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edouard

Route du Rhum 2014

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I see that Sensation Class 40 (Marc Lepesqueux) has arrived in St Peter Port (Guernsey) after losing its keel.

Thought the 40's were supposed to be bullet proof? especially the hull / keel stucture etc

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Coville interview below :

http://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/route-du-rhum/route-du-rhum-en-images-l-arrivee-de-coville-a-roscoff-03-11-2014-10410946.php

 

For me clearly he didn't manage his priorities very well ...

 

Yup, but I just hope it doesn't turn into a blame game. I am sure many of these sailors have made that type of error last night, but they were lucky enough that it only meant a good fright but no damage.

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I see that Sensation Class 40 (Marc Lepesqueux) has arrived in St Peter Port (Guernsey) after losing its keel.

Thought the 40's were supposed to be bullet proof? especially the hull / keel stucture etc

 

It's obviously a design or build flaw of this particular boat model (Sabrossa 40). There were only two and they are untested and ... they both lost their keel last night.

 

Don't know what the Class40 class asks in terms of tests to be certified. But there might be some motivation for thought here.

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I see that Sensation Class 40 (Marc Lepesqueux) has arrived in St Peter Port (Guernsey) after losing its keel.

Thought the 40's were supposed to be bullet proof? especially the hull / keel stucture etc

 

It's obviously a design or build flaw of this particular boat model (Sabrossa 40). There were only two and they are untested and ... they both lost their keel last night.

 

Don't know what the Class40 class asks in terms of tests to be certified. But there might be some motivation for thought here.

 

That's for sure ! and after some googling:

To add insult to injury these boats are the brainchild of the helivaced skipper; who is on one end an engineering lecturer in a Msc degree engineering uni ! and got the boat designed by a young design firm, as one of the partners in this was a former student of his.

On the other hand this skipper is apparently the Class 40's current president.

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“Performance Offshore” race boats falling apart is getting old fast. It seems to me that offshore racing is now more about a sailors/team’s skill in emergency repairs and less about true sailing. I miss the “slow” boats that you could push hard without the same fear of the boat falling apart under your feet or above your head. The loads seem to be unmanageable for the equipment/design and it would appear that the delta between “working” load and “failure” load are too close. Most of these boats are not fit for purpose and death traps.

 

I miss the old 10M America Cup boats, warhorse offshore sleds, and brick house over-built boats. Maybe they were slow by today’s standards and sure they would round-up more but at least the keel would stay attached, hull would remain stuck together, and the mast would stay up in the air.

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“Performance Offshore” race boats falling apart is getting old fast. It seems to me that offshore racing is now more about a sailors/team’s skill in emergency repairs and less about true sailing. I miss the “slow” boats that you could push hard without the same fear of the boat falling apart under your feet or above your head. The loads seem to be unmanageable for the equipment/design and it would appear that the delta between “working” load and “failure” load are too close. Most of these boats are not fit for purpose and death traps.

 

I miss the old 10M America Cup boats, warhorse offshore sleds, and brick house over-built boats. Maybe they were slow by today’s standards and sure they would round-up more but at least the keel would stay attached, hull would remain stuck together, and the mast would stay up in the air.

+1

I'm not saying that pushing the boundaries is a bad thing but it's for inshore sorties with a support boat on hand and not in open ocean races where other peoples lives are on hand.

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“Performance Offshore” race boats falling apart is getting old fast. It seems to me that offshore racing is now more about a sailors/team’s skill in emergency repairs and less about true sailing. I miss the “slow” boats that you could push hard without the same fear of the boat falling apart under your feet or above your head. The loads seem to be unmanageable for the equipment/design and it would appear that the delta between “working” load and “failure” load are too close. Most of these boats are not fit for purpose and death traps.

 

I miss the old 10M America Cup boats, warhorse offshore sleds, and brick house over-built boats. Maybe they were slow by today’s standards and sure they would round-up more but at least the keel would stay attached, hull would remain stuck together, and the mast would stay up in the air.

 

Anything else? We've heard this litany for the last ... 50 years.

 

Besides, there never were anything such as the AC 10m boats. There were 12 MR boats, indeed built as tanks to sail around the cans, but what the heck has that to do with ocean racing?

 

Nostalgia isn't what it used to be but one thing remains: it was always better in "the days".

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“Performance Offshore” race boats falling apart is getting old fast. It seems to me that offshore racing is now more about a sailors/team’s skill in emergency repairs and less about true sailing. I miss the “slow” boats that you could push hard without the same fear of the boat falling apart under your feet or above your head. The loads seem to be unmanageable for the equipment/design and it would appear that the delta between “working” load and “failure” load are too close. Most of these boats are not fit for purpose and death traps.

 

I miss the old 10M America Cup boats, warhorse offshore sleds, and brick house over-built boats. Maybe they were slow by today’s standards and sure they would round-up more but at least the keel would stay attached, hull would remain stuck together, and the mast would stay up in the air.

Really ... or is this a troll-post?

 

Stop the world I want to get off..... and in a RdR tread....

 

This singelhanded beasts makes it so much more interesting than those overcrowded VOR stuff. Here is 92 entrants - the VOR is 7? Think about the development that is necessary to make these boat singlehanded.... thats the impressive part - and that most of them is holding together in these conditions - ok to crash into a cargo ship is a little to much....

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“Performance Offshore” race boats falling apart is getting old fast. It seems to me that offshore racing is now more about a sailors/team’s skill in emergency repairs and less about true sailing. I miss the “slow” boats that you could push hard without the same fear of the boat falling apart under your feet or above your head. The loads seem to be unmanageable for the equipment/design and it would appear that the delta between “working” load and “failure” load are too close. Most of these boats are not fit for purpose and death traps.

 

I miss the old 10M America Cup boats, warhorse offshore sleds, and brick house over-built boats. Maybe they were slow by today’s standards and sure they would round-up more but at least the keel would stay attached, hull would remain stuck together, and the mast would stay up in the air.

 

Anything else? We've heard this litany for the last ... 50 years.

 

Besides, there never were anything such as the AC 10m boats. There were 12 MR boats, indeed built as tanks to sail around the cans, but what the heck has that to do with ocean racing?

 

Nostalgia isn't what it used to be but one thing remains: it was always better in "the days".

You beat me to it ;)

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Am I the only one to find this or does the "Distance to Finish" calculation for the rankings dramatically favor anybody upwind in the West when they have all eased sheets ?

Hard to compare the map to rankings.

 

e.g:

ULTIME : Prince de Bretagne v/s Spindrift

IMOCA : Bureau Vallée against the top guys

RHUM: Aneo v/s Vento di Sardegna

 

M.be not the perfect tracker ??

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Conrad Humphries heading for Brest with sail damage - I was looking forward to him doing well. From the tracker it looks like a couple of other 40s are heading that way too.

RKJ posted his thoughts on the first night on the RdR website - he always said that he was going to be cautious and not break anything but it sounds like a pretty typical grim November night in the Channel.

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It was a typo, I meant 12M.

 

Yeah, I know I’m bitching. I’m not trying to derail anything nor am I hoping to start down a path that’s pointless. I was just disappointed to see the damage report this morning.

 

I don’t follow the VOR or AC like I follow the singlehanded sailing as these guys impress the hell out of me. I will never sail even close to the level they are at but I do learn from some of the things they post and even the pictures of their rigging. This is probably why I am annoyed by failures of things for reasons that I just can’t wrap my arms around. These sailors put their heart into the sport like no other and do so on a boat that that startles the line between amazing and scary.

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Am I the only one to find this or does the "Distance to Finish" calculation for the rankings dramatically favor anybody upwind in the West when they have all eased sheets ?

Hard to compare the map to rankings.

 

e.g:

ULTIME : Prince de Bretagne v/s Spindrift

IMOCA : Bureau Vallée against the top guys

RHUM: Aneo v/s Vento di Sardegna

 

M.be not the perfect tracker ??

 

Not if you compare their positions to the grand circle route (i.e. the arbitrary reference).

 

Of course some boats might be ahead on the best route in the current weather conditions than others while being behind in the rankings. But that's the case more often than not in ocean racing, especially as far away from the finish line with negligible deltas compared to the distance yet to be sailed. See the VOR leg 1 thread for an inventory of the usual "much more relevant measures than this idiotic DTF measure".

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Am I the only one to find this or does the "Distance to Finish" calculation for the rankings dramatically favor anybody upwind in the West when they have all eased sheets ?

Hard to compare the map to rankings.

 

e.g:

ULTIME : Prince de Bretagne v/s Spindrift

IMOCA : Bureau Vallée against the top guys

RHUM: Aneo v/s Vento di Sardegna

 

M.be not the perfect tracker ??

 

Not if you compare their positions to the grand circle route (i.e. the arbitrary reference).

 

Of course some boats might be ahead on the best route in the current weather conditions than others while being behind in the rankings. But that's the case more often than not in ocean racing, especially as far away from the finish line with negligible deltas compared to the distance yet to be sailed. See the VOR leg 1 thread for an inventory of the usual "much more relevant measures than this idiotic DTF measure".

 

I've followed the VOR thread rants ;)

 

I was under the impression that previously "intermediate" discretionary way points were used on French trackers and not the pure grand-circle, when currently most sail below it.

I may be wrong but in this respect the outside of the Finisterre DTF might have been a good way point

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It was a typo, I meant 12M.

 

Yeah, I know I’m bitching. I’m not trying to derail anything nor am I hoping to start down a path that’s pointless. I was just disappointed to see the damage report this morning.

 

I don’t follow the VOR or AC like I follow the singlehanded sailing as these guys impress the hell out of me. I will never sail even close to the level they are at but I do learn from some of the things they post and even the pictures of their rigging. This is probably why I am annoyed by failures of things for reasons that I just can’t wrap my arms around. These sailors put their heart into the sport like no other and do so on a boat that that startles the line between amazing and scary.

 

So 5-10 boats out of 91 on the starting line have issues, not all terminal, after beating in anger in hefty conditions through the night and you have "issues"? (Ever watched a world level motor race in your life? First corner incidents are common.)

 

Why the heck second guess their motivation if you're not at their level by your own admission? They all know that to be competitive you have to push the envelope and in a mechanical sport that means breaking things from time to time. They^re not there to cross the the Atlantic, they are there to RACE across the Atlantic.

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Oh,oh. The power of the Spindrift has been unleashed, 28knts+.

 

And they will neither tack nor jibe for a while.

 

Really curious to see how this pans out over the next 24 hours.

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It was a typo, I meant 12M.

 

Yeah, I know I’m bitching. I’m not trying to derail anything nor am I hoping to start down a path that’s pointless. I was just disappointed to see the damage report this morning.

 

I don’t follow the VOR or AC like I follow the singlehanded sailing as these guys impress the hell out of me. I will never sail even close to the level they are at but I do learn from some of the things they post and even the pictures of their rigging. This is probably why I am annoyed by failures of things for reasons that I just can’t wrap my arms around. These sailors put their heart into the sport like no other and do so on a boat that that startles the line between amazing and scary.

 

 

It was pretty blustery here in the middle of the English Channel last night with awkward seas to contend with, though this is the norm at this time of year.

 

Many Route de Rhum starts over the years have seen a high percentage of breakages.

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Its a bit harsh that as soon as you are out of the race you are cut from the tracker. It would be nice to see how the disabled boats are getting on.

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De Broc out, hurt badly his elbow (being the guy who had self-stiched his tong during a VG, it must be quite bad !) - he also broke his autopilote's ram over the night.

 

I don't know if Riou will be able to continue, but in any case he his out for the win ...

I don't see anybody who can threaten Gabart for the win, except a breakage

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My French sailing vocabulary is not good enough to tell what PRB broke. Anyone able to translate the more technical details?

 

The panel holding the mainsail traveller failed when the boat jumped off a wave and crashed into the next.

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Guichard has slowed down to 13 knots from 35 in one sched...

 

Yup saw that. Hope he didn't break anything. Maybe slowed down to take another riff, they expect very rough conditions around Cap Finisterre.

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Guichard has slowed down to 13 knots from 35 in one sched...

 

Yup saw that. Hope he didn't break anything. Maybe slowed down to take another riff, they expect very rough conditions around Cap Finisterre.

Yeah, let's hope so, he was just getting up to speed!

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That was an area which was recently worked on and modified, correct?

They did substantially alter the back of the boat, but I don't know if that particular structure was modified.

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Guichard has slowed down to 13 knots from 35 in one sched...

 

Yup saw that. Hope he didn't break anything. Maybe slowed down to take another riff, they expect very rough conditions around Cap Finisterre.

From YG:

 

"The boat is making ​​impressive jumps and we both suffer with every passing wave, I feel like the boat will break up. Any maneuver is physically grueling." admitted Spindrift's Yann Guichard at 1000hrs this morning. He was looking forwards to his first micro-nap of 15 and he aims to get some more through today.

 

 

 

Later from RdR web:

 

The battle of the giants was taking on its hotly anticipated centre stage action this afternoon as Guichard continued to march steadily up through the field, now into slightly more moderate breezes but still with big confused seas. He was almost 10 knots quicker than Peyron on the late afternoon poll.

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“Performance Offshore” race boats falling apart is getting old fast. It seems to me that offshore racing is now more about a sailors/team’s skill in emergency repairs and less about true sailing. I miss the “slow” boats that you could push hard without the same fear of the boat falling apart under your feet or above your head. The loads seem to be unmanageable for the equipment/design and it would appear that the delta between “working” load and “failure” load are too close. Most of these boats are not fit for purpose and death traps.

 

I miss the old 10M America Cup boats, warhorse offshore sleds, and brick house over-built boats. Maybe they were slow by today’s standards and sure they would round-up more but at least the keel would stay attached, hull would remain stuck together, and the mast would stay up in the air.

Funny. That's not how I remember the old Whitbread days at all.

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I can't believe how unlucky Coville is. The poor guy can't get a break (sorry!)

Meanwhile the old fox Peyron and Golden Boy Gabart have managed their race starts impeccably. Very impressive.

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Racing those ultimates, already across the biscay, solo, what a speed.

 

Class 40 is still interesting to follow for me, as aspected by me, Kleinjans doing well, but will drop back, old boat. But he is a very talented sailor.

So cheering for hte rest for Pella...

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Looks like the back markers are going to have a really rough time of it in two days with the wind on the nose and then another front coming through with confused seas again, so another bout of boat-breaking likely to come off Finisterre.

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Im all for Peyron.

 

This guy deserve this.

Same here. Over on the VOR thread there's a discussion about leadership and what skippers do well. Here's a good bit of Peyron showing his completely positive, optimistic and committed command on BPV for the Jules Verne. You don't have to speak French to get how much fun it would be to sail around the world with this guy:

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Im all for Peyron.

 

This guy deserve this.

Same here. Over on the VOR thread there's a discussion about leadership and what skippers do well. Here's a good bit of Peyron showing his completely positive, optimistic and committed command on BPV for the Jules Verne. You don't have to speak French to get how much fun it would be to sail around the world with this guy:

I speak french. Ive been following his happy project for the RDR 2014. I was thrilled when banque populaire recruited him. He wouldnt had the chance if he didnt done his happy project. He was all prepared for the rdr.

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Im all for Peyron.

 

This guy deserve this.

Same here. Over on the VOR thread there's a discussion about leadership and what skippers do well. Here's a good bit of Peyron showing his completely positive, optimistic and committed command on BPV for the Jules Verne. You don't have to speak French to get how much fun it would be to sail around the world with this guy:

Loick or Frances. I'd be very happy if either wins, hope they come 1-2.

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Coville interview below :

http://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/route-du-rhum/route-du-rhum-en-images-l-arrivee-de-coville-a-roscoff-03-11-2014-10410946.php

 

For me clearly he didn't manage his priorities very well ...

 

Yup, but I just hope it doesn't turn into a blame game. I am sure many of these sailors have made that type of error last night, but they were lucky enough that it only meant a good fright but no damage.

Agree but I watched the interview and I don't think he looked into the camera once, seemed to be avoiding it. Fully understand he's very upset, stressed and tired but that's not good

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“Performance Offshore” race boats falling apart is getting old fast. It seems to me that offshore racing is now more about a sailors/team’s skill in emergency repairs and less about true sailing. I miss the “slow” boats that you could push hard without the same fear of the boat falling apart under your feet or above your head. The loads seem to be unmanageable for the equipment/design and it would appear that the delta between “working” load and “failure” load are too close. Most of these boats are not fit for purpose and death traps.

 

I miss the old 10M America Cup boats, warhorse offshore sleds, and brick house over-built boats. Maybe they were slow by today’s standards and sure they would round-up more but at least the keel would stay attached, hull would remain stuck together, and the mast would stay up in the air.

Funny. That's not how I remember the old Whitbread days at all.

Every single Whitbread since I was kid has been the same. Boats loaded up and things going ping.

RdR is always a war of attrition due to the fact of heading out of the Bay of Biscay in November. Wouldn't find me out there anymore, way too chicken for that!

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Architectes : Cabinet VPLP

Nom officiel : Maxi Trimaran Solo Banque Populaire VII

Numéro de voile : 19

Longueur : 31,50 m

Largeur : 22,50

Déplacement : 18 000 kg

Tirant d’eau : 5,70 m

Hauteur du mât : 33,50m

Structure : carbone-Nomex

Voilure au près : 411 m2

Voilure au portant : 678 m2

Toute première mise à l’eau : juin 2006

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BPVII is 105 31.5 meters.

 

Spindrift 2, shes the old BPV , in wich Loick won the jules verne trophy. Shes 40 meters.

 

Quite a story if Loick hold her off.

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Coville interview below :

http://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/route-du-rhum/route-du-rhum-en-images-l-arrivee-de-coville-a-roscoff-03-11-2014-10410946.php

 

For me clearly he didn't manage his priorities very well ...

 

Yup, but I just hope it doesn't turn into a blame game. I am sure many of these sailors have made that type of error last night, but they were lucky enough that it only meant a good fright but no damage.

Agree but I watched the interview and I don't think he looked into the camera once, seemed to be avoiding it. Fully understand he's very upset, stressed and tired but that's not good

 

And the blame game starts.

 

There were several cameras from various media and he was answering to a group of journalists not one in particular. In short, it wasn't an interview but an impromptu press conference. And it is bloody professional from him to answer questions so frankly in those circumstances, he hadn't even stepped off the boat yet!

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BPVII is 105 31.5 meters.

 

Spindrift 2, shes the old BPV , in wich Loick won the jules verne trophy. Shes 40 meters.

 

Quite a story if Loick hold her off.

 

And he will. Loick is a God.

 

OK, well maybe maybe not but it's absolutely fascinating to find out if Spindrift is really too big to sail solo relative to BPVII (nb, Spindrift has a smaller mast than when it was BPV yes?). Anyway, it's extraordinary and they're all making good pace. It's hard to tell from the tracker and relative to the rumb (rhum?) line but I'd guess the leaders made better day 1 milage than Lemonchoise's record run.

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BPVII is 105 31.5 meters.

 

Spindrift 2, shes the old BPV , in wich Loick won the jules verne trophy. Shes 40 meters.

 

Quite a story if Loick hold her off.

 

And he will. Loick is a God.

 

OK, well maybe maybe not but it's absolutely fascinating to find out if Spindrift is really too big to sail solo relative to BPVII (nb, Spindrift has a smaller mast than when it was BPV yes?). Anyway, it's extraordinary and they're all making good pace. It's hard to tell from the tracker and relative to the rumb (rhum?) line but I'd guess the leaders made better day 1 milage than Lemonchoise's record run.

Rhumb

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Loick said he nearly capsize last night. He fall asleep while driving, and then pull the tiller, he wake up when the boat was high in the air....just in time to release the sheet.

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Good to see Miranda merron as top woman and brit. Plus in front of halvard...

 

+1 - Great to see - she has been steadily clawing her way towards the front over the last 24 hrs. Good to see Conrad Humphries back on the track as well after a quick pit-stop (sail repairs I think?)

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Loick said he nearly capsize last night. He fall asleep while driving, and then pull the tiller, he wake up when the boat was high in the air....just in time to release the sheet.

Full report from routedurhum.com translated below:

 

Loïck Peyron (Ultime) : Good news!

« The sea state starts to soften a bit : it is the best news we got in the last 48 hours ! It is still very rough though, very much so. The wind strength is still very unstable: from 25 to 40 knots in the squalls and I am always tuning the auto pilot. The sailing conditions so far have been hellish. But last night, it got better: we have moonlight, a few clouds, not too many boats, the fun part is going to start. It can only get better. By tomorrow, it will be much more comfortable. I have spent a lot of time at the helm, and even with this very wide boat, I almost capsized, falling asleep at the helm: falling off, I made the boat bear away. By the time I got everything in order again, I gained a few more gray hair! »

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Olmix hit by lightning; skipper Pierre Antoine is OK but has been airlifted off the boat... water ingress in main hull.

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Coville interview below :

http://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/route-du-rhum/route-du-rhum-en-images-l-arrivee-de-coville-a-roscoff-03-11-2014-10410946.php

 

For me clearly he didn't manage his priorities very well ...

 

Yup, but I just hope it doesn't turn into a blame game. I am sure many of these sailors have made that type of error last night, but they were lucky enough that it only meant a good fright but no damage.

Agree but I watched the interview and I don't think he looked into the camera once, seemed to be avoiding it. Fully understand he's very upset, stressed and tired but that's not good

 

And the blame game starts.

 

There were several cameras from various media and he was answering to a group of journalists not one in particular. In short, it wasn't an interview but an impromptu press conference. And it is bloody professional from him to answer questions so frankly in those circumstances, he hadn't even stepped off the boat yet!

Laurent

 

Can you put some english sub titles to the interview with Thomas Colville?

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Coville interview below :

http://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/route-du-rhum/route-du-rhum-en-images-l-arrivee-de-coville-a-roscoff-03-11-2014-10410946.php

 

For me clearly he didn't manage his priorities very well ...

 

Yup, but I just hope it doesn't turn into a blame game. I am sure many of these sailors have made that type of error last night, but they were lucky enough that it only meant a good fright but no damage.

Agree but I watched the interview and I don't think he looked into the camera once, seemed to be avoiding it. Fully understand he's very upset, stressed and tired but that's not good

 

And the blame game starts.

 

There were several cameras from various media and he was answering to a group of journalists not one in particular. In short, it wasn't an interview but an impromptu press conference. And it is bloody professional from him to answer questions so frankly in those circumstances, he hadn't even stepped off the boat yet!

Laurent

 

Can you put some english sub titles to the interview with Thomas Colville?

 

I don't have Laurent's skills, so I will just give you an "off" translation:

 

- Opening sequence: (Distraught voice addressing journalists waiting for him as he arrives) Guys, it's indescribable what you are asking me to do here.

- Wide shot of Sodebo Ultim, off camera voice: Well first: I feel like I just went through a car accident. I have the impression I just hit a truck with a motorcycle.

- Back to him on cam: (Trying to collect himself, searching for his words) I was leaving the shipping lane ... I was going real fast ... I had had a small problem at the bow during the night and had decided to push again and I think I was catching up with Loick ... I was comfortable. That's when I had a low batteries alarm from the generator. I went inside because I was surprised to hear that after only 8 hours. I went inside (below in main hull I suspect because he says he went 'down inside'), saw nothing was wrong and went back out. I saw at that point on the screen ... you understand on these boats at these speeds we don't see much especially at night in squalls we rely on AIS and radar screens ... we basically work like airplane pilots in those conditions: on instruments only ... I had seen there were two ships ... my autopilot was in "wind" mode where the boat has a somewhat unpredictable (in terms of heading ndlr) trajectory ... I am at 25kts the ship is at 18kts ... we have a closing speed of 40kts ... the couple of miles separating us are covered in less than two minutes ... I was monitoring my generators rpm when I suddenly saw a black wall in front of me. I hit him a few meters from the stern...

 

The rest is very emotional. You feel he is just gutted for his team and all those you supported him.

 

Throughout the whole sequence, journalists don't interrupt him and let him pour it out. One of them has the right reflex and simply says "Merci Thomas" as concluding remark.

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Olmix hit by lightning; skipper Pierre Antoine is OK but has been airlifted off the boat... water ingress in main hull.

 

So the leading Class40 boat, GDF SUEZ with Sabastian Rogues, was asked to divert to OLMIX position and stayed there till Antoine was airlifted off. He thereby fell to third in the rankings with others closing on him. How on earth does the race committee compensate him for this?

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Olmix hit by lightning; skipper Pierre Antoine is OK but has been airlifted off the boat... water ingress in main hull.

 

So the leading Class40 boat, GDF SUEZ with Sabastian Rogues, was asked to divert to OLMIX position and stayed there till Antoine was airlifted off. He thereby fell to third in the rankings with others closing on him. How on earth does the race committee compensate him for this?

Looking at previous speeds, routage, etc.. He was the closest boat and OLMIX has a major water leak, it makes sense to me that safety for her skipper comes before any kind of competition..

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Olmix hit by lightning; skipper Pierre Antoine is OK but has been airlifted off the boat... water ingress in main hull.

 

So the leading Class40 boat, GDF SUEZ with Sabastian Rogues, was asked to divert to OLMIX position and stayed there till Antoine was airlifted off. He thereby fell to third in the rankings with others closing on him. How on earth does the race committee compensate him for this?

 

Basically the same way race committees have always given redress , estimate the time lost.

 

It's not perfect, but what else do you suggest? That "the show must go on whatever happens" and that Sebastian should just have sailed by yelling "sorry mate I'm here to race not to help you, got anything you want to say to your potential widow if everything goes wrong?"

 

I know this place is called Sailing Anarchy, but many here really seem to understand only the Anarchy part.

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Coville interview below :

http://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/route-du-rhum/route-du-rhum-en-images-l-arrivee-de-coville-a-roscoff-03-11-2014-10410946.php

 

For me clearly he didn't manage his priorities very well ...

Yup, but I just hope it doesn't turn into a blame game. I am sure many of these sailors have made that type of error last night, but they were lucky enough that it only meant a good fright but no damage.

Agree but I watched the interview and I don't think he looked into the camera once, seemed to be avoiding it. Fully understand he's very upset, stressed and tired but that's not good

 

And the blame game starts.

 

There were several cameras from various media and he was answering to a group of journalists not one in particular. In short, it wasn't an interview but an impromptu press conference. And it is bloody professional from him to answer questions so frankly in those circumstances, he hadn't even stepped off the boat yet!

Laurent

 

Can you put some english sub titles to the interview with Thomas Colville?

 

I don't have Laurent's skills, so I will just give you an "off" translation:

 

- Opening sequence: (Distraught voice addressing journalists waiting for him as he arrives) Guys, it's indescribable what you are asking me to do here.

- Wide shot of Sodebo Ultim, off camera voice: Well first: I feel like I just went through a car accident. I have the impression I just hit a truck with a motorcycle.

- Back to him on cam: (Trying to collect himself, searching for his words) I was leaving the shipping lane ... I was going real fast ... I had had a small problem at the bow during the night and had decided to push again and I think I was catching up with Loick ... I was comfortable. That's when I had a low batteries alarm from the generator. I went inside because I was surprised to hear that after only 8 hours. I went inside (below in main hull I suspect because he says he went 'down inside'), saw nothing was wrong and went back out. I saw at that point on the screen ... you understand on these boats at these speeds we don't see much especially at night in squalls we rely on AIS and radar screens ... we basically work like airplane pilots in those conditions: on instruments only ... I had seen there were two ships ... my autopilot was in "wind" mode where the boat has a somewhat unpredictable (in terms of heading ndlr) trajectory ... I am at 25kts the ship is at 18kts ... we have a closing speed of 40kts ... the couple of miles separating us are covered in less than two minutes ... I was monitoring my generators rpm when I suddenly saw a black wall in front of me. I hit him a few meters from the stern...

 

The rest is very emotional. You feel he is just gutted for his team and all those you supported him.

 

Throughout the whole sequence, journalists don't interrupt him and let him pour it out. One of them has the right reflex and simply says "Merci Thomas" as concluding remark.

Thanks edouard

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Good too see Idec is moving up a few positions...

 

With the better sea state and more stable wind conditions, we will start to see these guys really push the big tris.

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Anyone some backgroundstory of Thibaut Vauchel Camus ?

One year on a Class 40, Hydroptere crew, long list of victories in the F18 cat.

Impressive ranking so far.

 

Rogues,

changed course at 1040 on the tracker, appears again 1352, travelled 17 miles in between.
While competitors did 15 knts,

So roughly 3 hrs, 45 M lost, but did 17 M, equals 1 hour.

So redress 2 hrs.

He lost some leverage, 10 M more south, harder to quantify.

So around 2.5 hrs is my guess, will be wrong :)

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Olmix hit by lightning; skipper Pierre Antoine is OK but has been airlifted off the boat... water ingress in main hull.

 

So the leading Class40 boat, GDF SUEZ with Sabastian Rogues, was asked to divert to OLMIX position and stayed there till Antoine was airlifted off. He thereby fell to third in the rankings with others closing on him. How on earth does the race committee compensate him for this?

 

Basically the same way race committees have always given redress , estimate the time lost.

 

It's not perfect, but what else do you suggest? That "the show must go on whatever happens" and that Sebastian should just have sailed by yelling "sorry mate I'm here to race not to help you, got anything you want to say to your potential widow if everything goes wrong?"

 

I know this place is called Sailing Anarchy, but many here really seem to understand only the Anarchy part.

 

Easy there big guy, I'm all for him being asked to help and agreeing to do so, just wondering how they figure out compensation. No Anarchy, just asking.

 

Thanks LeoV for trying to work it out. Be interesting to see what they do.

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Why's he getting a redress?

 

See above, although I've yet to see anything on their website about redress, although they must surely offer some since they asked him to divert and standby and he did it.

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Here is a photo of Alessandro Di Benedetto's Team Plastique during the Route du Rhum.

 

This photo is from the Route du Rhum's Twitter feed.

post-106106-0-01023000-1415121376_thumb.png

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Okay, so now a stupid question. The big trimarans seem able to get down to the trades around the Canary islands in time to avoid the light patch predicted just north of the Canaries. But the IMOCAs are not trying for that, instead it looks like they will take their medicine ahead of the next front and then ride it down to the trades. Am I on the right track here?

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This one ?

Another tale of the high seas occurred in The Transat (former Ostar) this time: In 1984, Yvon Fauconnier went to the rescue of Philippe Jeantot after his capsize. The second to cross the finish line, ten hours and thirty minutes after Philippe Poupon, the skipper of Umupro-Jardin was proclaimed winner of this edition, since the jury had quite logically redressed the sixteen hours spent helping Philippe Jeantot.

source:http://www.gitana-team.com/en/event.news.aspx?eventid=27&newsid=319

Bottom part.

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IMO - and this is just my opinion - this event is a great display of incredibly bad seamanship.

 

In NZ waters those boats would all fit the classification of Navigational Hazard.

 

I do fully respect the guys doing the race, it's massive - and the boats are amazing machines - but that doesn't remove the fact that such big boats travelling at such high speeds should have at least 2 sets of alert and properly rested eyes on watch at all times...

 

Just my opinion.

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Yves Le Blevec, and his Multi-50 Actual, forced to make a pit stop in Portugal due to malfunctioning electronics.

 

Actual is currently in third place in it's class.

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Has anyone else noticed the straight tracks of both Loick and Francis? Looks like those two are on rails compared to the others like they're steering a heading and the others wind angles?

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Josse is smoking on his "little" MOD. Right there with Spindrift in 3rd place, and ripping it at nearly 33knts. So far, I would say he and Loick are having the best race to this point in the Ultime class.

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IMO - and this is just my opinion - this event is a great display of incredibly bad seamanship.

 

In NZ waters those boats would all fit the classification of Navigational Hazard.

 

I do fully respect the guys doing the race, it's massive - and the boats are amazing machines - but that doesn't remove the fact that such big boats travelling at such high speeds should have at least 2 sets of alert and properly rested eyes on watch at all times...

 

Just my opinion.

I am supposed to believe that the Whitebread or VOR yachts entered NZ waters with "2 sets of alert and properly rested eyes on watch at all times..." after weeks of on the edge racing.

 

Give me a break.

 

Edit: and as Navigational Hazards go, I am sure any fleet of Wednesday evening racers from any place in the world qualify way ahead of the Rhum fleet.

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Pierre Antoine, skipper of the Multi50 Olmix

“In fact the lightning struck the top of the mast. I later found the bulb from the masthead down on the ground. It came down through the mast right to the bottom. The boat is made of wood so it left a hole in the wood and right through the electrical cables which had caught fire. I thought first of all it was just alight, so I tried to put it out with the extinguisher, as I didn't think there was any hole. When I went inside the boat, there was already 50 cm of water and she was beginning to go bow down. After that, the water just kept rising. I found bits of wood floating around. It's the sort of thing that never happens. It's crazy. Luckily I wasn't inside the boat, seeing it had burnt everywhere. I could have been sitting in front of the computer. I can't imagine what would have happened… The screens exploded and everything turned to dust…”

 

Lucky escape indeed.

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Awesome so far.... shame about the problems but with a start like that it was inevitable. 2 1/2 days and 35 boats have had to either retire or return to restart. Very hard considering its blowing it's tits off for two days in the busiest shipping lanes with little sleep and COLD. The multi guys are on no sleep.... absolute legends (or nut jobs, I'm not sure)

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