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What to use on interior teak?

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Anything out there better than lemon oil to prevent mold forming?

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Varnish - lots of coats then wet sanded and polished. :P

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Fix the deck leaks, and use some Dri-Z-air...

 

Varnish is your best bet, but if you want an oiled finish, Tung oil is pretty good. It polymerizes with age. It can be washed down pretty good. Boiled Linseed oil darkens with age, so unless you lie the really dark, oiled teak look, best to stay away from it.

 

Never tried just lemon oil - don't know.

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Seafin works pretty well and is easy to apply and touch up. According to the spec sheet it is a combo of: Tung, Phenolic, Oil Modified Urethane. Don't know about mold.

 

Seafin

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Occasionally....

Put a couple open pans of Clorox ( or generic) in your cabin, close everything, go away for a while and then ...

Open everything and air it out.

 

I have used this method to turn blackened hull walls back to white

 

Pretty much nothing but cockroaches survive that treatment

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Occasionally....

Put a couple open pans of Clorox ( or generic) in your cabin, close everything, go away for a while and then ...

Open everything and air it out.

 

I have used this method to turn blackened hull walls back to white

 

Pretty much nothing but cockroaches survive that treatment

Gouv,

seriously? will the fumes from a bleach kill the moldies and mildew without actual contact ie: scrubbing?

how long ya talking about leaving it closed up? a day.. a week? temperature a factor?

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Related question: What is the procedure to upgrade from oiled to varnished teak? If you need to remove the oil, is there a way other than sanding, especially for veneer?

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Related question: What is the procedure to upgrade from oiled to varnished teak? If you need to remove the oil, is there a way other than sanding, especially for veneer?

 

I scrubbed mine with ZEP non-solvent degreaser - several times. It worked pretty well but you still have to 220 grit sand at the end.

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Related question: What is the procedure to upgrade from oiled to varnished teak? If you need to remove the oil, is there a way other than sanding, especially for veneer?

As with all things varnish-related, read Rebecca Wittman's book "Brightwork, the art of finishing wood".

Essentially, clean and sand as necessary, then varnish as usual.

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I use Waterlox on all my interior wood.

 

Super easy to apply over just about anything, with minimum prep.

 

Lasts a few seasons and zero prep for applying over coats.

 

Not sure about mold resistance, but probably mentioned on their site.

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Gouv says:

 

"Occasionally....
Put a couple open pans of Clorox ( or generic) in your cabin, close everything, go away for a while and then ...
Open everything and air it out.

I have used this method to turn blackened hull walls back to white

Pretty much nothing but cockroaches survive that treatment"

 

 

 

This is definitively advice but, in some situations, it may not be good advice (as Gouv alludes to) especially if you have electronics, any kind of rubber/latex (maybe condoms too!), stainless steel, or non-white upholstery in your boat. Bleach, aka sodium hypochlorite, evolves Cl2 gas which indeed is not good for mold spores but it is even worse for electronics, copper wire, most metals including stainless and it will do a quick job turning red cloth into pink.

 

Just saying ....

 

Foe.

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I think I'm going to be buying a 1980 boat which was built in Finland.

 

The teak in the cabin is in pretty nice shape, but it's a little soiled in spots. I'd like to clean it up (without going at it with a Starbrite-type product like you would use above decks) and renew the oil type finish it has - nothing glossy.

 

I would appreciate a recommendation as to some cleaning products and finishing products. I remember Deks Ole from years ago, but wonder if there's anything better out there.

 

Thanks.

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I've used wipe on polyurethane - it works pretty well but takes several coats - goes on pretty much like oil but dries hard.

 

The gloss Minwax stuff actually ends up pretty close to a hand rubbed finish after 4 or so coats. Rubbing it down with fine Scotchbrite between coats works well. It's too thin to sand, even with 320.

 

As noted earlier, I cleaned up my teak successfuly with ZEP degreasers - the orange and the purple. Go easy on veneer though, don't soak it. TSP works very well too, especially on solid wood that can take being soaked.

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I've used wipe on polyurethane - it works pretty well but takes several coats - goes on pretty much like oil but dries hard.

 

The gloss Minwax stuff actually ends up pretty close to a hand rubbed finish after 4 or so coats. Rubbing it down with fine Scotchbrite between coats works well. It's too thin to sand, even with 320.

 

As noted earlier, I cleaned up my teak successfuly with ZEP degreasers - the orange and the purple. Go easy on veneer though, don't soak it. TSP works very well too, especially on solid wood that can take being soaked.

 

Sloop, I've used Goo-Gone. Is that the same thing as Zep?

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I don't think so - Goo Gone is a solvent isn't it? The ZEP products are cleaners, not solvents. They are available at Home Depot - might even be a house brand. They are good products.

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When I replaced my main bulkhead 5 years ago I used West epoxy (two coats, gently sanding between to remove blush) then 3-4 coats of a quality anti-UV varnish. Yes, it is glossy, but it still looks exactly like the day I put it in the boat and I suspect I won't have to do anything to it for a very long time.

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My experience:

 

An acetone wash (with proper ventillation and personal protection) will remove most oils, waxes, polish residues, etc. (at least as long as your Admiral didn't use silicone-based stuff like Pledge - if so, sell the boat and start over). A couple of scrubs over the surface, followed by wiping with clean, dry, lint-free rags does pretty well. If the surface is in good condition, do not sand. If you must, do so very lightly, with 220 or 320 grit. And if you do, do not fail to use a firm, very flat sanding block - nothing flexible on flat surfaces. And no machine sanding on veneer.

 

Then I make up my own wiping varnish - comes out very nearly like hand rubbed. I mean real, actual hand rubbed. (i.e., it has a bit more gloss than mat vernish, but less than gloss. And it doesn't dull the surface like mat varnish or the so called "hand rubbed varnish" that's sold by all the manufacturers these days. They add SiO2 or some other particulate to the varnish to dull the gloss that also dulls the appearance of the wood beneath. Ugly stuff, IMHO.) It's a penetrating finish that doesn't build a thick coating like brushed varnish and/or polyurethane you'll want to use on deck if you're blessed with brightwork up there. And it goes on nicely over bare wood or old finishes of any kind except lacquer (which dissolves or softens with acetone). And except for anything silicone. But you won't have anything silicone on your boat anyway, right?

 

I mix resin varnish with tung oil, mineral spirits and actone, 1:1:1:1 by volume. As I see it, the acetone and mineral spirits carry the varnish and oil into the surface a bit and evaporate fairly quickly but not too quickly, thanks to the mineral spirits slowing the process compared to straight acetone. The phenolic resin varnish has a drier component that accelerates the cure of the tung oil, so that it doesn't take a week for the coating to dry. Overnight is enough for most purposes, although it will continue to harden for several more days.

 

To use the wiping varnish, you can wipe it on with a saturated rag, a (cheap, disposable) brush, a roller, a paint sprayer (or even a garden sprayer). The idea is to get the surface thoroughly wet out with the mix. After five or ten minutes, wipe off with a clean, dry rag to remove any that didn't penetrate. Wipe, don't scrub.

 

If used on fresh uncoated wood, the first application may raise the grain a little. (Not as much as a water based coating, but a little.) It may be enough that you will need to wipe the raised grain off with 220 or 320 grit paper - Yes, with that sanding block and after the coating is dry to the touch - using very light pressure.

 

Once each coat is at least tacky (i.e., the solvents have evaporated), wipe on another coat, again flooding the surface (note that it will take less of the mix to flood the surface on the second and subsequent coats), let stand a few minutes and wipe off. If you get an early start, you can apply three coats in a day. I allow four hours between coats; that generally works well.

 

Do not sand between coats. You can "wipe off" dust nibs if needed with 220 or 320 paper. Even better, a 3M white (non-abrasive) or gray (very fine abarasive) Scotch Brite pad. Again, a light touch. And, again, use that flat sanding block, damit!

 

Three coats are generally enough.

 

When, in time, the surface gets scratched or dulled, wipe with acetone to degrease, lightly wipe with 220 or 320 paper and apply a fresh coat. You can make spot repairs without worry that it will show poorly. It will be an invisible repair in most cases (although scratches into the wood will show through, just like any other transparent coating. Sorry.)

 

It's hard to do this and not get a really good looking finish. If you like the hand rubbed varnish look, that is.

 

Enjoy!

 

 

Edit: Works well over epoxy, or gloss varnish, too. Doesn't penetrate, but will build (many) thin coats and a great appearance.

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That sounds almost exactly like the wipe on poly I use, only a lot more trouble than simply buying a can of the stuff.

 

Your application instructions are almost exactly what I experience with the wipe on, except that even 320 is too coarse for it - Scotchbrite only.

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I like the idea of a varnish to protect the wood from soiling, but I want a finish that looks oiled. These sound like good ideas.

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I've used wipe on polyurethane - it works pretty well but takes several coats - goes on pretty much like oil but dries hard.

 

The gloss Minwax stuff actually ends up pretty close to a hand rubbed finish after 4 or so coats. Rubbing it down with fine Scotchbrite between coats works well. It's too thin to sand, even with 320.

 

As noted earlier, I cleaned up my teak successfuly with ZEP degreasers - the orange and the purple. Go easy on veneer though, don't soak it. TSP works very well too, especially on solid wood that can take being soaked.

 

This is exactly what I do. It's by far the best result/effort technique I've ever found. The finish looks as good as sprayed but is far faster and more forgiving than spray or roll or brush. The first company to come up with a durable exterior product that goes on the same way will own the world.

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I like the idea of a varnish to protect the wood from soiling, but I want a finish that looks oiled. These sound like good ideas.

 

Deks Olje #1. Basically a "wiping varnish." Super easy to use.

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I'm going to try the Don Casey (This Old Boat) approach: wash the interior teak with a mixture of 1 gallon water, 1 cup liquid laundry detergent, 1 cup household bleach, using a towel. He recommends lemon oil - what the OP doesn't want - but says other oil products for teak are OK. I going to try Watco Teak oil.

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I'm going to try the Don Casey (This Old Boat) approach: wash the interior teak with a mixture of 1 gallon water, 1 cup liquid laundry detergent, 1 cup household bleach, using a towel. He recommends lemon oil - what the OP doesn't want - but says other oil products for teak are OK. I going to try Watco Teak oil.

 

Some of the Watco Teak oil has pigment in it. That's NOT the kind you want.

 

I've used Watco oil at times, but found it had less resin than I liked and resulted in too little build and too little durability. That's why I mix my own with varnish and tung oil as described above. If you prefer the oil finish look to the hand rubbed varnish look, you will probably be happy with Watco, buy you may need to add a coat or two every couple of years. I've got 5 year old finish that gets no real attention and still looks great.

 

Now if I could just get that kind of life for topsides teak finish too!

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"If you prefer the oil finish look to the hand rubbed varnish look, you will probably be happy with Watco..."

 

I have to plead ignorance. I don't know which I prefer. I know that I don't want to sand it, I don't want it to be shiny, and I don't want it to be a dirt magnet (I had that experience with teak oil on topside teak). All I want to do is clean it gently, put a few coats of something on it, and forget about it for a couple of years. There will be no smoking in the cabin, and almost no cooking.

 

Right now, the teak has a nice color, as though it were oiled some time ago, but it looks a little dry and has no luster. There are no serious scratches to worry about. I'd to simply preserve the nice color of the teak, give it some luster, and seal it to some degree.

 

A change of plans: I brought home some of the interior pieces. Instead of Watco, I will try the SloopJohnB approach on the divider & door between the forward cabin and anchor locker, i.e. ZEP cleaner, and Minwax rub on poly.

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I used organoil on a balustrade some 14yrs ago. Wet sanded to 400.

Looks like the day I put it on.

Not UV resistant as I recall. Also depends on wood grain.

Pretty keen to try that below.

How would oil go over epoxy sealed wood?

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"If you prefer the oil finish look to the hand rubbed varnish look, you will probably be happy with Watco..."

 

I have to plead ignorance. I don't know which I prefer. I know that I don't want to sand it, I don't want it to be shiny, and I don't want it to be a dirt magnet (I had that experience with teak oil on topside teak). All I want to do is clean it gently, put a few coats of something on it, and forget about it for a couple of years. There will be no smoking in the cabin, and almost no cooking.

 

Right now, the teak has a nice color, as though it were oiled some time ago, but it looks a little dry and has no luster. There are no serious scratches to worry about. I'd to simply preserve the nice color of the teak, give it some luster, and seal it to some degree.

 

A change of plans: I brought home some of the interior pieces. Instead of Watco, I will try the SloopJohnB approach on the divider & door between the forward cabin and anchor locker, i.e. ZEP cleaner, and Minwax rub on poly.

 

Where should I send the invoice for my consulting fee?

 

If the ZEP degreaser doesn't do it, plain old TSP is the next step.

 

Good luck - I think you'll like it - don't forget to use GLOSS Minwax if you want a "hand rubbed" look - it's pretty low gloss.

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SJB!

 

I've been expecting you to come help with the contact cement. Where've you been? I'm going to be working on it this week if you're available.

 

Actually, on the teak, I am trying something different. I used the ZEP orange. It does a nice job. I rinsed it, and then when dry, wiped it down with acetone. Then I did two applications of Watco Teak Oil. It really looks good on some "test" pieces. I did this because the label says that after 72 hours, you can put a poly on it, and because I wanted to get some oil into the wood, which looked a little dry. I bought the Minwax gloss wipe on poly which I plan to apply as you suggested.

 

Thanks.

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I've been waiting for that transcontinental ticket in Ruling Class that you were going to send. ;)

 

One thing I didn't mention about the Minwax - I found I got a faster build if I quickly and generously brushed it on, let it sit until there were dry and wet spots showing, brushed it on again and then wiped it down with a cloth wet with it.

 

That gets a coat built faster than simply wiping it with a cloth dipped in it. Slop it on with a brush and then smooth it out by wiping with a wet cloth.

 

Once you have an even coat dried (no dry & glossy spots) then you can do further coats with just a wet cloth.

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I've used Interlux Rubbed Effect varnish to re-do sections of my interior with great results. Seems to seal the wood pretty well.

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Darkened, spotty teak can be treated with oxalic acid (Owatrol sells it as "Net-Trol Deck Cleaner", others may have it under some other name). A silky, oily finish can then be achieved with Owatrol "D1", or "InteriOil". For interior teak, you may even use some random non-marine "antique wax" for furniture. Just wax it over from time to time, like cleaning.

 

The problem with varnish is: you'll have to sand it off completely every few years, and rebuild it. An oiled surface only has to be sanded over a bit and added one or two new layers of oil. You can even get rid of scratches by just oiling them over.

 

Hey, I love the high end glossy finish that only comes from a couple dozen layers of varnish. But I also suffer from a nervous fear of sanding, so I'd say: stay with oil whenever possible!

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Why would you have to strip interior varnish every few years?

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Acid cleaners, such as oxalic acid and others soften the teak and lead to erosion of the material. It should be avoided if possible, and if it has to be done, the acid should (must) be neutralized after cleaning. That's the basis of two part cleaners. The first coat is the acid, the second is a neutralizing base. After that, a really good rinse with fresh water is important.

 

It should be an exceptionally rare circumstance to use an acid cleaner on below-decks teak. Don't do it. Find another way. I didn't do it. I wasn't there. I didn't mean it. It was an accident. I'm sorry.

 

Single part teak cleaners are usually a waste of time and money.

 

I cleaned my teak decks once, after I bought the boat, and since have rolled on Semco Teak Sealer two or three times a year. The trigger for a new coat is when water stops beading up on the surface. Takes a couple of hours with a foam roller on a long (stnd-up) handle and details with a 2-3 inch foam brush. Otherwise, a soft brush and mild boat soap take care of things.

 

Brightwork is sealed with 3 coats West 105/207 and 5 coats Epifanes varnish; easy to apply, easy to keep up, easy to touch-up, looks super.

 

Got rubbed varnish finish below decks. Keep it wiped down every few months with lemon oil (some brand discovered by the Admiral in one or another of our sailing magazines) and always looks good, smells good. Non-varnished solutions get wiped/washed down with Concrobium anti-mildew stuff a couple of times a year. Works, afik. Keeps the Admiral happy.

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Jax, thank you for the Concrobium tip. I will try it on our boat next year if for no other reason that to eliminate mold as a trigger for my daughter's allergies.

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I've used Interlux Rubbed Effect varnish to re-do sections of my interior with great results. Seems to seal the wood pretty well.

I emailed Waterline Systems / US Watercraft with many of the old TPI craftsmen there to get a recommendation on what to use for touch up on the interior Cherry used on my J/109. The recommendation came back as Epifanes Rubbed Effect Varnish. I assume the Interlux and Epifanes products are similar and if anyone has experience with both, please comment.

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Alright, you do have to neutralize the acid. But sometimes it is the only thing that helps against those black areas.

 

Last week I used oxalic acid to neutralize paint remover (teak ply and solid fir) and washed it all off with lots of fresh water. The wood looks good so far. How do I know if it is "softened"?

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I've used Interlux Rubbed Effect varnish to re-do sections of my interior with great results. Seems to seal the wood pretty well.

I emailed Waterline Systems / US Watercraft with many of the old TPI craftsmen there to get a recommendation on what to use for touch up on the interior Cherry used on my J/109. The recommendation came back as Epifanes Rubbed Effect Varnish. I assume the Interlux and Epifanes products are similar and if anyone has experience with both, please comment.

 

I've used Epifanes Rubbed Effect on below decks touch-ups and add-ons; works great, looks great when applied with due care. (Like any varnish, it looks like shit if it gets runs, sags, bristles embedded from cheap brushes, etc.) The entire interior of the boat wood is rubbed look, but it's old and I don't know what was used. It predates my purchase of the boat. When the time comes, I'll go with the Epifanes.

 

On new wood, even below decks, I seal with epoxy if practicable and then finish with gloss varnish and put one coat only of rubbed effect on as top coat. In the long run, too many coats of the rubbed effect dull the appearance of the wood and hide the grain more than I like. Additionally, repairs are easier when there's a scratch to feather out and touch-up when the base is gloss.

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Alright, you do have to neutralize the acid. But sometimes it is the only thing that helps against those black areas.

 

Last week I used oxalic acid to neutralize paint remover (teak ply and solid fir) and washed it all off with lots of fresh water. The wood looks good so far. How do I know if it is "softened"?

 

Unless you got carried away and overdid the oxalic acid and/or didn't flush it off adequately, you should be okay. If you want to be super cautious, which is almost surely overkill, you could put on a coat of household ammonia to make sure the pH isn't too low and flush again with fresh water. Careful with the ammonia.

 

If a thumb nail can leave a dent in the teak between the growth rings, it's too soft. Doesn't work reliably for fir, as it's softer anyway.

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C^** or a solution of baking soda and water. Much more pleasent to work with

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Own a teak palace down below.

(weighs more than some of the boats I race).

 

I like Murphy's soap cut 50% with water in squirt bottle (or buy the spray bottle version which is already cut).

Spray on and lightly scrub with the grain with a scotchbrite pad.

Then swipe with a damp microfiber towel and lots of fresh water.

If you have oil stains, several light rubs with a rag and acetone will do the job.

Let dry for an hour or 2 and then wipe on a coat of Formbies Tung oil.

Seems to leave a better glow than others.

 

Lemon oil does not last very long.

Teak oil attracts dirt and gets dark.

 

Do not listen to Gov about chlorine fumes.

HAD a perfect 35 year old motorcycle.

Wrenches used to swoon all over it whenI would go for an inspection sticker.

Always covered with a blanet when not used in the shed.

One spring I came out to find all the clearcoat lifted, cases pitted, and much of the hardware corroding.

The culprit was a 5 gallon bucket of left over cholroine pellets for the pool nearby

And the lid had been screwed on.

Stuff is attacks everything in fume form.

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I've used Interlux Rubbed Effect varnish to re-do sections of my interior with great results. Seems to seal the wood pretty well.

I emailed Waterline Systems / US Watercraft with many of the old TPI craftsmen there to get a recommendation on what to use for touch up on the interior Cherry used on my J/109. The recommendation came back as Epifanes Rubbed Effect Varnish. I assume the Interlux and Epifanes products are similar and if anyone has experience with both, please comment.

 

I redid a good portion of a bulkhead using Epiphanes Rubded Effect on my J/35. I used a seam in the teak plywood as the dividing line between new and old (I didn't have to or want to refinish the whole area, only where it went bad and the teak was darkened). Worked like a charm and you can't see the difference, well I can bcz I did it, but no one else can. I had used Interlux before and the Epithanes seems interchangable.

 

And I think I read above don't use Oxalic acid down below. Well, I had some really dark patches and used some harwdware store bought crystals mixed with water to lighten the dark spots. I did it sparingly and it came out great. Like I said earlier, I was the only one who knew it was there when it was done.

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Drew - great news on the Epifanes. How did you apply it to get the best matching finish? I have a few "dents" that are not discolored. I was thinking on "filling" those with Epifanes gloss finish to level them, then apply the rubbed effect varnish.

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Drew - great news on the Epifanes. How did you apply it to get the best matching finish? I have a few "dents" that are not discolored. I was thinking on "filling" those with Epifanes gloss finish to level them, then apply the rubbed effect varnish.

 

Before you fill the dents, you might try a damp towel and clothes iron on a medium setting, not too hot, to see if the dents will swell to near original level. It may not work, but if it does, it'll be better than filling the dents. It should at least reduce the amount of filling needed and make the repair less visible.

 

Bon chance!

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Drew - great news on the Epifanes. How did you apply it to get the best matching finish? I have a few "dents" that are not discolored. I was thinking on "filling" those with Epifanes gloss finish to level them, then apply the rubbed effect varnish.

 

Before you fill the dents, you might try a damp towel and clothes iron on a medium setting, not too hot, to see if the dents will swell to near original level. It may not work, but if it does, it'll be better than filling the dents. It should at least reduce the amount of filling needed and make the repair less visible.

 

Bon chance!

 

Jax beat me to the punch. To raise dents it is usual to use the iron and steam method. This works well on solid teak, not so much on plywood I've found. But totally worth a try, but be careful. If it's teak veneer (plywood) be careful you don't sand thru the veneer when your done. My newish teak and holly sole has a veneer that appears to be .01mm thick, it's so thin I squeege'd 4 or 5 coats of epoxy on the sole before I varnished it just to make sure I didn't sand thru. I need to refinish the sole and it has dents (of course). I am going to live with the dents and just varnish normally.

 

I applied the Epitfanes with a standard badger brush. It flattens out nicely.

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On chlorine fumes, the only place you can find more rust than a boat is in the equipment room of a large swimming pool. Everything rusts, from top to bottom.

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Had good outcome with Minwax spar varnish. Comes in satin or gloss. I went with gloss. Light sanding if current finish in fair shape and do about 3 coats. Don't recommend for sole will not hold up to trampling. If working with bare teak thin first coat 50-50. Buy at Home Depot for like $12 a quart...

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Another vote for the Minwax spar varnish. I sanded first but that was because my teak had gotten quite dark from POs. Goes on easy and looks like hand rubbed after 3-4 coats. Been on a year and no sign of needing even touch up. Just do NOT use on sole... will not hold up to traffic...

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rbyham, are you stuffing the ballot box for Minwax, or are you just excited?

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A couple of days ago I brought the beat-up and dirty solid teak companionway steps home. I first set them up outside and cleaned them with a mix of 1 gal. warm water, 2 TBSP TSP, and 2/3 cup of ammonia. This took off 95% of the dirt and all the old oil. Now I'm in the process of sanding them down. It's a serious pain because C&C used a stain under the oil and I have to sand through the stain layer.

Once I'm done there I have to figure out how to refinish them. My first recourse is usually Epifanes gloss, I did a teak and holly cabin sole with it years ago and it was seriously wear-resistant. There will be traction strips on the steps so I'm not worried about slippery so much. I have a test panel on the sole right now with Varathane semi-gloss oil interior and it's standing up well too so that's an option. Any other bright ideas?

 

I just tried the Minwax Helmsman poly spar varnish on a small project. I hated it. No matter what I did, I couldn't stop it running and curtaining. After 45+ years of varnishing, I have tried a lot of varnishes, this was one of the worst ever.

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Funny, my sole (and soul) did not hold up with Epiphanes gloss. It looked ok for the first year but seriously went downhill quick in the second year. I need to redo it this spring it's totally failed now, 4 years. With Ultimate Sole not being available any more, does anyone else have some suggestions for a tougher varnish on the teak and holly plywood sole?

 

I did the 'Hinckley' method when I made the sole, 4 coats of thin epoxy (MAS) squeeged on, and 6 or 7 coats of varnish, all done in my heated shop then installed. In high traffic areas (bottom of the companionway ladder) its almost worn thru to the epoxy.

 

I plan on stripping it with chemicals and going real easy on the sanding as the veneer is about as thick as a piece of paper, since I made it myself I know just how thick the top layer isn't.

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Funny, my sole (and soul) did not hold up with Epiphanes gloss. It looked ok for the first year but seriously went downhill quick in the second year. I need to redo it this spring it's totally failed now, 4 years. With Ultimate Sole not being available any more, does anyone else have some suggestions for a tougher varnish on the teak and holly plywood sole?

 

I did the 'Hinckley' method when I made the sole, 4 coats of thin epoxy (MAS) squeeged on, and 6 or 7 coats of varnish, all done in my heated shop then installed. In high traffic areas (bottom of the companionway ladder) its almost worn thru to the epoxy.

 

I plan on stripping it with chemicals and going real easy on the sanding as the veneer is about as thick as a piece of paper, since I made it myself I know just how thick the top layer isn't.

 

You must have a lot more traffic than I did. I did similar, 4 coats of West all round, wet-sanded in between coats on the topside, then 4-5 coats of varnish. I only had the boat for 5 more years, but it essentially looked the same the day I sold it.

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This is a timely turn in the thread, that is to teak that is often trod upon. My boat has a single companionway step that is removable. It's made of teak-faced plywood. I've been using Watco Teak Oil followed by wipe-on poly for the rest of the interior, but I know I'll need something different on this. Plus I need to get some traction strips.

 

For traction, Jamestown Distributors has "Incom Textured Vinyl Traction Tape," which looks good. Would you put it on over the varnish?

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I've seen a specialized varnish for bowling alleys - might that work? How about what they use on gymnasium floors?

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I've seen a specialized varnish for bowling alleys - might that work? How about what they use on gymnasium floors?

 

A lot of those products have gone by the wayside with the new outgassing regulations. GymSeal and Ultimate Sole were my top choices before their untimely demise.

 

I'm leaning towards Varathane, if only because it's easy, cheap, and durable enough. I try not to wear golf shoes down below.

Unfortunately, their floor finish only comes in gallons, otherwise I'd give that a try.

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What Varathane product are you looking at? Our local Home Despot has all their Varathane products in gallon and quart sizes, including the floor finishes.

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I am going to use this on my cabin sole this spring. It's not specifically sold for high traffic areas but I have used it at home with very good results in the TV room that gets a ton of use its oil vases as well so should provide that nice rich colour.

 

http://www.homedepot.ca/wcsstore/HomeDepotCanada/images/catalog/Y110041_4.jpg

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I am going to use this on my cabin sole this spring. It's not specifically sold for high traffic areas but I have used it at home with very good results in the TV room that gets a ton of use its oil vases as well so should provide that nice rich colour.

 

http://www.homedepot.ca/wcsstore/HomeDepotCanada/images/catalog/Y110041_4.jpg

 

That is exactly the stuff I was going to use if I didn't find a specific floor finish.

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I used that on a walnut parquet kitchen floor I laid 25 years ago - it's good stuff.

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I used that on a walnut parquet kitchen floor I laid 25 years ago - it's good stuff.

 

The skull and crossbones on the label tell you so.

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I used that on a walnut parquet kitchen floor I laid 25 years ago - it's good stuff.

 

SJB, you must be living the good life. Back then, I was lucky to have a standard red oak floor.

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I used that on a walnut parquet kitchen floor I laid 25 years ago - it's good stuff.

 

The skull and crossbones on the label tell you so.

 

Exactly - always a good sign on cans of chemicals. ;)

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I used that on a walnut parquet kitchen floor I laid 25 years ago - it's good stuff.

 

SJB, you must be living the good life. Back then, I was lucky to have a standard red oak floor.

 

I could only afford it because I was just paying for materials - all the work was mine.

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I used that on a walnut parquet kitchen floor I laid 25 years ago - it's good stuff.

 

I used it on a kitchen counter I made 20 years ago, and just completed its first refinish this week. It held up really well.

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Bet the formulation has changed- taken the good , err, nasty shit out of it.

 

I did a kitchen bench in epoxy & overcoated with mirotone uv inhibited and it started crapping out a couple of years later.

First slightly milky, then peeling. Bloody horrifying.

Roof window above though. I think they left the uv out.

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Bet the formulation has changed- taken the good , err, nasty shit out of it.

 

I did a kitchen bench in epoxy & overcoated with mirotone uv inhibited and it started crapping out a couple of years later.

First slightly milky, then peeling. Bloody horrifying.

Roof window above though. I think they left the uv out.

 

Seems to be exactly the same to my eye and nose, I refinished a table a few years back and it looks good still. Had to buy a new can because the old one went a bit weird after 12 or so years. I just redid our kitchen cupboards with the satin version, that came out really well too.

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Well, the weather has finally warmed up so that I could start on the floor. I' using the oil based Varathane with a satin finish.

 

http://www.homedepot.ca/wcsstore/HomeDepotCanada/images/catalog/Y110041_4.jpg

 

This is the floor partially stripped and with the 2nd coat on. (still wet)

 

post-37611-0-47989900-1429626380_thumb.jpg

post-37611-0-63757100-1429626424_thumb.jpg

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Looking good.

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Update;

 

SJB!

 

I've been expecting you to come help with the contact cement. Where've you been? I'm going to be working on it this week if you're available.

 

Actually, on the teak, I am trying something different. I used the ZEP orange. It does a nice job. I rinsed it, and then when dry, wiped it down with acetone. Then I did two applications of Watco Teak Oil. It really looks good on some "test" pieces. I did this because the label says that after 72 hours, you can put a poly on it, and because I wanted to get some oil into the wood, which looked a little dry. I bought the Minwax gloss wipe on poly which I plan to apply as you suggested.

 

Thanks.

 

 

I've been waiting for that transcontinental ticket in Ruling Class that you were going to send. ;)

 

One thing I didn't mention about the Minwax - I found I got a faster build if I quickly and generously brushed it on, let it sit until there were dry and wet spots showing, brushed it on again and then wiped it down with a cloth wet with it.

 

That gets a coat built faster than simply wiping it with a cloth dipped in it. Slop it on with a brush and then smooth it out by wiping with a wet cloth.

 

Once you have an even coat dried (no dry & glossy spots) then you can do further coats with just a wet cloth.

 

I finished all of the interior teak a while back using this method, and I'm very happy with the result. The worst part is cleaning and rinsing. The Watco oil does a beautiful job of restoring warmth and luster to the wood, and the MInwax Wipe-On Poly is practically fool-proof.

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Well???

 

Pics or.......

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Does the gloss miniwax stuff hold up on high traffic areas? About to start work on the cabin steps.

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I like the Minwax products. Five or six coats and anything holds up. Just don't buy the fast drying stuff. It drags too much and at 70 degrees it flashes so fast there's no flow.

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Does the gloss miniwax stuff hold up on high traffic areas? About to start work on the cabin steps.

 

In a word, no - not for foot traffic.

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