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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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thx712517

Dinghy Recommendation

55 posts in this topic

Hi. New guy here, looking for info. I used to sail quite a bit - learned on an Opti, went up to a Sunfish, got into a Snipe for two seasons, crewed on a Y-Flyer, had a Laser for a summer, and then got out of it. Kicking myself for that, but I burned out on racing.

 

Last two times I've been sailing have been in a rented Walker Bay 10. Slow as piss but it's sailing and I'm on the water. I'm looking for something to buy and hold onto for a while.

 

I'm in Atlanta, so I sail on Lake Allatoona and Lake Arrowhead a lot, with Lake Lanier a close third. I'm looking for something that I can trailer with a Honda Civic. Going to be a solo boat for the most part (5' 9", 155 lbs), but I'd like to take wife along from time to time since that makes getting said boat much more likely to happen.

 

So I'm looking for a sailboat good for one but that can handle two, more for daysailing versus racing. Centerboard or daggerboard would be easiest with trailering, I think, and make it more likely to store it in a garage. The big thing is ease of getting on the water. The Snipe and even the Laser spent too much time on the shore since rigging was a pain in the ass. (Snipe moreso than the Laser of course)

 

I like traditional-looking boats. Like the Crawford Melonseed. Nice hull, simple rig, looks fun, and oars when the wind dies. Expensive as hell though, at $11K. So something cheaper would be nice. I figure as far as performance goes I can just let the sheet out when things get hairy, but I'd like to keep out of capsizing too often with wife aboard.

 

Suggestions?

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Are there any scows down there? I spent plenty of summers in high school and college taking girls out on my families MC while they just laid out in their bikinis. The newer MCs have a one person mast stepping design so getting it ready to go by yourself isn't an issue.

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I can't think of a boat, other than a traditional Windsurfer, that can be rigged faster than a Laser. The Melonseed sure cannot.

 

But what really matters is what are you looking to do? You said you got burned out on racing, is that still true? If that's the case then pretty much any boat that fits how you want to sail will do.

 

If performance of the boat isn't important the Melonseed or Walker is viable since it doesn't matter how fast you are going.

 

If you want a bit more performance particularly with a SENSATION of speed but without the stability issues, A used Hobie 16, or even one of their newer Rotomolded Getaway's with the hiking seats might be the ticket! No they don't have "traditional looks" but they come in new at around $6k, are durable as hell have lots of space so you can take your wife and even another couple out on a sunny day.

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Check out a Raider 16 with a cat rig. Mine takes about 10 min to rig and launch off my trailer. Easy to sail solo and easily takes wife or GF in comfort.

Several used ones in the GA. area. Good performance too!

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Yes, I burned out on racing a number of years ago but the interest is slowly returning. It seems to be taking shape more as "I want to go fast!" than "I want to race around marks!", so this boat, whatever it is, will be more of a daysailing get on the water have fun and go fast-ish kind of boat, rather than a fleet. I figure if I really get back into racing I'll pick up a boat that's got a big fleet around here - Laser, Snipe.

 

No scows in the area aside from a Y-Flyer fleet on Allatoona and the occasional Butterfly. An MC Scow looks kind of interesting. I sailed a Capri 14.2 with keel once, and that was fun. Capri 14.2 Expo looks interesting as well. I saw the Hobie Bravo, and even though I'm not a huge cat guy it seemed interesting.

 

For rigging - let's say a boat that can be rigged up and ready to go in 15 minutes or so.

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Good luck with that rigging time. You are pushing it to have a Laser rigged that fast from trailer to sailing. Be more realistic. 30 minutes can be done with a Hobie Getaway

Cuz from the trailer all you have to do is

 

Step the mast, unfold the bunks (assuming you go for the seat option, attach the rudders. Hoist the main (the jib is roller furled on the forestay so that was "hoisted" when you stepped the mast) and Bob's your Uncle.

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...just look on your local craigslist,see what grabs you--every boat has it's +'s and -'s ;)

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Hobie Wave? rigging time is going to be the same as a Laser though. Like others said a Laser is about as simple and quick as it gets. With a Wave it's as simple as a Sunfish to sail. There are three lines, main halyard, cunningham, main sheet. Room for 1-4. Stable, quicker than any mono you might be interested in, maintenance free hulls, trailers easy, can be broken down by 2 people pretty easily for longer term storage. Pretty much a guaranteed smile producer. You don't have to have a special trailer. I have a basic small boat trailer with some cross pieces of wood u bolted on as my trailer. Set up the mast alone. Or as BB said, a getaway. 4-6 people with a few more lines but basically the same amount of fuss as a Wave. Used Waves can be had for less than 2k, a getaway is going to be more. Troll Craigslist constantly and see what pops up. Remember sometimes the boat you have is the boat you want.

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Lake Lanier Sailing Club has a MC Scow fleet. They regularly get 3-5 boots on the water for fleet races.

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Those seats on the Getaway remind me of the Hobie 17. That could be the boat for you, the 17. Meant to be good solo or with a light crew. Good boats, I got a 16 which I solo most times. What a blast! though not sure it could be rigged in record time compared to something like a Laser. 16 mast is awkward and heavy if stepping it on your own.

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I am seriously enjoying the Vagabond/Holder 14 I'm boatsitting. Stable but not underpowered, very comfortable cockpit that holds two or three people great and if there's kids you can fit several more. Hard chine feels better to me than Cyclone, Club Jr., Oday, montgomery style, and most definitely better than a walker bay. Setup time meets your 15 minutes pretty much. You can rig a spinnaker and have plenty of room and stability to fly it.

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Those seats on the Getaway remind me of the Hobie 17. That could be the boat for you, the 17. Meant to be good solo or with a light crew. Good boats, I got a 16 which I solo most times. What a blast! though not sure it could be rigged in record time compared to something like a Laser. 16 mast is awkward and heavy if stepping it on your own.

Having just sold a Hobie 17, don't get one. Out of production. Certain parts are getting hard to find. Rigging it alone is possible but not fun. Certain parts of the boats are prone to failure and maintenance is constant.

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Ah right, I have seen them come up for sale in the UK. The 16 I have already fits the bill, nice tough boat. Heavy to manhandle about on your own though.

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I'll keep an eye out for a Holder and keep my mind open about catamarans, might take a look at Lake Lanier and their MC Scow fleet.

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I would go Mc Scow all the way. In light winds it'll be fun with just one and in the heavies you can bring some dead weight and fly up wind. If you want something a bit bigger and faster but still singlehandable a Fireball might fit the bill. Single trap would allow you to singlehand up to 15 maybe and if you had a crew you could have a ton of fun in much more. It doesn't hurt that there gorgeous to.fireball_varnish.jpg

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the Raider 16 sound like exactly what you are asking for. I love mine, easy to sail solo, fast to rig up, takes two easy!!!

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I am seriously enjoying the Vagabond/Holder 14 I'm boatsitting. Stable but not underpowered, very comfortable cockpit that holds two or three people great and if there's kids you can fit several more. Hard chine feels better to me than Cyclone, Club Jr., Oday, montgomery style, and most definitely better than a walker bay. Setup time meets your 15 minutes pretty much. You can rig a spinnaker and have plenty of room and stability to fly it.

 

Not underpowered? You must have almost brand-new sails and a pretty good wind where you're sailing. Those things are regarded as pigs by many. The two smallish boats I sail the most (junior program) are the Club FJ and the Oday Javelin and both will whizz right past a Vagabond/Holder/Capri 14.2

 

That said, it's a fun little boat. Simple and fairly robust, and if you're serious about it you can get better sails. I happen to like the stability too.

 

Dunno if it's been mentioned yet in this thread: Coronado 15 a rocket compared to the Vag/Ho/Capri but stable enough to stand on the gun'l and also self-bailing. Heavier though.

 

If the budget extends to a Raider then definitely give it serious consideration. Several generations newer/better design, really good construction too. The Coronados etc etc are all heavier and crunchier than they should be.

 

FB- Doug

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I am seriously enjoying the Vagabond/Holder 14 I'm boatsitting. Stable but not underpowered, very comfortable cockpit that holds two or three people great and if there's kids you can fit several more. Hard chine feels better to me than Cyclone, Club Jr., Oday, montgomery style, and most definitely better than a walker bay. Setup time meets your 15 minutes pretty much. You can rig a spinnaker and have plenty of room and stability to fly it.

 

Not underpowered? You must have almost brand-new sails and a pretty good wind where you're sailing. Those things are regarded as pigs by many. The two smallish boats I sail the most (junior program) are the Club FJ and the Oday Javelin and both will whizz right past a Vagabond/Holder/Capri 14.2

 

That said, it's a fun little boat. Simple and fairly robust, and if you're serious about it you can get better sails. I happen to like the stability too.

 

Dunno if it's been mentioned yet in this thread: Coronado 15 a rocket compared to the Vag/Ho/Capri but stable enough to stand on the gun'l and also self-bailing. Heavier though.

 

If the budget extends to a Raider then definitely give it serious consideration. Several generations newer/better design, really good construction too. The Coronados etc etc are all heavier and crunchier than they should be.

 

FB- Doug

Had a Coronado 15 for years and years. Great boat. Update the cockpit by removing the heavy center traveler go to stern sheeting and it makes a world of difference regarding cockpit space. Self draining cockpit really nice size great for taking a two other people out kicking around. Or trap out and get fast etc. Price range good boats fall into your budget I would put it up there near the top of the list they made thousands of them you just need to do a little snooping around and you can find one many times nearly new stashed in a garage or barn some place. A tired and needing some TLC Lightning would fall into your budget that would be high on my list larger than the C15 little better suited for going out cruising around more room and more stable etc. Oday Day sailor is even slightly larger if you keep your eyes out you can find decent one's in your price range. If you want to go smaller than the C15 then your looking at more or less single handed hulls like the sun fish and laser etc.

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I'll put the Raider on the list, but finding one in Georgia doesn't seem like an easy task. Same for the C15, on the list but hopes are low. I really liked the "non-exhaustive" but very helpful list posted earlier. The last time I sailed a Snipe was as a kid about 50 pounds lighter and a lot less patient. How are they these days?

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Raiders...........2 in Columbia, SC, (Waters Sails) and 1 in Hiawassee, GA. (lake Chatuge)

PM me if U want more info.

JD

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9844853474_08849c0b41_b.jpg

 

A slug indeed! But closer to the original post's idea than, say, a beach cat or even a Lightning.

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I know family fun but for me the brain damage of being outpointed by a catboat was insurmountable, my problem not yours

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I'll put the Raider on the list, but finding one in Georgia doesn't seem like an easy task. Same for the C15, on the list but hopes are low. I really liked the "non-exhaustive" but very helpful list posted earlier. The last time I sailed a Snipe was as a kid about 50 pounds lighter and a lot less patient. How are they these days?

 

Come to Houston and I'll sell you my Raider 16. I haven't had time to sail it much this year, I've only had it out once this summer. I will sell it for $3500.

 

-Kent

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I'll put the Raider on the list, but finding one in Georgia doesn't seem like an easy task. Same for the C15, on the list but hopes are low. I really liked the "non-exhaustive" but very helpful list posted earlier. The last time I sailed a Snipe was as a kid about 50 pounds lighter and a lot less patient. How are they these days?

 

One in Columbia SC

http://columbia.craigslist.org/boa/4064872802.html

 

At least one more in Florida, link not handy at present -BUT- seek and ye shall find!

 

FB- Doug

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I have a 1998 Escape Expedition 14.5 with a custom sail and carbon boom. Fits your bill perfectly. From pulling up the ramp to driving away, a relaxed 10 minutes. Uncover the boat, step the mast/sail assembly (easy), stick the foils on, and go sailing. The boom stays deployed. See my other posts for the virtues of this outstanding, thoroughbred hull design and super useful and practical rig. Hard to find, between $3K and $4K and you can do a lot with sail design.

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I have a 1998 Escape Expedition 14.5 with a custom sail and carbon boom. Fits your bill perfectly. From pulling up the ramp to driving away, a relaxed 10 minutes. Uncover the boat, step the mast/sail assembly (easy), stick the foils on, and go sailing. The boom stays deployed. See my other posts for the virtues of this outstanding, thoroughbred hull design and super useful and practical rig. Hard to find, between $3K and $4K and you can do a lot with sail design.

 

 

 

 

That sounds very interesting... the stock Expedition seems very underpowered, a custom sail should fix that. How about some juicy details, or pics of this rig?

 

IMHO one of the best improvements to make in the sport of sailing is to shorten the rig-up time. I am as impatient as anybody and want a boat I can shove into the water & go.

 

FB- Doug

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Beautiful Fireball. What's the sail number? This would be a good boat, think Y-Flyer with a trapeze.

 

 

I would go Mc Scow all the way. In light winds it'll be fun with just one and in the heavies you can bring some dead weight and fly up wind. If you want something a bit bigger and faster but still singlehandable a Fireball might fit the bill. Single trap would allow you to singlehand up to 15 maybe and if you had a crew you could have a ton of fun in much more. It doesn't hurt that there gorgeous to.fireball_varnish.jpg

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VX One sailboat... The baddest boat on the block, no doubt, WAKE UP YALL ! Whos your daddy ? Can do anything - leisure sail, put on smaller sail for recreational, or put on your race sail and blow everyone away. So I hear.. Would love one of these, pricey though !



http://bennettyachting.com/vx-one/


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VX One sailboat... The baddest boat on the block, no doubt, WAKE UP YALL ! Whos your daddy ? Can do anything - leisure sail, put on smaller sail for recreational, or put on your race sail and blow everyone away. So I hear.. Would love one of these, pricey though !

http://bennettyachting.com/vx-one/

 

Those look awesome, but it isn't a dinghy.

 

Nor can they be rigged in less or equal time as a laser, not even close.

 

The rigging time is the hard part as there isn't much faster off the shore that a Laser unless we include boats that are much slower on the water.

 

The easy solution is to give up speed and go sunfish, they can handle 2 -for just long enough- to show your wife how to work one and then head back for the second boat on the trailer that your Civic towed without problem. Yes they sail like barges, but they are everywhere, easy to maintain, repair, tow and resell. If you were to do what 90% of the people who post these threads do, odds are the first boat you go look at locally will be a sunfish anyway. They are fun boats and are absolutely as simple as it gets. Also there is often very good OD racing locally and racing against the wife is far less likely to lead to "issues" than racing with the wife, just saying.

 

Sunfish can be had for basically nothing and are good boats for passing time while making choices on which direction you want to go. Or join a club with a club fleet you can use to shop around for what you want and then be able to leave a boat with the mast up. I'm completely unfamiliar with sailing in your area, so not sure where that would land on cost.

 

Or if you feel like building your own google Goat Island Skiff. It would tick all the boxes i think. traditional look, oars, can be singlehanded or take more, fast to rig...ect.

 

Don't spend too much time looking for the perfect boat, just get back out there.

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I have a 1998 Escape Expedition 14.5 with a custom sail and carbon boom. Fits your bill perfectly. From pulling up the ramp to driving away, a relaxed 10 minutes. Uncover the boat, step the mast/sail assembly (easy), stick the foils on, and go sailing. The boom stays deployed. See my other posts for the virtues of this outstanding, thoroughbred hull design and super useful and practical rig. Hard to find, between $3K and $4K and you can do a lot with sail design.

 

 

 

 

That sounds very interesting... the stock Expedition seems very underpowered, a custom sail should fix that. How about some juicy details, or pics of this rig?

 

IMHO one of the best improvements to make in the sport of sailing is to shorten the rig-up time. I am as impatient as anybody and want a boat I can shove into the water & go.

 

FB- Doug

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=148465&p=4218307 Post # 53

 

http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=133857 #58, 60

 

 

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How long do u think it takes to rig a VX One since u seem to know about it and are knocking it?

 

Where exactly is the line between dinghy and not a dinghy?

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He's right ride. It will take a min of 20 min to rig a Vx from trailer mode.

 

He's also kind of right about the Vx not being a dingy. However one reason I purchased a Vx was the fact that you can drop the lead with two quick bolts and if you really want to get jiggy add a masthead kite and traps.

 

Pretty flexible design.

 

Get to rush creek during the na's and ill make sure you get a ride.

 

Don't think he is knocking it. Just voicing an opinions. Price tag is big obstical for most.

 

How long do u think it takes to rig a VX One since u seem to know about it and are knocking it?

 

Where exactly is the line between dinghy and not a dinghy?

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How long do u think it takes to rig a VX One since u seem to know about it and are knocking it?

 

Where exactly is the line between dinghy and not a dinghy?

Ballast. And no longer than a Flying Dutchman, the "big dinghy" and at 450 pounds already stretching the definition. Lighting is sort of a dinghy but not really. Should be called a sharpie or a flattie. Or a dinghy. Thistle has a 70 lb CB but it moves up and down and the boat will turtle and fill--so a dinghy. That applies to the Lighting too except it is kinda big. Would you call a Flying Scot a dinghy? Or an e-scow? Or a raven? How about calling them centerboarders. Trying to put things in neat little boxes is fruitless. Better to let things be what they are.

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Wow, i didn't intend to offend anyone.

 

The VX One does look like an awesome boat, but if the $11k price tag on a Melonseed which the original poster mentioned really liking is too much, The $30K price tag on VX, which is quite nearly the polar opposite, well not saying that isn't a good value (it is) but that doesn't seem like a good recommendation.

 

Also the boat is so new, not much in the way of a used market. I would be among them masses of cheap bastards cheering on your class, because i want used ones to flood the market years from now :ph34r:

 

I consider sailboats that use fixed ballast in the keel to be keel boats. I don't mean that in a derogatory way and it is a fuzzy line that continues to get fuzzier with boats like the VX and Viper. Not sure there is an actual definition anywhere, kinda like what is or is not a "skiff". It is a never ending point of contention, so if you wish to call it a "ballast assisted dinghy" i'm perfectly fine with that. :huh:

 

The poster has experience so he knows how long it takes to rig an unstayed cat rig as well as a sloop rigged boat such as the y-flyer.

 

There isn't much faster than a laser or similar except some traditional rigs, lanteen or the ?HOYT? smart rigs as found on the very rare escape expedition.

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He's right ride. It will take a min of 20 min to rig a Vx from trailer mode.

 

 

I have a buddy that has a VX One, awesome boat BUT I'll bet you a nice 6 pack of Sam that you can't rig it in 20 min! Shit the spreaders and all the standing rigging have to come off to put the mast cover on!!!

 

My Laser I can rig in 20 min. I don't even think I can rig my Buccaneer 18 in 20 min being fully covered...

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I'm not one of those guys who take all that crap apart every time I go sailing. - unless its a long road trip.

 

If I'm back and forth from the local pond I leave all the gear in place.

 

Stick the mast, pin shrouds, sails on and away I go.

 

Hell the first thing I did when I got the boat was to glue the mast together so I wouldn't be temped to split it for transport.

 

I would bet you a case of whatever I could do it myself in 20 from the time my wheels stop rolling to the time I'm ready to back it in the water. But I'm pretty proficient.

 

Edit: in terms of rigging there's probably little difference between it and the Vx. Except ill bet the mast is lighter.

 

 

 

 

 

He's right ride. It will take a min of 20 min to rig a Vx from trailer mode.

 

I have a buddy that has a VX One, awesome boat BUT I'll bet you a nice 6 pack of Sam that you can't rig it in 20 min! Shit the spreaders and all the standing rigging have to come off to put the mast cover on!!!

 

My Laser I can rig in 20 min. I don't even think I can rig my Buccaneer 18 in 20 min being fully covered...

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OK I'll take that bet as long as you take me sailing after. I can't loose that bet!!! :D

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....

 

I can show up to the ramp covers and all and get my Buccaneer in the water in 15 minutes...any day..unless Hobie Dog is showing up with a six pack...which would add hours to the rigging ;)

 

Used Buccs are available in most parts of the country cheap...they make good daysailers...

 

Roller furling JIb makes de-powering in heavy breeze very easy.

 

Here's a video showing how easy it is to step the mast...

If you leave the mainsail on the boom (I do) and the jib rolled in the boat...you can have this boat in the water in 10 minutes...a few more if you (have one) and want to play with the kite...

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I have a 1998 Escape Expedition 14.5 with a custom sail and carbon boom. Fits your bill perfectly. From pulling up the ramp to driving away, a relaxed 10 minutes. Uncover the boat, step the mast/sail assembly (easy), stick the foils on, and go sailing. The boom stays deployed. See my other posts for the virtues of this outstanding, thoroughbred hull design and super useful and practical rig. Hard to find, between $3K and $4K and you can do a lot with sail design.

 

 

 

That sounds very interesting... the stock Expedition seems very underpowered, a custom sail should fix that. How about some juicy details, or pics of this rig?

 

IMHO one of the best improvements to make in the sport of sailing is to shorten the rig-up time. I am as impatient as anybody and want a boat I can shove into the water & go.

 

FB- Doug

 

i am really glad that the our pro friends in the Americascup are helping us by developing new methods to shorten the rig-up time dramatically. great effort guys!

 

as for me, we are up and running in our fd in 10 to 15 minutes. depending on the rush and the weather / time of the year. (clothing)

 

 

 

I have a 1998 Escape Expedition 14.5 with a custom sail and carbon boom. Fits your bill perfectly. From pulling up the ramp to driving away, a relaxed 10 minutes. Uncover the boat, step the mast/sail assembly (easy), stick the foils on, and go sailing. The boom stays deployed. See my other posts for the virtues of this outstanding, thoroughbred hull design and super useful and practical rig. Hard to find, between $3K and $4K and you can do a lot with sail design.

 

 

 

That sounds very interesting... the stock Expedition seems very underpowered, a custom sail should fix that. How about some juicy details, or pics of this rig?

 

IMHO one of the best improvements to make in the sport of sailing is to shorten the rig-up time. I am as impatient as anybody and want a boat I can shove into the water & go.

 

FB- Doug

 

i am really glad that the our pro friends in the Americascup are helping us by developing new methods to shorten the rig-up time dramatically. great effort guys!

 

as for me, we are up and running in our fd in 10 to 15 minutes. depending on the rush and the weather / time of the year. (clothing)

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....

 

I can show up to the ramp covers and all and get my Buccaneer in the water in 15 minutes...any day..

 

If you leave the mainsail on the boom (I do) and the jib rolled in the boat...you can have this boat in the water in 10 minutes...

 

Aye. That's nothing.

 

When I were a lad, we used to rig t' International Fourteen in 5 minutes. We'd show up with covers on and wooden spars. We'd sand and varnish the spars, rig the boat, lick road clean wit tongue and chop a cord of firewood all in 5 minutes or our Dad would thrash us with his belt.

 

and you try and tell the young people of today that.......they wont believe you!

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Are we talking rigged on a trailer or rigged and sailing away from the shore.

 

Buccaneers are quick, but launching on a public ramp can suck away a fair amount of time in itself. Even if you have the place to yourself, figure 50-100 yards from the parking lot and the extra steps of having to float it off the trailer - get out - tie it off to the dock - drive back to the parking lot - walk back - raise the sail or start the engine - shove off....add even light traffic and prepare to wait longer than it took to rig on the trailer.

 

Where a laser or similar can share the handlaunch area with canoes/kayaks...walk it in from 10 yards away, walk the dolly back then return, jump in and go. Even with traffic, paddlers are easier to work around. Also it is often more convenient being able to use the nearest public waterfront rather than having to travel all the way over to the actual public launch...ok well...at least around me it is.

 

I'm thinking more along the lines of, in a race from covered/secured on the trailer to the committee boat 100 yards from shore, what boat would get there first as a gauge of actual convenience. I think i have done that in a Laser in <15 minutes. I didn't bother to time it as i was already late, but i had just finished sleeving the sail when the 10 minute horn sounded and i hit the line on time then proceeded to the wrong mark like a champ.

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....

 

I can show up to the ramp covers and all and get my Buccaneer in the water in 15 minutes...any day..

 

If you leave the mainsail on the boom (I do) and the jib rolled in the boat...you can have this boat in the water in 10 minutes...

 

Aye. That's nothing.

 

When I were a lad, we used to rig t' International Fourteen in 5 minutes. We'd show up with covers on and wooden spars. We'd sand and varnish the spars, rig the boat, lick road clean wit tongue and chop a cord of firewood all in 5 minutes or our Dad would thrash us with his belt.

 

and you try and tell the young people of today that.......they wont believe you!

 

 

You were spoiled. We used to have to rig an International 15 in four minutes, and we had to weave the cloth for the sails out of sister's hair, then we used to boat to bring home a half-ton of coal or else no hot dinner. And we'd get thrashed if we didn't put sister's hair back on after t' race

 

FB- Doug

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....

 

I can show up to the ramp covers and all and get my Buccaneer in the water in 15 minutes...any day..

 

If you leave the mainsail on the boom (I do) and the jib rolled in the boat...you can have this boat in the water in 10 minutes...

 

Aye. That's nothing.

 

When I were a lad, we used to rig t' International Fourteen in 5 minutes. We'd show up with covers on and wooden spars. We'd sand and varnish the spars, rig the boat, lick road clean wit tongue and chop a cord of firewood all in 5 minutes or our Dad would thrash us with his belt.

 

and you try and tell the young people of today that.......they wont believe you!

 

 

You were spoiled. We used to have to rig an International 15 in four minutes, and we had to weave the cloth for the sails out of sister's hair, then we used to boat to bring home a half-ton of coal or else no hot dinner. And we'd get thrashed if we didn't put sister's hair back on after t' race

 

FB- Doug

 

Hot dinner?

 

Luxury!

 

We had two bits of cold gravel, worked twenty-nine hours a day at mill for sixpence every four years, and when we got home our Dad would slice us in two wit' bread knife.

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You had it easy. Our old dad had us sharpen the rigging knife ourselves first, using our teeth, before he carved us up and served us to ourselves for dinner.

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What wimpy softies ... we had to dig the lake to sail on first!

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What wimpy softies ... we had to dig the lake to sail on first!

And when we wern't bottling Corona Light, we had to fill the damn lake. :rolleyes:

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Sarcoma...+1...my advice is above all, keep it simple...sounds like MC or M16 country...as Bandit implies?

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