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      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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ProaSailor

Dick Newick

66 posts in this topic

Sad to report that Dick Newick, multihull guru to the world and personal guru to me, passed away last night.

 

onroguebow-l.jpg

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r.i.p. dick.

 

and peace to his family.

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Back in June, at a gathering in France. Sitting with Marc Van Peteghem, Hanneke Boon, and James Wharram.

 

DSCN0375.JPG


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Fair Winds, Dick. Your contributions will sail and be admired forever.

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Fair winds. You brought much beautiful light into this world. I hope you find the same in the next.

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Fair winds to a multihull pioneer and artist.He drew some beautiful boats.

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Dick was the finest mentor and friend one could hope to have. I learned some of life's most important and hardest lessons from him and he will be missed wherever the wind blows. His vessels will carry his spirit forever.

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During the 80s and early 90s I was a fanatical worshiper of Newick. His boats are graceful to look at and to sail. I did a 10 day cruise of the (SoCal) Channel Islands on a Val one time that included some of the best sailing of my life. As a young man, I dreamed of someday owning a Native 38. I actually came very close to pulling the trigger on Rusty Pelican in 1985.

 

Long will live the influence of Dick Newick on the Multihull World.

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Wow. One of my idols is gone. He brought beauty and speed to the seas.

 

Fair winds, Dick.

 

Mike

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Thanks Dick, you definitely enriched, inspired and changed my view on sailing, sailboats and life in a way I'll never forget.

 

Cheers on you

 

 

Fair winds

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Remember seeing 'Cheers' in Milbay Docks before the start of the OSTAR in 1968.

 

Impossibly beautiful, fragile, radical.

 

Sad loss..

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This is a really sad day for the multihull community. Actually, any community that loves simplicity, finesse, power and beauty. A man ahead of his time....

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I met Dick while studying at the Landing School and became his apprentice. I then worked for Dick and he was probably the most exceptional boss I ever had. In his early 70's it was like he was a teenager. We designed and built a 16' trimaran with a crabclaw rig in his garage and then went out to do sea trials in 30 knots off Kittery Point.
He gave me a 40' Proa that he designed and spent two weeks to help me get it ready for one of my first offshore adventures. Fair winds and following seas Mr. Newick.

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I feel lucky to have known him and sailed on his boats. What I will always hold dear is how beautiful they are. He imagined and created something new that had never been before, but unlike the first cars or bridges or most of man's engineered creations, from the very beginning Dick's boats were beautiful, and expressed this new way of offering the ocean lightness and grace perfectly.

 

An extraordinary achievement from an extraordinary man to whom all who sail owe thanks. Fair winds, Dick.

 

Jesse Deupree

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My tremelino was the most fun boat I every owned and sailed, may the sailing gods be with you.

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Thank you Dick for imagining my Native 38, Naga, into reality. Such a great boat, I've just had to keep her and sail her for over 30 years now - my racing house, as I used to call her. A wonderful beautiful home - always the best looking boat in the anchorage - and a fantastic sailor that has carried me uncounted miles in every condition. Quick and nimble. Reliable, predictable, with perfect manners and no bad surprises. And fast, of course. Dick's work was genius. Dreams into reality. Thank you Dick. Naga is a living monument to you.

 

The world is a poorer place with Dick's departure. Such a sad day. We will miss him. All warm condolences to the family and friends.

 

Jack

 

post-37809-0-29156900-1377880940_thumb.jpg

 

post-37809-0-58880500-1377881004_thumb.jpg

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May you enjoy a broad reach in flat waters, while flying a hull high and dry

 

you'll be missed.

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Was lucky enough to own and sail a Val 31 all over the pacific for many years, really great boat, fast and SIMPLE with hardly any maintenance. Amazing how many Newicks were out there doing it and not sitting at a dock rotting, that says something!

 

What a legacy Dick has left, Cheers to the life of a great guy.

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He was a perfect combination of artist and engineer. Cheers and Three Cheers are still my favorite boats to find pictures of. Thank you Mr. Newick.

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Building, owning and sailing one of his designs has been an important life experience for me. I'm thankful for his brilliance.

Jim Conlin

'Spark' Damfino

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I think I see the DNA of Dick's designs in every modern trimaran.

 

I have long admired the man and his boats from afar and have a pang of jealousy of all of you here that have personal stories to share.

 

fair winds

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With that quizzical twinkle in his eyes and his bushy eyebrows, a conversation with Dick was always fun, challenging and thought-provoking. Steve Callahan's article brought back fond memories of the Val years.

 

I was fortunate to sail with Dick aboard Third Turtle after Mike Birch's extraordinary OSTAR second place. We enjoyed a fast passage from Martha's Vineyard to Stonington, Ct, in light airs that never challenged the little Val's capabilities.

 

I also raced in the Caribbean aboard Rogue Wave. I was already a believer in trimarans. An afternoon's daysail in the early 60's on a really daggy home-built 30-foot Arthur Piver Nimble permanently altered my thinking. But in those days I lived in a world of monohulls. Aboard Rogue Wave, Dick's pure genius was revealed as we effortlessly surfed at 25-knots down big ocean swells off Nevis, scattering flying fish under our bows.

 

Fair winds, Richard.

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Sad news... Fair winds Dick. Thanks for giving us the enjoyment of sailing your creations. RIP.

 

 

post-11288-0-15463900-1377903875_thumb.jpeg

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post-38823-0-49909600-1377906258_thumb.jpg

 

I think I see the DNA of Dick's designs in every modern trimaran.

 

I have long admired the man and his boats from afar and have a pang of jealousy of all of you here that have personal stories to share.

 

fair winds

I respect Dick as much as the early pioneers in aviation. Despite the naysayers, he intuitively evolved sailing designs into the era of the modern multihull. Does anyone recognize his DNA in this design? Does anyone know the details of it's genesis?

 

post-38823-029817100 1331335806_thumb.jpg

 

 

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Fair winds to be sure.

The 'Triple Jack' crew have always had the utmost respect for everything Newick.

Geoff Cooke, one of our racing team, knew him well and we always enjoyed his stories between races in St.Martin.

His designs looked great from any angle, it's as simple as that.

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Geff's beautifull picture of a sunset from the deck of a Newick Trimaran says it all for me, as the sun sets on a magical, exemplary, life well lived.

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I mourn the loss of the designer of some of the most beautiful multihulls, and a personal inspiration to me.

 

Sail on Dick, where you go we can only hope to follow.

 

Pat, our thoughts are with you.

 

Simon Fishwick

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In the moxie days when I asked Dick if he'd draw me a boat first thing I said is I'm a traditionalist--thinking fifes and concordias--Dick looked at me with that twinkle in his eyes and said, "Great! The Polynesians have been designing and building multihulls for two thousand years!" Sweet educator he was and kindest genius I ever met. F

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Wow, that is incredibly sad news. Dick Newick was one of the funniest designers that I ever met. In a world that didn't understand how to finesse multihulls into a form that was both beautiful and functional, Dick was able to do both and show the way forward with an uncanny touch. RIP Dick.

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Rest in peace Dick, you were a true gentleman and yachtsman, I enjoyed our brief talks.

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R.I.P

 

birch_1.jpg

Olympus here some hundred meters before the finishing line of the 1978 Rum Race, was designed and built by Walter Greene; of course Dick Newick's designs were a source of inspiration for Greene. The Greene's multis were stiffer and could sail upwind a little bit better. By the way, this picture is mine...

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R.I.P

 

birch_1.jpg

Fair breeze to Dick Newick.

 

The yellow tri, Olympus Photo, was a Walter Greene design. Over the years the design has often been mistake for a Newick.

In SAIL, April 1979 Walter Green the designer, builder and owner of the boat was quoted as saying that "the hull shapes were inspired by Newick. "you can't improve the wheel" he said at the time.

 

Regards,

Multisail.

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Thank you Dick for imagining my Native 38, Naga, into reality. Such a great boat, I've just had to keep her and sail her for over 30 years now - my racing house, as I used to call her. A wonderful beautiful home - always the best looking boat in the anchorage - and a fantastic sailor that has carried me uncounted miles in every condition. Quick and nimble. Reliable, predictable, with perfect manners and no bad surprises. And fast, of course. Dick's work was genius. Dreams into reality. Thank you Dick. Naga is a living monument to you.

 

The world is a poorer place with Dick's departure. Such a sad day. We will miss him. All warm condolences to the family and friends.

 

Jack

 

attachicon.gifNAGA_05_1984_OSTAR_Start_2a.jpg

 

attachicon.gifNaga_chalong_600px.jpg

 

Aloha Jack,

 

Love the Native design, a smaller (newer?) sister of Moxie. Here's Native at Corinthian YC,Tiburon, California, January, 1999

 

native-l.jpg

 

FYI, Jack's web site: http://www.trimaran-naga.com/

 

And map of his adventures in NAGA:

 

worldroute-full.gif

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Thank you all for your love, and admiration for our wonderful father, and husband. It has been comforting to read your memories of times spent with dad. He had a great sense of humor even through his final battle. He was hoping to finish his book, but Mom, and Lark promised him they would do it for him. Dad was a trooper to the end. Simply put, we miss him dearly.

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I took Triad (Newick 42' Creative) out for a sail on Friday with two good friends in honor of Dick and his achievements. We toasted him with cold Heinekens, and remembered fondly all he has done for us and the multihull community. Here's a link to a photo taken yesterday at The Gloucester Schooner Race of Triad with a full compliment aboard.

 

 

www.dropbox.com/s/ag6ns16hrav0yob/Triad.jpg

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Hi Dick, I've told you before that you've given me some of the most exciting adventures in my life on board your creations. And you encouraged and assisted me in creating my own adventures, in the past and even recently. You've always been very generous with your time, and your insights. I'll miss checking in with you. With much love, and I look forward to seeing you later and talking about our new adventures and hearing your new ideas. Tom

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Growing up in St. Croix and being able to sail on Trice, Trial, Tryst, Viti Viti, Trine, Tri-I, Braco Mañana and Charis...... All I can say is wow, Dick you will be missed, thank you for being sooooo far ahead of your time!

What a humbling experience to have crossed your path, my heart felt condolences to the entire Newick clan.

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So sorry for your loss. I did not know the man but very much admired his designs. There is no doubt he was and is the leading designer that opened the world's eyes to what modern multihulls could and should be. Its nice to hear he was as good a man as a NA/designer.

 

I look forward to reading that book some day.

 

Regards,

 

Wess

Thank you all for your love, and admiration for our wonderful father, and husband. It has been comforting to read your memories of times spent with dad. He had a great sense of humor even through his final battle. He was hoping to finish his book, but Mom, and Lark promised him they would do it for him. Dad was a trooper to the end. Simply put, we miss him dearly.

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R.I.P

 

birch_1.jpg

Maybe a Walter Green design, but the picture pretty much says all that needs to be said about Mr. Newick's impact. Clearly made an impact on the French.

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When I was a boy my father struck up a friendship with Dick. He visited us when he attended the multihull symposium in Annapolis (long time ago), and we visited him in Martha's Vineyard. Will always remember the sail we took on Third Turtle, cookies from the Black Dog and a beer. An amazing ride on an amazing boat with an amazing man. Been hooked on boats with more than one hull ever since, and to this day still stop to look at and admire a Newick design whenever I come across one, be it just a picture or a real life boat. Prayers and thoughts for the whole family. Fair winds Dick!

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In the 80's some of us have had the privilege of being Dick's sons and I was one of them... not only that I was in my 20's at that time and considering Dick as older but mainly because he had a lot to teach me... This was a fantastic era when discovering those multihulls and racing them alone across the Atlantic... The family was great with people like Dick, Jack Petith, Walter Greene, Mike Birch and many others... A lot to learn, a lot to listen to from those people for a kid like I was and a great honour to sail on the boats they had designed and often built as well/
Should I say this has been the best part of my life so far? Sailing 3 times Route du Rhum, OSTAR on a creative or Lorient-Bermuda-Lorient on a Val has been a unique experience that has impacted my whole life. Unique boats and unique sailing sensations. I remember the Creative flying on her foils after starting the OSTAR in first position and all the mega multihulls behind... unique feelings when looking at the leeward outrigger spraying sparkles in the rising moonlight. I have always been some kind of a romantic and contemplative guy and could sit there and watch those boats sailing for hours. They were fitting myself like a glove. No other boat that I have been sailing on later has ever matched that.
Today I am feeling like an orphan...
So long Dick, your boats will remain in our hearts for ever.

post-102103-0-77180800-1379004882_thumb.jpgpost-102103-0-81003800-1379004908_thumb.jpg

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Life is difficult sometimes but memories are a wonderful thing. I have a tear in my eye as I try to write about this true legend in our lives.

 

Sailing a passage on one of Dick's boats can be a spiritual experience, it can change your life forever. Dick Newick's spirit lives on in all of his yachts that will continue to sail the world's oceans.

A great family man, yachtsman, innovator and designer. Sadly missed but never forgotten.

 

I hope I can speak for all the New Zealand multihull community in sending our condolences to Dick's family.

 

Rob Stone

former builder/owner "aihe" (val 2)

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Sailing a passage on one of Dick's boats can be a spiritual experience, it can change your life forever.

 

Rob Stone

former builder/owner "aihe" (val 2)

 

AMEN, brother. It did for me.

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Dick was one of the finest gentleman I have ever met. He was always so willing to share his design advice. One time while we were sitting in the cockpit of a boat I had designed and built I apologized for stealing some of his design techniques, he told me he was glad to help. Later that day over dinner he told me he was going to use a couple of mine!!! I was on cloud nine!!!!

Fair Winds Dick,

John Patterson, SV Buddy, West Indies

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I'm here in San Francisco awaiting the next America's Cup race. What would this year's Cup be like without multihull pioneers like Dick Newick? It's amazing to see these AC72s just fly across San Francisco Bay. I'm just sorry that Dick isn't physically here to witness these beasts!

 

I'm a little bit different from all the accomplished sailors on this post. I knew Dick as a little girl since he and my dad, Jim Sinclaire, were the best of friends from Rutherford. Only born a couple of months apart, the two families not only shared a town, but were Quakers too. My dad always fondly recalled the summer he and Dick drove across the US to go work on a farm in Oregon. Dick got my dad to eat lots of strawberries along the way and my dad ended up covered in hives. They both loved the sea...Dick went on to become the premier multihull designer, my father chose naval ships instead.

 

My dad passed in 1995...so wherever they are...hopefully they're together, reminiscing about Rutherford, Oregon, and watching this exciting AC72 America's Cup from a bird's eye view.

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Sheridan,

Awesome first post and ignore any other greeting others might offer.

+1

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Dick and I had some great conversations over the restoration of hull #1 of his Outrigger 26 design. It is the prettiest little vessel I have ever owned. He was such a good fella. Thanks for the memories Richard. Capt. Ed Wojtecki

 

 

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