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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.

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Rail Meat

The "Everest of Sailing".....irritates me to no end

126 posts in this topic

It was a joke Safiri. Your hyperbolic post is basically what this thread is about though.

 

My recipe? Waking up thousands of miles away from Mt. Everest every morning. Seems legit.

 

-R

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"We all have our el Guapo. You el Guapo just happens to be the real el Guapo."

 

Name it for the 3 night stay at the Palms, the new le Baron, matching Whirlpool washer and dryer, and a years supply of Siracha hot sauce...

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It was a joke Safiri. Your hyperbolic post is basically what this thread is about though.

 

My recipe? Waking up thousands of miles away from Mt. Everest every morning. Seems legit.

 

-R

 

Imagine; you been down on the boat, sailed all weekend (boat is 900 km, 4hrs train ride away) you get back and your colleague tells you that he managed to sell a boat which goes to Mars and back in no time, deadline is next week.....basically he sold the impossible, man, I had a shit day :)

 

Sailing and Climbing have plenty of common, whether you do it solo or in a team....climbing looks more accessible to the population though.....

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Three Amigos? Total guess.

Ding! Ding! Ding!

 

Watch the mail for your incredible prizes!

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Three Amigos? Total guess.

Ding! Ding! Ding!

 

Watch the mail for your incredible prizes!

 

 

This is the happiest day of my life! I conquered the Everest of guessing games! Very excited indeed. I should start playing Russian Roulette with my prowess for chance.

 

Make sure the le Baron is a convertible with blown out rear suspension and "wood" paneling.

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You SIR are a classy guy!

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Now please send a check for $450 for administration fees for your prizes. This fee will be returned to you upon your arrival at the Palms....

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The abuse of this comparison as a simple extension of the phenomena where every child gets a ribbon, or grade inflation at Harvard. We have gotten so numb to empty praise intended to make everyone feel special that we have to come up with ever more inflated ways to puff up our fragile egos. The Newport Bermuda or Sydney Hobart certainly is an accomplishment, particularly for a corinthian sailor who has never been more than 20 miles off shore. Either race may even be one's personal mountain to climb. But Everest? Don't be silly.

 

Well put, I'm cranky with you.

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Make sure the le Baron is a convertible with blown out rear suspension and "wood" paneling.

I was at a festival yesterday. In line with several classic cars was a le Baron convertible, with faux "wood" paneling. Me without my camera.

 

It was, of course, the Everest of car shows!

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That's funny OP because, I was browsing the Newport Bermuda site the other day and see a posted article by a skipper who did the race for the first time in 2012 and is sharing his thoughts for other people contemplating doing the race. "How nice", I thought to myself. Somebody who is generous with their experience and hopeful that others will get to have the same joy they got from ocean racing.



My good cheer lasted about five or six paragraphs, until in the middle of an explanation about safety he wrote "The Newport Bermuda Race is the best thing since sliced bread".



Really? A 635 mile jaunt that might take a longish weekend to complete is the same as the world's greatest invention, located in the remote regions of your bread box?





Seriously OP, it's a figure of speech. But the similarities are closer than I'm sure you feeble mind can comprehend.



1. For a non sailor/climber to do either one, it's going to take about a year of prep.


2. They both take a few days.


3. You can pay professionals to make the trip easier.


4. You can use both experiences to pull chicks at parties.


5. Both experiences cause the death of large numbers of braincells, Everest with temperatures, Bemuda/Hobart with copious amounts of rum.


6. Neither makes you a better person

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That's funny OP because, I was browsing the Newport Bermuda site the other day and see a posted article by a skipper who did the race for the first time in 2012 and is sharing his thoughts for other people contemplating doing the race. "How nice", I thought to myself. Somebody who is generous with their experience and hopeful that others will get to have the same joy they got from ocean racing.

My good cheer lasted about five or six paragraphs, until in the middle of an explanation about safety he wrote "The Newport Bermuda Race is the best thing since sliced bread".

Really? A 635 mile jaunt that might take a longish weekend to complete is the same as the world's greatest invention, located in the remote regions of your bread box?

Seriously OP, it's a figure of speech. But the similarities are closer than I'm sure you feeble mind can comprehend.

1. For a non sailor/climber to do either one, it's going to take about a year of prep.

2. They both take a few days.

3. You can pay professionals to make the trip easier.

4. You can use both experiences to pull chicks at parties.

5. Both experiences cause the death of large numbers of braincells, Everest with temperatures, Bemuda/Hobart with copious amounts of rum.

6. Neither makes you a better person

 

You're right, it's a figure of speech, one that says "this is the highest peak, you can't get any higher."

 

Reference to the Bermuda Race as some incredible challenge deters others from trying. This misconception is also forwarded by the organizing authority who insists on piling more and more egregious rules and regs on potential entrants, again giving the impression the race is incredibly dangerous and should only be attempted by those at the top of their game. People are so risk averse as to rule out a Bermuda race because someone said it was the "Everest of Sailing." We need to be encourage people to enter, not discourage them. The Bermuda Race is not the Everest of Sailing. It's a moderate endurance race followed by a fun party that, with the right planning, prep and budget, can be entered and finished by anyone.

 

Here are some entry stats. I suspect the trend is partially due to these misconceptions. An 18% drop in participation in 4 runnings is nothing to sneeze at.

 

NewportBermudaEntry.jpg

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That's funny OP because, I was browsing the Newport Bermuda site the other day and see a posted article by a skipper who did the race for the first time in 2012 and is sharing his thoughts for other people contemplating doing the race. "How nice", I thought to myself. Somebody who is generous with their experience and hopeful that others will get to have the same joy they got from ocean racing.

My good cheer lasted about five or six paragraphs, until in the middle of an explanation about safety he wrote "The Newport Bermuda Race is the best thing since sliced bread".

Really? A 635 mile jaunt that might take a longish weekend to complete is the same as the world's greatest invention, located in the remote regions of your bread box?

Seriously OP, it's a figure of speech. But the similarities are closer than I'm sure you feeble mind can comprehend.

1. For a non sailor/climber to do either one, it's going to take about a year of prep.

2. They both take a few days.

3. You can pay professionals to make the trip easier.

4. You can use both experiences to pull chicks at parties.

5. Both experiences cause the death of large numbers of braincells, Everest with temperatures, Bemuda/Hobart with copious amounts of rum.

6. Neither makes you a better person

"I'm sure you feeble mind can comprehend"... nice bit of irony there.

 

So it took you six months to come up with that rather tortured bit of bread box blather? Work a bit harder.

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The Everest of sailing would look something like this:

 

It was once one of the hardest things in the sport, partially because you could not actually get there from the most favorable side. A bit like the early circumnavigators would have only been allowed to go around against the prevailing winds.

 

It is an event in which a few very dedicated diehard professionals try to find ways in which to make it more difficult, like they would try single handed in a 49-er.

 

While many of the professionals in the sport have given up on the event, there are now a large number of under-trained amateurs who want to do it. Some of those have adequate experience; many have only played with rubber ducks in bath tubs. To get these people to the finish-line, a large number of locals have to do course for the event in cheap inflatable rubber dinghies to put marker buoys in the water at every mile. (Their clients cannot be relied on to do their own navigation.) If a group of these local “course markers” dies there is some outcry, but on the whole the business is too profitable for their families to quit. At regular intervals along the course, the locals also make small artificial islands with restaurants catering to the needs of the “adventurers” (wine is served). Finally once all preparations are in place the “adventurers” set out (in fact their boats are fully crewed). Once every 10 years or so there is a big storm, incompetence of the “adventurers”, their egos and crowding on the racecourse means that some of them die (as well as the crews of their boats).

 

Most people only make it to the start to have a look. Many of these people either complain that getting there to watch is either too hard, or that the “authentic feel” of the experience has been taken away. Spectators tend to dress-up as if they are to compete in the event itself. They all talk very loud and in simple language to the staff attending them in hotels and restaurants. This is because they have not yet realized that the money they bring every year means that many of the “locals” they interact with have gone to university and speak a variety of languages.

 

At the end of the event, the airport is closed for a week due to bad weather and everyone is stranded. The town they are in runs out of beer and people pay over the odds for helicopters to take them home.

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I had the mount everest of movements this morning.

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I had the mount everest of movements this morning.

.

...uh-oh

 

...please. no. :mellow:

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I had the mount everest of movements this morning.

Pointy on one end, broad on the other and a difficult push to get to the finish?

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I had the mount everest of movements this morning.

Pointy on one end, broad on the other and a difficult push to get to the finish?

 

That about sums it up.

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I had the mount everest of movements this morning.

Pointy on one end, broad on the other and a difficult push to get to the finish?

 

That about sums it up.

 

I have it on good authority that turds are pointed at both ends.

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imho, this is the volvo of mountains. :P

 

IMG_2124_Everest.jpg

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Well engineered, safe and family friendly?

 

I wanna meet your family!

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and i have always been under the impression that cape horn (on the usual non-benevolent days) was the everest of sailing. :P

Thing is, everyone just goes around the Horn. No one stops to climb it. What are they afraid of?

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I climbed ice extensivly, both water falls and moderatly high altitudes. I sail off shore occationally, sometimes in smaller boats than I should have. Any comparison by a person who has not done both is plain silly (some posters have, most users of the comparison have not).

 

It's not that one is more dangerous (both have elements of danger that go beyond what you can control--avalanch or rougue wave), or that one requires more skill (both require enormous skill to do safely if there is no paid crew/guide). It is that they are very different undertakings. Climbing tends to be very demanding for relativly short time periods. Sailing through storm requires enormous sustained effort with no sure end point. Either can be undertaken by the unqualified... and it might work out for them.

 

Both have scared me about equally.

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