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Spin Echo

New paneled sail, carbon fibers sticking out everywhere.

38 posts in this topic

Need advice. What should i do? Just got a new paneled mainsail made out of DP GPL Graph X and the carbon fibers are sticking out everywhere at the stitching/seams.

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The first thing to do would be post a photo, so we can see what you're talking about.

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well, we know who made the cloth, but who made the sail? I'd return it- I'm sure they'd love to get it done right- (or they need to get ass kicked)

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well, we know who made the cloth, but who made the sail? I'd return it- I'm sure they'd love to get it done right- (or they need to get ass kicked)

.

 

..or they'llstart telling you about the 'integrated tell-tale system' :mellow:

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'integrated tell-tale system' :mellow:

That sounds fast, where can I get that?

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I'd return it- I'm sure they'd love to get it done right- (or they need to get ass kicked)

 

Or you could just, you know... snip off the loose ends?

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Pretty normal guys,

 

Its not structural just where the cloth is cut across the bias or along the middle of the carbon run

Only time Ive seen it not happen is with laser cut panels

 

No degradation of strength

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+1 It's not like a knitted sweater, you won't unravel the whole thing by snagging a yarn.

 

Snip them off close to the sail (don't nick the sail), but definitely contact your loft if the runs start getting deep into the seam stitching.

 

HW

Pretty normal guys,

 

Its not structural just where the cloth is cut across the bias or along the middle of the carbon run

Only time Ive seen it not happen is with laser cut panels

 

No degradation of strength

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Regardless of how much of a non-issue it is structurally, it shows a lack of attention to detail from the loft--would you buy a new shirt, take it home and expect to start trimming off threads to make it wearable? Does the loft's miss on this reflect poor management? overworked and underpaid staff? cavalier attitude to some of their customers?

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This was likely something that happened after the sail was built and is common - as the sail is folded or rolled the edges of the laminate expose the carbon. Since carbon does not melt, there is not much you can do except use extra glue on the edge and that looks like crap.

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As was noted above. Tape the seams where carbon is sticking out. Pretty clean fix if done properly.

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That just happens, if it were a film/film sail they would probably have tedlar taped over the seams, but that doesn't work so well with taffeta. You could ask them to seamkote the edges, I'm surprised they didn't let you know that the carbon tows will shed if on an edge and that the seamkote option should be added. It is only cosmetic and adds to the charm of carbon.

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it is purely cosmetic. We tape all our seams in production, and it takes a lot more time, but this eliminates that "problem" you are facing. it really is not a problem.. no idea who made your sail but no need to slag them off on here.

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that sail is worthless.

 

if you try to use it you will die

 

awesome, just the laugh I needed this morning!

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that sail is worthless.

 

if you try to use it you will die

Forgot to mention that the next 6 generations of your family will be destitute, and the sail maker will go to your house and bang your wife.

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Well, the stitching looks good! I have a paneled jib by Glaser Sails that is the same cloth but has none of that.

 

I would trim it, but dont pull the threads when trimming.

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^^^What he said^^^. It happens,just trim it off.

 

All you guys who say "just trim it off" are fucking crazy

 

those innocent looking carbon fiber threads carry the herpes virus.

 

STAY AWAY FROM THEM

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This was likely something that happened after the sail was built and is common - as the sail is folded or rolled the edges of the laminate expose the carbon. Since carbon does not melt, there is not much you can do except use extra glue on the edge and that looks like crap.

 

How many times did you use it before it looked like that?

 

If it came this way brand new out of the bag, The builders did a shoddy job. Take it back and tell them you put a stop on the check.

 

With 11 yrs cutting dacron, Mylar and Kevlar (I stopped before carbon) I can tell you that this should never be delivered to a customer.

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Parma go suck a hard one already.

 

.

....opinions are like A-holes--everybody's got one <_<

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Evolution? MD loft? Seems par for the course for them.

i saw a brand new kevlar tri-radial mainsail with a lot of streaming kevlar telltails all over the sail made by Hyde Sails Cebu, Philippines. total lack of attention to details and lack of respect for the customer.

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>This was likely something that happened after the sail was built and is common - as the sail is folded or rolled the edges of the laminate expose the carbon. Since carbon does not melt, there is not much you can do except use extra glue on the edge and that looks like crap.

 

How many times did you use it before it looked like that?

 

If it came this way brand new out of the bag, The builders did a shoddy job. Take it back and tell them you put a stop on the check.

 

With 11 yrs cutting dacron, Mylar and Kevlar (I stopped before carbon) I can tell you that this should never be delivered to a customer.

 

So your saying that none of the sails you made out of different materials had carbon threads hanging off them? Nice work.

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spot on, I have seen this on dozens of carbon radial panelled sails, you have to cut across the bias and this exposes threads which in the case of carbon are not sealed as per other materials. It does no harm unless the frayed area encroaches into the seam stitching. Some of the other sailmakers have suggested using a strip of adhesive film cover but this looks pretty unsightly as well when it begins to peel off after some use.

 

 

 

 

>This was likely something that happened after the sail was built and is common - as the sail is folded or rolled the edges of the laminate expose the carbon. Since carbon does not melt, there is not much you can do except use extra glue on the edge and that looks like crap.


How many times did you use it before it looked like that?

 

If it came this way brand new out of the bag, The builders did a shoddy job. Take it back and tell them you put a stop on the check.

 

With 11 yrs cutting dacron, Mylar and Kevlar (I stopped before carbon) I can tell you that this should never be delivered to a customer.

So your saying that none of the sails you made out of different materials had carbon threads hanging off them? Nice work.

 

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Hell, I wish i had that problem. (being able to afford new sails)

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Best advice is to seamkote and trim the threads after. On another note, looks like a certain sailmaker I once new who liked to assemble all sails using pen mark on the inside edge of the seam stick. Failing eyesight is a bitch.......

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spot on, I have seen this on dozens of carbon radial panelled sails, you have to cut across the bias and this exposes threads which in the case of carbon are not sealed as per other materials. It does no harm unless the frayed area encroaches into the seam stitching. Some of the other sailmakers have suggested using a strip of adhesive film cover but this looks pretty unsightly as well when it begins to peel off after some use.

 

 

 

 

>This was likely something that happened after the sail was built and is common - as the sail is folded or rolled the edges of the laminate expose the carbon. Since carbon does not melt, there is not much you can do except use extra glue on the edge and that looks

like crap.

 

How many times did you use it before it looked like that?

 

If it came this way brand new out of the bag, The builders did a shoddy job. Take it back and tell them you put a stop on the check.

 

With 11 yrs cutting dacron, Mylar and Kevlar (I stopped before carbon) I can tell you that this should never be delivered to a customer.

So your saying that none of the sails you made out of different materials had carbon threads hanging off them? Nice work.

 

This is too funny. But Like I said if this is out of the bag brand new then..........................Quantity before Quality is the explanation.

 

I remember when Kevlar came out, it was over used because the Manufactures did not know how much was really needed in the weave yet.

I also remember constantly sharpening my scissors to cut the edges clean.

Time is money and I guess quality is out the window in Modern Sailmaking for the sake of PROFITS.

 

I bet the ED’s Evolution Sails did not have ragged edges???

 

shaw-anarchy-sail.jpg_sml.jpg

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it is purely cosmetic. We tape all our seams in production, and it takes a lot more time, but this eliminates that "problem" you are facing. it really is not a problem.. no idea who made your sail but no need to slag them off on here.

This man speaks the truth. If it bugs you there are always scissors ;)

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There's no Carbon visible in this sail, it's either GPL 00 (technora) or Black Twaron.



 

I bet the ED’s Evolution Sails did not have ragged edges???

 

shaw-anarchy-sail.jpg_sml.jpg

 

 

Fuzziness on a GPL sail is pretty common & has no impact on it at all other to the eye.

You'll see it more in heavier weights of the fabric where there much more Carbon.

The issue is always on the bias edges (I've made many, many GPL sails over the years) great fabric.

If the plotter cutting tool was dull or if it required hand cutting after (and someones scissor was dull...) the problem is at it's worst.

 

Here's an example of a GPL 5/10 HVY #1 off my old Evelyn 32 "Remedy". No fuzzies.

DSC00011.jpg

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