• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

dylan winter

Clyde to Tobermory Yacht race 1968 - no plastic here

Recommended Posts

Excellent background to this evocative film written by its director, Louis Miller, and a - work in progress (please help!) - boat spotter's guide for nerds can be found at the Peggy Bawn Press blog post: http://peggybawn.wordpress.com/2013/10/01/summer-of-68-the-tobermory-race/

 

Actually, we found at least two plastic boats in the 105-strong fleet: the van de Stadt designed Excalibur 36, Siolta, built by Southern Ocean Supplies Ltd., Bournemouth, 1966, and the Guy Thompson designed T24 Class, Caitlin, built by Hawkbridge of Chichester, 1968. Where are they now? The Excalibur's reputation as a solid heavy weather boat has lingered, but the T24 - a ground-breaking design in its time - has been rather forgotten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent background to this evocative film written by its director, Louis Miller, and a - work in progress (please help!) - boat spotter's guide for nerds can be found at the Peggy Bawn Press blog post: http://peggybawn.wordpress.com/2013/10/01/summer-of-68-the-tobermory-race/

 

Actually, we found at least two plastic boats in the 105-strong fleet: the van de Stadt designed Excalibur 36, Siolta, built by Southern Ocean Supplies Ltd., Bournemouth, 1966, and the Guy Thompson designed T24 Class, Caitlin, built by Hawkbridge of Chichester, 1968. Where are they now? The Excalibur's reputation as a solid heavy weather boat has lingered, but the T24 - a ground-breaking design in its time - has been rather forgotten.

 

 

 

some great quotes from the film maker

 

 

I suppose it’s only natural that the idea of filming the Tobermory should have been uppermost in my mind for so many years. Being in the film business, and a keen sailor, the two had to come together some time!

In the last ten years or so I have had a variety of boats including a Wayfarer dinghy, an ex-International Star, a 19/24, a beautiful little twenty-foot clinker job, a Silhouette, and one or two I would rather forget! It was in the year of the 19/24 that I first wrote up a proposal for filming the race. I intended to enter my own boat carrying a film crew, and I had some preliminary discussions with the Clyde Cruising Club secretary, Geoff Duncan in Alex Pearce’s house in Helensburgh.

But my colleagues in the film unit were much less enthusiastic.

‘Yachting isn’t a spectator sport, people would get bored.’

‘You cannot possibly hold the average viewer’s interest in a lot of boats sailing for half an hour.’

‘It takes more than pretty pictures to make a film.’ And so on and on and on. There was much sense in what they said.

It would be only too easy to make a film which would delight yachtsmen, but this film would be seen by people who had no special interest in boats, and somehow it would have to be made both interesting and entertaining to the layman.

 

it is all here

 

http://peggybawn.wordpress.com/2013/10/01/summer-of-68-the-tobermory-race/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent background to this evocative film written by its director, Louis Miller, and a - work in progress (please help!) - boat spotter's guide for nerds can be found at the Peggy Bawn Press blog post: http://peggybawn.wordpress.com/2013/10/01/summer-of-68-the-tobermory-race/

 

Actually, we found at least two plastic boats in the 105-strong fleet: the van de Stadt designed Excalibur 36, Siolta, built by Southern Ocean Supplies Ltd., Bournemouth, 1966, and the Guy Thompson designed T24 Class, Caitlin, built by Hawkbridge of Chichester, 1968. Where are they now? The Excalibur's reputation as a solid heavy weather boat has lingered, but the T24 - a ground-breaking design in its time - has been rather forgotten.

 

T24s are not forgotten in Burnham on Cruch - there were four of them on one trot this summer. Cracking boats, if a little ungainly looking at times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

T24s are not forgotten in Burnham on Cruch - there were four of them on one trot this summer. Cracking boats, if a little ungainly looking at times.

 

Fascinating. The early days of function over classic elegance?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I interviewed one of the human players, the redoubtable yacht designer and surveyor - and serial author of yachting books - Ian Nicolson, he remembered the BBC team placing fourteen individual pieces of technical equipment, a cameraman and a sound recordist aboard his 35ft ketch, St. Mary, before the race. It would be fascinating to hear the comparison almost half a century on with the equipment you use, Dylan...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I interviewed one of the human players, the redoubtable yacht designer and surveyor - and serial author of yachting books - Ian Nicolson, he remembered the BBC team placing fourteen individual pieces of technical equipment, a cameraman and a sound recordist aboard his 35ft ketch, St. Mary, before the race. It would be fascinating to hear the comparison almost half a century on with the equipment you use, Dylan...

 

 

obviously I never go sailing without the sound man, director, camera operator, focus puller, grip, lighting man, sfaety co-ordinator, runner and person with clip board.

 

I have to say that having done conventional crewed TV I prefer what I do now - worse money but much more enjoyable

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mesmerisingly beautiful. You missed out the stick in your gear inventory. What's that for, dare I ask?

 

 

the echo-sounder does not work at extreme shallow depths - you get a double or triple bounce. When trying to beat the six knot tides on the Humber you need to get close to the edge so I use the stick as a sounding pole.

 

D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep,

 

Very nice but very English.

 

I like mousehole best as Harbour.

I want to sail her with this yacht.

 

 

koopmans 10 meter aluminium retractable keel

https://www.google.nl/search?q=koopmans+yacht+te+koop&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=RcjLUs_ZDKe60QXlkoDADQ&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1920&bih=998

 

How do I get the docking right?

Contact the harbour master years in advance?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Mesmerisingly beautiful. You missed out the stick in your gear inventory. What's that for, dare I ask?

 

 

the echo-sounder does not work at extreme shallow depths - you get a double or triple bounce. When trying to beat the six knot tides on the Humber you need to get close to the edge so I use the stick as a sounding pole.

 

D

 

Aha: beating the tide with a stick - well I never...

 

Twice in my life I have taken over yachts lock stock and barrel and found inexplicable items of home-made custom gear aboard which presumably once had a very essential use...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

Mesmerisingly beautiful. You missed out the stick in your gear inventory. What's that for, dare I ask?

 

the echo-sounder does not work at extreme shallow depths - you get a double or triple bounce. When trying to beat the six knot tides on the Humber you need to get close to the edge so I use the stick as a sounding pole.

 

D

 

 

Aha: beating the tide with a stick - well I never...

 

Twice in my life I have taken over yachts lock stock and barrel and found inexplicable items of home-made custom gear aboard which presumably once had a very essential use...

 

 

Unless one has embraced the experience as Dylan does, his methods would seem a little primitive. One reason I value Dylan's

contribution is his videos have a mien of the amateur but the worldly among us recognize he is much more substantial than

the projection. Few among the armchairs here have actually ventured so willingly into the tortured realm of extreme tide and

current. My finest bit of sailing was crashing out of strange inlet into the Atlantic in a shoal Catboat heading south to parts

unknown. Navigation was a boxed compass between my knees, pelorus and bamboo pole for sounding. I never developed the taste for

spending hours aground waiting for the tide to set me free again, but like marmite, it takes discipline and the denial one is

experiencing some discomfort, qualities which are decidedly English. Once, one bitterly cold day on the bay, trying coax the

topping for my day's measure from an especially hard oyster reef, I heard the cries of seagulls waiting for a handout as they

circled my boat. I was reminded of Ezra Pound's Seafarer "Against tossed cliffs hail scur flew, seagulls cry was to me

laughter". I thought then mockingly, because my hands were numb inside my wet mittens, my feet cold and wet, snot frozen on my collar. Upon reflexion it was something more profound.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dylan thanks for the film.

 

Amazing window on an all-but-vanished breed of boat and sailor. Incredibly beautiful boats, even if they would all be thumped by the new stuff...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Next big realization - the line honours in this race were taken by 8m CHRISTINA - built in 1935!

 

I guess not much had happened in keelboats in 30 years. Boy that was about to change....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Next big realization - the line honours in this race were taken by 8m CHRISTINA - built in 1935!

 

I guess not much had happened in keelboats in 30 years. Boy that was about to change....

 

 

that is true.....

 

but the tides and weather patterns up there can make an utter nonsense of any handicapping system yet dreamed up

 

they are sailing through mountain ranges

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dylan,

 

Thanks for that first movie: 35 minutes of pure joy!

 

Those are gentlemen (and lady!) sailors. No yelling. No hyper-competitive references to racing rules. Comradeship. No one (at least in the film) complained about anything - they were all just exactly doing what they wanted to be doing in the place they wanted to be.

 

I took my first trip to Scotland last year and thought it would make some great sailing. There is a whisky distillery right on the waterfront at Tobermory. Very civilized and gentlemanly (and ladylike).

 

Thanks for opening a window for a glance at a magical time and place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dylan,

 

Thanks for that first movie: 35 minutes of pure joy!

 

Those are gentlemen (and lady!) sailors. No yelling. No hyper-competitive references to racing rules. Comradeship. No one (at least in the film) complained about anything - they were all just exactly doing what they wanted to be doing in the place they wanted to be.

 

I took my first trip to Scotland last year and thought it would make some great sailing. There is a whisky distillery right on the waterfront at Tobermory. Very civilized and gentlemanly (and ladylike).

 

Thanks for opening a window for a glance at a magical time and place.

 

 

not my film obviously as I was still sailing Enterprises at the time

 

but I will take the credit for coppying and pasting in the URL

 

there are films that are worth watching a few times and that is one

 

it might be woreth ripping it to your hard drive just in case the BBC wakes up and tells them to take it down

 

you can use this

 

http://www.clipconverter.cc/

 

if you do not have a ripper installed

 

I have spent two summers in Scotland in a 22 foot Eboat

 

it is the finest place I have ever sailed

 

great scenery, clear water, lots of wind, loads of shelter, great people, no pirates, wonderful beaches

 

cold water though and a faor bit of rain

 

I have worked in NZ and BC

 

they also look like great places for sailing

 

when I think of all the years I wasted working rather than sailing

 

This summer self and family will be doing the bit over the top - Orkney, Shetland, Pentland Firth, Cape Wrath and to the Hebrides

 

first I have to buy a bigger boat and cut an outboard well in it

 

D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dylan. That was fun.

Some of it sounded like a Monty Python skit.

 

 

you are correct...

 

although the script at least treated us as human beings as opposed to fleas with the attention span of gnats

 

when I look at all that wood I just think of the endless hours in boatyards with bits of sandpaper and cans of unguent

 

mind you... judging by the accents I would guess that most of the winter work was done by stout fellows with rather different accents

 

we are probably the luckiest sailors ever to have existed

 

immortal boats, rot proof sails, uberstrong sheets, fantastic communications and navigation gear, safe waters, almost instant rescue, perfect weather forecasts

 

my boat is currently afloat attached to a pontoon in a 300 year old Scottish Harbour and taking no harm from being out in this bloody awful weather

 

the way I treat boats I would kill a wooden one every year

 

D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Few among the armchairs here have actually ventured so willingly into the tortured realm of extreme tide and

current. My finest bit of sailing was crashing out of strange inlet into the Atlantic in a shoal Catboat heading south to parts

unknown. Navigation was a boxed compass between my knees, pelorus and bamboo pole for sounding. I never developed the taste for

spending hours aground waiting for the tide to set me free again, but like marmite, it takes discipline and the denial one is

experiencing some discomfort, qualities which are decidedly English. Once, one bitterly cold day on the bay, trying coax the

topping for my day's measure from an especially hard oyster reef, I heard the cries of seagulls waiting for a handout as they

circled my boat.

 

Perhaps he is doing research for a sequel to The Singing Sands (Josephine Tey) or The Riddle of the Sands (Erskine Childers).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Autres pays, autres mœurs. (Well, ish)

 

So, boatspotting. First boat seen - the white ?square metre? boat on the mooring. Has to be a windfall yacht?

Next looks like a Vertue. Or if not, definitely Giles, with that transom.

Then a Fife - with the dragon on the cove stripe.

 

Sawn off shotgun for sound signals! (They're well illegal now in the UK. Used for too many bank robberies & other nefarious activities by those with a looser appreciation of the law.)

 

Ian Nicholson. Does the designer's notes in ?PBO? http://www.mylne.com/Ian_Nicolson

 

And If. There's the chap circumnavigating Great Britain (rather slowly, it must be said), who got some film of her in Aldeburgh. But then I wouldn't trust him - he's got some mad idea to go chopping holes in Centaurs.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzNAm3gidC8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep,

 

Very nice but very English.

 

I like mousehole best as Harbour.

I want to sail her with this yacht.

 

attachicon.gifMousehole cornwall.png

koopmans 10 meter aluminium retractable keel

https://www.google.nl/search?q=koopmans+yacht+te+koop&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=RcjLUs_ZDKe60QXlkoDADQ&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1920&bih=998

 

How do I get the docking right?

Contact the harbour master years in advance?

Mousehole, pronounced "mau-zall" in Cornish, is a great little fishing port near Penzance, just East of Lands End. The harbour dries out so you may have to anchor in the bay outside the breakwater with that boat, unless you can dry out against the wall.

I was there one blustery and cold March day and the town was almost deserted. Very narrow lanes between buildings. I went into a gift shop and asked what goes on in Mauzall at this time of year. The shopkeeper said in a perfect pirate's Cornish accent " aaargh,.... naaht a laaht... Some 'effin, some fishin' "

 

The Tobermory race movie was excellent and reminds me of the inside legs between Vancouver Island and the Mainland, of the 630 mile Van Isle 360 Race. Exactly the same relaxed rivalries, great scenery, wicked currents, fjords, mountains, desolation, big wild life...

Roll on summer 2015 for the next one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Autres pays, autres mœurs. (Well, ish)

 

So, boatspotting. First boat seen - the white ?square metre? boat on the mooring. Has to be a windfall yacht?

Next looks like a Vertue. Or if not, definitely Giles, with that transom.

Then a Fife - with the dragon on the cove stripe.

 

Sawn off shotgun for sound signals! (They're well illegal now in the UK. Used for too many bank robberies & other nefarious activities by those with a looser appreciation of the law.)

 

And If. There's the chap circumnavigating Great Britain (rather slowly, it must be said), who got some film of her in Aldeburgh. But then I wouldn't trust him - he's got some mad idea to go chopping holes in Centaurs.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzNAm3gidC8

 

 

well spotted Ed

 

I had not noticed her

 

she is such a cracking looking yacht

 

it was wonderful to see her sailing on the river alde

 

as for the Centaur project

 

look upon me as a surgeon cutting out the cancerous bits (fekked old engine) and replacing it with something that will actually work

 

the project does seem to have upset a few of my fellow brits but they post threads about buying dry suits for £1250 a pop

 

I really am looking at boats that are one step away from a meeting with a JCB and a skip because the cost of a new inboard (6K) means that the hull is going to get chopped up

 

http://www.keepturningleft.co.uk/scuttlebutt/port-dinorwic-centaur/

 

IMAG1315-1024x577.jpg

 

 

 

 

I am going down to the Solent this weekend to poke around a few boatyards looking for immobile Centaurs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ran a comparison between this vid and one shot last year a month or two back...the race has really died a death unfortunately, with only a handful of entrants compared to the glory years, and not many of them all that pretty. What amazes me about the old film is that the boats seem to be maintained to a PRACTICAL (some might say 'noble') standard, often by owners, whereas nowadays on the Clyde a lot of the classic yacht scene seems to be going the way of perfection and the accompanying expense over other virtues. I like looking at perfect varnishwork and immaculate paint as much as the next man, but it's also great meeting boats which are kept to a practical 80% standard by their doting (and often skint) owners, many of whom sweat blood and tears over their boats and have some great stories to tell and advice to give. This summer in Tobermory we were moored just along from the Fife Kentra, when a chap in an interesting looking ketch rowed over to tell us that ours was the best looking boat in the anchorage. Thinking that he should have gone to Specsavers, I pointed over at Kentra. He just looked at me and said 'but your boat is YOUR boat, and that shines through'. That's my excuse anyway!

 

Photo of Bull Hole on Mull, opposite Ionapost-9642-0-36706100-1389299404_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dylan. That was fun.

Some of it sounded like a Monty Python skit.

The contrast between the laconic Scotts sailor in Lola and Ian Nicholson, the "try hard" yacht designer is classic.

 

Scott to reporter, "here you hold the tiller, I am going to have a cigarette"

 

Crew to Nicholson, "do you have a chart of the area handy?". Nicholson "no, not handy"

 

He then hits a rock the next day "awfully bad luck"

 

I am also impressed with the way he navigates by depth sounder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi WHL,

 

I been in Mauzal for 30 times I think,

She is my favourite holliday destination and my wife to.

 

What means:

aaargh,.... naaht a laaht... Some 'effin, some fishin'

 

The only part I understand is some fishing to do. :lol:

Effin?

naaht a laaht?

 

This translation site doesn't give a clue.

http://www.howlsedhes.co.uk/cgi-bin/diskwe.pl

 

Yep,

Very nice but very English.

I like mousehole best as Harbour.
I want to sail her with this yacht.

attachicon.gifMousehole cornwall.png
koopmans 10 meter aluminium retractable keel
https://www.google.nl/search?q=koopmans+yacht+te+koop&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=RcjLUs_ZDKe60QXlkoDADQ&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1920&bih=998

How do I get the docking right?
Contact the harbour master years in advance?


Mousehole, pronounced "mau-zall" in Cornish, is a great little fishing port near Penzance, just East of Lands End. The harbour dries out so you may have to anchor in the bay outside the breakwater with that boat, unless you can dry out against the wall.
I was there one blustery and cold March day and the town was almost deserted. Very narrow lanes between buildings. I went into a gift shop and asked what goes on in Mauzall at this time of year. The shopkeeper said in a perfect pirate's Cornish accent " aaargh,.... naaht a laaht... Some 'effin, some fishin' "

The Tobermory race movie was excellent and reminds me of the inside legs between Vancouver Island and the Mainland, of the 630 mile Van Isle 360 Race. Exactly the same relaxed rivalries, great scenery, wicked currents, fjords, mountains, desolation, big wild life...
Roll on summer 2015 for the next one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that, Dylan.

 

Such a pleasure to find Magnus Magnason narrating. Eons ago in university I plowed through many of his Icelandic saga translations; I knew he had worked for the BBC but had no idea he ever did a sailing film. A more appropriate narrator to find on deck off the western isles of Scotland I can not imagine. What a treasure that documentary is on so many levels!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi WHL,

 

I been in Mauzal for 30 times I think,

She is my favourite holliday destination and my wife to.

 

What means:

aaargh,.... naaht a laaht... Some 'effin, some fishin'

 

The only part I understand is some fishing to do. :lol:

Effin? = Effing...short for fucking...a bit of the old slap and tickle.

naaht a laaht? = Not a lot, spoken in local dialect.

aaargh...= aaargh

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dylan

 

Thank you for sharing the link. I have just sent it onto ian's son. I might just have to take the piss about the rock...

 

Great film, just makes me want to go back to the west coast.

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Autres pays, autres mœurs. (Well, ish)

 

So, boatspotting. First boat seen - the white ?square metre? boat on the mooring. Has to be a windfall yacht?

Next looks like a Vertue. Or if not, definitely Giles, with that transom.

Then a Fife - with the dragon on the cove stripe.

 

Sawn off shotgun for sound signals! (They're well illegal now in the UK. Used for too many bank robberies & other nefarious activities by those with a looser appreciation of the law.)

 

Ian Nicholson. Does the designer's notes in ?PBO? http://www.mylne.com/Ian_Nicolson

 

And If. There's the chap circumnavigating Great Britain (rather slowly, it must be said), who got some film of her in Aldeburgh. But then I wouldn't trust him - he's got some mad idea to go chopping holes in Centaurs.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzNAm3gidC8

 

Re: "First boat seen - the white ?square metre? boat on the mooring. Has to be a windfall yacht?"

 

Could be a "windfall"... But also, pre WW2, Baltic yachts often found their way to the Clyde and west coast of Scotland via the Forth & Clyde Canal (in effect North Sea – North Atlantic canal). Before it was insanely closed in 1963, I believe the canal could accommodate vessels of approx. dimensions: LOA 70ft; beam 18ft; draft 10ft – with no air height restrictions. The canal reopened in 2000 but with vastly reduced dimension limits and low air height.

 

I believe her to be a yacht named Ivanhoe (see the yacht leading the start at 03:10), owned by the Steedman family. West of Scotland yachters of a certain age may remember their later Ivanhoe, a Nicholson “Jolina” Class sloop. There is also a slight possibility that she is Blink, a “45 Square Metre” (to which rule I know not) and an active Clyde Cruising Club yacht of the 40s – 60s.

 

Tobermory Race 1968 film boat-spotting contributions welcome at http://peggybawn.wordpress.com/2013/10/01/summer-of-68-the-tobermory-race/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aye, but present advertised numbers for the Forth & Clyde Canal are:

 

Max. Boat Length: 19.20m (63ft)

Width / Beam: 6.00m (19ft 8in)

Channel Depth: 1.83m (6ft)

Maximum Headroom 3.00m (9ft 10in)

 

(http://www.scottishcanals.co.uk/media/996517/skippers%20guide%20a4.pdf)

 

 

Note that it's "channel depth", not max draft...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get my sails made by Nicolson Hughes. Didn't realise the connection until I saw this film. Love the way the other guy has an enormous glass of whiskey in Ian's hand before they've even tied up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get my sails made by Nicolson Hughes. Didn't realise the connection until I saw this film. Love the way the other guy has an enormous glass of whiskey in Ian's hand before they've even tied up!

 

 

there are so many wonderful things in this little film

 

everytime you watch it you see something new

 

my advice to you guys is to rip the film

 

stick it on a decent screen

 

get yourself a bottle of scotch and glass and then take a sip every time you see something nice in the film

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Such an excellent film, especially for the time, thanks for posting that link up.

 

Really makes me want an old slow wooden mono :)

 

But i guess boats are like guitars in that there's a perfect one for how you feel at the time, pity they are somewhat more expensive and harder to store !

 

I've always thought the British Isles a cold wet and unpleasant place to be but what an awesome, interesting sailing playground that is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Such an excellent film, especially for the time, thanks for posting that link up.

 

Really makes me want an old slow wooden mono :)

 

But i guess boats are like guitars in that there's a perfect one for how you feel at the time, pity they are somewhat more expensive and harder to store !

 

I've always thought the British Isles a cold wet and unpleasant place to be but what an awesome, interesting sailing playground that is.

 

 

It is crap here

 

never stops raining, shit climate, cloudy water

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always thought the British Isles a cold wet and unpleasant place to be but what an awesome, interesting sailing playground that is.

 

Wet and cold, but that's why the goddess invented thermonuclear underwear, oilskins, and whiskey for internal heating.

 

The joy of sailing on the Atlantic coasts of Scotland and Ireland is well worth the loss of bikini time. One of the great memories of my life is being alone on deck on our J/24 at about 10 knots under white sails blasting past the Skelligs, with big mountains and islands as the backdrop to sparkly blue seas and white tops. Helm in one hand, cuppa tea in the other ... which I raised to the red-faced fat git at the back of the 40-foot slug we were passing. He had hauled his crew on deck to break their backs piling on more sail in the forlorn hope of keeping up.

 

A million times more fun tan any race :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is crap here

 

never stops raining, shit climate, cloudy water

 

You missed the mud and pebble "beaches", everyone in London being either a scammer or a blagger and the illegal worker at the corner store short changing you every day for months on end… :rolleyes::rolleyes:

 

Wish I'd gotten out of London but my dad got sick unexpectedly and we went home :( Still, now you've given me a reason to come back and see the better side of the UK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites