• Announcements

    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Q-Douglas

Best Way to Learn?

29 posts in this topic

Any advice out there for the best way to get into the sport? I've seen lessons advertised occasionally at random beach spots, but that's about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) Buy or borrow a trainer kite (2m or 3m) and spend a few hours playing with it on the hard

2) Take a lesson. Or many lessons.

3) Find other people to go with

 

Lessons are generally expensive, but it's not really the kind of activity where you want to go just figure it out. Lessons should be on the instructor's gear, which will give you the opportunity to try out the sport before dropping the money on your own gear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I googled "kiteboarding forum" and in a few seconds found sites in the US, UK and AUS each with tens of thousands of members and hundreds of thousands of posts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I googled "kiteboarding forum" and in a few seconds found sites in the US, UK and AUS each with tens of thousands of members and hundreds of thousands of posts.

but I would have to go through being told to fuck off again :unsure: or worse yet...not being told to fuck off at all.

 

Thanks for the info JMD. The initial cost has always scared me away from it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kiting isn't as safe to jump in to cold turkey like a sailboat, or windsurfing. The best way is to take a couple of lessons, learn the safety, and then fly high! This way you don't need any gear to start, so if you hate it, there's no investment

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kiting isn't as safe to jump in to cold turkey like a sailboat, or windsurfing. The best way is to take a couple of lessons, learn the safety, and then fly high! This way you don't need any gear to start, so if you hate it, there's no investment

+1

Taking lessons is important, they will also explain to you how the safety gear works.

It doesn't hurt to buy a training DVD either before taking lessons, good way to learn the theoretical stuff.

The best way is to go someplace windy for a week or so and take lessons there, you can quickly make a lot of progress that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+2 with taking lessons.

also a cheap kite off ebay isn't going to be the safest kite to learn on

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are in the NY area there is a place out in Amityville LI, right next to the dinghy shop that does an excellent job of getting people up to speed. http://nykitecenter.com

 

 

Besides nice grass fields nearby to learn how to fly, there sailing area is in shallow protected marsh lands. One nice feature they employ is have jet skis to take you out to the sailing area and also as you learn they can bring you back up wind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any advice out there for the best way to get into the sport? I've seen lessons advertised occasionally at random beach spots, but that's about it.

 

I am planning on going to OBX this spring to take a multiday lesson, I bought a trainer kite on Amazon, and have had it out a few times, but the weather lately hasn't been too conducive for me to stand on a windy field for hours at a time.

There is also a Maryland/NoVa kiteboarders forum thats full of helpful people at eastkb.com too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My path;

1. Hours with a trainer in various conditions, trying to be precise/take lessons

2. Start on snow with skis (if possible) - less effort recovering/take lessons

3. Go south or someplace warm and take lessons...you'll get it going easily from there...up first day on board in water

 

In windsurfing, your problems are over when you fall. In kiteboarding, your problems have just begun when you fall...

 

Take the safety stuff seriously, easy to hurt yourself doing kooky newbie things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All of the above, particularly lessons from a competent instructor - kiteboading can kill ya. The best investment I made was a one hour lesson at a wakeboard cable park to learn how to get up on a board and control it. I came from a windsurfing background where keeping the board flat and riding the fin is key. That does NOT work on a twin tip kiteboard. It is a great sport and a good complement to sailing and windsurfing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the trainer kite, actually only two lines..

#4. go with somebody with a zodiac to pick you up downwind

looks like fun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got a short lesson on the safety features and how a kite reacts to input. Then I have just spent many hours on a frozen lake with skis, and by many I mean days and days. Basically I'm completely comfortable with a kite on skis, to the point of bring able to basically drive the kite blindfolded. I found it easy to learn on the ice as if something happened (twist something, break something, get over/under-powered, whatever) I could always put the kite down, walk up to it, pack it up and carry it back rather than dragging around.

 

Then I got to playing on water. I haven't spent much time on the water, but having complete confidence in my kite-driving skills made it pretty easy to get going as I only had to think about the board. Key thing to practice in the water first was a bit of body dragging, getting the feeling of using the kite to move you slowly without a board. And finding a place with water not much deeper than your waist makes recovering from falling off the board a lot easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I googled "kiteboarding forum" and in a few seconds found sites in the US, UK and AUS each with tens of thousands of members and hundreds of thousands of posts.

but I would have to go through being told to fuck off again :unsure: or worse yet...not being told to fuck off at all.

 

Thanks for the info JMD. The initial cost has always scared me away from it.

The initial cost really isn't too bad for gear. You should be able to pick up a gently used set (kite, bar, harness, board) of gear for $1,000-$1,500 on craigslist if there is kiteboarding in your area. New can be more like $2,000-$2,500.

 

Anything cheaper than that and you will spend so much time and money working on the bladders that it will eclipse any up front savings. I spent something like $700 for my first set of gear and there is nothing more frustrating than spending a blue bird day sitting on the beach because you can't figure out why the leading edge won't hold air.

 

When you go to buy a kite, err on the side of big for your first one. When you're starting out, you probably won't be going out in 25 knots, and you won't have the skills to really work apparent wind on the kite, so it's nice to have the grunt of a 13 m or 14 m to pop you out of the water and onto a plane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The initial cost really isn't too bad for gear. You should be able to pick up a gently used set (kite, bar, harness, board) of gear for $1,000-$1,500 on craigslist if there is kiteboarding in your area. New can be more like $2,000-$2,500.

.

 

.....I found the 'full-immersion' route to work well.......go to a kiteboard mecca (with cash in pocket),for a 3-4 week visit---enough to gain a solid core of skills,,,

,,get word-of-mouth on the beach as to who's the best approach -to your needs- on lessons---some have jetski/radio's,,,some have a more casual approach,,,,but it's great to get going on someone else's gear ;)

 

..in the meantime,learn about what gear's for sale in the area,,and learn what's hot,,what's not from the wind-tribe in the area....and most importantly,,try-out what's available as you gain some skills

......I ended up with a 3kite,1board Cabrihna set-up for ~$1G(late season)

 

 

 

....Trainer Kite's are helpful for the -very- basics of safety and maneuvering,,,

,,,but the -real- lessons start when you're handling a -LOT- of power :blink::mellow: ...and have a powerable kite with 4-line controls,,,

 

...a BIG lesson I can share(from some hard-knocks),,,is to start visualizing the -opposite- of natural clutch-response when you get overpowered........ie let power-bar OUTWARDS to de-power......it may seem thilly,,but it's worth going through the mental exercise 1000 times before doing much else ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...a BIG lesson I can share(from some hard-knocks),,,is to start visualizing the -opposite- of natural clutch-response when you get overpowered........ie let power-bar OUTWARDS to de-power......it may seem thilly,,but it's worth going through the mental exercise 1000 times before doing much else ;)

 

This I find a much easier instinct to get a hold on for people who have sailed, particularily in small high-performance oriented boats compared to somebody who's on their first time with a kite (I have taught a number of friends, from sailing buddies to school and work mates, but my sample is probably still small compared to a professional instructor).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

...a BIG lesson I can share(from some hard-knocks),,,is to start visualizing the -opposite- of natural clutch-response when you get overpowered........ie let power-bar OUTWARDS to de-power......it may seem thilly,,but it's worth going through the mental exercise 1000 times before doing much else ;)

 

This I find a much easier instinct to get a hold on for people who have sailed, particularily in small high-performance oriented boats compared to somebody who's on their first time with a kite (I have taught a number of friends, from sailing buddies to school and work mates, but my sample is probably still small compared to a professional instructor).

 

....certainly comes under the -survival instinct- category!

 

...unless you find it 'fun' t'rip the tether-mount right out of the board as you depart th'planet :unsure::mellow:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JMD. Reht directed that comment towards me. I posted some insight about getting into kiting, as well as some gear that I was selling without realizing that the site had a classified section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I learnt on my own but did have a 1 day course where I learnt a lot. Things like setting up the kite and lines and then relaunching the kite from the water after a crash, these were of great help.

I would have carried on with the course but ran out of time and had to return home. I bought a used 7.5mtr size LEI Kite with new bar/line set.

 

I didn't have a harness, but utilised a dinghy trapeze harness (actually the most comfy thing I ever used, looking at adapting one to take a kite style hook) I borrowed a board and attempted to learn:)

 

The biggest thing was self launching and landing, DONT do this as a learner..if you got assistance then use it. I never had a problem as such, it was out of sheer need that I sussed out the self launch thing. Getting assistance is next to impossible where I live, small population means limited interest in such things as kiting.

 

I spent a long time trying to get up and riding, many many hours in fact. One day I got it though! got that initial burst of power for a few metres. I was so pleased:) I learnt to ride very quickly after that, the basics came very easily. I am a dinghy sailor as well, so watching the wind and knowing apparent wind was a huge plus in my favour.

 

Its best to get instruction, my first kite was a bit small for my weight but I wanted this so as not to get into too much trouble. I wanted to learn to body drag and self launch/land and do packdowns. All basic stuff that no one should neglect to learn.

 

Its a great activity, so pleased I got into it. I wanted something for when the wind is too much for sailing, and now I got it. I got 2 years under my belt since learning. Currently teaching another guy who I sold some gear to a few weeks ago. He realises just how important tuition is.

 

Schools are the ideal, using their gear and getting good solid instruction. You can learn with a patient kite surfing friend too, but keep an open mind on any suspect practices and don't try to kite in conditions that are too rough. Things can go wrong very quickly, and always take time to look over your gear for signs of wear and tear.

 

Sorry to blather on! I think its a great thing to learn, sure its expensive if you buy all new stuff, but it lasts a long time if you take care of it. I kite so much that my poor old RS700 Skiff hardly ever gets used now:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

QD - you're in Naptown-get in your car and go to the outerbanks, not that far-do one of these coupla days courses at Real Kiteboarding and you will be set - not cheap but worth it imho

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

do one of these coupla days courses at Real Kiteboarding and you will be set - not cheap but worth it imho

.

......the term 'paradox of thrift' comes into play here,,,,you can sometimes find an 'independent operator' to learn from...

,,,maybe doesn't use a jetski,,maybe no vhf for instant feedback,,but by the time they're just shouting from shore or as they speed by,,,you're definitely wasting any $ you spend,,,and taking much longer on a period that can be painful and hazardous :mellow:

 

...best to bite the bullet on this one!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone have any good recommendations on a good learning video? Free or paid. I am a gearhead, but that doesn't do me any good if I lack the concept of working the kite properly...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The progression DVD's are OK. They are a little bit out of date now, and shows some techniques that I would never adopt, such as their self launch and self landing techniques.

 

Personally I purchased the kiteboared magazine on the ipad and it has a good beginner guide that includes videos, but as everyone keeps saying, you can't beat lessons with an instructor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I eventually plan on taking classes with an instructor once the water in Texas starts to actually warm up. Until then I want to get a good grasp of the concepts so I understand what they are talking about at the lesson. I'll look at the kiteboard magazine beginners guide. Thanks!

 

The progression DVD's are OK. They are a little bit out of date now, and shows some techniques that I would never adopt, such as their self launch and self landing techniques.

Personally I purchased the kiteboared magazine on the ipad and it has a good beginner guide that includes videos, but as everyone keeps saying, you can't beat lessons with an instructor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kittyhawk Kites in OBX has a good trainer video that includes a section using practice kites, set me up for some early successes during my first lesson (jet ski assisted). Would agree that a multi-day lesson flattens the learning curve significantly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites