toddster

The Zombie Fleet

Recommended Posts

Every marina has them. Those once-loved boats that just seem to gather moss and rot in place. Somebody keeps paying the mooring fees, for some reason...

 

Anyway, this didn't seem to quite fit into the "ugly boat" thread. And it seems like a good Halloween topic. Yesterday, I noticed that a rather graceful Cal 28 flattop that I've always admired from a distance has started sprouting mushrooms. Last registration sticker expired two years ago. Looks like it has entered the ranks of the floating dead...

 

 

boatshrooms_zpsffd1cb7b.jpg

 

What's spooky in your marina?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a moment there i thought we were all doomed because someone taught Zombies to sail.....

Whew!

 

:unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's spooky in your marina?

 

Not my marina, but I sailed into here (Vallejo) about 6 months ago:

(front row with the sterns facing us, third boat from the right. It's a little hard to see the boat given the way she's berthed so look at the masts if you don't see her at first)

 

post-73370-0-79611100-1381532116_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the topic. Nathan, that looks like a Navy yard full of mothballed ships.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having moved from Rhode Island to Florida I am amazed at the number of derelict, neglected or abandoned boats here. Launched my kayak across from the Davis Island Yacht Club in Tampa today and the mooring field was full of horrors. The docks weren't much better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a pretty nice spot for a YC. The club itself looked very nice. I kept thinking of the ugly boat thread while paddling through the mooring field but so many of the boats had people living on them that it didn't feel right to take pictures, particularly not while in my brand new kayak that was probably worth more than half the boats out there....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I keep hearing the Vincent Price "Ahh-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha" in my mind when I see those boats. Would make a great setting for an aquatic Halloween Marina of Terror...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have posted this one before, but it never ceases to amaze me. It was finally gone (after 15 years or so) the last time we went there, but I don't know if it moved or sank.

 

hut.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tiller.jpg

 

Yes, that is a piece of driftwood.

 

That is actually kind of cool on some bizarre level.

 

string.jpg

 

This one's not going anywhere soon.

 

My guess is the owner hasn't been back since the last hurricane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the right price (free) some of those zombies could be reconditioned relatively cheaply. Last winter my partner and I reconditioned a Pearson Flyer that had been on the hard 12 years. The only thing that made it a major pain in the ass was that the inboard engine was a block of rust and had to be replaced.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some of those examples look like the good boats in my marina. It hardly counts unless there is grass growing on the deck...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

crud.jpg

Across from my slip are several boats just like this, sadly they are boats worth saving, but with shredded canvas flapping in the wind and running rigging rotting into clumps of slime. They include 2 J 30s, an Aphrodite 101', an Olson 30, and Baba 30. Most of their scuppers are clogged so the decks look llike a swamp. I am waiting for the dock lines to rot away and have them end up drifting loose in a winter storm, bull in a china shop style. What I do not get is the morrage at the marina is not cheep, at least 2 of the boats are owned be sailors who have had major health issues but can not part with the boats. They are spending $400 a month to let their dreams decompose into scrap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At my last Marina in Alameda, CA 3/4 of the boats in the under 30' boats looked abandoned. Some obviously hadn't seen the owners in years. They were still paying the slip rent, however.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not quite zombie, but she has the look of not being about to go anywhere, then you look closer and see the duck nesting in the tangle of halyards in the cockpit. A higher life form than mushrooms.

post-38-0-63149100-1381666762_thumb.jpg

post-38-0-56595600-1381666775_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I am on the east coast of Canada where we do actually have winter the boats come out each fall for storage on land. Our club stores about 90 or so boats on the property each winter. We used to store 115 boats just a few years ago and were worried about turning boats away but that is another topic (sort of).

 

At any rate, of the 90 or so boats in the yard only 50 went in the water this year. So 40 boats stayed on land, a mix of sail and power. Many have "For Sale" signs on them. Some of these haven't been in the water for years. A few will never go in the water again. I'll get a photo or two tomorrow of the relics and post them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the topic. Nathan, that looks like a Navy yard full of mothballed ships.

 

This picture was taken of a marina across the way from the old Mare Island naval shipyard which specialized in submarines.

 

The mothballed ships are up in Suisun Bay, though Mare Island has had its share of odd looking derelicts tied up at various times.

 

The boat "in the picture" was one of about 3 which had sunk in their slips leaving only the mast visible. Some others didn't look far from that fate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a duck that, for a season, insisted it was living on our bimini. She'd leap off when we left the dock and would hop right back on when we returned. A bit foul tempered and territorial she was, too.

 

And then there was the time one got into the anchor well, died and got twisted up in the jib furl. Nasty business, that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

crud.jpg

Why bother locking the companionway?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably wouldn't help if he had it - that lock is probably seized solid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a service area on the Hutchinson River Parkway that backs up to a dirty little waterway called Westchester Creek. Just opposite the service area is the Boatyard Of Broken Dreams, or at least that's what I call it. I took some pictures a few years ago. I don't go by there often as I once did, but I think it looks even less like a boatyard now.

 

GOBD - 2

GOBD - 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that's the problem, you see. He can't find the key...

Well played sir.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dinghy deployed and ready to pull out at any moment. It's been floating like that for at least two years that I know of. You should see it on a cold day when the air inside contracts.

zombie1_zpsf690c4d2.jpg

 

Actually as I look around, some of the older derelicts have disappeared. The one with a nice lawn of grass on the foredeck, for instance. And the one with no fenders that just rubbed against the edge of the dock all the time. This one has a nice little tree growing out of a fender.

zombie2_zpsdff83fa9.jpg

 

 

And of course de rigueur, multiple layers of past-years tarps and plenty of "habitat" growing at the water line. Wow, something is plugged in here.

zombie3_zps4259556d.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It always killed me to see a C&C 37+ (I think) in Shilshole marina that never moved and had moss and mold all over, rotting canvas everywhere, aptly named "Amnesia". Made me think the owner had planned it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For years there was one of my boats at Shilshole, Islander/Nordic 34, that was totally green encrusted. The sail cover was hanging off in shreds.

The one day I walked by and someone had come down and power washed it. But they must have run out of gas because they got the boat clean back to amidships then there was this stark line where they stopped and the rest of the boat remained green. It stayed that way as long as I can remember. My fucking design! And on top of that a very good boat if it had not been left to rot. I can't imagine what it was like below.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you serious? I would have stolen that boat and fixed it up if I were in the area.

For years there was one of my boats at Shilshole, Islander/Nordic 34, that was totally green encrusted. The sail cover was hanging off in shreds.

The one day I walked by and someone had come down and power washed it. But they must have run out of gas because they got the boat clean back to amidships then there was this stark line where they stopped and the rest of the boat remained green. It stayed that way as long as I can remember. My fucking design! And on top of that a very good boat if it had not been left to rot. I can't imagine what it was like below.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ajax:

The really weird thing is that this boat was virtualy a near new boat when it was abandoned. Those are very good sailing boats. One of my very best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hazards to navigation..

Or just another barnacle boom town!

DSC04487.JPG

 

JAMES HARRIS

"Bella Barchetta"

Capri+04.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's one that gets launched every year, sits at the dock until haulout and then goes back into it's cradle (sort of). One of these years the slings will just go through it when we try to lift it.
post-37611-0-71786300-1382383037_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are probably refering to Wolf Pack, still at shilshole, still molding away in it's slip.

 

For years there was one of my boats at Shilshole, Islander/Nordic 34, that was totally green encrusted. The sail cover was hanging off in shreds.

The one day I walked by and someone had come down and power washed it. But they must have run out of gas because they got the boat clean back to amidships then there was this stark line where they stopped and the rest of the boat remained green. It stayed that way as long as I can remember. My fucking design! And on top of that a very good boat if it had not been left to rot. I can't imagine what it was like below.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hazards to navigation..

Or just another barnacle boom town!

DSC04487.JPG

 

JAMES HARRIS

"Bella Barchetta"

Capri+04.jpg

 

That looks like a fairly typical ferro boat - we have lots of them like that scattered throughout the islands here. The people who own them are generally the soul brothers and sisters of many of the original ferro crowd - Hippie lives!.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's one that gets launched every year, sits at the dock until haulout and then goes back into it's cradle (sort of). One of these years the slings will just go through it when we try to lift it.

attachicon.gifrsz_img_0306.jpg

 

That wheelhouse appears to have had a bit of artistry in its design. The cutout around the mast is a bit strange though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yet another dream gone south, but this one shows a bit of original competence, back in the mists of time...

 

10412936163_27d9e7c6c5_o.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This zombie is sitting in no hopers corner of a Caribbean boatyard. The mast is there and the dink is still on deck. The yard bill gets paid so I guess someone is keeping their dream alive

 

.post-46472-0-63877300-1382401683_thumb.jpgpost-46472-0-93254300-1382401695_thumb.jpgpost-46472-0-71003700-1382401716_thumb.jpg

 

From the looks of the deck layup and the cockpit she might have been a lightweight race boat at one time. Now just mouldering away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With permission from a FB friends page today.

 

He was inspecting the rig on Maya. Somewhere near Seattle.

 

Note the brown boat off the Stbd bow.

 

What a contrast

post-13551-0-01971900-1382404585_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With permission from a FB friends page today.

 

He was inspecting the rig on Maya. Somewhere near Seattle.

 

Note the brown boat off the Stbd bow.

 

What a contrast

I once took a very long hard look at Maya, wonderful vessel, if we were going to do a lot of offshore sailing we would have purchased her, but she just did not meet the Puget Sound daysailer concept I was after, so off to Bob I went.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With permission from a FB friends page today.

 

He was inspecting the rig on Maya. Somewhere near Seattle.

 

Note the brown boat off the Stbd bow.

 

What a contrast

I am pretty sure the brown boat is a Rawson 30, it and the Maya are are at the end of the fairlway for my slip. If your friend had expanded his photo you would see a Baba 30, 2 J 30s, and a few Catalina 30s in similar condition, although the Rawson is the worst of the lot. I am not sure why these boats are all lined up on the same dock, perhaps the Port of Seattle has designated an area where boats go to die.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There seems to be something that attracts the derelict boats to the ends of the docks at Shilshole. I'm on the S dock and the outer most boats on both sides don't look like they ever move and are uncrusted with junk. I think at least one of them is a liveaboard. Most interestingly it has had it's cockpit entirely glassed over to create more living space and kill the dream of the boat ever moving again.

 

The ends of the docks housing zombie boats isn't entirely true, the end of T dock has Whisper, which is a pretty nice motorless C&C 27. The end of P dock has a friend's nicely loved Yankee 30.

 

Maya has been forsale for quite a while. My wife loves it just because it has a dive compressor. It's way out of our budget.

 

I feel like Port of Everett Marina is really where the zombie vessel fleet lives in Puget Sound. I gave up on even looking at used boats there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

crud.jpg

Across from my slip are several boats just like this, sadly they are boats worth saving, but with shredded canvas flapping in the wind and running rigging rotting into clumps of slime. They include 2 J 30s, an Aphrodite 101', an Olson 30, and Baba 30. Most of their scuppers are clogged so the decks look llike a swamp. I am waiting for the dock lines to rot away and have them end up drifting loose in a winter storm, bull in a china shop style. What I do not get is the morrage at the marina is not cheep, at least 2 of the boats are owned be sailors who have had major health issues but can not part with the boats. They are spending $400 a month to let their dreams decompose into scrap.

 

You gotta wonder if they would change their mind if somebody walked up with a wad of cash to take it off their hands. I imagine that some of these folks feel like they have to "fix it up" to sell it, and that hurdle is too high, so they wait until they "are ready" to fix it up, which never happens.

 

A wad of greedbacks would disavow them of the notion that they have to fix it.

 

where is this at, anyway? a nearly free O30 sounds cool to me.... :P

-M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever happened to that Shishole rule that your boat had to be operable in order to moor there? Was that a weird joke?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Several boats near me clearly have no motors at all, so if there is a rule it is not enforced. Since Shilshole is owned by the Port of Seattle, and the Port is all about money, I think as long as the bills are paid they do not pay much attention.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You gotta wonder if they would change their mind if somebody walked up with a wad of cash to take it off their hands. I imagine that some of these folks feel like they have to "fix it up" to sell it, and that hurdle is too high, so they wait until they "are ready" to fix it up, which never happens.

 

A wad of greedbacks would disavow them of the notion that they have to fix it.

 

where is this at, anyway? a nearly free O30 sounds cool to me.... :P

-M

...hell a nearly free j/30 would work too ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dunno, re-coring the deck of an old 4ktsb with a solid, glass hull is one thing. Re-coring the delaminating hull of an old race boat is a more difficult, more critical task I think.

 

 

 

You gotta wonder if they would change their mind if somebody walked up with a wad of cash to take it off their hands. I imagine that some of these folks feel like they have to "fix it up" to sell it, and that hurdle is too high, so they wait until they "are ready" to fix it up, which never happens.

 

A wad of greedbacks would disavow them of the notion that they have to fix it.

 

where is this at, anyway? a nearly free O30 sounds cool to me.... :P

-M

...hell a nearly free j/30 would work too ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

crud.jpg

Across from my slip are several boats just like this, sadly they are boats worth saving, but with shredded canvas flapping in the wind and running rigging rotting into clumps of slime. They include 2 J 30s, an Aphrodite 101', an Olson 30, and Baba 30. Most of their scuppers are clogged so the decks look llike a swamp. I am waiting for the dock lines to rot away and have them end up drifting loose in a winter storm, bull in a china shop style. What I do not get is the morrage at the marina is not cheep, at least 2 of the boats are owned be sailors who have had major health issues but can not part with the boats. They are spending $400 a month to let their dreams decompose into scrap.

 

You gotta wonder if they would change their mind if somebody walked up with a wad of cash to take it off their hands. I imagine that some of these folks feel like they have to "fix it up" to sell it, and that hurdle is too high, so they wait until they "are ready" to fix it up, which never happens.

 

A wad of greedbacks would disavow them of the notion that they have to fix it.

 

where is this at, anyway? a nearly free O30 sounds cool to me.... :P

-M

The boats are in Seattle, where mold never sleeps. On the other hand we do not have the harsh freeze/thaw cycles of the midwest. You could leave a note or two on some of the boats, but I am not sure anyone checks up on them. For privacy reasons I assume the port would not give out owner info. The olson 30 and Aphrodite 101 were in very good shape and sailed until about 2 years ago so might be worth saving, I am not as sure about the J boats,

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if they were acting on a complaint from the marina, but this January, the Columbia County Sheriff sent out warning letters to everyone in the marina who didn't have current tags on their boat. The letter stated that being tied up at the dock counted as "operating on the waters of the state." There were threats of fines and eventual seizure. I got one because my new tags were still sitting on the chart table - didn't want to apply them in the rain.

 

Several derelicts disappeared shortly after that. One or two got new tags, but no cleaning. A few seem to have ignored the letter, with no obvious consequences.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever happened to that Shishole rule that your boat had to be operable in order to moor there? Was that a weird joke?

 

I assume it is like the thing that the liveaboards have to sign saying that they have a contract with a pumpout boat or are using the marina-supplied pump outs on a regular basis. I don't know that anyone checks it, but the office has it on file in case they need to kick you out.

 

Overall Shilshole mostly has boats in above average condition and a good sailing day (or any race day) S dock is fairly busy. All of the boats directly around me were used at least a few times each month. There are just a few obvious zombie boats on each dock.

 

Next time I remember I'll take a photo of the boat at the end of S with the glassed over cockpit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... ...

 

The boats are in Seattle, where mold never sleeps. On the other hand we do not have the harsh freeze/thaw cycles of the midwest. You could leave a note or two on some of the boats, but I am not sure anyone checks up on them. For privacy reasons I assume the port would not give out owner info. The olson 30 and Aphrodite 101 were in very good shape and sailed until about 2 years ago so might be worth saving, I am not as sure about the J boats,

 

 

The Aphrodite 101 would definitely be worth saving. That is a gorgeous boat and sails quite well. My wife literally dragged me away from buying one a few years back (and she was right to do so, I don't need one and it wasn't all that good a deal) but they are one of the few boats that look beautiful, and look "right" from almost any angle.

 

If I was on that side of the country I'd be thinking about an intervention...

 

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Whatever happened to that Shishole rule that your boat had to be operable in order to moor there? Was that a weird joke?

 

I assume it is like the thing that the liveaboards have to sign saying that they have a contract with a pumpout boat or are using the marina-supplied pump outs on a regular basis. I don't know that anyone checks it, but the office has it on file in case they need to kick you out.

 

Overall Shilshole mostly has boats in above average condition and a good sailing day (or any race day) S dock is fairly busy. All of the boats directly around me were used at least a few times each month. There are just a few obvious zombie boats on each dock.

 

Next time I remember I'll take a photo of the boat at the end of S with the glassed over cockpit.

I am on R dock, we share the same gangway. My dock is also pretty busy with most boats used and maintained. The boats I have refered to are on Q.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

You gotta wonder if they would change their mind if somebody walked up with a wad of cash to take it off their hands. I imagine that some of these folks feel like they have to "fix it up" to sell it, and that hurdle is too high, so they wait until they "are ready" to fix it up, which never happens.

 

A wad of greedbacks would disavow them of the notion that they have to fix it.

 

where is this at, anyway? a nearly free O30 sounds cool to me.... :P

-M

...hell a nearly free j/30 would work too ;)

yeah...um...no.

I have a personal problem with those boats.

now an O30....different story.....

-M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Several boats near me clearly have no motors at all, so if there is a rule it is not enforced. Since Shilshole is owned by the Port of Seattle, and the Port is all about money, I think as long as the bills are paid they do not pay much attention.

 

Sometime during the marina rebuild one of the poor office peeps were down on fuel dock trying to collect a fee from the "stop and go" boats picking up racing crew.

From then on Jim/Snake Oil picked up crew at the north end dry storage dock.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What happens when the boat is totally buggered to the point you'd have to pay thousands of $ to take it away and they fees stop? The marina just cop the loss of hauling and sending it away on a truck to the tip?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have absolutely got to buzz through a couple of the local joints and take photos for this thread. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need to go to Weem's Creek with a camera. There are some moored derelicts that haven't moved in years and every now and then one sinks. Then there is the live aboard boat that drags anchor up and down the creek that has a deflated barnacle covered dinghy tied to the bow and from 0 to 4 other derelict boats rafted to it.

 

When I was a kid there was such a thing as poor neighborhoods on the water. We would take an old wood rowboat up to the headwaters of the Magothy where there were plenty of half-sunk wood powerboats either at decrepit piers or on the beach to play on and try to "salvage" interesting bits from. Some of the houses were abandoned too and some just looked that way. We got the crap scared out of us while exploring an "abandoned" house that turned out to not be. The family that lived there came in the front and we were running for our lives out the back :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need to go to Weem's Creek with a camera. There are some moored derelicts that haven't moved in years and every now and then one sinks. Then there is the live aboard boat that drags anchor up and down the creek that has a deflated barnacle covered dinghy tied to the bow and from 0 to 4 other derelict boats rafted to it.

 

When I was a kid there was such a thing as poor neighborhoods on the water. We would take an old wood rowboat up to the headwaters of the Magothy where there were plenty of half-sunk wood powerboats either at decrepit piers or on the beach to play on and try to "salvage" interesting bits from. Some of the houses were abandoned too and some just looked that way. We got the crap scared out of us while exploring an "abandoned" house that turned out to not be. The family that lived there came in the front and we were running for our lives out the back :o

Derelicts on Weems Creek? Man things have changed since I lived at Mariners Cove condos some years back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need to go to Weem's Creek with a camera. There are some moored derelicts that haven't moved in years and every now and then one sinks. Then there is the live aboard boat that drags anchor up and down the creek that has a deflated barnacle covered dinghy tied to the bow and from 0 to 4 other derelict boats rafted to it.

 

When I was a kid there was such a thing as poor neighborhoods on the water. We would take an old wood rowboat up to the headwaters of the Magothy where there were plenty of half-sunk wood powerboats either at decrepit piers or on the beach to play on and try to "salvage" interesting bits from. Some of the houses were abandoned too and some just looked that way. We got the crap scared out of us while exploring an "abandoned" house that turned out to not be. The family that lived there came in the front and we were running for our lives out the back :o

 

Almost every harbor in the Caribbean seems to have a zombie fleet. Even a place like English Harbour Antigua, where they charge to stay, there area few. Places like Le Marin in Martinique, the Lagoon in St. Martin, and some corners of Grenada there are many boats that you look at them and wonder how the hell they are even floating still.

 

Once in St. Martin we gave a lift in off of one of these wrecks to the guy that apparently owned it, he was checking on it. Apparently there is some sort of informal liveaboard/guest/rental/loaner community on these things, and people let others live on them some of the time for various reasons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

crud.jpg

Across from my slip are several boats just like this, sadly they are boats worth saving, but with shredded canvas flapping in the wind and running rigging rotting into clumps of slime. They include 2 J 30s, an Aphrodite 101', an Olson 30, and Baba 30. Most of their scuppers are clogged so the decks look llike a swamp. I am waiting for the dock lines to rot away and have them end up drifting loose in a winter storm, bull in a china shop style. What I do not get is the morrage at the marina is not cheep, at least 2 of the boats are owned be sailors who have had major health issues but can not part with the boats. They are spending $400 a month to let their dreams decompose into scrap.

 

You gotta wonder if they would change their mind if somebody walked up with a wad of cash to take it off their hands. I imagine that some of these folks feel like they have to "fix it up" to sell it, and that hurdle is too high, so they wait until they "are ready" to fix it up, which never happens.

 

A wad of greedbacks would disavow them of the notion that they have to fix it.

 

where is this at, anyway? a nearly free O30 sounds cool to me.... :P

-M

 

Handful of coins, not wad of cash. That's why they want to fix it up, to get a wad of cash. You're right, it generally does not happen.

 

This thread is sad. The only thing that would make it sadder would be if I went down to Barry's marina, where all the boats are more neglected than anything in this thread and all have a colony of semi-feral cats living aboard.

 

I'm not sure it needs to be that sad.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread is frustrating.

 

People often bemoan the high cost of sailing, but there are cheap, solid sailboats out there waiting to be had. They aren't all nasty, impossible project-boats. They aren't fast, but they'll take you places and close racing between shitboxes is still fun. For people who can't afford dockage or a mooring ball, there are a zillion old Hobie Cats, Lasers and Flying Scots still out there.

 

It's frustrating because young people in the U.S. no longer have any sense of adventure or risk, or a desire to learn a skill any more complicated than "up/down, left/right, start, left trigger/right trigger" to master the special moves of the latest PlayStation game.

 

I overheard two female co-workers yammering on about something exciting happening in a TV show that they both watch. I mentioned that I watch about one hour of TV per week and one of the women stated almost proudly, that ALL she does is watch TV.

 

I am positively aching to cast of my lines and go exploring. I love racing my boat, but I really want to travel by my sailboat. I love sailing to new places on the Chesapeake, but I'm ready to go farther. My daughters are nearly self-sustaining and my old beagle is near the end of his life, so I'm nearly free to go. A quick test-drive around DelMarVa, and I'm setting off for Maine and maybe Newfoundland.

 

When I see the Zombie Fleet not only do I see wasted boats, I see wasted lives and squandered opportunities.

 

God save me from dying on my living room sofa...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's amazing how nice this boat looks in the pictures. It doesn't look nearly as nice in real life (lesson here is don't buy a boat without looking at it in person).

 

In fact it sank last year, was hauled back up and hasn't left the slip since. It's a real shame because it's a beautiful thing with a sweet canoe stern.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread is frustrating.

 

People often bemoan the high cost of sailing, but there are cheap, solid sailboats out there waiting to be had. They aren't all nasty, impossible project-boats. They aren't fast, but they'll take you places and close racing between shitboxes is still fun. For people who can't afford dockage or a mooring ball, there are a zillion old Hobie Cats, Lasers and Flying Scots still out there.

 

It's frustrating because young people in the U.S. no longer have any sense of adventure or risk, or a desire to learn a skill any more complicated than "up/down, left/right, start, left trigger/right trigger" to master the special moves of the latest PlayStation game.

 

I overheard two female co-workers yammering on about something exciting happening in a TV show that they both watch. I mentioned that I watch about one hour of TV per week and one of the women stated almost proudly, that ALL she does is watch TV.

 

I am positively aching to cast of my lines and go exploring. I love racing my boat, but I really want to travel by my sailboat. I love sailing to new places on the Chesapeake, but I'm ready to go farther. My daughters are nearly self-sustaining and my old beagle is near the end of his life, so I'm nearly free to go. A quick test-drive around DelMarVa, and I'm setting off for Maine and maybe Newfoundland.

 

When I see the Zombie Fleet not only do I see wasted boats, I see wasted lives and squandered opportunities.

 

God save me from dying on my living room sofa...

Ajax

 

If you get a chance absolutely go to NFLD. It's an awesome place with great scenery and sailing. But best of all is the people. I was there in '97 on my dad's bayfield 23 and its' definitely on the list when we start moving further afield.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread is frustrating.

 

People often bemoan the high cost of sailing, but there are cheap, solid sailboats out there waiting to be had. They aren't all nasty, impossible project-boats. They aren't fast, but they'll take you places and close racing between shitboxes is still fun. For people who can't afford dockage or a mooring ball, there are a zillion old Hobie Cats, Lasers and Flying Scots still out there.

 

It's frustrating because young people in the U.S. no longer have any sense of adventure or risk, or a desire to learn a skill any more complicated than "up/down, left/right, start, left trigger/right trigger" to master the special moves of the latest PlayStation game.

 

I overheard two female co-workers yammering on about something exciting happening in a TV show that they both watch. I mentioned that I watch about one hour of TV per week and one of the women stated almost proudly, that ALL she does is watch TV.

 

I am positively aching to cast of my lines and go exploring. I love racing my boat, but I really want to travel by my sailboat. I love sailing to new places on the Chesapeake, but I'm ready to go farther. My daughters are nearly self-sustaining and my old beagle is near the end of his life, so I'm nearly free to go. A quick test-drive around DelMarVa, and I'm setting off for Maine and maybe Newfoundland.

 

When I see the Zombie Fleet not only do I see wasted boats, I see wasted lives and squandered opportunities.

 

God save me from dying on my living room sofa...

 

Worse- it's a metaphor for the whole planet

 

As for people watching TV/vdieo games, it's just a more efficient opiate for the masses. 99% of "the people" have always been herdbeasts since we moved out of the caves.

 

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every airport has airplanes that have 4 foot high grass around them because they never leave and the lawn service can't cut their spot. Some of them that do move have one flight logged to go get their annual inspection and then no more until the next annual. Some of them can't move because the tires rotted out. We have houseboats at my marina that cycle through owners and have not had functioning engines in a decade. It doesn't take much searching on Craigslist to find boats on land with frigging TREES growing in them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People often bemoan the high cost of sailing, but there are cheap, solid sailboats out there waiting to be had. They aren't all nasty, impossible project-boats. They aren't fast, but they'll take you places and close racing between shitboxes is still fun.

 

Some magazine writer I read somewhere pushed the proposition that the 7-years-old was the sweet spot to buy a boat. (That's the boat's age, not the buyer's.) He argued that was the cross over between the price drop with age and the increased cost of maintenance, renewals, and replacements. That may or may not be true, but I think that from 7 years to maybe 15 years the overall cost doesn't change much. When the boat gets older than that, you are automatically entered into a lottery in which you lose when a big ticket item fails. My boat is 25 years old, and the Yanmar seems to run fine, but if/when it fails, the replacement will cost the retail value of the boat, or more.

 

There is plenty of testimony on the CA that it cost of an engine, hull paint, rig, etc, etc is not less when put in an old hull than in a new hull. Living with an older boat usually means living with a lesser boat, and most of us are content with that.

 

It remains that the only reason to bring an old boat back from the brink is that you want THAT boat, and if you do, that's fine. There are boats you can't get any other way, like say one of Ted Brewer's Lazy Jack schooners. Otherwise, you want to start with a functioning boat, not a derelict.

 

 

 

1463671561_a944ab7ca3_z.jpg?zz=1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Semi, I suppose there is truth in that article, but it's not the whole truth and I suspect that it doesn't take into account the current economy.

 

I paid $4,000 for my boat in sail-away condition. If I didn't care about racing, I could have started out with ordinary preventative maintenance.

I don't think I'm the exception to the rule either. Red Lady got a boat in even better condition, with a lot more bells and whistles, and only paid a smidgeon more than I did.

 

If you choose a boat from the 20-27 foot range, chances are that you'll pick a boat that was meant to be outboard-powered, and you can avoid the whole "inboard re-power" debacle and just focus on the rigging, hull and interior.

 

I guess that the engine will always be sort of a lottery, but a boat purchase doesn't have to be. Read books, learn about boats, bring knowledgable friends along or hire a surveyor. There are engine tests that can be performed to make buying an old boat less of a lottery and more of an informed purchase.

 

There are boats that are too far gone to reclaim, but there are a lot of boats that are just beginning their descent into Zombie-Hell, that can be saved for cheap, and brought back with a little cash and sweat by enterprising, young people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

People often bemoan the high cost of sailing, but there are cheap, solid sailboats out there waiting to be had. They aren't all nasty, impossible project-boats. They aren't fast, but they'll take you places and close racing between shitboxes is still fun.

 

Some magazine writer I read somewhere pushed the proposition that the 7-years-old was the sweet spot to buy a boat. (That's the boat's age, not the buyer's.) He argued that was the cross over between the price drop with age and the increased cost of maintenance, renewals, and replacements.

 

Hmm. I was curious about this theory, so I looked at what 7-13 year old boats would cost me on Yachtworld.

 

It looks like I could get a Catalina 28 for about $50-60k, which is about $30-40k more than what boat (Pearson 28-2) goes for. The Catalina 28 isn't as nice of a cruising boat, and looks less performant as well (heavier, lower SA/D). There aren't many other options, there a lot of J/92s and Alerions, but they aren't really small cruising boats either.

 

For $40k investment in my old boat I could get:

* a brand new diesel

* a new sail inventory

* pay a yard to rebed all deck fittings

* pay someone to refinish interior wood

* new cushions

 

It wouldn't help the resale much (maybe it would now be worth $30-35k), so it's probably not the smartest option, but it seems like a cheaper way to get a reliable boat.

 

Doing the same on a motorless 1982 Yankee 30 (there is one for sale on the west coast) makes it even cheaper.

 

I'm friends with a lot of "young people" (mid 20s to mid 30s) who spend little time watching TV and enjoy outdoor activities. Few of them can afford or justify the $2500-4000/year moorage fees that go along with boat ownership. There isn't a lot of spare time to dedicate to sailing when also working 50 hour weeks and wanting to go bike touring, hiking, out to music, drink beers with friends, etc. It's not purchase price that keeps them from getting into it.

 

I had interest in sailing when I was in my early 20s, but didn't do anything about it because it seemed so expensive. Looking back I should have joined just about any sailing club and just have gotten sailing time in that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no photos, but a possibly relevant story to offer. How you too can move up in the boating world without hardly trying! The details were heard second-hand but I did see the boats in question and asking about them was how I got the story.

 

For a couple of years, there was a small derelict power boat anchored out near the harbor entrance channel. It was draped in blue tarps and sometimes you could see smoke coming out of there. A "homeless" guy was living on it.

 

The fire department was getting ready to set an old donated boat on fire, for practice. Somebody realized that the boat they were going to burn up was in better shape than the one that guy was living on. So they offered him a trade. For the next year, he lived on a better boat. The next year, again the sacrificial fire boat was better than the one that guy was living on - so he traded up again :) That one didn't look out of place, riding out there next to the fancy houses. Now there is a (from a distance) fairly decent-looking sailboat anchored in that spot. I wonder if it's the same guy?

 

Since then, new condo owners have gone to war against the live aboard fleet. (I paid a zillion samolians for this new condo built on an industrial waterway and the last thing I want is to look out my window and see old boats!) They got a new state law passed that forbids anchoring in any spot for more than 30 days. Then you have to move at least five miles away. Personally, I think the liveaboards should just trade places in a sort of "musical chairs" arrangement, and always keep an assortment of especially nasty-looking hulks squarely in front of the condo that started it all.

 

11753898-large.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

People often bemoan the high cost of sailing, but there are cheap, solid sailboats out there waiting to be had. They aren't all nasty, impossible project-boats. They aren't fast, but they'll take you places and close racing between shitboxes is still fun.

 

Some magazine writer I read somewhere pushed the proposition that the 7-years-old was the sweet spot to buy a boat. (That's the boat's age, not the buyer's.) He argued that was the cross over between the price drop with age and the increased cost of maintenance, renewals, and replacements.

 

Hmm. I was curious about this theory, so I looked at what 7-13 year old boats would cost me on Yachtworld.

 

It looks like I could get a Catalina 28 for about $50-60k, which is about $30-40k more than what boat (Pearson 28-2) goes for. The Catalina 28 isn't as nice of a cruising boat, and looks less performant as well (heavier, lower SA/D). There aren't many other options, there a lot of J/92s and Alerions, but they aren't really small cruising boats either.

 

For $40k investment in my old boat I could get:

* a brand new diesel

* a new sail inventory

* pay a yard to rebed all deck fittings

* pay someone to refinish interior wood

* new cushions

 

It wouldn't help the resale much (maybe it would now be worth $30-35k), so it's probably not the smartest option, but it seems like a cheaper way to get a reliable boat.

 

Doing the same on a motorless 1982 Yankee 30 (there is one for sale on the west coast) makes it even cheaper.

 

I'm friends with a lot of "young people" (mid 20s to mid 30s) who spend little time watching TV and enjoy outdoor activities. Few of them can afford or justify the $2500-4000/year moorage fees that go along with boat ownership. There isn't a lot of spare time to dedicate to sailing when also working 50 hour weeks and wanting to go bike touring, hiking, out to music, drink beers with friends, etc. It's not purchase price that keeps them from getting into it.

 

I had interest in sailing when I was in my early 20s, but didn't do anything about it because it seemed so expensive. Looking back I should have joined just about any sailing club and just have gotten sailing time in that way.

 

For people like your friends that you mention, I specifically pointed out the gobs of dinghies that are also decaying on trailers. I picked up a 99% complete Hobie 16 for $100.00 (including great sails).

 

"Drink beer with friends"? That's what the boat is for. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Toddster- Love the "musical chairs" solution. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

This thread is frustrating.

 

People often bemoan the high cost of sailing, but there are cheap, solid sailboats out there waiting to be had. They aren't all nasty, impossible project-boats. They aren't fast, but they'll take you places and close racing between shitboxes is still fun. For people who can't afford dockage or a mooring ball, there are a zillion old Hobie Cats, Lasers and Flying Scots still out there.

 

It's frustrating because young people in the U.S. no longer have any sense of adventure or risk, or a desire to learn a skill any more complicated than "up/down, left/right, start, left trigger/right trigger" to master the special moves of the latest PlayStation game.

 

I overheard two female co-workers yammering on about something exciting happening in a TV show that they both watch. I mentioned that I watch about one hour of TV per week and one of the women stated almost proudly, that ALL she does is watch TV.

 

I am positively aching to cast of my lines and go exploring. I love racing my boat, but I really want to travel by my sailboat. I love sailing to new places on the Chesapeake, but I'm ready to go farther. My daughters are nearly self-sustaining and my old beagle is near the end of his life, so I'm nearly free to go. A quick test-drive around DelMarVa, and I'm setting off for Maine and maybe Newfoundland.

 

When I see the Zombie Fleet not only do I see wasted boats, I see wasted lives and squandered opportunities.

 

God save me from dying on my living room sofa...

 

As for people watching TV/vdieo games, it's just a more efficient opiate for the masses. 99% of "the people" have always been herdbeasts since we moved out of the caves.

 

FB- Doug

 

Exactly right - all the forms of vid are simply the actualization of Soma in Brave New World. Tell me how the NBA/NFL/NHL/MLB differ from the Roman Colosseum - 2000 years later and it's still bread and circuses for "The Herd". In truth though, the Herd's not 99% - it's more like 80%.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I once got asked to leave a Sociology class for suggesting that Welfare and NFL was the 'Bread and Circuses' or our day. Good to see that open-minded debate was alive and well in academia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

People often bemoan the high cost of sailing, but there are cheap, solid sailboats out there waiting to be had. They aren't all nasty, impossible project-boats. They aren't fast, but they'll take you places and close racing between shitboxes is still fun.

 

My boat is 25 years old, and the Yanmar seems to run fine, but if/when it fails, the replacement will cost the retail value of the boat, or more.

 

 

 

 

1463671561_a944ab7ca3_z.jpg?zz=1

 

Rebuilding an engine doesn't cost nearly as much as buying a new one - especially if you do most or all the work yourself.

 

If you're going to go for an old boat you better be able to do most of the work yourself.

 

It strikes me that the people in favour of resurrection are do it yourselfer's or hobbyists like me and the people who speak against it are the ones who only care about the sailing and write cheques for most or all their boat work. A friend of mine is the latter and he recently spent more for a discounted new main and a full on North gennaker setup for his 38' than I did for my entire 30 YO 33 footer (kind of similar to the pic), complete with 7 near new sails, including a gennaker.

 

I gave him a symmetrical from my last boat that cost me $400 and worked great, He kept it but he had to write the big cheque as well.

 

If you know what you're doing, zombies can be great buys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Basic fact - the pool of old boats exceeds those who want old boats by quite a bit at this point :(

I think I can buy another C&C 35 with newer sails, better hull paint, and a nicer interior cushions for less than I can get new sails, new cushions, and a paint job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I once got asked to leave a Sociology class for suggesting that Welfare and NFL was the 'Bread and Circuses' or our day. Good to see that open-minded debate was alive and well in academia.

 

Command Central of political correctness is hardly a place for reasoned debate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Basic fact - the pool of old boats exceeds those who want old boats by quite a bit at this point :(

I think I can buy another C&C 35 with newer sails, better hull paint, and a nicer interior cushions for less than I can get new sails, new cushions, and a paint job.

 

Go to Bacons for the sails, paint it yourself and do the cushions yourself. A ful suit of new sails for a C&C 35 could easily exceed $20K or even $30K if you go carbon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Don't assume that. While using this method to hunt for donations for Sea Scouts in Bellingham about 10 years ago I discovered this is public information in WA. At least for public marinas. Stop by the harbour masters office, and fill out a form for each slip you want owners contact infor for. Attest that it is not for commercial purposes (ie running a business, trying to sell the owner something.) and they will give you the information. There may have been a limit to how many request they would do at one time. 10 or 20 or something, not sure if I remember that part correctly.

 

WE did get a decent Uniflight 28? flybridge we did some minor fixing for and sold for around $10K and were offered a few more boats. Was offered an old port orford cedar Puget SOund Gillnetters Assn boat, and a CLASSIC Monk in Roche Harbour. But no sailboats that were in any kind of usable/fixable shape for us. They would have just drained our money for dockage and been in the same boat they where in to start with.

 

Responses to the letters was less than 10%. 1/2 the responses we did receive came from ppl who had heard we were looking. So I think some ppl who got letters told some friends. We were not offering money, you may get more response with some type of $$$ offer.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For people like your friends that you mention, I specifically pointed out the gobs of dinghies that are also decaying on trailers. I picked up a 99% complete Hobie 16 for $100.00 (including great sails).

 

That is a possible option if you live in the suburbs with lots of free space and available parking. It's not so easy when living in apartments in the city, especially if you don't have a car.

 

I think that clubs are probably the best low cost option. There is a great one in Seattle for University of Washington students and alumni.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's amazing how nice this boat looks in the pictures. It doesn't look nearly as nice in real life (lesson here is don't buy a boat without looking at it in person).

 

In fact it sank last year, was hauled back up and hasn't left the slip since. It's a real shame because it's a beautiful thing with a sweet canoe stern.

 

 

Isn't that A Rafiki? and someone's letting it die a slow death? grrr....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, clever!

 

I once got asked to leave a Sociology class for suggesting that Welfare and NFL was the 'Bread and Circuses' or our day. Good to see that open-minded debate was alive and well in academia.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More validation for my theory:

 

2 former crew of mine (hubby/wife team) have just purchased a zombie Pearson 30 that is only 24 hull numbers away from mine. (Cousins!)

 

It was being used as a dock-condo when he bought it for very cheap. The engine crapped out on them shortly after departing on the delivery home. Surprise! (Not)

 

Last night, we ironed out 4 distinct electrical problems and brought the engine back to life for a fist-full of dollars. The engine itself is very sound. (Go, the Atomic-4!)

 

The cabintop will require some re-coring, but the rest of the boat is very clean and sound. Equipped with roller furling, and a brand-new sanitation system- Toilet, hoses, valves, the works! They are young, eager, and very excited about their purchase.

 

This is exactly the shit I'm talking about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites