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MauiPunter

Rigging Jacklines

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Anatomy_of_Jacklines.png

 

I found various diagrams online in regards to rigging jacklines, checked out the market for the equipment and the accompanying text and something isnt adding up. I have read that the jackline and tether should be setup such that you dont end up in the water and the tether should end at the edge of the boat. However, it seems like every tether on the market is 6' long. Since you rig up jacklines on each side of the coach roof generally, unless you have 6' wide side decks (not including the stretch of the tethers and jacklines) you are going to end up in the water. Perhaps this is not a problem as long as you are not at the back of the boat where you want the stern end of the jackline to be a tethers length from the stern, where you dont want to end up being dragged behind the boat. What is the reality of these systems? What have you found to be the best practices?

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That's the illustration you see everywhere but I don't like it.

 

I run my jacklines down the centerline (passing on each side of the mast), over the top, aft edge of the cabin trunk (inboard of the cabintop winches) and down to two folding padeyes on either side of the companionway at the cockpit sole. I can clip in on either side before I exit the companionway and with the longer leg of the two-legged tether, I can get around the cockpit. While seated at the helm, I take a turn of the tether around the windward primary. (It's only a 30' boat.) I gets more complicated with a dodger.

 

I use the shorter leg of the two-legged tether when I'm going forward.

 

I race mostly singlehanded so I don't pee off the stern - I use a pee bottle in the cockpit.

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Centerline jacklines totally make more sense. The conventional jacklines will not prevent one going overboard, but the centerline jacklines will.

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For a centerline system, how do you deal with a dodger at the companion way? If its threaded through the dodger, then gettng forward from the cockpit is a non-starter. For centerline, I assume you dont have a dodger, right?

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Right. Some of the guys have narrow hatch dodgers so it's not a big deal. With a big one you could go over the top but the frame probably isn't strong enough to keep the lines tight - that's going to be a mess.

 

The offshore racing rules require jacklines be continuous, otherwise you would have more options. A two-legged tether would allow you to clip into a forward jackline before unclipping from the aft, outboard line for example.

 

A lot of it is boat-specific and you do the best you can.

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I was also thinking, that in the diagram above, if you, as a rule, always clipped onto the windward side, you are safe. That should be ok 99% of the time. If you are on the leeward side then you just have to exhibit extra care.

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MP,

 

Are you racing? Cruising? Short handed or crewed? If cruising, I would ignore the rules about continuous & run a centerline from the mast to bow, then 2 lines on each side of your dodger to the mast. Your safety issues will primarily be fwd of the mast. With a long continuous run when the vessel lurches, or you trip you will be over the side. Not a big deal if you are on a crewed racing vessel, but a bigger deal if you're alone or your 98 lb wife needs to get you back aboard.

 

And let's not get started on backing plates and bolt sizes for the attachment points, tether shackles and lengths, or harness attachment points and leg straps. This discussion can get complex in a hurry.

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The offshore racing rules require jacklines be continuous.

I think you have mis-read the OSRs. The jacklines do not have to be continuous, but you have to be able move on deck continuously clipped on. With a two leg tether you can do this with discontinuous jacklines. You can even do it with a one leg tether if you have adequate static safety lines (which are essentially tethers fixed at the work stations).

 

I personally think the work station clip on points and static safety lines are much more important than the jacklines, and that there is too much focus and discussion on jacklines and not enough on workstation clip points and static clip lines. The static safety lines can be exactly sized to allow you to work while not long enough to reach the deck edge, and these and the clip points can easily be right on or near the centerline. And most of the mob incidents are crew working with two hands (eg not holding on with one) and very few are with crew moving up and down the deck (where they have hands free to hold onto stuff).

 

----------------------------------

4.04 Jackstays, Clipping Points and Static Safety Lines

4.04.1 The following shall be provided:

a) Jackstays:shall be provided

i attached to through-bolted or welded deck plates or other suitable and strong anchorage fitted on deck, port and starboard of the yacht's centre line to provide secure attachments for safety harness:-

ii comprising stainless steel 1 x 19 wire of minimum diameter 5 mm (3/16 in), high modulus polyethylene (such as Dyneema/Spectra) rope or webbing of equivalent strength

iii which, when made from stainless steel wire shall be uncoated and used without any sleeving

iv 20kN (2,040 kgf or 4,500 lbf) min breaking strain webbing is recommended;

v at least two of which should be fitted on the underside of a multihull in case of inversion.

 

4.04.2 Clipping Points:- shall be provided-

a) attached to through-bolted or welded deck plates or other suitable and strong anchorage points adjacent to stations such as the helm, sheet winches and masts, where crew members work for long periods:

B) which, together with jackstays and static safety lines shall enable a crew member

i to clip on before coming on deck and unclip after going below;

ii whilst continuously clipped on, to move readily between the working areas on deck and the cockpit(s) with the minimum of clipping and unclipping operations.

c) The provision of clipping points shall enable two-thirds of the crew to be simultaneously clipped on without depending on jackstays

d) In a trimaran with a rudder on the outrigger, adequate clipping points shall be provided that are not part of the deck gear or the steering mechanism, in order that the steering mechanism can be reached by a crew member whilst clipped on.

e) Warning - U-bolts as clipping points - see OSR 5.02.1(a).

 

 

Note: the new USSailing regs also do not required continuous jacklines. in my opinion they incorrectly minimize the focus on static clip points/safety lines to the companionway area. I think this is unfortunate and NOT the best practice.

 

Each crewmember shall have a safety harness and compatible safety tether not more than 7 feet (2.13m) long. The tether shall have a snap hook at its far end and a means to quickly disconnect the tether at the chest end.

 

A boat shall carry jacklines with a breaking strength of at least 4500 lb. (20kN) which allow the crew to reach all points on deck, connected to similarly strong attachment points, in place while racing.

 

A boat shall have adequate clipping points or jacklines that allow the crew to clip on before coming on deck and unclip after going below.

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Thanks Estar - I had misread them. That opens up more options for when a dodger is installed.

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Right. Some of the guys have narrow hatch dodgers so it's not a big deal. With a big one you could go over the top but the frame probably isn't strong enough to keep the lines tight - that's going to be a mess.

 

The offshore racing rules require jacklines be continuous, otherwise you would have more options. A two-legged tether would allow you to clip into a forward jackline before unclipping from the aft, outboard line for example.

 

A lot of it is boat-specific and you do the best you can.

there s no rule about having a bunch of them. For example, an Express 37 traveler would prevent one from routing jacklines as you do on Rags. Same on my boat or an Andrews 56. So we run jacklines that allow us to clip in before coming on deck, yet transition to the deck jacklines, cockpit jacklines, or hard clip points as desired. Don't get trapped into thinking that you have to meet ALL of your requirements with one pair of jacklines.

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Dyneema 8mm, spliced loops on both ends. deck end cow hitched to whatever hardware (padeye etc), harness end cow hitched to harness clip. I am using tylaska shackles (actually the one in the photo below is a wichard I think, but generally 'trigger shackles') for the harness clips (compact and can be released under load).

 

There is an article I wrote on jacklines and tethers at www.bethandevans.com/pdf/jackline.pdf, and there are two photos of static lines in place at the helm and mast in it.

 

By the way, another tip, which was developed on the Volvo boats, is to have 'pockets' sewn into the jacklines at whatever locations you might stop and work. You clip around the jackline to move up and down the deck, but clip into one of these pockets when you stop and work. If a wave comes aboard and you are just clipped around the jackline you can get washed down its full length and smashed against the wheel or a winch. But if you are clipped into a pocket it holds you right there. These are not as good as near centerline fixed points or static lines at keeping you on board, so the fixed clip points and static lines are preferred. but the pockets are useful in some locations and some circumstances and are easy and cheap and light.

post-8534-0-92173100-1385838799_thumb.jpg

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Flat luminescent , night glow, safety harness tethers and jack lines are visible at night and assist crew if they must untangle themselves from deck gear. Flat jack lines dont roll under foot.

 

Glow tethers are also easy to find at night

 

Sparcraft type shackles are dangerous. You cant hear them " click" closed when its howling outside , there is no visual indicator to enure proper closure......and many crew may not be familiar with there use.

 

Best use professional gear at sea

 

image.jpg

subefotos

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Slug,

 

That type of clip (which you show) is preferred for the end that clips to the jack line, and I use a similar gibb design. But it is most definitely NOT preferred for the end that clips to the harness. You want, and various racing safety rules either recommend or require, a clip that can be released under load. That clip you show can not be released under load. There are various clip designs that that can, and generally it is agreed that the trigger shackles are the best of the 'under load' alternatives (as they were in fact specifically designed exactly for release under load).

 

The static lines I was talking about, and which my picture shows, cow hitch to hardware on deck and so don't need a jack line clip like the one you show. The only clip needed is that which goes to the harness, and a 'release under load clip is recommended and preferred.

 

Most of the comments you have made on this board have been a bit old fashion, and large boat cruising oriented, but represent acceptable choices. However, your comment above is flat out incorrect and represents bad seamanship. Perhaps that's because you are not familiar with the concept of static safety lines, (as required in the ISAF offshore safety regs) or the various incidents where people have been trapped by their tethers and not able to release them.

 

And you must not have recently used a sparcraft or tylaska or wichard trigger shackle, or have only used very worn ones,, because there is certainly a very definite clip felt when they close. You can always tell if they have not closed properly.

 

I do however agree with you that the night glow line and webbing is nice stuff. I made these static lines before it was available (and it is still hard to buy in USA), but if I was making these static lines again I would use it.

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Are products like the witchard jacklines too stretchy? I run those cow hitched to the forward mooring cleats and aft to the mooring cleats aft with the little attachment fitting they have.

 

I have 4 hard points into the cockpit that were once run with 1x19 wire, but removed it and just have people attach to the hard point.

 

I'm planning on adding hard points at the granny bars near the mast (currently I use the empty mast collar fittings) and next to the companionway. There is a fitting near the stem that is used for the inner forestay - I'm thinking that might be a useable hard point as well.

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Good article Estar

 

It's interesting to note that between UK and Australian OSRs there is a difference between requirements on the clip at the harness end of a tether. The UK are silent, the Australian state a snap clip. I've got a cow hitch and a knife based on the fact the standard release clips won't release under load anyway.

 

This is the first time I've seen a suggestion of using the Tylaska style shackles at the harness end. I'll go get one tomorrow!

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Yes, the 'knife solution' . . . I do agree that "a seaman should carry a knife" . . . Terrific if it is all setup perfectly, lousy if not.

 

My set-up is fine for "normal" use, but not as good for emergency use . . . but it is practically speaking what I am willing to do.

 

I have compact "one-hand open" folder with a ceramic blade and a spike. I use both impliments. I normally wear it on a lanyard around my neck, under my shirt, but I also have a pocket for it on my harness strap.

 

I like the ceramic both because it's damn sharp, but also there will never be any rust or corrosion. Some of the 'stainless' folders I have had have frozen at the hinges (poor maintenance on my part).

 

I think ideally you would have a fixed blade (I can see problems with a folder when you are a bit shocked and stunned and injured) mounted so that you could always reach it with either hand (you might well injure one shoulder or arm in the incident). How to carry/mount it is the difficult part. The spinlock storage is completely unacceptable. Belt does not work. High on the harness strap can be good but you have to make sure a pfd bladder will not block it.

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Estar,

Concerned about the lanyard around the neck - don't put anything around your neck that won't break with a good pull. If a rope can get caught on something .........

Do you use a lightweight lanyard?

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^^

 

Yea, I appreciate the neck concern. I remember someone way back had a serious incident.

 

The lanyard is really highly engineered . . . Its a long shoe lace :) not sure of the breaking strength . . . Not very high but probably could strangle me.

 

I never use the knife while the lanyard is around my neck (the lanyard is specifically not long enough) . . . I usually loop it around a wrist in use.

 

And when I am not using it, it is well tucked inside my shirt or jacket (except when I am naked on tropical passages :) )

 

I have tried all sorts of carring places and this works best for me . . . Eg I actually carry it and actually use it. . . . Which seems better than some theoretically safer method but which in real world practice I will not use.

 

I have a leatherman on my climbing harness . . . But it is not a one hand open.

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Shoelaces do seem to be well engineered; mine only ever break when I'm tieing my shoes in a hurry!

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^^ except, unfortunately, where spinlock has chosen to place it on the vest makes it extremely difficult to access when the bladder is inflated. There have been a couple incidents where a sailor found it impossible (fortunately no-one has died from that yet . . . . but we do of course have the UU incident where the spinlock bladders failed).

 

The reason the spinlock was designed as it is (with a cowhitched tether to a webbing loop and a hidden knife) is because pro racing sailors using grinders wanted as little metal as possible on the other guys chest - they would hit their knuckles on the kong/gibb type clips.

 

If you use "two-up" grinders on your boat that might be a consideration, but most of us do not.

 

"Most" authorities would suggest both a 'release under load' shackle on the harness end of the tether and a knife is the safety best practice.

 

Regarding the spinlock knife itself . . . .

 

It is not clear to me if the spinlock knife is generally useful on deck or really only specific to cutting webbing. I am guessing that it would be considered specific to cutting webbing and you might want to carry a more general purpose knife also. But I would be interested in hearing from a knife 'expert' on this? Will it quickly cut a 12mm vectran halyard or is a 'regular' blade better for that.

 

And . . . does the spinlock hook actually meet the various knife requirements and recommendations (just for instance ISAF requirement 5.05 A knife, one shall be supplied to each crew member to be worn on the person at all times) or do you need another 'general purpose knife' to meet these requirements? I suspect most crew have (would be required to have) an additional general purpose knife, simply because they do not wear their vests all the time, and the kinfe is required 'at all times', but I have not seen this come up in an inspection yet.

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The reason you use a cutter is because a human only has two hands..one hand holding on to the boat the other Hand cutting free.

 

Additionaly an open blade may damage your vest air bladder or life raft. A pull cutter wont.

 

Always station a pull cutter at your liferaft pennant

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^^


Slug (or anyone else), does/can the spinlock pull knife cut a 12mm vectran halyard (or sheet) easily? I am honestly interested. That would be my personal test whether it is minimally adequate as a general purpose knife (meeting the various recommendations and requirements). Perhaps I will have to get one and try it if no-one else knows.


And Slug (or anyone else), what fraction of life raft pennants are webbing vs rope (the ones I am familiar with have all used rope)? Again, it would be interesting to know. 'Most' rafts have a knife in their kit, located near the door, and 'most' of those knives are standard fixed blade knives. But that may well have to do with cost rather than optimal function.


The issue of puncturing the raft is certainly potentially/theoretically valid, although I have not heard of it happening in the real world. Interestingly, there have been a couple real world cases where people have used a regular knife (not pull/hook) intentionally to puncture a pfd bladder, in order to save themselves (a couple when trapped under water and can't swim out with the bladder inflated, and a couple stupid cases when wearing the pfd under a jacket and it inflated and almost cruised the persons chest).


And Slug, at least in my experience, a 'normal blade' knife has no problem cutting a loaded line one handed. You only need a second hand if the line is not loaded. And the difficult tether situations we (or at least I) have been talking about are with a loaded tether.

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Unless you are carring a push button switchblade then you need Two hands. To open it , then two hands to close it.

 

I have no idea if a pull cutter will slice a piece a vectran, it certainly will cut a life harness tether or a life raft pennant

 

Ive never seen a web liferaft pennant, always rope and They are not Particularly strong..something like 1500 lb.

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Evans,

can you post a link to the ceramic knife with the marlinspike? I've been looking for that combination in a sailing knife.

 

Thanks, Eric

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^^
Slug (or anyone else), does/can the spinlock pull knife cut a 12mm vectran halyard (or sheet) easily? I am honestly interested. That would be my personal test whether it is minimally adequate as a general purpose knife (meeting the various recommendations and requirements). Perhaps I will have to get one and try it if no-one else knows.
And Slug (or anyone else), what fraction of life raft pennants are webbing vs rope (the ones I am familiar with have all used rope)? Again, it would be interesting to know. 'Most' rafts have a knife in their kit, located near the door, and 'most' of those knives are standard fixed blade knives. But that may well have to do with cost rather than optimal function.
The issue of puncturing the raft is certainly potentially/theoretically valid, although I have not heard of it happening in the real world. Interestingly, there have been a couple real world cases where people have used a regular knife (not pull/hook) intentionally to puncture a pfd bladder, in order to save themselves (a couple when trapped under water and can't swim out with the bladder inflated, and a couple stupid cases when wearing the pfd under a jacket and it inflated and almost cruised the persons chest).
And Slug, at least in my experience, a 'normal blade' knife has no problem cutting a loaded line one handed. You only need a second hand if the line is not loaded. And the difficult tether situations we (or at least I) have been talking about are with a loaded tether.

 

 

The problem with using a cutting hook for 12mm anything is a lot of them aren't big enough to take a 12mm line into the hook. However we did find in testing that cutting any uncovered vectran/dyneema/etc was far easier than cutting any sort of poly cover(not really surprising, but always aim for the tapered part!)

 

Unloaded is going to be a problem no matter what you're using as a cutting blade.

 

The biggest problem with the cutting hooks is the lack of sawing action. However with a knife it is easy to pull the knife over the line/webbing in the wrong direction without putting enough pressure on the line/webbing when it's dark(not to mention the stabbing yourself bit)

 

I did find this knife searching around the internet one day, looks like the best of both worlds to me: http://www.outdoorplay.com/NRS-Captain-Kayak-Folding-Rescue-Knife

 

NRS-Captain-Kayak-Folding-Rescue-Knives-

 

However I HATE the lockback system for locking the blade open. Can't be closed with one hand without cutting yourself.

 

I carry a Myerchin A500 fixed blade on my harness(climbing harness) with the sheath attached to the thigh strap, which put it low enough to be out of the way for most things but very easy to pull and use. Also had a leatherman on the tool loop of the harness, and now I typically have an Emerson CQC-7(wave feature, incredibly slick opening) in an outer pocket of whatever I'm wearing. If I can't get through it with one of the 4 knives and the cutting hook in that setup I have bigger issues.

 

 

Unless you are carring a push button switchblade then you need Two hands. To open it , then two hands to close it.

 

Wrong. Almost every folder on the market is designed to be opened with one hand, unless it's a swiss army knife. And depending on the lock system you should be able to close it with one hand. Benchmade's Axis lock is one handed, the frame lock that Leatherman, Emerson, CRKT, Kershaw, Spyderco(sometimes) and almost everyone else uses is designed to be one handed.
And my Emersons(with no spring system in them at all) are both way quicker to open than any assisted or full auto knife on the market when starting from in the pocket.
Here is an interesting article on the locking mechanisms:

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Evans,

can you post a link to the ceramic knife with the marlinspike? I've been looking for that combination in a sailing knife.

 

Thanks, Eric

Boye Cobalt Folding knife

 

Get the "sheepsfoot" rather than the "pointed tip" blade (to slugs point about accidents)

 

It's not perfect, but it's pretty damn good.

 

There are a lot of good knives out there. The key is to get one, and a carrying method, so you actually carry and use it. I would guess that 90% of the knives bought end up in a drawer. The Boye is light enough so I don't feel it around my neck, but a serious enough knife for real use, and the neck carry works for any clothing.

 

And Slug, I see BlueLaser has corrected you about one hand open and close. It is very widely available, but the various brands and models do differ in exactly how easy it is. As I mentioned, its one of the reasons I like the ceramic blade, because the hinge will never get stiff(er) from corrosion, even despite owner neglect.

 

How big (diameter) a line (not webbing) will fit in the spinlock hook?

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Good topic, never fully thought through issues about jacklines.

 

For knives, though, my all-time favorite is Spyderco Atlantic Salt w/ added tether: sheepsfoot blade, rust-free, one-handed opening and closing. Makes a great gift for crew.

 

41Z857jNT5L.jpg

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This is what I carry in the ocean: http://www.nrs.com/product/27571/nrs-titanium-pilot-knife

My confidence in my ability to open a knife while being dragged through the water is very much lower than y'all with your opening knives stored in your pockets.

One problem is that they come in a very dull state, but seem to hold an edge pretty well once sharpened- and they don't rust!

4183ruotq7L.jpg

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Regarding the original topic of jackline locations.

 

On medium size boats with cabins, I think the best place to attach the forward jackline is outboard of the cabin top winches, so they run just below the handrails, running inside the shrouds to the tack point of the spinnaker staysail, or some other point on centerline at least a meter aft of the bow. This allows you to move from the cockpit to the bow without much risk of going over the side. It's a bit of a bummer to go inside the shrouds on those boats with inboard shrouds, but I think it's much safer.

The main advantage of this system is that if you have sails stacked on the rail, like in a race to Mexico or Hawaii, the jackline is not pinned under the stack.

 

In the cockpit I like a single jackline on centerline since it lets the trimmer move around freely with little risk of going over the side.

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Each boat is different though. I would go inside on my boat except that the jacklines get pinched in the blocks for the german mainsheet setup, and the forward legs of that mainsheet make it hard to go inside the shrouds.

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I'm a big fan of fixed blades when it comes to a rescue/safety knife. When it hits the fan, you don't have time to dig into your pocket or open a folder.

 

The one that Trevor B posted is very similar to my cheap dive knife that's lashed to my vest.

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I found the Spinlock cutter to be next to useless vs. 1" webbing, and virtually any diameter of Amsteel.

 

Btw Slug, I carry a folding Gerber that comes out of my pocket open.

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Regarding the original topic of jackline locations.

 

On medium size boats with cabins, I think the best place to attach the forward jackline is outboard of the cabin top winches, so they run just below the handrails, running inside the shrouds to the tack point of the spinnaker staysail, or some other point on centerline at least a meter aft of the bow. This allows you to move from the cockpit to the bow without much risk of going over the side. It's a bit of a bummer to go inside the shrouds on those boats with inboard shrouds, but I think it's much safer.

The main advantage of this system is that if you have sails stacked on the rail, like in a race to Mexico or Hawaii, the jackline is not pinned under the stack.

 

In the cockpit I like a single jackline on centerline since it lets the trimmer move around freely with little risk of going over the side.

+1. Some minds think alike. I also have two hard points at the helm. I don't want my driver dragging behind the damn boat.

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The spin pole , when hung on the mast and fixed forward to the pulpit, lifelines, makes a fine life harness tether point an is always clear of foredeck sails

 

Streering wheel hubs , with an eye welded on the nut, make a fine helmsmans tether point.

 

I dont like tether points on the cockpit sole...very dangerous if a crew gets tangled in a running sheet.

 

On some boats the staysail track, with an extra car , makes a fine tether point for mast work

 

Working on the boom when reefing is difficult. Thought should be placed on this issue.....tether points shoud be on the boom.

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When I read the bit about tethering to the spin pole, I just laughed. Then when I read your proposal for tether points on the boom...I had to ask "are you serious?"

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Here is what we did on Brigadoon a couple years ago. They are due for replacement -- that will happen, along with some upgrades, this spring.

 

IMG_6877.JPG

 

 

IMG_6881.JPG

 

They are currently made of 4000lb test nylon tubular webbing. I do have a couple knots in it, which reduces the strength but, that will be remedied with...

 

The next version, which will be dyneema core with the nylon webbing stitched over it.

 

At first, I wondered if the height above the foredeck (knee height) would be a problem, but I figured that I'd find out in testing. It wasn't a problem to step over it. I don't like rushing around the foredeck anyway and, when I have to step over, it's never been an issue.

 

The system is mostly centered and, since it's off the deck we can reach it easily without bending over.

 

I'm also going to make my own dyneema tethers, like Evans shared earlier.

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BJ, if you have the length, it may be better to loop around the mast instead of going through the vang bail. For some reason that looks like the weak point if you were to take a whipper. You could also get it a bit lower on the fordeck then?

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The problem with all this S@S stuff is that its all pretty much based on theory so is a tad on the BS side of town! In this case, not too many folks have been dragged through the water at 6+ knots on the end of a teather, let alone cut themselves loose, so not a lot of expertise. So people hear what sounds like a pretty good idea, like being able to get un-hooked, and say "oh yeah, how 'bout this Tylaska I have, that would be great" For those of you who have actually used a Tylaska, say on a spinaker guy, you already know that the only way to safely un-hook one, under load, is with a fid. Doing so with your finger is a good way to break said finger. Now think about being towed through the water by the finger you stuck in that Tylaska, if you still have it...not pretty!

 

Take it all with a grain of salt, and stay with the boat!

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When I read the bit about tethering to the spin pole, I just laughed. Then when I read your proposal for tether points on the boom...I had to ask "are you serious?"

At least he's consistent. I haven't found much of anything he's said that makes much sense.

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Tell me how you work on a boom 3 meters above the deck. i confident that you never have.

 

Sailing anarcy is full of goofy buggers with limited experience..and you are one of them.

 

And remember the hung spi pole. It works very well.

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Tell me how you work on a boom 3 meters above the deck. i confident that you never have.

Sailing anarcy is full of goofy buggers with limited experience..and you are one of them.

And remember the hung spi pole. It works very well.

You would be correct...ALL of my trips to and from HI or down the west coast have been on boats under 60' long. You know zit, it would really help some of us if you would qualify your "suggestions" by stating that they're applicable to a 147' frigging mega yacht. And we tend to use our spiny pole for flying the kites...we have tons of places to clip in that don't include the pole.

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Slug (or anyone else), does/can the spinlock pull knife cut a 12mm vectran halyard (or sheet) easily? I am honestly interested. That would be my personal test whether it is minimally adequate as a general purpose knife (meeting the various recommendations and requirements). Perhaps I will have to get one and try it if no-one else knows.

 

Yachting Monthly did a test of the Spinlock S-Cutter, Gill Harness Rescue Tool, Green River Knife, Gill Personal Rescue Knife, Gerber Obsidian Folding Knife, Gerber EZ-Out Rescue Safety Knife, Wichard WD10062, Leatherman Fuse in their July 2012 issue.

 

Article is available for purchase and download. Search for Spinlock here, YM, July 2012, Buyer's guide/product tests. Article is titled: "What knife or cutter do you need on board?"

 

Not impressed by YBW's charging policies for back issue articles. Ouch.

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Tell me how you work on a boom 3 meters above the deck. i confident that you never have.

 

Sailing anarcy is full of goofy buggers with limited experience..and you are one of them.

 

And remember the hung spi pole. It works very well.

No clue how to safely work on a boom 9 feet off the deck. It was your spin pole comment that bugs me. They can be accidentally released from the mast, get loose with you attached, break in all sorts of ways, and the list goes on.

 

I also take issue with the nonsense about needing two hands to open or close a knife, as well as advocating the use of a shackle that doesn't release under load.

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The problem with all this S@S stuff is that its all pretty much based on theory so is a tad on the BS side of town! In this case, not too many folks have been dragged through the water at 6+ knots on the end of a teather, let alone cut themselves loose, so not a lot of expertise. So people hear what sounds like a pretty good idea, like being able to get un-hooked, and say "oh yeah, how 'bout this Tylaska I have, that would be great" For those of you who have actually used a Tylaska, say on a spinaker guy, you already know that the only way to safely un-hook one, under load, is with a fid. Doing so with your finger is a good way to break said finger. Now think about being towed through the water by the finger you stuck in that Tylaska, if you still have it...not pretty!

 

Take it all with a grain of salt, and stay with the boat!

Tylaska makes more than trigger shackles.

 

As Lincoln said, "Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and to remove all doubt."

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the last time i saw reference (aside from my own system, which i have sine abandoned) to a tylaska at the harness end, it was rigged with a trip line so that you would not lose the end of your finger or have to use a fid.

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the last time i saw reference (aside from my own system, which i have sine abandoned) to a tylaska at the harness end, it was rigged with a trip line so that you would not lose the end of your finger or have to use a fid.

That's what I've got. I tied a line to the bail, fed it through the trigger, and tied it back to the bail. Nice and simple.

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