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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
oioi

New imoca boats

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naj what are we looking at in your last post, good score either way

 

 

OTUSA's first AC72 (pre-crash). The board is the one they adapted from parts of one of the the DOGzilla boards. The angle could be adjusted by swiveling the titanium joint in the middle.

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The titanium is for the joining piece, a substantial piece of metal that both ends of the "J" connect to. Not sure whether they are screwed in like the AC72 and GC32 foils or bonded some other way - depends where they were built, I guess.

You got pictures you can post up Clean?

Assuming or knows?

Seahorse had a good article with closeups of a similar construction for Oracle's 72, where titanium was the joining of the two carbon elements. Guess I'd assume they're built similarly.

Thanks, I'll Google that and see what i get.

 

September 2013 - All credit to the Seahorse. Please don't sue.

 

cREPrsT.jpg?2

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BATEAU-SAFRAN-LEGENDES-GB.jpg

 

I think it's pretty cool the Safran campaign is a company wide effort, not just a "money sponsor"

 

Or am i falling for some marketing BS?

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Not a new IMOCA but does anyone know where the current Hugo Boss (ex VIRBAC-PAPREC 3) is headed given that the new HB will launch soon? Seems to be one of the few last generation IMOCA's available.

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Not a new IMOCA but does anyone know where the current Hugo Boss (ex VIRBAC-PAPREC 3) is headed given that the new HB will launch soon? Seems to be one of the few last generation IMOCA's available.

she's owned by FNOB, the organisers of the BWR, and they have sold her

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Not a new IMOCA but does anyone know where the current Hugo Boss (ex VIRBAC-PAPREC 3) is headed given that the new HB will launch soon? Seems to be one of the few last generation IMOCA's available.

she's owned by FNOB, the organisers of the BWR, and they have sold her

 

Is it the one that Kito de Pavant just bought?

 

I saw a snippet that he just bought the former Hugo Boss.... but there are so many former Hugo Boss...

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Not a new IMOCA but does anyone know where the current Hugo Boss (ex VIRBAC-PAPREC 3) is headed given that the new HB will launch soon? Seems to be one of the few last generation IMOCA's available.

she's owned by FNOB, the organisers of the BWR, and they have sold her

 

Is it the one that Kito de Pavant just bought?

 

I saw a snippet that he just bought the former Hugo Boss.... but there are so many former Hugo Boss...

 

yeah, Kito has bought VP3!

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I'm loving this Vendee Globe 2016 arms race. Awesome.

 

Amazing how new paint can change the look of a boat. I'm sure SMA will still be massive (macif)!

post-76289-0-85872200-1429044613_thumb.jpg

post-76289-0-37829400-1429044826.jpeg

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In the video of SMA being launched - at 1.43 they manipulate a mechanism.

 

What is this???

 

It has threaded rose links in the same direction as a cassette. But it is not the head of the keel - which was shown in red paint just before this shot.

It also seems to be an exterior fiiting.

 

But specifically they are setting some form of gearing.

 

So what is it?

 

Answers (not) on a postcard please.

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In the video of SMA being launched - at 1.43 they manipulate a mechanism.

 

What is this???

 

It has threaded rose links in the same direction as a cassette. But it is not the head of the keel - which was shown in red paint just before this shot.

It also seems to be an exterior fiiting.

 

But specifically they are setting some form of gearing.

 

So what is it?

 

Answers (not) on a postcard please.

 

My guess, has something to do with the rudder system

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In the video of SMA being launched - at 1.43 they manipulate a mechanism.

 

What is this???

 

It has threaded rose links in the same direction as a cassette. But it is not the head of the keel - which was shown in red paint just before this shot.

It also seems to be an exterior fiiting.

 

But specifically they are setting some form of gearing.

 

So what is it?

 

Answers (not) on a postcard please.

 

My guess, has something to do with the rudder system

 

 

Wrong, perhaps some attachment to lift the boat?

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In the video of SMA being launched - at 1.43 they manipulate a mechanism.

 

What is this???

 

It has threaded rose links in the same direction as a cassette. But it is not the head of the keel - which was shown in red paint just before this shot.

It also seems to be an exterior fiiting.

 

But specifically they are setting some form of gearing.

 

So what is it?

 

Answers (not) on a postcard please.

 

My guess, has something to do with the rudder system

 

 

Wrong, perhaps some attachment to lift the boat?

 

 

 

Perhaps...Ok I haven't got a clew

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Sorry, mis spell, CLUE

Ha, ha. And I thought that was a clever word play, mili. :)

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i hadnt realised the foils didnt penetrate the deck. they must move more out than down. they look like a very neat solution but I cannot see how they are not immersed and draggy in the light stuff. cant wait to see them working!

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In the video of SMA being launched - at 1.43 they manipulate a mechanism.

 

What is this???

 

It has threaded rose links in the same direction as a cassette. But it is not the head of the keel - which was shown in red paint just before this shot.

It also seems to be an exterior fiiting.

 

But specifically they are setting some form of gearing.

 

So what is it?

 

Answers (not) on a postcard please.

 

My guess, has something to do with the rudder system

 

 

That would be my guess. The system for adjusting the toe-in of the rudders. I suppose you want toe-in to equal leeway + weather helm angle - so that the non working, windward rudder is aligned with the boats course through the water, so minimizing drag. If the tiller is the black box section, and the tie bars attach to the screw threads, the two wheels screw in and out to adjust the effective length of the tie bars, so adjusting toe in.

 

post-419-0-18564800-1429088486_thumb.png

Apologies for crappyness of captions.

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Yep toe adjustment. I remember looking at Virbac a few years ago and she had a similar system. She also had a massive vertical interceptor trim tab system. Cool engineering and fabrication.

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In the video of SMA being launched - at 1.43 they manipulate a mechanism.

 

What is this???

 

It has threaded rose links in the same direction as a cassette. But it is not the head of the keel - which was shown in red paint just before this shot.

It also seems to be an exterior fiiting.

 

But specifically they are setting some form of gearing.

 

So what is it?

 

Answers (not) on a postcard please.

 

My guess, has something to do with the rudder system

 

That would be my guess. The system for adjusting the toe-in of the rudders. I suppose you want toe-in to equal leeway + weather helm angle - so that the non working, windward rudder is aligned with the boats course through the water, so minimizing drag. If the tiller is the black box section, and the tie bars attach to the screw threads, the two wheels screw in and out to adjust the effective length of the tie bars, so adjusting toe in.

 

attachicon.gifTiller.png

Apologies for crappyness of captions.

 

 

 

Your guess was nuch better than mine, it came with a manual

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Thanks Peeps.

 

Now that you have said steering adjuster I can see the location being the aft edge of the cockpit floor. Can't explain why I didn't see that before...... Any Hoos

 

I also know that they have quite fancy geometry to allow for the ackerman effect ( inside vs outside turn rates of dual rudders - more commonly seen on multis) - I think I even have a formula for working it all out.

 

The threading on the lateral articulations allow for adjustment of toe in or out.

 

BUT

 

I am still slightly in the dark what those gears are doing?

Is it a way to disconnect the weather rudder prior to lifting it in those fancy cassette systems?

 

It reminds me of those cam activated climbing anchors - but obviously isn't one of those.

 

Have we collectively got any more detail on that bit please??

post-108539-0-97565500-1429181949_thumb.jpg

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I have a dumb question.

 

Inversion tests have been done the same way since they were instituted. Other than depth restrictions in the harbour and the cost of the rig, why are they not done with the mast and main up? Is it assumed that a turtled boat has lost it's rig? Or are they satisfied caculating the additional RM is would take to turn the boat over with th rig still intact?

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The latter, yes. The last time I remember reading on the subject, it was that a catastrophic failure in pitchpole or knockdown would take the rig out as well, and the boat need be able to right from the position. Of course, if you lose the bulb and that causes the flip, you're SOL...

 

HW

I have a dumb question.

 

Inversion tests have been done the same way since they were instituted. Other than depth restrictions in the harbour and the cost of the rig, why are they not done with the mast and main up? Is it assumed that a turtled boat has lost it's rig? Or are they satisfied caculating the additional RM is would take to turn the boat over with th rig still intact?

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On that same note, the tests are done with the hatch closed and dogged, and the interior watertight.

 

Does anyone know how often skippers do this? I remember reading reports of skippers flipping the boat and staying inside while the either cant the keel or waiting for waves to flip back over. All while watching the water and gear slosh outside the windows. How many skippers dog the hatch when they go below?

 

HW

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The latter, yes. The last time I remember reading on the subject, it was that a catastrophic failure in pitchpole or knockdown would take the rig out as well, and the boat need be able to right from the position. Of course, if you lose the bulb and that causes the flip, you're SOL...

 

HW

 

I have a dumb question.

 

Inversion tests have been done the same way since they were instituted. Other than depth restrictions in the harbour and the cost of the rig, why are they not done with the mast and main up? Is it assumed that a turtled boat has lost it's rig? Or are they satisfied caculating the additional RM is would take to turn the boat over with th rig still intact?

Ah, thanks. All deck stepped and/so would be likely.

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The latter, yes. The last time I remember reading on the subject, it was that a catastrophic failure in pitchpole or knockdown would take the rig out as well, and the boat need be able to right from the position. Of course, if you lose the bulb and that causes the flip, you're SOL...

 

HW

 

I have a dumb question.

 

Inversion tests have been done the same way since they were instituted. Other than depth restrictions in the harbour and the cost of the rig, why are they not done with the mast and main up? Is it assumed that a turtled boat has lost it's rig? Or are they satisfied caculating the additional RM is would take to turn the boat over with th rig still intact?

Ah, thanks. All deck stepped and/so would be likely.

 

Acciona was keel stepped and capsized.

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Rather irrelevant whether the rig is deck or keel stepped if the keel falls off...

I'm not sure there would be many situations that a boat would end up upside down and with an intact rig and keel so it would be economically not worthwhile to test that situation.

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When was the last time an IMOCA capsized without the keel falling off. I remember it happened way back in the day when Bullimore and Isabelle Austissier lost their boats (not necessarily them but in that era) but I can't remember one since then

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Nothing earth shattering really...

 

This is the second day of sea trial, checking all systems with the team, letting the guys from the building team helming a bit as well. After all, it is a bonus for everybody who worked really hard to get the boat ready.

 

One of the designers was on board the day before, now with rig specialist, very little technical challenges, less than expected, everything works as planned.

 

Just happy being on board and sailing!

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Watched video from Gitana:

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2pxwkr_gitana-16-imoca-60_news

 

 

Interesting position for winches

Deep cockpit and winches on floor

attachicon.gifScreen Shot 2015-05-13 at 21.40.10.jpg attachicon.gifScreen Shot 2015-05-13 at 21.38.46.jpg

continuing the trend of getting the boat center of gravity as low as possible. Foncia(banque pop) and Macif both did this where the sheets had to run through tunnels in the side deck or hull sides to get into the cockpit.

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Thanks for the picture Moody Frog.

 

Unexpected stern treatment. The aggressive chine lip for the last 8-10 feet looks like it will add a lot of directional stability - because it sure as hell wont let the water out sideways like a traditional chine edge.

The blisters around the rudders are different.

I am seeing a bit of TP52 stern treatment with the way that the turn of bilge has the humps at just inboard of the rudder line - helping to run the rudders at the deepest point of immersion as well as achieve diagonally asymmetric hull lines (think scow hull lines that are designed to run on either outside edge - but not upright) that will enable these wide boats to run on either rudder with a large amount of hull not being immersed (reduces skin friction) as well as adding a large lever arm for the ballast tanks.

 

Going to be good seeing these boats getting sailed in anger. Hope they can get the settings worked out fast.

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Spars may overlap the hull by max 6 feet. That is bowspirit and boom aft of the transom at centerline combined.

 

Looking at both 2014 IMOCA Class rules, B.3.1.3 which became in the 2015 IMOCA Class rules D.2.1.c there seems to be no change other than numbering. [i don't have older rules.]

So I'd say perspective, which can be very deceptive on such a shot, or a shorter boom on this one.

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BP VIII pics keep coming in, in the french press.

 

Interesting view of the stern in this stability test pic.

The new Safran has a similar hollow

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BP VIII pics keep coming in, in the french press.

 

Interesting view of the stern in this stability test pic.

The new Safran has a similar hollow

 

 

While this could be expected, given they share the same design-office, it does not show that clearly in the available images.

 

http://www.safran-sailingteam.com/multimedia/videotheque/article/bapteme-du-feu

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BP VIII pics keep coming in, in the french press.

 

Interesting view of the stern in this stability test pic.

The new Safran has a similar hollow

 

 

While this could be expected, given they share the same design-office, it does not show that clearly in the available images.

 

http://www.safran-sailingteam.com/multimedia/videotheque/article/bapteme-du-feu

 

Can be seen in these:

 

https://scontent-sea1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpt1/v/t1.0-9/11150372_988223737862059_1412071273855882080_n.jpg?oh=3b9c8a7f680c77bf6eea3cf041023217&oe=55EE0253

 

https://scontent-sea1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xaf1/v/t1.0-9/11149546_977256492292117_1888999932091306030_n.jpg?oh=4cb1bd01605795e8009521fa39f6ceb9&oe=5631BED4

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BP VIII pics keep coming in, in the french press.

 

Interesting view of the stern in this stability test pic.

The new Safran has a similar hollow

 

 

While this could be expected, given they share the same design-office, it does not show that clearly in the available images.

 

http://www.safran-sailingteam.com/multimedia/videotheque/article/bapteme-du-feu

 

Can be seen in these:

 

https://scontent-sea1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpt1/v/t1.0-9/11150372_988223737862059_1412071273855882080_n.jpg?oh=3b9c8a7f680c77bf6eea3cf041023217&oe=55EE0253

 

https://scontent-sea1-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xaf1/v/t1.0-9/11149546_977256492292117_1888999932091306030_n.jpg?oh=4cb1bd01605795e8009521fa39f6ceb9&oe=5631BED4

 

 

Yes! thanks, had not seen these pics

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Spars may overlap the hull by max 6 feet. That is bowspirit and boom aft of the transom at centerline combined.

 

Looking at both 2014 IMOCA Class rules, B.3.1.3 which became in the 2015 IMOCA Class rules D.2.1.c there seems to be no change other than numbering. [i don't have older rules.]

So I'd say perspective, which can be very deceptive on such a shot, or a shorter boom on this one.

Thanks for looking in the rules.

Think its the 6 feet on this photo, a larger one. If I guess the water level at 50 cm.

http://girodiboa.corriere.it/files/2015/06/laterale.jpg

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^ Wow. That's some serious new generation racing machine right there.

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Watching the video in #364 was enlightening.

 

For a good shot of the corner stern treatment stop it at 5.37 - you can see that the chine has a full 90 degree turn before softening back to dead rise - so there is no "fence" on the edge as I had 'seen' in #348 - it is a purely horizontally flat section that creates the flat triangle that is in shadow - and as such will allow water escape, but at the same time still have maximum water release potential when on the plane.

 

I was also surprised to see that although launched and inversion tested with foils inserted (I imagine that it is a rule requirement to have them present...) the foils were actually absent for that first test sail - is that to get some baseline settings without their effect or was there another reason?

My French has deteriorated that I couldn't keep up with all that was being said.

 

Also it was interesting seeing the bow treatment from various oblique angles around to fully side on - it is the aggressive tumblehome above mid topsides that tricks the eye into seeing a reverse dreadnought style bow - when in fact it is plumb, that I had commented/asked about in earlier posts.

 

Again, looking forward to seeing these boats getting fully worked up.

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The foil was present on the starboard side while sailing, but not at port. As far as I could see.

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The foil was present on the starboard side while sailing, but not at port. As far as I could see.

Correct.... Video didn't show stb side on purpose I think. Over 3 months since Safran launched and no video. Their both definitely keeping foil under wraps.

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Just got back from the Record SNSM, was cool to see Safran sailing in the flesh but couldn't help but make a couple of observations. The start line was a 50°twa upwind beat and Safran didn't have any foils deployed at all, this could have been because of traffic but the boat still seemed to track straight without them. Also they lost to SMA by a few hours over a 325 mile course with variable wind conditions ranging from 3-5kts and up to 15-18kts at all wind angles. Suspecting Michel Desjoyeaux on SMA had something to do with it, plus I guess with the new foils it's going to take a little learning to get the best from them. It was a shame that the new Banque Populaire had to pull out of the race before the start due to a 'minor problem'. In class 40 news the win went to the Mach 40 Peleton (137) and second place went to Credit Mutuel Bretagne (125).

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Just got back from the Record SNSM, was cool to see Safran sailing in the flesh but couldn't help but make a couple of observations. The start line was a 50°twa upwind beat and Safran didn't have any foils deployed at all, this could have been because of traffic but the boat still seemed to track straight without them. Also they lost to SMA by a few hours over a 325 mile course with variable wind conditions ranging from 3-5kts and up to 15-18kts at all wind angles. Suspecting Michel Desjoyeaux on SMA had something to do with it, plus I guess with the new foils it's going to take a little learning to get the best from them. It was a shame that the new Banque Populaire had to pull out of the race before the start due to a 'minor problem'. In class 40 news the win went to the Mach 40 Peleton (137) and second place went to Credit Mutuel Bretagne (125).

Thanks, JL92S. Seen any media links about with pics at all?

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I've been wondering why most of the IMOCA60 boats have outriggers for shrouds and after a bit of googling found that it is so they can swivel and sweep aft and forward as the mast is rotated and raked back and forth.

That sounds like it would be incredibly complex to adjust while sailing.. I guess they've got time to play with those kinds of fine details on a long Ocean race.

Does anyone know more information about this? Do they use computers to adjust it automatically? Can they still play with mast bend on outriggers? How do the control lines work? Hydrolics?

Thanks!

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The current generation boats have fixed outriggers

 

The reason they are used is the rule classifies them as (deck) spreaders to support the mast and this method is what has been found to be best with a rotating wing mast. An added benefit is the spreader provides a handy spot for outboard leads on headsails.

 

I've been wondering why most of the IMOCA60 boats have outriggers for shrouds and after a bit of googling found that it is so they can swivel and sweep aft and forward as the mast is rotated and raked back and forth.
That sounds like it would be incredibly complex to adjust while sailing.. I guess they've got time to play with those kinds of fine details on a long Ocean race.
Does anyone know more information about this? Do they use computers to adjust it automatically? Can they still play with mast bend on outriggers? How do the control lines work? Hydrolics?
Thanks!

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I've been wondering why most of the IMOCA60 boats have outriggers for shrouds and after a bit of googling found that it is so they can swivel and sweep aft and forward as the mast is rotated and raked back and forth.

That sounds like it would be incredibly complex to adjust while sailing.. I guess they've got time to play with those kinds of fine details on a long Ocean race.

Does anyone know more information about this? Do they use computers to adjust it automatically? Can they still play with mast bend on outriggers? How do the control lines work? Hydrolics?

Thanks!

 

The only powered and non-human activated control allowed on the boat when racing is the helm. Everything else is human power and human control. No computers. Most catamaran sailors are used to rotating masts, and that is pretty much what they have here - a racing catamaran rig. The width of the rig with the outriggers (deemed deck spreaders as a way of skirting the rules on things outside the beam of the boat) allows a safe and stable rig to rotate inside the shrouds. Masts can bend, and pretty much everything else works as you would expect. The big downside seems to be that the boat is extremely vulnerable in a collision with objects that would usually not be a danger, as only a glancing blow to the carbon rod from the outrigger down to the hull can damage the rod, and render the rig unsafe.

 

Not sure about the control, but I would guess that the fore-aft location of the outrigger is simply controlled with ordinary rope lines and purchases, and moving the outrigger like this can be used to effect canting of the mast.

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Methinks you just might be correct. 😊

 

I had forgotten the keel. However there is no automatic control of keel angle. So the helm is the only automatic powered device.

Not true. Depending upon the boat setup, The keel can be set to full cant, centre, leeward.

The rig had to be fixed fore and aft according to IMOCA rules. So the deck spreaders are fixed, with a rotation device (often an arm) to rotate the rig.

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I've been wondering why most of the IMOCA60 boats have outriggers for shrouds and after a bit of googling found that it is so they can swivel and sweep aft and forward as the mast is rotated and raked back and forth.

That sounds like it would be incredibly complex to adjust while sailing.. I guess they've got time to play with those kinds of fine details on a long Ocean race.

Does anyone know more information about this? Do they use computers to adjust it automatically? Can they still play with mast bend on outriggers? How do the control lines work? Hydrolics?

Thanks!

 

The only powered and non-human activated control allowed on the boat when racing is the helm. Everything else is human power and human control. No computers. Most catamaran sailors are used to rotating masts, and that is pretty much what they have here - a racing catamaran rig. The width of the rig with the outriggers (deemed deck spreaders as a way of skirting the rules on things outside the beam of the boat) allows a safe and stable rig to rotate inside the shrouds. Masts can bend, and pretty much everything else works as you would expect. The big downside seems to be that the boat is extremely vulnerable in a collision with objects that would usually not be a danger, as only a glancing blow to the carbon rod from the outrigger down to the hull can damage the rod, and render the rig unsafe.

 

Not sure about the control, but I would guess that the fore-aft location of the outrigger is simply controlled with ordinary rope lines and purchases, and moving the outrigger like this can be used to effect canting of the mast.

 

The masts have a fixed headstay. there is no rake adjustment, and no cant adjustment. The deck spreaders are simply there in order to allow a wide enough shroud base for the wingmast.

 

The forward and aft cables on the deck spreaders are fixed as well.

 

The only controls which are not winch powered on board a modern IMOCA 60 is the canting keel, as mentioned by Potter.

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To be clear. The RSS disallow any adjustment or trim that is not human controlled.

 

Indeed, canting rigs are forbidden on IMOCA 60s. (Hard to keep track of all the various boat rules.) So no adjustment of the outrigger position is allowed to effect a cant. Masts must never cant to windward.

 

The keel is powered, but is not computer controlled in the sense that the trim is automatic (RSS). It must however automatically self centre if the boat heels excessively (IMOCA rules).

 

The auto-helm is powered and may be computer controlled (RSS).

 

Deck spreaders (aka outriggers) can support the mast and are allowed to be used for sail trim (ie leading sheets), but nothing else. (IMOCA rules)

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Coville had the last canting rig, got banned from the rules afterwards. I believe Pindar (with Brian Thompson) had the last raking rig with movable outriggers. he took them off for the Vendee. After that that got banned too.

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Coville had the last canting rig, got banned from the rules afterwards. I believe Pindar (with Brian Thompson) had the last raking rig with movable outriggers. he took them off for the Vendee. After that that got banned too.

And I remember that rig going over the side a couple of times

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At 1:54 did anyone else see that wing sail getting pushed around in the background. Was that the Groupama C Class cat?

 

Yeah, It was out the same day, shows up in a few different shots being assembled then launched.

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Which boat is Yann Ellies using now?

He has the old Safran, the 1st VPLP design! (name Groupe Queguiner)

 

Did they ever figure what caused the keel failiure?

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What the titanium keel that they said went through more fatigue cycles than they expected? Someone put waves in the ocean!!!

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What the titanium keel that they said went through more fatigue cycles than they expected? Someone put waves in the ocean!!!

On that note if one of the new keels fails is there some sort of manufacturers guarantee like with the whole vo65 fleet? So if one snaps will the whole fleet with the od keel get a free upgrade to a new one? Same goes for the rigs

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He's pretty brave to walk "up" the mast like that. If something had broken and the boat had righted herself with him at the top of the mast, I'll bet it would have been quite the catapult!

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In many way these new boats are more exciting than the AC Cats on foils. There is no doubt that the foils testing and development will mean a lot as the potential gains are match winning. I'm not sure any of the teams will be giving too much away and hence the lack of videos with the new boats using their foils. This is a cat and mouse game and it's for sheep stations back in France, massive following. The French really have any appetite for this type of racing so I look forward to any footage of these things in full flight.

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What the titanium keel that they said went through more fatigue cycles than they expected? Someone put waves in the ocean!!!

decimal place fail