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hawaiifins

Left Coast Dart #004 + psychological torture

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The good news is that LC Dart #004 made it across the Pacific from the left coast at an amazing average speed of 22.8 knots. Of course, it was strapped to a Matson container ship the whole way. The MV Manoa arrived on time, Saturday morning. Our condo overlooks the terminal and we watched it being offloaded most of Saturday and much of Sunday. We never saw our boat but when the ship pulled out yesterday morning, there it was, sitting on the dock right across the harbor. And there it stayed, yesterday morning, afternoon, evening, night, this morning....

 

This is torture. I can see it, but I can't have it. Sure, they took away the power boat sitting right next to it, but the Dart??!! Agghh! It's just sitting on the dock of the bay, watching the time roll away.

 

Okay, rant over. Back to the binoculars.

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...ahh so near..........yet soooooo far!

 

............at least you're not watching some hooligans strip it! :mellow:

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I'd go completely bonkers in a situation like that.

 

Maybe you could get Cindy to call the and ask if she could pick up her boat?

 

-jim lee

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Somebody should get it off the pier . After a couple of days they will charge you demurage.. That's why that other boat is gone already.

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More likely a low priority. Perishables go out first, followed by time sensitive freight. Weird shaped items apparently sit way down on the list. Except for power boats. I used to know a guy who knew a guy, but that first guy is no longer with us. I do know a guy who used to work for a tug company. Maybe he knows a guy? Matson even politely told Mrs. LCDart #004 to stop calling, They'll get to it when they get to it- something like that.

 

I feel like Jimmy Stewart in Rear Window, peering out with my binoculars all day.

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More likely a low priority. Perishables go out first, followed by time sensitive freight. Weird shaped items apparently sit way down on the list. Except for power boats. I used to know a guy who knew a guy, but that first guy is no longer with us. I do know a guy who used to work for a tug company. Maybe he knows a guy? Matson even politely told Mrs. LCDart #004 to stop calling, They'll get to it when they get to it- something like that.

 

I feel like Jimmy Stewart in Rear Window, peering out with my binoculars all day.

At least your leg's not in a cast...

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unmarked envelopes with crisp Benjamin's inside is universally understood tallow.

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Still waiting. Why can't they get my boat off the rack? Three days? Tim/Tom could move it without any mechanical force.

hawaiifins,

 

How about posting a pic of the tortuous view you have of your new baby, "sittin on a dock on the Bay".

 

Cheers!!!

 

-MH

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Still waiting. Why can't they get my boat off the rack? Three days? Tim/Tom could move it without any mechanical force.

Time to stop screwing with the front office. Time to find a bruddah after work and see what can be done. It's O'Ahu. Deals can be made.

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More likely a low priority. Perishables go out first, followed by time sensitive freight. Weird shaped items apparently sit way down on the list. Except for power boats. I used to know a guy who knew a guy, but that first guy is no longer with us. I do know a guy who used to work for a tug company. Maybe he knows a guy? Matson even politely told Mrs. LCDart #004 to stop calling, They'll get to it when they get to it- something like that.

 

I feel like Jimmy Stewart in Rear Window, peering out with my binoculars all day.

At least your leg's not in a cast...

Yeah, and you'd have to put up with Grace Kelly in her prime.

 

http://www.citizen.tv/hitchcock-1954-rear-window-the-classic-kiss-scene-between-g-kelly-j-stewart-yqTVK2Kv1L.html

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Still waiting. Why can't they get my boat off the rack? Three days? Tim/Tom could move it without any mechanical force.

Time to stop screwing with the front office. Time to find a bruddah after work and see what can be done. It's O'Ahu. Deals can be made.

If only I knew how to access one of those dudes. Meanwhile, as we speak, they are stacking containers all around the boat. Pretty soon, it'll be wedged in tight. Calling everyone we know.

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Well, after a bunch of phone calls made by Mrs. Dart ( I would have been ballistic) it looks like the night shift will unload the Dart tonight for pickup Thursday morning. Five days from Oakland to Hawaii. Four + days on the dock in Hawaii. Huh? I'm afraid to get too excited but if any locals are around WYC at about 10AM, we need to put the stick up, the boom on, and splash it. And then the work begins.

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Because sailboats are owned by rich fffff haole's. So well down the queue.

 

Look forward to seeing your new ride this weekend.

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I'll be there for the Cal 20 blessing. Will duke it out with the barflies in the pupu line.

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Shit... I had an trailered O'Day 25 shipped to Oahu on Matson. It sat in the yard for weeks until I drove by and discovered it, covered by dust and airplane soot. All it took was a phone call and the released it too me, but I had to go pick it up. Was supposedly going to be delivered. Hooking my '79 Toyota 4x4 up and hauling it off to the launch at Keehi was one of the best days of my life. Sleeping onboard over night waiting for high tide while drug deals were constantly going on in the parking space right next to me.. not one of the best nights ever, but floating again the next morning was worth it.. sorta.

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Awesome stuff! Must be like Christmas Eve for you and Mrs HF! Look forward to pics and reviews!

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Talked to Hawaiifins, they have the boat, they are getting ready to launch it.

 

-jim lee

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Congrats, new boat owner Hawaiifins!

 

We expect not to hear from you for a few days as you remove the bow and unwrap that shiny new toy! Then,a full sitrep, si vous plait.

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We expect not to hear from you for a few days as you remove the bow

 

What!?!? The bow fell off?!

 

More seriously, congrats Hawaiifins! Looking forward to hearing about the new boat!

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I think you may be a bit confused,

not bow:

post-14756-0-11185600-1376059316.jpg

 

or bow;

post-14756-0-23265400-1376059422.jpg

 

but BOW...

post-14756-0-62862000-1376059453.jpg

 

Is english not your 1st language?? :blink:

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We expect not to hear from you for a few days as you remove the bow

 

What!?!? The bow fell off?!

 

More seriously, congrats Hawaiifins! Looking forward to hearing about the new boat!

Its OK if the bow/bough ( :blink: ) fell off. Hawaii is almost outside of the environment.

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Thanks Hilly, ya read me right. Although, now that I've reread my post, I too envision some satanic ritual involving two chainsaws and a come-along; yikes!

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Lovely to see said vessel last evening at WYC along with Mr. & Mrs Hawaiifins. The boat looks fabulous.

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All that's left is to bend the mainsail on. It all took awhile because getting it out of Matson was a longer process than anticipated; the graphics took several hours (but look great), the hoist at WYC is not high enough so we had to modify the lifting harness, and its been horrendously hot, meaning frequent forays for shade and cold beverages of one type or another. Plus, Friday I was by myself doing the residual. I would think that a small team of guys (2-3) could get the mast up, keel down and have it launched and ready to sail in a couple of hours. It'll get faster when we know more about what we're doing.

 

Back to my job... it's raining today, so it's not the end of the world.

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Are you going to be able to store it mast up unless you're traveling to another harbor/hoist?

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Mast up and keel down. In other words, it has antifouling and will live in a slip at Waikiki Yacht Club. The main is on slugs, too. The whole idea is that I can race it with 3-5, or sail it by myself or with Mrs. Hawaiifins on a sunny afternoon. Dart #3 lives on an amazingly cool hydrohoist type of mechanism behind the owner's home in New Orleans. The other three Darts, including mine,

are put together to live in the water. I am retaining the trailer in order to participate in events at Kaneohoe Yacht Club, on the other side of the island. The trip over there is about six or more hours of upwind bashing around a significant point of land. It's like being in an industrial washing machine.

 

Putting the mast up is relatively easy and Jim's keel crane and winch mechanism is slick and efficient. Still, I want the boat ready for a last minute sail out the Ala Wai. The boats that do live in our yard have the masts up and are ready to be splashed and sailed.

Back to my school's leadership retreat. The sun is coming out... damn...

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Mast up and keel down. In other words, it has antifouling and will live in a slip at Waikiki Yacht Club. The main is on slugs, too. The whole idea is that I can race it with 3-5, or sail it by myself or with Mrs. Hawaiifins on a sunny afternoon. Dart #3 lives on an amazingly cool hydrohoist type of mechanism behind the owner's home in New Orleans. The other three Darts, including mine,

are put together to live in the water. I am retaining the trailer in order to participate in events at Kaneohoe Yacht Club, on the other side of the island. The trip over there is about six or more hours of upwind bashing around a significant point of land. It's like being in an industrial washing machine.

 

Putting the mast up is relatively easy and Jim's keel crane and winch mechanism is slick and efficient. Still, I want the boat ready for a last minute sail out the Ala Wai. The boats that do live in our yard have the masts up and are ready to be splashed and sailed.

Back to my school's leadership retreat. The sun is coming out... damn...

Thanks for the info---

More questions:

Did you put an epoxy barrier coat on under the anti-foulung?

What king of anti-fouling?

How long does it take to lower and secure the keel after the boat is in the water?

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Mast up and keel down. In other words, it has antifouling and will live in a slip at Waikiki Yacht Club. The main is on slugs, too. The whole idea is that I can race it with 3-5, or sail it by myself or with Mrs. Hawaiifins on a sunny afternoon. Dart #3 lives on an amazingly cool hydrohoist type of mechanism behind the owner's home in New Orleans. The other three Darts, including mine,

are put together to live in the water. I am retaining the trailer in order to participate in events at Kaneohoe Yacht Club, on the other side of the island. The trip over there is about six or more hours of upwind bashing around a significant point of land. It's like being in an industrial washing machine.

 

Putting the mast up is relatively easy and Jim's keel crane and winch mechanism is slick and efficient. Still, I want the boat ready for a last minute sail out the Ala Wai. The boats that do live in our yard have the masts up and are ready to be splashed and sailed.

Back to my school's leadership retreat. The sun is coming out... damn...

Thanks for the info---

More questions:

Did you put an epoxy barrier coat on under the anti-foulung?

What king of anti-fouling?

How long does it take to lower and secure the keel after the boat is in the water?

Jim Betts Enterprises put on the bottom, starting with an epoxy barrier coat. They sprayed Micron 66 on top of that. In terms of the keel, a drill could raise and lower it in a few minutes. By hand cranking, it took about 10 minutes to lift. Going down is faster.

Access to a hoist makes the whole procedure super easy. If I were to do this frequently, I'd invest in a heavy-duty drill. Jim Lee and Tim/Tom used one at the shop and say that it worked really well.

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Mast up and keel down. In other words, it has antifouling and will live in a slip at Waikiki Yacht Club. The main is on slugs, too. The whole idea is that I can race it with 3-5, or sail it by myself or with Mrs. Hawaiifins on a sunny afternoon. Dart #3 lives on an amazingly cool hydrohoist type of mechanism behind the owner's home in New Orleans. The other three Darts, including mine,

are put together to live in the water. I am retaining the trailer in order to participate in events at Kaneohoe Yacht Club, on the other side of the island. The trip over there is about six or more hours of upwind bashing around a significant point of land. It's like being in an industrial washing machine.

 

Putting the mast up is relatively easy and Jim's keel crane and winch mechanism is slick and efficient. Still, I want the boat ready for a last minute sail out the Ala Wai. The boats that do live in our yard have the masts up and are ready to be splashed and sailed.

Back to my school's leadership retreat. The sun is coming out... damn...

Thanks for the info---

More questions:

Did you put an epoxy barrier coat on under the anti-foulung?

What king of anti-fouling?

How long does it take to lower and secure the keel after the boat is in the water?

Jim Betts Enterprises put on the bottom, starting with an epoxy barrier coat. They sprayed Micron 66 on top of that. In terms of the keel, a drill could raise and lower it in a few minutes. By hand cranking, it took about 10 minutes to lift. Going down is faster.

Access to a hoist makes the whole procedure super easy. If I were to do this frequently, I'd invest in a heavy-duty drill. Jim Lee and Tim/Tom used one at the shop and say that it worked really well.

Thank you.

Let me know how the Micron 66 works where you are. I have it on my boat in the Bay Area and it seems to be a good choice between a cruising bottom and a full on hard paint racing bottom. (And I like that i can get it in green)

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I used Micron 66 on our racer-cruiser (Sydney 36) for several years. It has held up very well in our tropical environment. Typically, we were able to get 18 months to two years out of it without reapplying. There is more expensive stuff out there, but any of it would be overkill for our program

 

Question for y'all: how do you upload pictures to a post on SA? Really...I have no idea. And I currently don't have access to a twelve year old who might explain it to me. Some of you have asked for pics and I would like to comply.

 

Another question: how do I change my username and password-seeing as I no longer own Fins- and let folks know that it's the same person with a new name, rather than a sock puppet?

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I used Micron 66 on our racer-cruiser (Sydney 36) for several years. It has held up very well in our tropical environment. Typically, we were able to get 18 months to two years out of it without reapplying. There is more expensive stuff out there, but any of it would be overkill for our program

 

Question for y'all: how do you upload pictures to a post on SA? Really...I have no idea. And I currently don't have access to a twelve year old who might explain it to me. Some of you have asked for pics and I would like to comply.

 

Another question: how do I change my username and password-seeing as I no longer own Fins- and let folks know that it's the same person with a new name, rather than a sock puppet?

Never changed my user name so I'm not sure. The desire to avoid the sockpuppet label... maybe you can have your user name as "(new name) formerly known as H'fins"

 

Photos, Hmmm...

 

If you click the "more reply options" when answering a post there is an option at the bottom of the template to attach files. As long as your file or photo is less than 1MB it should upload. then you select "Add to Post". It should appear as below.

There may be other ways, but I'm not aware of them.

Photo Below is By Chuck Lantz a local Photographer here in SF.

 

 

post-18853-0-56299500-1376328193_thumb.jpg

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I used Micron 66 on our racer-cruiser (Sydney 36) for several years. It has held up very well in our tropical environment. Typically, we were able to get 18 months to two years out of it without reapplying. There is more expensive stuff out there, but any of it would be overkill for our program

 

Question for y'all: how do you upload pictures to a post on SA? Really...I have no idea. And I currently don't have access to a twelve year old who might explain it to me. Some of you have asked for pics and I would like to comply.

 

Another question: how do I change my username and password-seeing as I no longer own Fins- and let folks know that it's the same person with a new name, rather than a sock puppet?

Changing names was not too hard, I did it a few weeks ago. Click on your name where you are logged in (upper right corner of the screen), click on MY SETTINGS, then DISPLAY NAME. It gives you a place for a new name and asks for your password. There is a limit on how often you can change names. I have done it once in 8 years!

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I'd suggest putting up an avatar pic first, something distinctive, in true SA style, that way no one will notice what you call yourself... B)

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I used Micron 66 on our racer-cruiser (Sydney 36) for several years. It has held up very well in our tropical environment. Typically, we were able to get 18 months to two years out of it without reapplying. There is more expensive stuff out there, but any of it would be overkill for our program

 

Question for y'all: how do you upload pictures to a post on SA? Really...I have no idea. And I currently don't have access to a twelve year old who might explain it to me. Some of you have asked for pics and I would like to comply.

 

Another question: how do I change my username and password-seeing as I no longer own Fins- and let folks know that it's the same person with a new name, rather than a sock puppet?

Never changed my user name so I'm not sure. The desire to avoid the sockpuppet label... maybe you can have your user name as "(new name) formerly known as H'fins"

 

Photos, Hmmm...

 

If you click the "more reply options" when answering a post there is an option at the bottom of the template to attach files. As long as your file or photo is less than 1MB it should upload. then you select "Add to Post". It should appear as below.

There may be other ways, but I'm not aware of them.

Photo Below is By Chuck Lantz a local Photographer here in SF.

 

 

attachicon.gif85588112.6JEzYy5I.jpg

The photos I'm trying to upload are 1.6 MB. How can they be reduced to 1 MB?

 

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The photos I'm trying to upload are 1.6 MB. How can they be reduced to 1 MB?

I compress my files outside of SA. I don't know of a way to do it in SA. I open my photos in Microsoft Office Picture Manager (there are lots of other photo editors out there) that came with my computer. I go into EDIT PICTURES and COMPRESS PICTURES and select the size as DOCUMENTS. This compresses them from several MB to a few hundred KB. I usually have them saved as a different file name to preserve the original. My way is probably cumbersome, but it works for posting here and on my blog that needs smaller files. There are many other ways and I am sure that others can chime in with their method.

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If you have a Mac and use iPhoto, just export them to a folder. Using the export command on the file menu. Its what I do and it does a good job mashing 'em down.

 

-jim lee

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Get a photobucket account, easy peasy.

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On the PC there is a free app called Fotosizer it allows you to resize a whole bunch of pictures at once. If you want to upload a whole bunch of pictures to say photobucket... you could COPY the folder to another (to protect the originals)... then use Fotosizer to convert them to a specific size.

 

I just upload my pictures to my own server... that way I can just drop the whole folder and done... I know... spoiled and easy. But storage is free!

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LCD4- formerly Hawaiifins here. Fortunately, our club has a hoist so cranking the keep up by hand probably won't happen very often, although the crane mechanism Jim designed is pretty darn ingenious.

 

We've been sailing the boat a bunch, always on the smaller jib. Tried both kites on Saturday, launching at Diamond Head bouy in fresh trades. The boat hits ten kits very quickly and easily, and then picks up steam in puffs. I suspect 15s are reachable, and higher if surfing a wave. It is rare for me to need more than two fingers to steer, upwind or down. My tendency to over tack the boat does send us into near wipeouts, but that's driver error- the Sydney 36 was a Mac truck compared to the Dart. Generally the boat is well behaved but for racing, will need some beef on the rail. Double-handed, a reefed main alone will be enough power and simple to manage. This is truly a dual purpose boat. Pictures when I get the chance- I'm a teacher and school just started so it's been hectic. A friend has a quick video from last Friday night- near sunset, three adults and a 12 year old trimming the kite. Just what Jim was hoping for!

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although the crane mechanism Jim designed is pretty darn ingenious.

 

How about a picture of that crane?

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It's buried in storage- but Jim can probably put together a shot.

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Bummed I had to move before the Dart arrived, but at least I have the AC72s to keep me busy. May even have a front row seat at the boundary to keep me occupied next week.

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Here's a look at the crane..

 

1009781_10151473029966290_1009536719_n.j

 

There is a structural beam behind the keel that the post through the companionway sits on with an alignment pin. The plywood plate steadies the crane from saying left to right. The cable drops straight down to the keel from the winch. Behind LCD4 there is a pad at the forward end of the beam that sits on the deck right behind the mast transferring the load to the compression post. The beams and post are all aluminum to reduce the weight.

 

Really it was Leif's design, we just changed it a little here and there.

 

Here's the video clip they speak of..

 

https://www.facebook.com/video/embed?video_id=10201933866412463

 

-jim lee

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Here's a look at the crane..

 

1009781_10151473029966290_1009536719_n.j

 

There is a structural beam behind the keel that the post through the companionway sits on with an alignment pin. The plywood plate steadies the crane from saying left to right. The cable drops straight down to the keel from the winch. Behind LCD4 there is a pad at the forward end of the beam that sits on the deck right behind the mast transferring the load to the compression post. The beams and post are all aluminum to reduce the weight.

 

Really it was Leif's design, we just changed it a little here and there.

 

Here's the video clip they speak of..

 

https://www.facebook.com/video/embed?video_id=10201933866412463

 

-jim lee

Jim, is that a hand crank or 18V cordless crank? Rick

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is that a block coming off the tack in that video? looks like fun, but no sound, FYI

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is that a block coming off the tack in that video? looks like fun, but no sound, FYI

The boat was rigged with the tack line on both sides of the cabin house, which gives a lot of purchase and means that it can be controlled from either side of the boat. There is indeed a double block on the tack to make this possible. It works great. In regard to the winch, it is set up to be hand cranked but can be used with a drill for weaklings like me.

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