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semelis

Transat Jacques Vabre

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I wonder if they have the budget to update their floats. Now's as good a time as any.

 

They just finished putting new bows on the floats, back to the forward beam, earlier this season. Pretty odd to be blaming the age of the floats under the circumstances.

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Any news on why Concise seems to be heading in?

 

S.

Broke a rudder.

Unfortunate stuff.

SO, pitstop or out? Guess that depends upon whether they can get a new rudder quick enough.

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Any news on why Concise seems to be heading in?

 

S.

Broke a rudder.

Unfortunate stuff.

SO, pitstop or out? Guess that depends upon whether they can get a new rudder quick enough.

Think they posted on their twitter they're out. Might have some structural damage too, but that's just a guess.

Won't take long before people start blaming the boat as it's such a radical design

Stupid if they do, could have hapened to anyone

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Vowing never to give up, Hannah Jenner & Rob Windsor are back on the TJV course after an unscheduled pit stop in Lorient to repair a broken forestay.


November 12, 2013 - At 21:54:35 Europe Standard Time (20:54:35 GMT, 15:54:35 Eastern Standard Time) Team 11th Hour rejoined the Transat Jacques Vabre after making an unscheduled pit stop in Lorient, France to repair a failed strop on their forestay. On land for just four hours, Team 11th Hour is now in pursuit of the rest of the fleet en route to Itajai, Brazil. Below is the first hand account of the breakage from Hannah Jenner and an update shortly after rejoining the race from Rob Windsor.


fcf4e09fcef7b58d_HANNAHJENNER88fe8d.jpgHannah Jenner recounts the forestay breakage.
"We had had a reasonable night sailing upwind into a breeze of 15-20 knots. Pretty much since Ushant we had been bouncing around in the residual sea state left by the storm that held us up in Roscoff. The boat felt good as she usually does on this point of sail. We were flying the solent with one reef in the main, fully stacked and ballasted aiming at Finisterre and inching closer to our downwind expressway to the sunshine. But at 0945 UTC not long after I had come on watch there was that dreaded loud bang. I have lost the rig on this boat before and although this bang was way more timid than the sound of the rig snapping, it was still unpleasant. As I turned to look towards the foredeck I watched the solent sail allong with the forestay drop from the sky and come to rest a couple of feet under the water. I had seen this before but at least this tiime the rig was still standing. Before I had even finished calling his name Rob was on deck. We dropped the mainsail immediately and stood back to try to take in what had just happened.

Of course initially we felt a sense of relief that the mast was still upright but as we set to work to retrieve the sail from the water and stabalize the mast the sinking feeling of months of hard work gone right before your eyes swamped us and we woked on in silence. After assesing what we could by way of sighting the rig with binoculars we determined that if we could get to Lorient we may just be able to turn this around and get back into the race assuming that it is just a broken forestay strop. Thankfully we have an amazing team and network of friends and supporters so with communications flying back and forth between England, France and the USA we should have the parts we need waiting for us on the dock when we get in.

But there in itself lies a problem. We are running an environmentally concious campaign and had not planned on using any diesel fuel besides what is required to get on and off the dock. We left with 40 litres in our fuel tank and a back up 20 litres in a gerry can just incase we had hydrgenerator problems and no sunshine to fuel the solar panels. When the forestay broke we were 150 miles away from Lorient. Now in a car that would take us 2 hours, but out here we were looking at many more. We motored slowly all day, but fuel supplies got low, too low for us to be able to make it into port. Of course it was pitch black outside, but with a few alterations to our set up we hoisted the staysail and thankfully the one thing in our favor was that the breeze was coming from behind.

We are beyond gutted that while we sailed northeast the rest of the fleet head southwest. To get to the start of a TJV takes a monumental effort but we have not quit yet!! We are doing everythng we can to fix this situation and get back out on the race course. Maybe we can't win anymore but stranger things have happened at sea. Rest assured we will never give up."


Rob Windsor checks in shortly after leaving Lorient and rejoining the race.

f67cd0952e384341_RobWindsor284e4d2.jpg"After our forestay detached from our rig, we spent the better part of 30 hours getting to Lorient to try and fix the problem. When we arrived in Lorient we found three people waiting for us on the dock: Ryan Breymeier, a good friend and fellow American short-handed sailor, Yann Le Bretton, prepareteur who we met in Charleston this year at the Atlantic Cup and Yann's girlfriend who's name I didn't catch. As soon as we got to the dock they hopped on board. Ryan had a dock cart full of bits to sort out all of our trouble; a mast jack to jack up the rig so we could fix the forestay problem, vacuum bag material to fix our leaky rudder post, and a bunch of rigging bits to put it all together. On top of all of that they brought 2 large pizzas.

It's pretty awesome to be in another country, in a harbor you have never been in, pull in with a broken boat (and broken Rob but we will get to that in a minute), see two faces you know smiling at you telling it will all be OK and pull off the dock just 4 hours later with it all fixed. Ryan asked if I was OK because Hannah mentioned that I had hurt myself. So, sometimes I over do it. People that know me will laugh at that because maybe it's more than sometimes. Anyway, I think I pulled something too hard and both my forearms were swollen and really painful. Anytime I pulled or grabbed something I was in a lot of pain and of course sailing is all about pulling and grabbing so nedless to say, I was suffering. Ryan told me he had spoken to a doctor at the hospital and that I could go to the Emerrgency Room and walk right in. He said there would be no wait and that the doctor would sort me out. I ws thinking no way. I was just in a hospital in France 2 weeks ago getting stitches in my finger and it took 4 hours for 3 stitches. Yann's giirlfriend took me to the hospital, we walked in and the doctor took me in in less than a minute! They took some blood and spoke a lot of French words I didn't understnd and told me I pulled tthe tendons in my hands and forearms. They gave me some pills and cream and a splint for one arm and we were out the door in an hour.

When I got back to the boat, all the work was done. All the tools were being put away and they were tossing us our lines. As I write this, I am smiling from ear to ear. We have worked so hard to get here. We will never give up. As of now we are back on the race course, going down wind at about 14 knots! With the help of some friends and some good sailing from us, we will be right bck in this race very soon. Thanks to everyone for your support."

  • Follow Team 11th Hour's progress on the course with the online race tracker HERE
  • For more news and information on Team 11th Hour Racing please visit their Facebook page and their Website. Print quality images of Team 11th Hour Racing can be found HERE

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Update from Team Concise

 

At about 10pm UTC Ned and Sam finally got into the wind they were looking for .
They had about 24 knots at 110 degrees apparent and were doing 17 knots under A3 and double reefed main when their active rudder kicked up.
The boat went into a broach which the guys were able to recover from and even managed to get A3 down, intact.
No mean feat in the confused seas off Finisterre.
However, fate still had its hand to play and they were then knocked for six by a big breaking wave which did further damage to the raised rudder and some of its components’.
Regretfully , after a thorough check of the system the boys took the decision that they were unlikely to make it all of the way to Brazil safely and at 23.00 UTC spoke to the Race Committee via their Inmarsat and informed them of the decision, location and intention to head to the closest safe haven.
Having seen our friends on 11th Hour Racing make a successful pit stop for repairs earlier, with Caterham there are now just two “British” boats left in the race which we will continue to follow.

 

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Wow, I don't know if Cheminees Poujoulat has been sucked under a big cloud during the night, or suffured a massive failure, but she took a bad blow during the night !
5 knots of speed, lost more than 20nm to macif and PRB ... something seems wrong !

During this time, Macif catching up .... only 10nm behind PRB, faster, and able to dip a little bit more downwind .... seems good for them !

 

edit : on twitter, Team Poujoulat says it's because of a wind hole.

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Tks for update popo. Three Vendee winners (and JLC with a 2nd) on the first two IMOCA boats. Amazing, amazing quality.

 

I hope PRB doesn't break. I suspect if she hadn't in the last VG she'd have been right in the fight with Macif and Brit Air. Good to see these four exceptional sailors with two amazing boats full on at each other.

 

Of course all the entries are amazing talents but I suspect it's hard to compete with the quality of sailor and equipment/boat we see with PRB and Macif.

 

I would love to know what PRB actually weighs. It's still a secret right?

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PRB is goung for a quick pit stop in cap verde.

Problem on rudder, they can sail port tack with no trouble, but they have to make a repair for the rest of the course.

What's funny is that gabart asked confirmation on this pit stop on his twitter to his team before that the news went on

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Francois and Mich steadily climbing back on MACIF.

 

Early westing has proved very expensive, for Safran.

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hum .... it wasn't boat failure for Stamm, but bad weather choice/luck.
Macif seem faster in pure speed, and with two brains like that aboard, no mistake on the course.
Before the start, everybody was saying that there was a pack of 5 IMOCA very quick, but that Gabart and Mich were manoeuvering really faster than anybody else ...

 

About the MOD 70, Oman was holding on his lateral gap to catch up, but in a video today, S.Gavinet says that he his happy by the speed of the boat under a gale, but that he's loosing all his lateral separation, and it's pissing him off

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I think you're right about capsizes, but there have been a lot of structural issues with the few 50's built after CW 2. Maitre Jacques/ Whaoo 2 has been a reliable boat for a lot of Transatlantics. It's really impressive.

Yeah I made a typo. The capsizing is not an issue. If a boat can fly a hull it can capsize, by definition you're sailing on the back side of the stability curve. What I meant was the M50s have been structurally poor in recent times with noses falling off, crossbeams breaking etc. The early boats were in many cases grandfathered chopped ORMAs e.g. F.Y. Escoffier's Crepes Whaou etc but since the Multi50 rule specific boats have come on the scene they have been fragile.

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I think you're right about capsizes, but there have been a lot of structural issues with the few 50's built after CW 2. Maitre Jacques/ Whaoo 2 has been a reliable boat for a lot of Transatlantics. It's really impressive.

Yeah I made a typo. The capsizing is not an issue. If a boat can fly a hull it can capsize, by definition you're sailing on the back side of the stability curve. What I meant was the M50s have been structurally poor in recent times with noses falling off, crossbeams breaking etc. The early boats were in many cases grandfathered chopped ORMAs e.g. F.Y. Escoffier's Crepes Whaou etc but since the Multi50 rule specific boats have come on the scene they have been fragile.

Or maybe just pushed too hard.

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Did PRB make a stop in Porto Novo in the Cape Verdes or was that just the best island pick play ever by Macif going around the other side of Santa Luzia?

 

30 NM up now for Macif.

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Best i can tell from the tracker PRB didn't stop... I reckon at some point soon Macif and probably PRB are going to have to gybe over to the west.

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Ho ho, some people are not following.

PRB made a -less than one hour- pit stop to change the port tack rudder

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Very good article.

Can't wait to see what's coming for the doldrums.

Very hard choice, keeping the most possible east, without having a too big doldrums to cross .... Brains are going to smoke !

About the little "psych" of Dejoyeau, he said that a few years ago, somebody said he was going for a pitstop, didn't actually stoppes and won the race

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Macif took a small jibe, then quickly jibed back - currently they are in light air, but with better wind forecast in 12 hrs. Still 30 miles ahead of PRB and 80+ ahead of Safran and Maitre. In fact, if the forecast holds, Macif is likely already thru well on their way to the Pot Noir and is currently away to the races - making 13 knots VMG vs 10 and 11 for the Gang of Four. Amazing call by Mich to run thru the Cape Verdes.........

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Yes, really good move to have been able to put themselves back in front of PRB without losing distance.
But poor François Gabart ...

Everybody seems to think that Mich is making the calls, but that's not true ! Desjoyeau said himself that Gabart is the one spending the most time doing the routage, cause "François likes it a lot".

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Hmmm....it IS a team effort without doubt - and Francois IS a Vendee winner.....but I suspect Mich is doing a lot of "coaching" and his statement is maybe a little more "Psych" from him re: Francois. I like to think that Francois presents the computer solution and Mich gently "modifies" it. But, in the end, the boat only goes where Mich wants it to go. It is certainly a fascinating dynamic between them - the old grizzled sailing veteran and the young superstar wizard. Thiers is a story within a story within a story.....framed by the wild ocean and almost as good as the dynamic between Riou and LeCam on PRB. A la Transat Jacques Vabre - fantastique....

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In every post-vendee interviews, Mich was always saying that he was bored with people always calling him a mentor, and Gabart a studdent. He said, and I really don't think that it wasn't false modesty, that at the same age, Gabart is better than he was.

Gabart made only good moves for all the vendee globe, were he was doing the trajectory by himself, why not here.

Of course there must be a team effort, but don't forget who the skipper of the boat is.

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I agree - obviously Gabart is good - very, very good - and I dont wish or mean to take anything away from him. My point is that he is young, and enthusiastic and (I suspect) Mich serves to temper and - ummmm - direct - Francois's energy. They are stronger together than apart. But, I dont think Mich is simply the reserve helmsman aboard......and I am an old guy too......

 

No matter our considerations or imaginations - the result is they are ruthless and fast....very ruthless and very fast.

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In every post-vendee interviews, Mich was always saying that he was bored with people always calling him a mentor, and Gabart a studdent. He said, and I really don't think that it wasn't false modesty, that at the same age, Gabart is better than he was.

Gabart made only good moves for all the vendee globe, were he was doing the trajectory by himself, why not here.

Of course there must be a team effort, but don't forget who the skipper of the boat is.

 

Yup the homo-nauticus just keeps improving with time and generations !

 

There is a slightly larger "age" gap between Mich Desj and Gabart than between myself and Mich Desj .

When the now 50 years old popped in, it was clear that Mich Desj (and sailors of his generation altogether) was a better sailor than my generation bests at the same age (same gap at any level in the generation).

It just has to happen that way - quicker learning, more time to progress further on forerunners' experience- I think.

 

If you add up that Gabart spent time in the French olympic squad, which neither MD nor his generation did.

If you also add up that in parallel to his olympic training Gabart grabbed a Msc and must master the computer and nav-programs better than any of the older guys, we might have an answer.

 

The most gifted guy still wins in the end but the level of sailing keeps increasing.

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Hmmm....it IS a team effort without doubt - and Francois IS a Vendee winner.....but I suspect Mich is doing a lot of "coaching" and his statement is maybe a little more "Psych" from him re: Francois. I like to think that Francois presents the computer solution and Mich gently "modifies" it. But, in the end, the boat only goes where Mich wants it to go. It is certainly a fascinating dynamic between them - the old grizzled sailing veteran and the young superstar wizard. Thiers is a story within a story within a story.....framed by the wild ocean and almost as good as the dynamic between Riou and LeCam on PRB. A la Transat Jacques Vabre - fantastique....

It's a mistake to identify Gabart as anything but a genius. He is not only scary smart, but as I wrote when I first interviewed him in 2011, he is far, far older than his years.

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Regardless of how good Gabart is relative to Mich was his age etc Gabart will have to do a bit more (IMHO) to take Mich's title as the best shorthanded ocean racer.

 

This progression though is why the French are so good: Gabart, Beyou, etc are the "sons" of Mich, leCam, Riou etc who are the "sons" of Tabarly so every generation gets better standing on the shoulders of the ones that came before. I think the only other parallel in another country in sailing is in New Zealand

 

 

Ho ho, some people are not following.
PRB made a -less than one hour- pit stop to change the port tack rudder

Popo ma poule if it weren't for all this damned work I could actually pay proper attention to the race. The TJV is my favorite of all the transats.

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Mich and Francois are undoubted talent, but that VPLP machine, MACIF is a rocket ship too.

 

It's a pretty formidable combination all round.

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Francois will begin to eclipse Mich as soon as he sets the singlehanded RTW record in his new boat. Mich will always be beloved, but IMO Francois is going to be the top star in offshore French sailing for a long, long time.

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This progression though is why the French are so good: Gabart, Beyou, etc are the "sons" of Mich, leCam, Riou etc who are the "sons" of Tabarly so every generation gets better standing on the shoulders of the ones that came before. I think the only other parallel in another country in sailing is in New Zealand

 

Ainslie & Percy from Rodney Pattisson/Lawrie Smith etc via Jim Staltonstall.

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MACIF is a rocket ship

Maitre Coq is supposed to be the same !

A common misconception, but they are NOT actually sister ships.

 

The differences in MACIF to Maitre Coq are:

- narrower beam

- higher aspect ratio rig (bigger upwind/smaller down wind sail area)

- slightly lighter weight

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I'm surprised, cause gabart said that the hull comes from the same mould than Banque Populaire

( but the deck is different)

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I'm surprised, cause gabart said that the hull comes from the same mould than Banque Populaire

( but the deck is different)

 

 

 

A 200mm difference (5.7m vs 5.9m) in max beam, suggests to me the mould wasn't the same - and therefore they cannot be sister ships.

 

Happy to stand corrected.

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I'm surprised, cause gabart said that the hull comes from the same mould than Banque Populaire

( but the deck is different)

 

 

 

A 200mm difference (5.7m vs 5.9m) in max beam, suggests to me the mould wasn't the same - and therefore they cannot be sister ships.

 

Happy to stand corrected.

 

 

The data (i.e. the 5.7m vs 5.9m) provided by the IMOCA website isn't always accurate and I've also heard an interview of the guys at CDK Technologies saying the hull molds were the same for Maitre Coq (ex Banque Pop, ex Foncia II) and Macif.

 

François Chevalier & Jacques Taglang who have a very good record of getting design data from photographs also say the two hulls are the same. (they even say the masts are the same height contrary to what the IMOCA website publishes)

http://chevaliertaglang.blogspot.ch/2013/02/vendee-globe-challenge-2012-2013.html

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The thing is that with the conditions coming ahead, reaching mostly, it will be at Macif's advantage, she is the fastest at this point of sail.

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Regardless of how good Gabart is relative to Mich was his age etc Gabart will have to do a bit more (IMHO) to take Mich's title as the best shorthanded ocean racer.

 

This progression though is why the French are so good: Gabart, Beyou, etc are the "sons" of Mich, leCam, Riou etc who are the "sons" of Tabarly so every generation gets better standing on the shoulders of the ones that came before. I think the only other parallel in another country in sailing is in New Zealand

 

 

Ho ho, some people are not following.

PRB made a -less than one hour- pit stop to change the port tack rudder

Popo ma poule if it weren't for all this damned work I could actually pay proper attention to the race. The TJV is my favorite of all the transats.

 

All that without mentioning the Jedi-Master once?!

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Fantastic (or perhaps lucky) job by PRB to close the gap on Macif and restart the race. Riou and LeCam definitely know how to get across the Pot Noir as well as Mich and Francois. Safran also looks to be trying to work her way East, and seems to have good pace. Maitre and Cheminees are certainly not out of it either. Even if Macif gets to the trades first, PRB and the others wont be far behind. PRB in particular seems able to match her in these conditions. Insane quality among these five teams - bodes well for the Barcelona World Race, Rhoute de Rhum and the next Vendee! Hopefully, sponsors see the same quality and loosen their purses to build lots of new boats. Perhaps Sir Keith Mills is on to something......

 

There will be another compression when they approach the Brazilian coast as we see in the MOD70 fleet. There is great racing between the muti's too - with the Multi50 match race closing right up.

 

Throw in the Class 40 race and the Mini's and there is almost TOO much happening in the Atlantic.

 

Gotta love it!

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hum ... today 18-19 french time.

Yup, my bad. Misread the position data.

 

Makes it even more impressive.

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Does anyone know how the organizers come up with the speed data in the tracker?

 

It's a little odd to have higher VMG than speed at times. (For example, Cheminee Poujoulat at 12:30 UTC is credited with 12.8 kts speed over two hours and ...13.4 VMG ... uh?)

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Macif and PRB in lock-step. Not a hair in it.

 

PRB ain't slow folks. Hope she doesn't have trouble with breakages this time!

 

Jean Le Cam, co-skipper of PRB (IMOCA)
"We saw Macif who is just a mile away. We can see their lights and the outline of the boat under the full moon. When the boats are close, you stick to trimming and watching your speed all the time, so seeing MACIF up close is really interesting. The conditions are fabulous: 15 knots on a reach with the full moon and not a single cloud. We are out of the doldrums eating up miles on MACIF. It also looks like those ahead will get the best conditions. We managed to get out of the doldrums really quickly and doing 25 knots flat out except for the one time when we came to a complete standstill for 2 hours. The wind is expected to strengthen and back: the pace will accelerate and we could get to Itajaí Sunday. This descent of the North Atlantic was super fast, we were never below 15 knots."

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Macif and PRB in lock-step. Not a hair in it.

 

PRB ain't slow folks. Hope she doesn't have trouble with breakages this time!

 

Jean Le Cam, co-skipper of PRB (IMOCA)

"We saw Macif who is just a mile away. We can see their lights and the outline of the boat under the full moon. When the boats are close, you stick to trimming and watching your speed all the time, so seeing MACIF up close is really interesting. The conditions are fabulous: 15 knots on a reach with the full moon and not a single cloud. We are out of the doldrums eating up miles on MACIF. It also looks like those ahead will get the best conditions. We managed to get out of the doldrums really quickly and doing 25 knots flat out except for the one time when we came to a complete standstill for 2 hours. The wind is expected to strengthen and back: the pace will accelerate and we could get to Itajaí Sunday. This descent of the North Atlantic was super fast, we were never below 15 knots."

Lead has changed a couple of times. A very exciting battle up front.

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Great effort by both MOD70 crews to show the class may have some life after two disastrous capsizes.

 

They fought all the way across the Atlantic. They were essentially even until Cape Finisterre when EDR broke free and started a quick sleigh ride down the coast of Portugal with a consistent lead of about 100 miles. EDR took one leg to the west to get thru the Doldrums. Both boats took flight after that, and Oman's easterly position started to pay dividends as she ate into EDR's lead day after day and had closed the gap to 30 miles at one point. Finally, negotiating the tricky conditions into Itajai, EDR broke free again and stole a reach into the finish. All told a fast and skillful race to the New World.

 

I think Oman never really attacked EDR and just seemed to match her move for move. The only time they maneuvered to get some leverage was thru the Doldrums - and it wasnt quite enough. Brilliant race by Sebastian Josse and Charles Caudrelier.

 

I recall one video (Saturday I think) where EDR helm was WheeHawwing in a 25 knot squall - what a ride that must be!

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Boom ! Just like that Macif took 12nm to PRB through the night ! How bloody fast is that ?

(Apparently, it happend thanks to a squall)

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Boom ! Just like that Macif took 12nm to PRB through the night ! How bloody fast is that ?

(Apparently, it happend thanks to a squall)

You snooze...you lose. Awesome.

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Macif 366.6 nm over 24hrs to 351.4 for PRB. Essentially from a bow to bow dead heat to a 17.8 nm lead. I don't notice any manoeuvres on the tracker.

 

So a little over 4% faster straight line over the past day but lots of race left...

 

Any reports available subtitled or with english translation from either boat? This is a great race!

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I feel for Rob and Hannah. No gribs....its like being blind. It has probably cost them 200 miles in the past 2 or 3 days. I keep trying to will them to slide east a bit.

 

Knowing Rob, I am sure he has done everything but climb up to the satellite in search of a fix.

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Multi 50's having a tussle down the coast of Brazil - about to round Frio for the finish and only 50 miles apart. Actual made up ground on the long reach down, but a few little wiggles have cost them dearly. Still - both boats averaging almost 19 know vmg over the last 24 hrs. Mighty quick in anyone's book.

 

IMOCA - no change with PRB now 20 miles behind. Maitre and Safran 85 and 100 miles behind look to be racing for third place. Looking ahead tho, a serious hole develops off the coast in the next 12 to 24 hrs north of Rio, with big breeze south of it. Whoever get thru the hole and into the breeze first - wins. I wonder if the "older" crew on PRB still have the stamina to push the boat hard enough or if they are slacking a bit. No slacking on Macif......

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2nd time for these two on macif bugger

2nd time for these two sailing together, first time was on Foncia. Sucks either way, they had sailed a great race

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Surprised they're not jury rigging and trying to finish.

 

Didn't see anything suggesting that they are retiring. A pit stop is probably in order to figure out wtf they are going to do.

 

Big battle for 2nd (probably) between Maitre CoQ and Safran. What's the deal with Safran, btw? Same boat from the Vendee with a new keel? Same titanium blade as before?

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Reports indicate they cut away the rig - maybe not much left to jury rig.

 

It will be interesting to see if the new IMOCA one-design masts contain design features that will prevent the failure that took down Macif's mast.

 

Safran is the same boat from the Vendee and current Transatlantic record holder. The IMOCA class site still lists Safran's keel as titanium - but it could have been replaced with stainless.

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And its not over yet.....Macif has turned for shore, and is already 90 miles behind PRB - christ these boats are fast.

 

Safran and Maitre only three miles apart and 60 miles back - but both are 4 knots faster than PRB at the moment. A tricky wind forecast over the next day or so, may compress these three and start the race all over again with less than 1000 miles to go. Photo finish in Itajai certainly possible.

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Marc Guillemot reported that they had tough conditions for the boats with winds suddenly gusting to over 25+ knots while average winds are more in the 12-15 range. I.e, they get caught in these gusts with a LOT of canvas.

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Surprised they're not jury rigging and trying to finish.

more than 1,000 nm to the finish line from where they broke the mast.

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http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x17g80q

I don't know exactly what he is trying to show.

Perhaps that .... they are not motoring ...

 

otherwise, first time that I'm seing such a ... (how to call that) jury-daggerboard-rig ?

 

edit : they just confirmed that the race is over for them. And also that they have enough fuel onboard.

They are heading for salvadore, meet the technical team, work on a better jury rig, and then join Itajai.

The mast broke 10 meters (32 feets) up from the deck. It wasn't the same that the one for the VG, it was a lighter one.

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Sad to see Macif out but it's clear the competitors understand it's part IMOCA. For better or worse is up for debate. I know I'd have preferred to see this one come down to an overlapped finish between Macif and PRB but as a fan I also want to see design pushing the envelope, not dumbed down to bulletproof. I'm torn!

 

From the TJV site:

 

Vincent Riou, racing with Jean Le Cam on second placed PRB, was just 11 miles away when MACIF’s rig came tumbling down,

“I don’t know what happened. All I know it is hard on the boats. But that is part of the sport. Since the start of the race you work to keep the boat intact, but I must admit that the last few days have been pretty hard.” Riou said early this morning.

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oh Putain...

 

 

 

Regardless of how good Gabart is relative to Mich was his age etc Gabart will have to do a bit more (IMHO) to take Mich's title as the best shorthanded ocean racer.

 

This progression though is why the French are so good: Gabart, Beyou, etc are the "sons" of Mich, leCam, Riou etc who are the "sons" of Tabarly so every generation gets better standing on the shoulders of the ones that came before. I think the only other parallel in another country in sailing is in New Zealand

 

 

Ho ho, some people are not following.
PRB made a -less than one hour- pit stop to change the port tack rudder

Popo ma poule if it weren't for all this damned work I could actually pay proper attention to the race. The TJV is my favorite of all the transats.

 

All that without mentioning the Jedi-Master once?!

 

Jedi-master?

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Marc Guillemot reported that they had tough conditions for the boats with winds suddenly gusting to over 25+ knots while average winds are more in the 12-15 range. I.e, they get caught in these gusts with a LOT of canvas.

check front page. wind was stable when the rig came down.

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oh Putain...

 

 

 

Regardless of how good Gabart is relative to Mich was his age etc Gabart will have to do a bit more (IMHO) to take Mich's title as the best shorthanded ocean racer.

 

This progression though is why the French are so good: Gabart, Beyou, etc are the "sons" of Mich, leCam, Riou etc who are the "sons" of Tabarly so every generation gets better standing on the shoulders of the ones that came before. I think the only other parallel in another country in sailing is in New Zealand

 

 

Ho ho, some people are not following.

PRB made a -less than one hour- pit stop to change the port tack rudder

Popo ma poule if it weren't for all this damned work I could actually pay proper attention to the race. The TJV is my favorite of all the transats.

 

All that without mentioning the Jedi-Master once?!

 

Jedi-master?

Loick Peyron has been refferred to as the Jedi Master.

 

I am not 100% certain, but I think it comes from the 2008 Transat. Dee refferred to him as Le Maitre de Jedi in an interview, and then he won the race after rescuing Riou. It seemed to stick.

Of course he may have been called that before, but I do not remember seeing it.

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All that without mentioning the Jedi-Master once?!

 

Jedi-master?

Loick Peyron has been refferred to as the Jedi Master.

 

I am not 100% certain, but I think it comes from the 2008 Transat. Dee refferred to him as Le Maitre de Jedi in an interview, and then he won the race after rescuing Riou. It seemed to stick.

Of course he may have been called that before, but I do not remember seeing it.

OK yes Loick is a Jedi Master no doubt but I generally think of him as multihull master.

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hum .... it wasn't boat failure for Stamm, but bad weather choice/luck.

Macif seem faster in pure speed, and with two brains like that aboard, no mistake on the course.

Before the start, everybody was saying that there was a pack of 5 IMOCA very quick, but that Gabart and Mich were manoeuvering really faster than anybody else ...

 

About the MOD 70, Oman was holding on his lateral gap to catch up, but in a video today, S.Gavinet says that he his happy by the speed of the boat under a gale, but that he's loosing all his lateral separation, and it's pissing him off

back in the day they used to send the ORMAs around Ascension Island so they'd end up in Brazil around the same time as the IMOCAs. it was also a fun leg because a lot of the time it was a a screaming beam reach with the boats knocking off 600 mile days

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It was indeed Foncia II/Banque Pop/Maitre CoQ, but I only found reference as this being the second time the duo lost a rig (and it's only the second time these two race together), not that it happened on the same boat.

 

For all their talent, their accumulated aggressiveness might well be just too much for any boat..

 

 

The front page says it's the second ttime Mich and Gabart lost a rig in this boat, but wasn't the Barcelona done in Foncia?

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It was indeed Foncia II/Banque Pop/Maitre CoQ, but I only found reference as this being the second time the duo lost a rig (and it's only the second time these two race together), not that it happened on the same boat.

 

For all their talent, their accumulated aggressiveness might well be just too much for any boat..

 

 

The front page says it's the second ttime Mich and Gabart lost a rig in this boat, but wasn't the Barcelona done in Foncia?

That...and perhaps an over-obsessive drive to save weight at the expensive of strength in that new spar.

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It was indeed Foncia II/Banque Pop/Maitre CoQ, but I only found reference as this being the second time the duo lost a rig (and it's only the second time these two race together), not that it happened on the same boat.

 

For all their talent, their accumulated aggressiveness might well be just too much for any boat..

 

 

The front page says it's the second ttime Mich and Gabart lost a rig in this boat, but wasn't the Barcelona done in Foncia?

That...and perhaps an over-obsessive drive to save weight at the expensive of strength in that new spar.

Agree. It's also part of what I meant by aggressiveness.

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Gutek is doing a nice comeback after a bad start. They seem to begin to understand and tame that beast of a boat.(If anyone can it's him.)

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Marc Guillemot reported that they had tough conditions for the boats with winds suddenly gusting to over 25+ knots while average winds are more in the 12-15 range. I.e, they get caught in these gusts with a LOT of canvas.

check front page. wind was stable when the rig came down.

 

I'm aware of that, but all it takes is a small crack due to the gusts which, although not terminal on the spot, gradually extends until the mast snaps.

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