805759271870660608

 

Vendée Globe@VendeeGlobe 1h

1 hour agoView translation

 

 

Sébastien Destremau a trouvé la solution pour démarrer son moteur ! Bravo à lui et merci à @desjoyeaux ! @teamfaceocean #TFFO #VG2016

 

Translated from French by BingWrong translation?

 

 

Sébastien Destremau has found the solution to start his engine! Congrats to him and thanks to @desjoyeaux! @teamfaceocean #TFFO #VG2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two questions here with the Destremau's jump start:

 

His diesel too big to put a hand crank on it?

 

The line leads to the clew on his headsail? Dump the sheet and pulls the line leading to engine?

 

Thought someone here said Mich Des used his boom, tightened up close-hauled and then popped the mainsheet.

No one seems to make marine engines anymore that have decompression levers to aid hand cranking. The technique he has used is well known particularly with cruisers where the engine is at the bottom of the companionway with flywheel facing forward so route for line to boom is straightforward compared to a 60. Assume it easier for him to get line to headsail via a shallow cockpit and forward than up to boom and also probably more line speed/length and easier to undertake in fresh and bumpy conditions compared to boom.

 

Not sure I would continue into the SO relying on that start technique to move water ballast in a fixed keeler.

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Authoritative crash box answers is something for rmb.
We know that all the new boats had their foil systems substantially reinforced after the failures in the first races. Holing the boat was not an acceptable design feature. Question is if they had this particular failure mode in mind.

Yeah, I didn't see that pic until afterwards. A shore crew told me in Les Sables that he thought they didn't have Genasun controllers, and I never looked myself, so once again assuming something results in bad info.

In any case, if the internal circuit boards of the controllers get wet, it's not good (meltdown). As it says in the manual they're supposed to be in a dry place (hard thing to find on an IMOCA, I know). Or, at least mount then with the terminal ends facing down so the wires have a drip loop. So bummed that Conrad got held up so much. He sure did a good job sorting the mess out, and recorded much of the process while he did it. Impressive.



The image came later.

Let me snicker a bit about the marine gear that can't get wet. Here is what the GVB-8-Li ad copy says:

Marine Grade: Reliable Power After Years at Sea
Genasun Boost controllers provide reliable power in the harshest environments on earth. GVB's have been powering boats on round-the-world sailing races for years.[/color]


Perhaps it's time to hit them over the head with their golf cart charge controllers, those are apparently supposed to be waterproof.
Dunking power electronics into epoxy is not really an option.

I hope that he does not have another electrical fire episode. Once is more than enough.


Conrad definitely does something right when it come to media. The shore side of the media effort is also good. - And some want to make him a VOR OBR out of him. After pulling of a VG campaign by himself (&Clara &family &friends). Does not make too much sense to me.

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Twitter Video of Destremau starting his engine https://twitter.com/VendeeGlobe/status/805759271870660608

 

Vendée Globe@VendeeGlobe 1h

1 hour agoView translation

 

 

Sébastien Destremau a trouvé la solution pour démarrer son moteur ! Bravo à lui et merci à @desjoyeaux ! @teamfaceocean #TFFO #VG2016

 

Translated from French by BingWrong translation?

 

 

Sébastien Destremau has found the solution to start his engine! Congrats to him and thanks to @desjoyeaux! @teamfaceocean #TFFO #VG2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two questions here with the Destremau's jump start:

 

His diesel too big to put a hand crank on it?

 

The line leads to the clew on his headsail? Dump the sheet and pulls the line leading to engine?

 

Thought someone here said Mich Des used his boom, tightened up close-hauled and then popped the mainsheet.

No one seems to make marine engines anymore that have decompression levers to aid hand cranking. The technique he has used is well known particularly with cruisers where the engine is at the bottom of the companionway with flywheel facing forward so route for line to boom is straightforward compared to a 60. Assume it easier for him to get line to headsail via a shallow cockpit and forward than up to boom and also probably more line speed/length and easier to undertake in fresh and bumpy conditions compared to boom.

 

Not sure I would continue into the SO relying on that start technique to move water ballast in a fixed keeler.

He tried the boom first with not much success.

 

I imagine in a 50 knot blow a handkerchief might get it started.

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Thx.

 

Also wondering how many times he expects to be able to do that over the next two months.

 

OTOH, he's in 'Adventure Mode' so maybe just wants to finish anyways possible.

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Another foil breakage. A pattern is developing similar to other Syd-Hob experiences with skinny things sticking out the side of the boat in rough conditions.

 

Who would have predicted that?

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Authoritative crash box answers is something for rmb.

We know that all the new boats had their foil systems substantially reinforced after the failures in the first races. Holing the boat was not an acceptable design feature. Question is if they had this particular failure mode in mind.

 

 

Yeah, I didn't see that pic until afterwards. A shore crew told me in Les Sables that he thought they didn't have Genasun controllers, and I never looked myself, so once again assuming something results in bad info.

 

In any case, if the internal circuit boards of the controllers get wet, it's not good (meltdown). As it says in the manual they're supposed to be in a dry place (hard thing to find on an IMOCA, I know). Or, at least mount then with the terminal ends facing down so the wires have a drip loop. So bummed that Conrad got held up so much. He sure did a good job sorting the mess out, and recorded much of the process while he did it. Impressive.

 

 

The image came later.

 

Let me snicker a bit about the marine gear that can't get wet. Here is what the GVB-8-Li ad copy says:

Marine Grade: Reliable Power After Years at Sea

Genasun Boost controllers provide reliable power in the harshest environments on earth. GVB's have been powering boats on round-the-world sailing races for years.[/color]

 

Perhaps it's time to hit them over the head with their golf cart charge controllers, those are apparently supposed to be waterproof.

Dunking power electronics into epoxy is not really an option.

I hope that he does not have another electrical fire episode. Once is more than enough.

 

 

Conrad definitely does something right when it come to media. The shore side of the media effort is also good. - And some want to make him a VOR OBR out of him. After pulling of a VG campaign by himself (&Clara &family &friends). Does not make too much sense to me.

 

No sense whatsoever. All he needs is a fast boat now for his next tilt at the VG - and podium tilt at that. But then he's not got halfway round in this one yet, so all in good time.

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Here is the new routing for the top 6 starting with the 12/05/16 4UTC positions till just past the longitude of Tasmania close to the ice limit to line up for passing south of Kiwiland. Picture shows weather as predicted by ECMWF just when ALC gets there 3.5 days from now with an inset showing their predicted times for both ECMWF (9km res) and GFS (0.25 res). Routes only shown for ECMWF to keep the clutter down. Given the distances between the boats it's really hard to show you guys anything meaningful without some sort of animated GIF or MOV or something but at least you get an idea of the rough optimal trajectories and predicted wind strengths and direction along the way. You might need to zoom in but every optimal trajectory has little wind barbs along the way depicting expected conditions. Sorry, haven't had time to spend any time with any in depth analysis so this is just of the cuff directly out of the SW. I'll try to post some candy stats later for AT in terms of time on stb vs port and wind strengths and angles to get the juices flowing re whether he can reel ALC in. I like ALC but I'm still pulling for AT/HB. Go, go! Oh, and it sucks that Koji is out.

 

Thanks, and congrats on your predictions. Quick questions--what software is this, and does the lower black track from Alex indicate an ideal route?

 

Surprised Armel's lead is only a few hours. Guess whether Alex gybes soon will be key. Cheers

 

 

I use Expedtion written by Nick White (http://www.expeditionmarine.com).

 

The lower black track line in the image is simply the Great Circle Route (shortest distance) between Alex's last position and the waypoint I picked just past Tasmania.

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Twitter Video of Destremau starting his engine https://twitter.com/VendeeGlobe/status/805759271870660608 [tweet snipped]

Two questions here with the Destremau's jump start:

 

His diesel too big to put a hand crank on it?

 

The line leads to the clew on his headsail? Dump the sheet and pulls the line leading to engine?

 

Thought someone here said Mich Des used his boom, tightened up close-hauled and then popped the mainsheet.

No one seems to make marine engines anymore that have decompression levers to aid hand cranking. The technique he has used is well known particularly with cruisers where the engine is at the bottom of the companionway with flywheel facing forward so route for line to boom is straightforward compared to a 60. Assume it easier for him to get line to headsail via a shallow cockpit and forward than up to boom and also probably more line speed/length and easier to undertake in fresh and bumpy conditions compared to boom.

 

Not sure I would continue into the SO relying on that start technique to move water ballast in a fixed keeler.

He tried the boom first with not much success.

 

I imagine in a 50 knot blow a handkerchief might get it started.

 

Re decompression -- is that what he is setting with the T-wrench? My first car (gas) had a hand crank, and I think I tried it once or twice. Can't imagine hand cranking a 37+ HP diesel, so was impressed with the rolling hitch to the foresail sheet system.

 

So Destremeau, Josse, (JPD?), Alex, Romain and more join Conrad's 'get er done' club. "Can-do Colman" is now stuck in my head, living the dream.

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Another foil breakage. A pattern is developing similar to other Syd-Hob experiences with skinny things sticking out the side of the boat in rough conditions.

 

Who would have predicted that?

 

Alex's team. See the video posted earlier.

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Authoritative crash box answers is something for rmb.

We know that all the new boats had their foil systems substantially reinforced after the failures in the first races. Holing the boat was not an acceptable design feature. Question is if they had this particular failure mode in mind.

 

Yeah, I didn't see that pic until afterwards. A shore crew told me in Les Sables that he thought they didn't have Genasun controllers, and I never looked myself, so once again assuming something results in bad info.

 

In any case, if the internal circuit boards of the controllers get wet, it's not good (meltdown). As it says in the manual they're supposed to be in a dry place (hard thing to find on an IMOCA, I know). Or, at least mount then with the terminal ends facing down so the wires have a drip loop. So bummed that Conrad got held up so much. He sure did a good job sorting the mess out, and recorded much of the process while he did it. Impressive.

 

The image came later.

 

Let me snicker a bit about the marine gear that can't get wet. Here is what the GVB-8-Li ad copy says:

Marine Grade: Reliable Power After Years at Sea

Genasun Boost controllers provide reliable power in the harshest environments on earth. GVB's have been powering boats on round-the-world sailing races for years.

 

Perhaps it's time to hit them over the head with their golf cart charge controllers, those are apparently supposed to be waterproof.

Dunking power electronics into epoxy is not really an option.

I hope that he does not have another electrical fire episode. Once is more than enough.

 

Conrad definitely does something right when it come to media. The shore side of the media effort is also good. - And some want to make him a VOR OBR out of him. After pulling of a VG campaign by himself (&Clara &family &friends). Does not make too much sense to me.

 

Thanks for the details. Natural power is getting closer, thanks to these tests.

Like Acciona in the BWR and http://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/12367/acciona-thank-you-bubi almost completed its RTW without diesel. Another can-do sailor

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Don't think Conrad Coleman will be doing another VG? He has had to deal with some horror situations. Hard enough for a whole crew let alone solo. I get the feeling survival needs to be the single priority for most of the boats now. If you can keep your boat in tact and finish the race the rest will take care of itself. The 2 leaders have completed 45% of the race no half way yet. Armel may of been the best prepared for this? Good to Alex gaining rather than losing last sked.

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It looks like in two hours he has a decision, cross the line, or try to sail along it. The tracker shows winds will be dead astern, but below 40 so he could bounce along the line till the worst passes. By 9 hours he's got a starboard tack (not good for the foil), be manageable breeze.

My bet, he gybes before the line and holds on.

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With the leaders completing 45% in just 29 days.... Is it to early to predict if they will beat the overall record (78 days) and by how much??? Will we see a sub 70day???

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Don't think Conrad Coleman will be doing another VG? He has had to deal with some horror situations. Hard enough for a whole crew let alone solo. I get the feeling survival needs to be the single priority for most of the boats now. If you can keep your boat in tact and finish the race the rest will take care of itself. The 2 leaders have completed 45% of the race no half way yet. Armel may of been the best prepared for this? Good to Alex gaining rather than losing last sked.

I'd say he is the most likely to do another one. This time around is just the interview or the audition.

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Don't think Conrad Coleman will be doing another VG? He has had to deal with some horror situations. Hard enough for a whole crew let alone solo. I get the feeling survival needs to be the single priority for most of the boats now. If you can keep your boat in tact and finish the race the rest will take care of itself. The 2 leaders have completed 45% of the race no half way yet. Armel may of been the best prepared for this? Good to Alex gaining rather than losing last sked.

I'd say he is the most likely to do another one. This time around is just the interview or the audition.

 

 

He has done well to get a boat in this race, financially didn't get the sponsorship he really needed. He has suffered some mishaps and asked himself why was he doing this? Do complete another one he will need to raise the money first. I personally hope he does but I know he asking himself the question. He is not the person most likely to do another one not sure where you would get that from? What about Alex, Vincent, and those before him?

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Don't think Conrad Coleman will be doing another VG? He has had to deal with some horror situations. Hard enough for a whole crew let alone solo. I get the feeling survival needs to be the single priority for most of the boats now. If you can keep your boat in tact and finish the race the rest will take care of itself. The 2 leaders have completed 45% of the race no half way yet. Armel may of been the best prepared for this? Good to Alex gaining rather than losing last sked.

 

I'd say he is the most likely to do another one. This time around is just the interview or the audition.

He has done well to get a boat in this race, financially didn't get the sponsorship he really needed. He has suffered some mishaps and asked himself why was he doing this? Do complete another one he will need to raise the money first. I personally hope he does but I know he asking himself the question. He is not the person most likely to do another one not sure where you would get that from? What about Alex, Vincent, and those before him?

Vincent and Alex? Highly unlikely. You only go around so many times, before enough is enough.

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Thanks to those who are hurdling the language barriers to get us the news. Any hint where he will likely head for repairs/ shelter? Albany?

 

 

 

If he does come this way I'll be the first to greet him but in all likelihood if he does pull out I'm guessing he'll try to get to Fremantle, that's if he hasn't had to travel too far east of Leeuwin due to the system he's in down there.

No doubt Australian Maritime Rescue authorities are well aware of his situation and would be on standby if assistance required.

 

Amazing to hear Le Cleac'h & Thompson have already passed my line of longitude and are now east of south of me. 5 days off the previous record.

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Don't think Conrad Coleman will be doing another VG? He has had to deal with some horror situations. Hard enough for a whole crew let alone solo. I get the feeling survival needs to be the single priority for most of the boats now. If you can keep your boat in tact and finish the race the rest will take care of itself. The 2 leaders have completed 45% of the race no half way yet. Armel may of been the best prepared for this? Good to Alex gaining rather than losing last sked.

I'd say he is the most likely to do another one. This time around is just the interview or the audition.

 

 

Agree 100%.

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Don't think Conrad Coleman will be doing another VG? He has had to deal with some horror situations. Hard enough for a whole crew let alone solo. I get the feeling survival needs to be the single priority for most of the boats now. If you can keep your boat in tact and finish the race the rest will take care of itself. The 2 leaders have completed 45% of the race no half way yet. Armel may of been the best prepared for this? Good to Alex gaining rather than losing last sked.

I'd say he is the most likely to do another one. This time around is just the interview or the audition.

He has done well to get a boat in this race, financially didn't get the sponsorship he really needed. He has suffered some mishaps and asked himself why was he doing this? Do complete another one he will need to raise the money first. I personally hope he does but I know he asking himself the question. He is not the person most likely to do another one not sure where you would get that from? What about Alex, Vincent, and those before him?

Vincent and Alex? Highly unlikely. You only go around so many times, before enough is enough.

 

 

If Alex doesn't win this one (It's looking like a long shot from here) he'll be back I'm sure. Fastest boat and a first class sailor - why wouldn't he?

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For all the concern about JPD's slow start, he's looking more and more all the time like a potential podium contender. Pushing hard enough to stay ahead of the main pack, but not hard enough to break stuff. Maybe he'll be the one guy who still has the capacity to push hard after Cape Horn.

 

Still rooting for Costa to eventually catch a train and actually pass someone straight up rather than via abandonment and/or damage. He should catch Destremau soon, but that can be at least partly attributed to the engine issues. The first "relatively undamaged" person to be passed by Costa seems to still be weeks away.

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Twitter Video of Destremau starting his engine https://twitter.com/VendeeGlobe/status/805759271870660608

 

Vendée Globe@VendeeGlobe 1h

1 hour agoView translation

 

Sébastien Destremau a trouvé la solution pour démarrer son moteur ! Bravo à lui et merci à @desjoyeaux ! @teamfaceocean #TFFO #VG2016

 

 

Translated from French by BingWrong translation?

 

 

Sébastien Destremau has found the solution to start his engine! Congrats to him and thanks to @desjoyeaux! @teamfaceocean #TFFO #VG2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two questions here with the Destremau's jump start:

 

His diesel too big to put a hand crank on it?

 

The line leads to the clew on his headsail? Dump the sheet and pulls the line leading to engine?

 

Thought someone here said Mich Des used his boom, tightened up close-hauled and then popped the mainsheet.

No one seems to make marine engines anymore that have decompression levers to aid hand cranking. The technique he has used is well known particularly with cruisers where the engine is at the bottom of the companionway with flywheel facing forward so route for line to boom is straightforward compared to a 60. Assume it easier for him to get line to headsail via a shallow cockpit and forward than up to boom and also probably more line speed/length and easier to undertake in fresh and bumpy conditions compared to boom.

 

Not sure I would continue into the SO relying on that start technique to move water ballast in a fixed keeler.

 

 

Yanmar used to do a 3-cylinder diesel with 3 decompressor levers on top, and either a spring starter (favoured by the RNLI in Britain) or a pull-start pulley arrangement. We specified a couple of these for a Whitbread ULDB that sadly didn't get built in 89. They work just fine. Not sure if they still make them. Produced about 30hp. Bloody good idea, though.

 

Wind up the spring, prime the fuel, open the decompressors, let 'er rip on the spring, and quickly close the levers one by one.

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Twitter Video of Destremau starting his engine https://twitter.com/VendeeGlobe/status/805759271870660608

 

Vendée Globe@VendeeGlobe 1h

1 hour agoView translation

 

 

Sébastien Destremau a trouvé la solution pour démarrer son moteur ! Bravo à lui et merci à @desjoyeaux ! @teamfaceocean #TFFO #VG2016

 

Translated from French by BingWrong translation?

 

 

Sébastien Destremau has found the solution to start his engine! Congrats to him and thanks to @desjoyeaux! @teamfaceocean #TFFO #VG2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two questions here with the Destremau's jump start:

 

His diesel too big to put a hand crank on it?

 

The line leads to the clew on his headsail? Dump the sheet and pulls the line leading to engine?

 

Thought someone here said Mich Des used his boom, tightened up close-hauled and then popped the mainsheet.

No one seems to make marine engines anymore that have decompression levers to aid hand cranking. The technique he has used is well known particularly with cruisers where the engine is at the bottom of the companionway with flywheel facing forward so route for line to boom is straightforward compared to a 60. Assume it easier for him to get line to headsail via a shallow cockpit and forward than up to boom and also probably more line speed/length and easier to undertake in fresh and bumpy conditions compared to boom.

 

Not sure I would continue into the SO relying on that start technique to move water ballast in a fixed keeler.

Lombardini engines have decompression levers. Hopefully I never need to use mine.

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Don't think Conrad Coleman will be doing another VG? He has had to deal with some horror situations. Hard enough for a whole crew let alone solo. I get the feeling survival needs to be the single priority for most of the boats now. If you can keep your boat in tact and finish the race the rest will take care of itself. The 2 leaders have completed 45% of the race no half way yet. Armel may of been the best prepared for this? Good to Alex gaining rather than losing last sked.

I'd say he is the most likely to do another one. This time around is just the interview or the audition.

He has done well to get a boat in this race, financially didn't get the sponsorship he really needed. He has suffered some mishaps and asked himself why was he doing this? Do complete another one he will need to raise the money first. I personally hope he does but I know he asking himself the question. He is not the person most likely to do another one not sure where you would get that from? What about Alex, Vincent, and those before him?

Vincent and Alex? Highly unlikely. You only go around so many times, before enough is enough.

 

 

If Alex doesn't win this one (It's looking like a long shot from here) he'll be back I'm sure. Fastest boat and a first class sailor - why wouldn't he?

 

 

Yep, although his boat will be old technology by the next edition, as the foiling concepts for these boats are evolving rapidly.

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