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      Moderation Team Change   06/16/2017

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buys737

Sailing around the world in a San Juan 24

17,588 posts in this topic

Have you ever wondered (hypothetically) just how far you could go if you set sail one day and headed out over the horizon in a Craiglist special 4ksb with almost no preparation? Well...now you dont have to because three weeks ago this Russian immigrant, Rimas Meleshyus, left Oak Harbor, Washington in an old San Juan 24 he bought for $500 the month before. Where is he headed? Around the world...via Cape Horn. He has no autopilot or self steering, no communications equipment other than a handheld VHF. He has two ancient handheld gps units, 85 gallons of water and a boatload of food. Despite everyone telling him this was probably a bad idea, he left determined to follow his dream. This isn't the first time he's tried this kind of thing. A couple he spent 34 days crossing the Gulf of Alaska, also in a SJ24. He ended up shipwrecked on an island near Kodiak for 9 days before he was rescued by the Coast Guard. I gave him a Spot tracker and a bunch of batteries for it because I figured this could be an interesting show. He is currently a few hundred miles off the coast of Northern California. His progress has not been particularily good. 25 to 50 miles a day...but not always in the right direction. Right now he seems like maybe he's changed his mind and is headed for Hawaii. Anyway, I've attached a link to his Spot tracker if anyone's interested. He seems like a really nice guy with a huge dream and a lot of determination. I wish him well, but he has a lot of challenges ahead of him that Im afraid he's not prepared for.

 

Here's a link to an article in the local paper. There is also quite a bit of info on the guy if you google him.

 

http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/news/213584831.html?mobile=true

 

And here is a link to the tracker.

 

http://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0peJuCrfr2oqehW0RAegJdeJsCaHryH5q

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Isn't that like buying a car with no wheels or tires, and think you could do the Indy 500? There are the stupid and then there is the unrealistic.

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Just so you know . . . . an American couple (Dave and Jaja Martin) with 2 kids sailed round the world in a Cal24 (circa 1995 - we sailed across the Indian Ocean the same year they did).

 

They then had a third child, bought a 'big boat' - all of 33ft and sailed to Iceland and Norway.

 

That's just one case.

 

There are all sorts of people who have successfully made amazing trips in very very modest boats.

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Have you ever wondered (hypothetically) just how far you could go if you set sail one day and headed out over the horizon in a Craiglist special 4ksb with almost no preparation? Well...now you dont have to because three weeks ago this Russian immigrant, Rimas Meleshyus, left Oak Harbor, Washington in an old San Juan 24 he bought for $500 the month before. Where is he headed? Around the world...via Cape Horn. He has no autopilot or self steering, no communications equipment other than a handheld VHF. He has two ancient handheld gps units, 85 gallons of water and a boatload of food. Despite everyone telling him this was probably a bad idea, he left determined to follow his dream. This isn't the first time he's tried this kind of thing. A couple he spent 34 days crossing the Gulf of Alaska, also in a SJ24. He ended up shipwrecked on an island near Kodiak for 9 days before he was rescued by the Coast Guard. I gave him a Spot tracker and a bunch of batteries for it because I figured this could be an interesting show. He is currently a few hundred miles off the coast of Northern California. His progress has not been particularily good. 25 to 50 miles a day...but not always in the right direction. Right now he seems like maybe he's changed his mind and is headed for Hawaii. Anyway, I've attached a link to his Spot tracker if anyone's interested. He seems like a really nice guy with a huge dream and a lot of determination. I wish him well, but he has a lot of challenges ahead of him that Im afraid he's not prepared for.

 

Here's a link to an article in the local paper. There is also quite a bit of info on the guy if you google him.

 

http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/news/213584831.html?mobile=true

 

And here is a link to the tracker.

 

http://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0peJuCrfr2oqehW0RAegJdeJsCaHryH5q

The coast Guard should go ahead and send him a bill

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Have you ever wondered (hypothetically) just how far you could go if you set sail one day and headed out over the horizon in a Craiglist special 4ksb with almost no preparation? Well...now you dont have to because three weeks ago this Russian immigrant,

 

Stopped reading at 'Russian Immigrant'. Crazy Ruskies. :P

 

Not impossible though.. as proven by the Martins.

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Sprouts? Cheese?

 

Can he write better than Reid? No, wait, I already know the answer to that.

 

First leg and Horn rounding has definitely Been done before, father and son doublehanded in a 25' Vertue, a tough little boat, also with sextant and few electronics:

http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f127/brief-review-my-old-man-and-the-sea-3599.html

 

And Matt Rutheford, solo in an Albin Vega, recently:

https://www.google.com/search?q=matt+rutherford+albin+vega&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=a5EWUvGzJKeU2wW2qoCICQ&ved=0CDoQsAQ&biw=1024&bih=726

 

 

 

 

Ah, what the hell. Good luck and Godspeed..

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Have you ever wondered (hypothetically) just how far you could go if you set sail one day and headed out over the horizon in a Craiglist special 4ksb with almost no preparation? Well...now you dont have to because three weeks ago this Russian immigrant, Rimas Meleshyus, left Oak Harbor, Washington in an old San Juan 24 he bought for $500 the month before. Where is he headed? Around the world...via Cape Horn. He has no autopilot or self steering, no communications equipment other than a handheld VHF. He has two ancient handheld gps units, 85 gallons of water and a boatload of food. Despite everyone telling him this was probably a bad idea, he left determined to follow his dream. This isn't the first time he's tried this kind of thing. A couple he spent 34 days crossing the Gulf of Alaska, also in a SJ24. He ended up shipwrecked on an island near Kodiak for 9 days before he was rescued by the Coast Guard. ... ...

 

 

Well, a SJ-24 is not a good boat for this kind of thing, but it could be worse.

 

What he needs is not cool electronic doohickeys but to make sure the boat & rig & basic gear is sound. What does he have for ground tackle? Has the standing rigging been replaced at any time in the life of the boat or is it OEM? Have the hatches been given a bit of attention to make them strong & tight? What has he got for a bilge pump?

 

Most big dreams founder on the most mundane rocks. I know you meant well giving him a SPOT but that's far far down the list of stuff he needs.

 

FB- Doug

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Some of you guys need to read about the history of what people have done in sailing from hundreds of years before this Russian guy started out. Seems a modern vacuum happens often when people think everyone needs a 40' boat with autohelm and GPS. What bullshit.

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I hope he doesn't try to set a chute downwind in a breeze. The SJ24 is a real broach coach. But then that's probably the least of his potential problems. Good luck Ivan, you'll need it.

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Have you ever wondered (hypothetically) just how far you could go if you set sail one day and headed out over the horizon in a Craiglist special 4ksb with almost no preparation? Well...now you dont have to because three weeks ago this Russian immigrant, Rimas Meleshyus, left Oak Harbor, Washington in an old San Juan 24 he bought for $500 the month before. Where is he headed? Around the world...via Cape Horn. He has no autopilot or self steering, no communications equipment other than a handheld VHF. He has two ancient handheld gps units, 85 gallons of water and a boatload of food. Despite everyone telling him this was probably a bad idea, he left determined to follow his dream. This isn't the first time he's tried this kind of thing. A couple he spent 34 days crossing the Gulf of Alaska, also in a SJ24. He ended up shipwrecked on an island near Kodiak for 9 days before he was rescued by the Coast Guard. ... ...

 

Well, a SJ-24 is not a good boat for this kind of thing, but it could be worse.

 

What he needs is not cool electronic doohickeys but to make sure the boat & rig & basic gear is sound. What does he have for ground tackle? Has the standing rigging been replaced at any time in the life of the boat or is it OEM? Have the hatches been given a bit of attention to make them strong & tight? What has he got for a bilge pump?

 

Most big dreams founder on the most mundane rocks. I know you meant well giving him a SPOT but that's far far down the list of stuff he needs.

 

FB- Doug

Thanks Doug, I don't know much history on the boat but it is very stock and probably an OEM rig. As far as the tracker goes, I promised him that when he first got the boat. Rimas had no money and I figured people might be more apt to help him out and donate stuff he really needed to increase his chance of success if they would be able to follow along on his journey. Also when he needs to stop for repairs and supplies, it might give him more credit with people when they can see what he has already done (or just add to the evidence that he's a bit crazy!) Anyway, I think it helped because a lot of people donated a lot of safety gear, spares, and food. I just wish he could of waited longer and done a proper refit of the boat, but he was determined to leave this year. But honestly, the tracker isn't as much for Rimas as it is for me. I'm just really interested in seeing how he does.

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A San Juan 24 is not the best boat for this trip. It has a huge, very deep cockpit. When sailing, it is customary to plug the cockpit drains, as if it heals or squats, water starts pouring in.

 

10 years or so, a guy sailed his SJ24 from Oregon to Hawaii. He had a fair amount of experience, and had owned the boat for a number of years. He put in collision bulkheads, upgraded the rigging, etc. Took him a month, was knocked down frequently, and decided not to sail it home, as beating home for 6-8 weeks, after his experiences did not appeal to him. He ended up sailing it through the Panama Canal, and leaving it in the Caribbean.

 

The Cal 25 ended up getting significantly upgraded, both structurally and the rigging near the beginning of the trip.

 

The San Juan 24 is a great little boat, but isn't designed for serious offshore work.

 

I am not saying it is impossible, I wish him luck, I just think he could have chosen a better boat for this trip.

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Having owned a SJ24, I will begin a prayer vigil for him.

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Just so you know . . . . an American couple (Dave and Jaja Martin) with 2 kids sailed round the world in a Cal24 (circa 1995 - we sailed across the Indian Ocean the same year they did).

 

They then had a third child, bought a 'big boat' - all of 33ft and sailed to Iceland and Norway.

 

That's just one case.

 

There are all sorts of people who have successfully made amazing trips in very very modest boats.

 

They completely rebuilt and repurposed that boat before they left - they didn't simply buy a bottom $ CL special and sail away.

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I've owned a SJ24 too. Lovely boat but unless it's in the hands of a good sailor it might be a handful to self steer. No autopilot or windvane is his stupidest decision. It's a bit wet beating to windward - but it goes very nicely in light air. Hope it stays light around Cape Horn.

 

Some days I wish we lived in an benevolent dictatorship. Somebody would step in and say "sorry this is too stupid an idea". I'm all for sailing around the world in small boats (Webb Chiles for example), but it sure helps if you're a sailor first!

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Isn't that like buying a car with no wheels or tires, and think you could do the Indy 500? There are the stupid and then there is the unrealistic.

Its more like buying a junker 914 and then just driving onto the Brickyard figuring that if you start now you might get in 200 laps before next Memorial Day weekend

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I read about this nitwits first "adventure" in some small boat publication.

 

I think he washed ashore, burying the keel and snapping the rudder off the post because he was too exhausted from hand steering and fell asleep or something.

:wacko:

 

Having owned and re-fit a SJ24 some years back I had half a mind to write a firmly worded letter to the editor detailing all the things large and small that made the vessel an extremely poor choice for ocean voyaging but in the end couldn't be bothered.

<_<

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24' boat.. fookin' luxury, probably got a spa..

Small boat for ocean voyaging start at 3'11", and went from Tangiers to Grand Caneria,

post-14756-0-18662700-1377253268_thumb.jpg


For going all the way 'round the marble you will need a bigger boat, this model at 12' is all you really NEED, everything else is a WANT...

post-14756-0-73148900-1377253307_thumb.jpg


Me personally, something like the Maltese Falcon would be fine.

post-14756-0-78798600-1377253339.jpg




Link to crazy bastards in small boats, my hats' off to all of them, the list doesn't include

Evgeny Gvozdev, he is worth googling.


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Some of you guys need to read about the history of what people have done in sailing from hundreds of years before this Russian guy started out. Seems a modern vacuum happens often when people think everyone needs a 40' boat with autohelm and GPS. What bullshit.

Woody...here's my Swanson. post-14990-0-43440800-1377304330_thumb.jpg

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Some of you guys need to read about the history of what people have done in sailing from hundreds of years before this Russian guy started out. Seems a modern vacuum happens often when people think everyone needs a 40' boat with autohelm and GPS. What bullshit.

 

I don't think people need a 40'boat with fancy stuff, but I do think crossing oceans... or even sailing around the edges exposed to weather... requires a boat that is sound in the basics. You know, rudders that don't break, masts that don't fall down, hatches that don't let the sea come pouring in, anchors that will hold the vessel in place... in the absence of one of these, or one of a large number of similar basic requirements... a relatively simple situation goes from benign to malignant.

 

A SJ-24 is not a good choice for a number of reasons, but a super-cheap beater SJ-24 that has no real gear and dubious maintenance for the past ? decades is really just playing Russian Roulette. You can get away with with it for a lot of clicks, enough that the skipper and/or the people watching might not even be aware that's what is going on.

 

FB- Doug

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For those who may not know...

 

Webb Chiles - who regularly peruses these pages, and was just featured on the front page of SA last week for his critique of the Americas Cup - is preparing to embark on a circumnavigation in a Moore 24.

 

http://www.inthepresentsea.com/the_actual_site/gannet.html

 

His always interesting blog is here:

 

http://www.inthepresentsea.com/the_actual_site/journal/journal.html

 

This ain't his first rodeo. It will be his sixth circumnavigation, and he has extensively modified his Moore for the task.

 

Gannet is not the smallest boat he has taken across oceans either:

 

http://www.inthepresentsea.com/the_actual_site/journal/Entries/2007/2/13_Evanston%3A_leaving_in_CHIDIOCK.html

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A Moore 24 is a very different boat than a SJ 24. For one, it does not go downhill faster on its side than upright.

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A Moore 24 is a very different boat than a SJ 24. For one, it does not go downhill faster on its side than upright.

 

Not meaning to directly equate the two...

 

The Russian in the SJ24 falls squarely in the "not likely to succeed" category, whereas Mr. Chiles has "been-there-done-that" enough times to mount a serious attempt that far exceeds any characterization as a foolhardy stunt.

 

Just thought folks who perhaps didn't know would be interested in hearing about it.

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Chiles certainly has earned credibility with his exploits. His trip on Chidiock could be classified as a stunt but since then.... well lets just say he has nothing to prove. He is obviously a consummate seaman, albeit just a tad eccentric. ^_^

 

He is in his 70's now so maybe he just wants to do a Slocum.

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Weird. It looks like he will sail awhile then take sail down and drift for 3 or 4 days, then go sailing again. Maybe just trying to get things figured out.

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If you're looking at the waypoints, the time stamp on each point shows that for some reason, they're coming at variable intervals, so his speed is possibly pretty constant but the waypoints are random.

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No mention of small boat, initially inexperienced, RTW sailors is complete without a mention of Shane Acton and Shrimpy.

 

He bought an 18ft 6in plywood bilge keeler on an inland river and set off never having had the mast up. No electronics at all!

 

Plastic sextant and minimal charts.

 

OK some may say he wussed out because he went via the canals.

 

His description of surviving a Biscay gale then cooking some comfort food [chips] in the cockpit on a primus held in a biscuit tin between his feet is a classic.

 

I had a copy of Shrimpy aboard when I set off from the UK bound for the Caribbean with a little more experience and a lot more boat.Any time I doubted my sanity I read a chapter from Shrimpy.

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In Cabo early to mid 80's. Several of the yachties get together on the beach for a fire.

 

I got to talking to one guy who was single-handing on a Columbia 24. He was from California and mentioned he was on the way to New Zealand. I said something about how that would possibly be a rough trip in that boat. He laughed and said, ' Yeah, there was some rough weather last time!'

 

Turned out he had already single-handed a different Columbia 24 to new Zealand a couple of years earlier. Sold it there, came home, and decided to do it again. I quit offering him advice.

 

Good times.

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I remember the plugs for the cockpit scuppers. When I bought my first race boat (sj 24) i was going through the boat with the owner. I noticed a pair of plugs tied off to a plug on each side of the cockpit...what the hell are these for??? the owner smiled and said if you sail it hard enough you'll find out...i did...

 

raced the boat offshore 3 times for the annual Gulfport to Pensacola race...two of them were nice kite carries and one was a power reach...those plugs came in handy...

loved the boat and raced it hard for several years and then it was time to move up...

 

last time i saw it was maybe 20 years ago at Dog River marina in Mobile, and it was beat up...i hated to see it like that because i always kept it up and had more damn fun on it than the law would allow....

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Well, bump. What the hell.

 

This guy is so much more pleasant than Reid.

 

He's quiet. What a relief. So if he mangles marine terminology, we don't have to know it.

 

He didn't con a clueless inexperienced too-young girlfriend into going along.

 

He's headed in the right direction:

http://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0peJuCrfr2oqehW0RAegJdeJsCaHryH5q

and apparently (I guess) making more than a steady two knots)

 

He hasn't yet been bow-clipped by a passing container ship he never saw, despite not having a crew for port and starboard watches.

 

He's not ferrocement. Doesn't have a fawning and creepy home team.

 

Apparently isn't afraid of sighting land?

 

Hasn't driven SA types crazy and cause them to appear obsessed or make way too many posts (the "Reid Effect")

 

Is actually trying to get somewhere, not just kill as much time as possible.

 

 

Am I giving him too much credit? Possibly. But kindly re-read second sentence above..

 

 

 

 

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Well, he's off Mehico now.

 

Will there be more interest when he gets closer to the Horn?

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OK, Small Craft Advisor, #79 2012.

Wherein Rimas say, "instead of blocking waves, small boats rise and go over waves. Not as many breaking waves hit the boat".

Also, "12', 19', 22', 24', 25' -all sailed around the world. But bigger boats, like 40 footers, many are missing".

And yeah, he "accidentally" fell asleep for 3 hrs and ended up on a sandy beach.

Lucky it weren't the rocks, no?

And if he is off Mexico it ain't as his stated itinerary in the mag which had him headed for Japan first, then Guam, then Cape Horn........

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In the 60's a 17 year old boy dial the oceans in a 24 FT sloop.. Great story!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Lee_Graham

 

I thought about that too, I don't think RLG even had a radio on that boat, all navigation was DR and celestial. However, his 24 foot boat (Lapworth 24) weighs 33% more than a SJ24 and has a full keel and a protected rudder ... much better for this sort of thing.

 

That said, I admire this guy's guts and wish him luck.

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Dove also dismasted twice. And keep in mind, the last leg of Robin's trip was finished on an Allied Luders 33, Return of Dove. It wasn't a full circumnavigation, either.

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As long as he's going upwind should be fine. Downwind is where the trouble starts in a SJ24.

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Well, a couple weeks ago, it seems Rimas the Russian had a change of heart and headed for Hawaii. Looks like he might get to Hilo in a week or so. I think choosing Hawaii over a likely cold and stormy demise in the Southern Ocean is probably an excellent choice! If he successfully makes it to Hawaii in his $500 boat, I will have to admit I'm kind of impressed by his luck! So if you are in Hawaii, be on the lookout for the little yellow San Juan 24. Go Rimas!

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Luck is right. I'm surprised he could carry enough water to last this long, let alone food and everything else.

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According to the OP, the beginning of August - "3 weeks before" August 22nd.

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Wonder if he was subject to the residuals of those tropical depressions, maybe that helped change his mind?

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And he's been sooooooooo much quieter than Reid. Russians generally don't whine much or get all creepy-weird.

 

Good luck, and get there safe.

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Having sailed to antarctica with Ried and knowing Rimas I must say there is a world of difference in personalties.

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Having sailed to antarctica with Ried and knowing Rimas I must say there is a world of difference in personalties.

 

Well this would be as great a place, as any, to elaborate on that statement. Please Do!

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Having sailed to antarctica with Ried and knowing Rimas I must say there is a world of difference in personalties.

 

Well this would be as great a place, as any, to elaborate on that statement. Please Do!

Christ, I thought you were wofsie there for a sec....

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I HAD NO CHARTS HAWAII ONLY SOUTH AMERICA CHARTS. LUCKY I FIND ON GPS THE HAWAII ISLANDS.

I WOULD NEVER MAKE TO HAWAII WITHOUT.
BUT GPS FOR CAR AND NO SHOW HARBORS, ONLY ROADS.

 

 

wow!

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I HAD NO CHARTS HAWAII ONLY SOUTH AMERICA CHARTS. LUCKY I FIND ON GPS THE HAWAII ISLANDS.

I WOULD NEVER MAKE TO HAWAII WITHOUT.

BUT GPS FOR CAR AND NO SHOW HARBORS, ONLY ROADS.

 

 

wow!

I think that is awesome.

 

I love the Russo-Anglo syntax.

 

Romain

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After that he STILL wants to do a Shackleton?

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Are we sure this isn't a farce, just meant to troll sailing forums?

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$500.00 for a San Juan 24? He paid too much.

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right, wrong, or stupid - this dude is a badass.

 

Best of luck dude!

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So I guess he made it... Now What?? Does he just park the POS in front of the YC and hang out for a couple of months?? Without an address he is sol as to job hunting and I would assume it costs at least as much as a small apartment to moor the dang thing somewhere.....

 

Good on him to get there, and he has balls the size of the kremlin, but what now??

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UPDATED MY NEW STATUS!
THE FIRST LEG.
THE EXPEDITION SOLO SAILING AROUND THE WORLD IN A SAN JUAN 24-FOOT SAILBOAT.

IT STARTED GREAT ADVENTURE OF EXCITEMENT AS I HEAD SOUTH ALONG COAST OF AMERICA. BUT THINGS GET PROBLEMS ON THE BOAT.

FIRST BAD HAPPEN FOR ME IN STORM ON 38 LATITUDE PROBABLY ABOUT 400 OR MORE MILES FROM SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA WHERE MY ENGINE IS GONE WHEN PICK UP GALE 35, 40 KNOTS SPEED. IT WAS A BIG BANG I WAS THAT MOMENT INSIDE MY COCKPIT AND I RUN TO SEE NO ANYMORE HONDA OLD ENGINE.
LATER STARTED TO LOOSE IN VERY A STRONG WIND CONDITION MY RIGGING. NOT SO FAR FROM MEXICO CABO SAN LUCAS WIND BREAK MY THREE OF FOUR SHROUD WIRES THAT THEY MY MAST HOLD UP. AND THEN THERE WAS NO CHOICE. I NO CAN GO UPWIND BACK TO WASHINGTON OR CALIFORNIA TO MAKE REPAIR. I ONLY CAN GO DOWNWIND ON TRADEWINDS SO MUST HEAD TO HAWAII FOR TO MAKE REPAIRS.

I HAD NO CHARTS HAWAII ONLY SOUTH AMERICA CHARTS. LUCKY I FIND ON GPS THE HAWAII ISLANDS. I WOULD NEVER MAKE TO HAWAII WITHOUT.
BUT GPS FOR CAR AND NO SHOW HARBORS, ONLY ROADS.

MANY STORMS WITH MOUNTAIN SEAS. WAVES CRASHING INTO COCKPIT. NIGHTIME MOST DANGER FULL OF DARKNESS. THE MOST DANGEROUS IS SQUALLS. 45KNOTS STRONG WINDS RIP UP SAILS. SO FAST I NEED TO GET SAILS DOWN. MAINSAIL RIPPED BELOW THIRD REEF.

BETWEEN MEXICO AND HAWAII I SEE NO SHIPS,NO PLANES, NO WHALES. IT WAS MOST LONELINESS. BECAUSE I SEE NOTHING OUT THERE. JUST LONELY BEAUTY OF SEA. SOMETIMES I LOOK AT STARS FOR LONG TIME AT NIGHT. CLOUDS ALWAYS CHANGING AND COLORS AS WEATHER MOVES IN FROM THE NORTH.

I ALWAYS SCARED MAST COME DOWN AND NOBODY TO HELP AS I WAS SO FAR FROM PEOPLE AND LAND. WATER WAS LOW I FIND SCARY BUT THEN RAIN COMES AND I FILL BARRELS.

BUT SOMETIMES IT WAS PEACEFUL. I SAW ALL THINGS WEATHER AND EMOTION IN 84 DAYS ON THE SEA. I LEARN FROM SEA TO BE BETTER SAILOR.

VERY GREAT ADVENTURE IT WAS. SO MANY EXPERIENCE. I LOVE SEA AND SAILING. I ALREADY MISS THE SEA AND MUST CONTINUE. I BELONG TO THE SEA.

I AM IN HILO, HAWAII NOW AND NEED TO DO WORK ON RIGGING TO REPLACE AND LOOKING FOR THOSE WHO ARE WILLING TO HELP MY AMBITIOUS SOLO TO CONTINUE TO SOUTH AMERICA VIE CAPE HORN ANS SOUTH GEORGIA ISLAND-UK, ANTARCTICA. THE BEST TO CONTACT ME ON FACEBOOK AND CELL 1-808-937-9468

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WOW, COOL..... Balls the size of coconuts.......


Respect..

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He REALLY needs to head west from there and forget the Cape Horn idea.

RESPECT for HTFU and not hitting 911 on his SPOT!

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I was actually able to meet Rimas when he showed up at Hilo. I was amazed at what good health and spirits I found him in. I figured he would be calling it quits after nearly three months at sea in that little boat. But instead, he is more determined than ever and would leave tomorrow if his boat was fixed. But the boat is a mess. The rig is barely standing. Its amazing he kept it up all the way across the pacific. The mast top literally flops over a foot from side to side. The rigging was old (probably the original 1974 rigging) and broke due to corrosion at the turnbuckles. The boat hull itself held up fine and the cabin stayed dry for the entire passage. His plan is to anchor in Hilo bay while he tries to find work and raise support to buys new rigging and reinforce his boat. Then he wants to leave and head to Tahiti before heading to the southeast to round Cape Horn next year. He's crazy but determined and a super nice guy. l guess after hanging out with him, I have drank the Koolaid and actually believe that with repairs, upgrades, and a lot of luck, Rimas could actually make it around Cape Horn in that little boat. I believe he has a chance anyway.

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He REALLY needs to head west from there and forget the Cape Horn idea.

RESPECT for HTFU and not hitting 911 on his SPOT!

Wouldn't have worked anyway, SPOT doesn't cover the Pacific near Hawaii....

 

SPOT Coverage Map

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He REALLY needs to head west from there and forget the Cape Horn idea.

RESPECT for HTFU and not hitting 911 on his SPOT!

Wouldn't have worked anyway, SPOT doesn't cover the Pacific near Hawaii....

 

SPOT Coverage Map

Surprisingly, the Spot Tracker worked nearly all the way to Hawaii. It finally stopped sending less than 100 miles from Hilo. But yes, he's definitely going to need a different tracker if he heads south from Hawaii.

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Rimas, you look good after all that. You're a stud, and definitely not a whiner. And you have the jury rigs, and the waterline mussels, to prove it.

 

 

 

Friends, I too wonder how in hell he kept the mast up with all the broken shrouds, look at all the lashing around gooseneck level. Must have been jib-alone or bare poles, for a long way. And "Nighttime most danger full of darkness", yeah I definitely get it. We all do.

 

His last few paragraphs in "Russ-English" convey eloquently and in few words, the both the beauty and the fear of sailing alone way offshore on a small boat,

 

With sound rigging to go with an evidently sound hull, I wouldn't put anything past this guy. Good luck, Godspeed.

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Hey, Hawaiifinns, can you pop over and lend Rimas a hand?

 

Surely there is some second hand gear knocking about someones garage that could help.

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Hmmm wonder if we should send this guy some good ol' SA love. He's out there doing it, and we can help him with some kind of a crowd funding effort. sbuys do you think he would accept help of that sort?

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Anybody in Hawaii ever sees that thing hanging in the slings grab the keel and tell us how much you can wiggle it.

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Anybody in Hawaii ever sees that thing hanging in the slings grab the keel and tell us how much you can wiggle it.

 

 

Well, less than the mast, i hope.

 

 

 

Dash, Sbuys, I'm game if you (and others?) are. Kinda like we supported Bismarck D, though admittedly without any crooked law enforcement locals..

 

Whatya think the estimated tab is for new stays/tangs etc for a SJ24? If he's going to go back out no matter what, he can't/shouldn't do it with any remaining 40-y.o. rigging.

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Hmmm wonder if we should send this guy some good ol' SA love. He's out there doing it, and we can help him with some kind of a crowd funding effort. sbuys do you think he would accept help of that sort?

 

He could do a Teespring campaign. Not sure how much he needs to raise but I just threw together a sample with a stock sailboat picture. Maybe someone artsy could vector his head to stick on the front of the tee. With the below setup (front + back) and a price of $20 he would net an estimated $557 once 50 people agreed to purchase a shirt. The $557 is below the $600 figure that would require him to receive a 1099 tax document.

 

 

dEaOeQL.png

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Hey, cool ideas. I'm sure Rimas would love some help. The guy literally had $28 in his wallet when he landed in Hilo. Today I talked to a friend that works at one of the local rigging companies here in the northwest, and he's going to see about doing a complete set of standing rigging at cost. He is thinking around $600 to $800 for the whole deal. I've got to get some measurements and he has to clear with his boss, but I was thinking if it works out, we could set up an account at the rigging shop that we can contribute to and then I can also cover whatever is left on it. I'll keep you posted on that. I also like the t-shirt idea...

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A guy like this, he is going to do this adventure anyway, if I read the situation correctly. If he goes fishbait he'll do so doing what he wanted to do.

 

I fly airplanes. I get that.

 

Tell me where to send my $20. It'll only take 30 of us to get him new rigging.

 

dash

 

 

Shouldn't encourage him. What if he goes fish bait? How will you feel then, eh?

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A guy like this, he is going to do this adventure anyway, if I read the situation correctly. If he goes fishbait he'll do so doing what he wanted to do.

 

I fly airplanes. I get that.

 

Tell me where to send my $20. It'll only take 30 of us to get him new rigging.

 

dash

+1

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A guy like this, he is going to do this adventure anyway, if I read the situation correctly. If he goes fishbait he'll do so doing what he wanted to do.

 

I fly airplanes. I get that.

 

Tell me where to send my $20. It'll only take 30 of us to get him new rigging.

 

dash

+1

+2. You don't wait for life to come to you, you run right at it. I've done a few things that might have gotten me killed, still the most memorable experiences in my life...

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A guy like this, he is going to do this adventure anyway, if I read the situation correctly. If he goes fishbait he'll do so doing what he wanted to do.

 

I fly airplanes. I get that.

 

Tell me where to send my $20. It'll only take 30 of us to get him new rigging.

 

dash

 

 

Shouldn't encourage him. What if he goes fish bait? How will you feel then, eh?

 

Better he has a decently rigged boat because it seems he's going hell or high water. Sure, he's crazy, but in a good way. Rather a bit of adventure than slow death sitting in front of the idiot box.

 

Where do I send my $20?

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Good on him. Watching to see where to send my $20.

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I tried clicking on the shirt, why can't I buy it?! 'Very Great Adventure' - love it!

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I tried clicking on the shirt, why can't I buy it?! 'Very Great Adventure' - love it!

 

Haven't actually set up a teespring fundraising campaign yet, I just took a screenshot and posted that as an idea. Send any PMs with design suggestions over and I can get it up and running if we want to go that route.

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Hey, cool ideas. I'm sure Rimas would love some help. The guy literally had $28 in his wallet when he landed in Hilo. Today I talked to a friend that works at one of the local rigging companies here in the northwest, and he's going to see about doing a complete set of standing rigging at cost. He is thinking around $600 to $800 for the whole deal. I've got to get some measurements and he has to clear with his boss, but I was thinking if it works out, we could set up an account at the rigging shop that we can contribute to and then I can also cover whatever is left on it. I'll keep you posted on that. I also like the t-shirt idea...

 

this sounds like the most practical idea, and comes from someone who knows the guy both before departure, and now. Thanks sbuys and await word.

 

We could call it " 'Stay' strong, Rimas" ???

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I would sail around the world in a SJ24. Of course I would have it lashed down in the hold of a very large freighter ....

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Why waste money on a t-shirt? Someone should get one of those internet fund raising things going. I got $20.

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I would sail around the world in a SJ24. Of course I would have it lashed down in the hold of a very large freighter ....

 

+ 1

 

Why waste money on a t-shirt? Someone should get one of those internet fund raising things going. I got $20.

 

$20 a crack on the inter-webz?????????? :wacko:

 

Oh yeah! I can see where this is going.......he'll buy a condo on Maui and spend the rest on hookers and blow!

 

OTOH, doing anything to that tub less than a complete structural, standing and running rigging and sail wardrobe re-fit and we're merely paying for a new blood sport.

 

Hmmmm.......hows about we get real time video from his boat beamed to web?

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Oh yeah! I can see where this is going.......he'll buy a condo on Maui and spend the rest on hookers and blow!

 

Now I can get behind funding the guy for hookers and blow.

Hmmmm wonder if his boat already has a name?

I've never had the balls to tell the nice lady at the regatta registration table that my boat was named Hookers and Blow.

(I usually just make up a name on the spot)

Just do a kick starter or similar funding so tshirt and shipping $$ don't absorb this guys chances.

Looks like he needs about $1000 for haul and bottom paint too (if my wild guess at Hawaii haul and block is even close)

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Hmmm, 5th of rum or help crazy Russian sail around the world...

 

I'm in.

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Has anyone else made the comparison of this guy to Hot Rod? HR spent every cent his family had, worked his ass off for years with the vision of sailing to Hawaii but ended up with a barge anchored very tentatively in Sausalito.

 

This guy spent $500 on an old SJ24, put food & water aboard, set off and is IN Hawaii.

 

They're both batshit crazy MoFo's but Rimas actually succeeded.

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Has anyone else made the comparison of this guy to Hot Rod? HR spent every cent his family had, worked his ass off for years with the vision of sailing to Hawaii but ended up with a barge anchored very tentatively in Sausalito.

 

This guy spent $500 on an old SJ24, put food & water aboard, set off and is IN Hawaii.

 

They're both batshit crazy MoFo's but Rimas actually succeeded.

 

But the difference???

 

 

Look at all the anarchists on this thread who are willing to chip in $20 for Crazy Ivan.

 

 

I doubt anyone here donated to HotRod, despite his solicitations.

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Has anyone else made the comparison of this guy to Hot Rod? HR spent every cent his family had, worked his ass off for years with the vision of sailing to Hawaii but ended up with a barge anchored very tentatively in Sausalito.

 

This guy spent $500 on an old SJ24, put food & water aboard, set off and is IN Hawaii.

 

They're both batshit crazy MoFo's but Rimas actually succeeded.

 

But the difference???

 

 

Look at all the anarchists on this thread who are willing to chip in $20 for Crazy Ivan.

 

 

I doubt anyone here donated to HotRod, despite his solicitations.

 

HR started with a bunch of money and spent it badly. This guy started with almost nothing and spent it, well, better than HR. Gets my vote.

 

I feel sad about what happened to HR but he made all the decisions and seems to have ignored a mountain of advice. Somehow I think HR will bounce back. This guy, OTOH, needs help now and he's out there. Well, at least he's in Hawaii.

 

dash

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I am in for $25.00

Heck , the ATM takes $3.00

This towards rigging.

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I pledge twenty dollars US. Rimas is the real deal. He used an auto GPS to sail to HA - YCMTSU! How do we get our $ to Rimas?

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I LEARN FROM SEA TO BE BETTER SAILOR.

 

This quote is why the guy deserves $20. Hot Rod hasn't learned anything.

 

If this guy made it Hilo in a decrepit SJ24, using a car GPS chart, I should be able to make it to Maine in my Pearson 30 with all-new standing rigging, bilge pumps, VHF, SPOT, marine GPS and good sails.

 

I'm inspired.

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How would we donate money to his repairs? Maybe someone should call him on his cell phone and ask?

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Here is a picture of Rimas moments after his arrival in Hilo.

That's quite a waterline reef he is growing. Some of those critters look eatin' size!

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Wouldn't it be more in the theme to sell the San Juan and buy an $800 boat to continue?

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