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dylan winter

Mysterious Gubbins left on-board by previous owners

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I have bought a few boats over the years

 

the old dinghies came with a bag of gubbins - the odd block, spare penant, too many straps for the trailer

 

but yachts are in a different league

 

I am thinking of writing a bit of blog about the stuff and would like to hear of other people's experiences

 

I have just taken on an old Centaur

 

some really off stuff left on board

 

a 2007 tide table in the book rack

 

S1620033-300x200.gif

 

 

 

this lovely wall decoration

 

welcome-aboard-300x200.jpg

 

 

 

a spare Origo

 

 

http://www.keepturningleft.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/origo-1500-open.jpg

 

there is the most incredible bag of aold ropes and lots of small cardboard boxes that the electronic stuff came in

 

 

and so many hard to recognise bits and bobs

 

I am frightened to chuck it away but I do need room to move

 

D

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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My friend bought a HR 352 in Turkey a few backs. An elderly gent had lived on it for years and to say it had some gear on it is an understatement. Some old logs turned up and the boat had been literally everywhere in his ownership, a very impressive life story reading through it.

 

My favourite mysterious item, which we later discovered to be - toothpick racks - which were all over the boat.

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My friend bought a HR 352 in Turkey a few backs. An elderly gent had lived on it for years and to say it had some gear on it is an understatement. Some old logs turned up and the boat had been literally everywhere in his ownership, a very impressive life story reading through it.

 

My favourite mysterious item, which we later discovered to be - toothpick racks - which were all over the boat.

 

 

I had to do a google search on toothpick rack

 

blimey

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=toothpick+rack&client=firefox-a&hs=kPJ&rls=org.mozilla:en-GB:official&channel=sb&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=mbwHU_zbE6TH7Abpo4DwBg&ved=0CDEQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=637#channel=sb&q=%22toothpick+rack%22&rls=org.mozilla:en-GB:official&tbm=isch

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I also got tons of old lines, boxes of bits and mystery rope with the boat. Most of it now lives in my basement. I keep telling myself that if I don't look at it for a year or so I will throw it all out.

 

Most amazing, at the end of the season, 3 months after taking over the boat we found an ORIGO heater under the v-berth.

post-37611-0-41132700-1393016035.jpg

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I also got tons of old lines, boxes of bits and mystery rope with the boat. Most of it now lives in my basement. I keep telling myself that if I don't look at it for a year or so I will throw it all out.

 

Most amazing, at the end of the season, 3 months after taking over the boat we found an ORIGO heater under the v-berth.

attachicon.gifthCA4XGP29.jpg

 

 

I think that might be a toothpick rack ?!

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When I bought a project Columbia 43 that "demonstrated a high degree of deferred maintenance" (quote from the listing) it was completely full of "stuff". How about two 5 gallon pails of new S/S & bronze fasteners? every locker was packed solid with depth sounders, outboard motor, cushions, tools, engine spares, pumps, sails, clock & barometer sets, charts, chemotherapy equipment (really!), a 5' deep icebox was FULL of wine & booze - probably 75 bottles. A deck box was full of brass oil lamps - one was an exact match to the one my wife gave me as a wedding present.

 

Shall I go on? It took my wife, son and me a full week to clear it out to ready it for trucking home. We filled 5 dumpsters just with the crap that had no value to anyone

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I did not catalog. But I remember that there was a full truckload of crap taken off the boat. Articles included spare lumber, spilled resin, spare engine parts, children's coloring books, odd bits of clothing, shredded tarps, ancient non-functioning instruments, television antennae, an uninstalled wood stove...

 

My first thought was "what on earth were they thinking?" (Most recent PO's were hippy live-aboards who never left the dock.)

 

My second thought was "Wow. I now own a boat big enough to contain a whole truckload of crap in its odd corners!"

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Not a purchase, but I traveled to Japan for a regatta in 1984 that was held in J/24s....the J that we were assigned had the regular assortment of "too much stuff" for a boat that was actively being raced - but it also had 16 life jackets (!), an umbrella, and a wok!

The owner became a terrific and long time friend - I still tease him about the incredible collection of gear on that boat.

 

WWing

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Our Ballad came with a Sony Watchman, a cigar humidor, an electronic poker game, and a wakeboard suitable for riders <140 lbs.

8193541663_7eb84dca45_o.jpg
The usual job lot of bent, mysterious, or obsolete chandlery items

8198643420_f90fac48cd_o.jpg

including four Whale foot pumps, none installed. Also a slip of paper bearing the phone numbers of three women (in three different hands), and one large hoop earring in the V-berth.

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When we bought the Swede55 back in 1995 we found it contained cocktail napkins for every holiday. Hundreds of them, unopened packages of them, we still have some and we use them fairly often. The boat came with a lifetime supply.

 

When we went looking for a good place to install a engine water exchange water heater we settled on under one of the cockpit seats, when I wiggled into the space to make sure there was enough room for it, we discovered a brand new never used.......engine water exchange water heater fully installed and plumbed. Never used.

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my only "find" was a wad of original Washington State lottery tickets wrapped with a rubber band.

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Shortly after buying Betty Alan, my son Ben was taking the furniture apart looking for a mobile phone that slipped down (we still haven't found it). He's got a very good sense of comic timing, and called out from below "Dad, I've found the drugs!" He'd found a stack of neat rectangular hessian like bags, straight out of The French Connection, quite well hidden. You think very quickly in those sort of situations - "Christ, this is going to pay for the boat" - "But I'm not a drug dealer" - "But, what's the bulk price for 200 kgs of coke?" - "Bugger - the police are going to rip the rest of the boat apart when I call them in".

 

It turned out to be lead shot, to balance the genset shoved in a cockpit locker, but I still treasure the memory of the moment.

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behind me on the quay is an old boat that has been seized by the authorities

 

http://www.keepturningleft.co.uk/scuttlebutt/the-boat-behind-me-belonged-to-captain-calamity/

 

it is now being stripped by a local boaty

 

he told me that he found a pretty good stash of dope on board

 

he said around half a pound of home grown

 

he chucked it straight in the river

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Congratulations on finding a Centaur for your northern adventure. Are you going to keep that spiffy-looking inboard the previous owner left behind?

 

It has an 18 hp volvo with 1000 hours on it - too good to junk. However, I am fitting an outboard bracket and taking the 6hp Tohatsu.

 

The mainsail is almost new but the genoa is a bit old and tattered

 

Incidentally, one of the things I discovered is that filming white sails is really hard so that you can see how they are set but the red ones work really well on camera

 

One of my fellow Brits suggested that I try Jeckells a very British company - I have spent countless hours staring at the tell tales above a Jeckells logo.

 

I phoned them up and was put through to their PR - Fiona - she understood what I was talking about and knew about my project and the MD Chris Jeckells said that it if paid the money for the sail cloth - around £200 - they would build a red genoa for me - worth around £1000

 

brilliant. I could not be happier

 

I am going up there on the day they build the sail and I will film the process - partly out of interest and to pay them for their kindness

 

The Centaur has GPS and Radar - both old but functional. the radio is an old sealine - still functioning.

 

I saw one advertised on ebay where it was described as vintage

 

echo-sounder not working yet - that dates from 1992

 

so she should be ready to launch March 17

 

I am loaning Katie L to a scottish sailor for the year.

 

D

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I hate it when people call stuff "Vintage" when I couldn't afford it when it was new. :D

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The boat we bought in 1998 had been lived aboard for two years. Hard dodger with lexan panels. Makes a great place to grow plants. Previous owner's wife had about 10 x 30 lb bags of potting soil in the bilge...we still grow stuff when cruising. Tomatoes do well.

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The boat we bought in 1998 had been lived aboard for two years. Hard dodger with lexan panels. Makes a great place to grow plants. Previous owner's wife had about 10 x 30 lb bags of potting soil in the bilge...we still grow stuff when cruising. Tomatoes do well.

 

 

dope needs exactly the same conditions as tomatoes.... so I am told....

 

however, I think that plants are often signs of a woman on board who would rather be in a house

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I have mixed emotions, Dylan, that we won't be hearing about the chainsaw adventures with the Centaur, but I am pleased for you. I was a bit nervous about outboards and the Pentland Firth and so on: there are some quite unforgiving places up North. I know you hate diesels, but you'll be fine if you keep the fuel clean, and have lots of spare fuel filters - once they start they tend to keep on going. Also, learn how to hotwire the starter motor - it saved our bacon once when the main wiring loom gave up through antiquity.

 

And in a bit of cross thread interbreeding, here's an image from the broker's description of a Peterson two tonner, discussed on Coolboats

 

00M0M_3gS4I058KoB_600x450.jpg

 

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"Celebrity (Imported) Sliced Bacon" in a can.

 

mmmmm...

 

That's a pretty freaking funny image to ad to a boat sale, kudos.

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Congratulations on finding a Centaur for your northern adventure. Are you going to keep that spiffy-looking inboard the previous owner left behind?

 

It has an 18 hp volvo with 1000 hours on it - too good to junk. However, I am fitting an outboard bracket and taking the 6hp Tohatsu.

MD11? If so, they're almost indestructible if FW cooled. If raw water cooled I'd be cautious.

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Congratulations on finding a Centaur for your northern adventure. Are you going to keep that spiffy-looking inboard the previous owner left behind?

 

It has an 18 hp volvo with 1000 hours on it - too good to junk. However, I am fitting an outboard bracket and taking the 6hp Tohatsu.

MD11? If so, they're almost indestructible if FW cooled. If raw water cooled I'd be cautious.

 

 

never have trusted the blooming things

 

I think it is alater than the MD11

 

they made a single cylinder 2001, a twin cylinder 2002, a thriple 2003 and a four cylinder one

 

I don't trust the blighters and the well idea would have been most entertaining and would have worked fine

 

but I will need to sell the boat next year and a decent inboard will add to the final price

 

where I am on the quay at Littlehampton a local crab fisherman goes past every day - he has a heavy 28 foot wide, steel tank of a boat - loads of windage - must weigh five tonnes

 

his chosen power unit is a 20 hp long shaft Honda - he powers up and down against the five knot tide no problems

 

makes fine progress producuing a massive wake from his displacement hull.

 

 

 

I have been enjoying the space in the Centaur

 

next week I am going up to Scotland to hand katie L over to the Scotsman who is will be sailing her this summer

 

I will spend four night aboard - see how I get on with the smaller space

 

D

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"never have trusted the blooming things"

 

Every time my wife wanted to set an alarm clock, she asked me to set my quartz watch alarm "as backup." She said she didn't know how to set the watch alarm herself. So, I spent an afternoon going from shop to shop looking at travel alarms, and bought her the simplest and most foolproof one I could find. Every time she has used it, she has awakened before the alarm has gone off and shut off the alarm. She's never heard it ring for real. And, I still have to set the watch alarm as back up. I've told her to please let the alarm sound, because having it actually go "ding, ding" is what will build trust. But she won't.

 

So, you won't trust your engine until you use it, use it, and use it again. So, use it. Learn how to make it work. An inboard diesel is much better than an OB when you are trying to get upwind in a seaway. It might be important to be able to do that sometime.

 

Aside from dirty fuel, the most common diesel problem is a battery without the juice to start it. A $75 (maybe less) solar panel can help with that. The most common way to damage a diesel is to let it overheat, so the cooling system is vital.

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"never have trusted the blooming things"

 

Every time my wife wanted to set an alarm clock, she asked me to set my quartz watch alarm "as backup." She said she didn't know how to set the watch alarm herself. So, I spent an afternoon going from shop to shop looking at travel alarms, and bought her the simplest and most foolproof one I could find. Every time she has used it, she has awakened before the alarm has gone off and shut off the alarm. She's never heard it ring for real. And, I still have to set the watch alarm as back up. I've told her to please let the alarm sound, because having it actually go "ding, ding" is what will build trust. But she won't.

 

So, you won't trust your engine until you use it, use it, and use it again. So, use it. Learn how to make it work. An inboard diesel is much better than an OB when you are trying to get upwind in a seaway. It might be important to be able to do that sometime.

 

Aside from dirty fuel, the most common diesel problem is a battery without the juice to start it. A $75 (maybe less) solar panel can help with that. The most common way to damage a diesel is to let it overheat, so the cooling system is vital.

 

 

the last one - fell off the no longer made mounts, blew a hole in the no longer made water valve, wore out the cutlass gland, got stuck in forwards gear, got the diesel bug, and twice I got it caught up in fisherman's debris

 

the outboards have never yet gone wrong....

 

I am sure I will come to love it for its fuel frugality, for the electrical power it produces and the dry heat the much bragged about bite

 

I will not like it for the way it will restrict where I can sail because of lobster pot fear, the ever present gentle odour of diesel, the size of the tool kit it demands, its lack of portability.

 

As for outboards - in all the years I have been running them I have never yet had a problem of any sort at all.... ever

 

D

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I found at the back of a locker on one of my boats a sealed tin labeled "Emergency Rations". The boat was about twenty years old when I bought it, and the tin might have sat in the locker another five years before one of my friends decided to open it. I regret I didn't photograph the contents. I vaguely recall some crackers and some chocolate in a condition so vile that I couldn't imagine ever being hungry enough to try eating any.

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The boat we bought in 1998 had been lived aboard for two years. Hard dodger with lexan panels. Makes a great place to grow plants. Previous owner's wife had about 10 x 30 lb bags of potting soil in the bilge...we still grow stuff when cruising. Tomatoes do well.

 

 

dope needs exactly the same conditions as tomatoes.... so I am told....

 

however, I think that plants are often signs of a woman on board who would rather be in a house

Actually it was the woman on board who suggested we buy the boat in the first place - she is also a better sailor than I.

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"never have trusted the blooming things"

 

Every time my wife wanted to set an alarm clock, she asked me to set my quartz watch alarm "as backup." She said she didn't know how to set the watch alarm herself. So, I spent an afternoon going from shop to shop looking at travel alarms, and bought her the simplest and most foolproof one I could find. Every time she has used it, she has awakened before the alarm has gone off and shut off the alarm. She's never heard it ring for real. And, I still have to set the watch alarm as back up. I've told her to please let the alarm sound, because having it actually go "ding, ding" is what will build trust. But she won't.

 

So, you won't trust your engine until you use it, use it, and use it again. So, use it. Learn how to make it work. An inboard diesel is much better than an OB when you are trying to get upwind in a seaway. It might be important to be able to do that sometime.

 

Aside from dirty fuel, the most common diesel problem is a battery without the juice to start it. A $75 (maybe less) solar panel can help with that. The most common way to damage a diesel is to let it overheat, so the cooling system is vital.

 

 

the last one - fell off the no longer made mounts, blew a hole in the no longer made water valve, wore out the cutlass gland, got stuck in forwards gear, got the diesel bug, and twice I got it caught up in fisherman's debris

 

the outboards have never yet gone wrong....

 

I am sure I will come to love it for its fuel frugality, for the electrical power it produces and the dry heat the much bragged about bite

 

I will not like it for the way it will restrict where I can sail because of lobster pot fear, the ever present gentle odour of diesel, the size of the tool kit it demands, its lack of portability.

 

As for outboards - in all the years I have been running them I have never yet had a problem of any sort at all.... ever

 

D

 

You've been lucky.

 

You also don't appear to have tended to the minimal requirements of an inboard very well, or at all - fell off its mounts? How rusty WERE they? Or maybe that, combined with the worn out cutless means it was never aligned. Diesel smell means unattended to leaks.

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I keep having dreams that I will find the same thing in my Swede, but it hasn't materialized yet! I also keep looking for a head that I can stand up in, but I haven't found that either...

 

 

When we bought the Swede55 back in 1995 we found it contained cocktail napkins for every holiday. Hundreds of them, unopened packages of them, we still have some and we use them fairly often. The boat came with a lifetime supply.

 

When we went looking for a good place to install a engine water exchange water heater we settled on under one of the cockpit seats, when I wiggled into the space to make sure there was enough room for it, we discovered a brand new never used.......engine water exchange water heater fully installed and plumbed. Never used.

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You've been lucky.

 

You also don't appear to have tended to the minimal requirements of an inboard very well, or at all - fell off its mounts? How rusty WERE they? Or maybe that, combined with the worn out cutless means it was never aligned. Diesel smell means unattended to leaks.

 

 

I am sure you are correct

 

when a new or 25 year old year old outboard gives me no problems then that is luck

 

 

when a 50 year old inboard gives me problems then that is obviously bad maintenance

 

 

 

D

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What great finds- like Bob I've never found anything. I'm reading a book called "Junkyard Planet" about worldwide recycling. Apparently the average American junked car has $1.65 in change in it. Doesn't seem like much till you think that around 12 million cars are junked each year. The best machine that shreds them in the US manages to find the coins and save them- they've done the math.

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What great finds- like Bob I've never found anything. I'm reading a book called "Junkyard Planet" about worldwide recycling. Apparently the average American junked car has $1.65 in change in it. Doesn't seem like much till you think that around 12 million cars are junked each year. The best machine that shreds them in the US manages to find the coins and save them- they've done the math.

 

 

drifting the thread here

 

but I could not find my waterproof camera

 

had not seen it for days

 

when I junked the polo I found it under the carpet in the boot (trunk)

 

bumma that was too close for comfort

 

D

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Aside from wildly inappropriately-scaled gear, not too much found - the 21-footer had deck-cleats properly sized for a 40+ foot boat and an anchor a bit small for a kayak while the 30' ULDB had a cast bronze flag-staff base from an aircraft carrier.

 

 

As for inboards vs outboards, well it's all been said no doubt, but I suggest you give the new Volvo a fair shake - it really is a liability if not tended to and properly functional AND they really aren't THAT hard to care for if you have the slightest mechanical inclination. Yeah, they look a bit intimidating at first, but most are pretty simple and by far the most common cause of death is neglect, followed by abuse -- and as you said, it's a BIG selling point for many later on, so make sure it's kept in a proper state.

 

 

Your concern about snagging crab-pots is common to lots of places in the US as well - I suppose the advantage of the O/B is that you can lift it to clear the prop ? - because they'd both seem to be as prone to spinning up the lines. Ugh, what a mess.

 

Nothing quite like the comforting putt-putt of a nicely maintained diesel thumping along at low speeds sipping fuel and warming the cabin...makes me nod right off, actually - so watch out for that if you are singlehanding !

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I feel cheated. I've never found any cool stuff on my new boats.

 

 

You may need to buy junkier boats. Here's a quick test: if you can break any mooring line that is in use using only your hands, it's a Gubbin Goldmine! ;)

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I feel cheated. I've never found any cool stuff on my new boats.

 

 

You may need to buy junkier boats. Here's a quick test: if you can break any mooring line that is in use using only your hands, it's a Gubbin Goldmine! ;)

 

 

aha

 

as a brit I have never heard the use of the word gubbins in the singular

 

goodonya for bending the language

 

a gubbin

 

sounds good to me

 

D

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One of the strangest valuations I ever did was for the small change that T.E. Lawrence kept under the petrol cap (below the cap, above a primitive fuel filter) for emergency fillups on GW 2275, his terminal Brough Superior SS100. Found and kept by the mechanics who dealt with the wreckage while he was dying. Entirely genuine, unlike many TEL souvenirs.

 

Oh, and by the way, can someone give me a warning? I seem to be the only person who has a counter for "warning points", which stands at zero, leaving me feeling both guilty and cheated. Bah.

 

Oh, got it - am I the only one who can see that? Like my invisible friends?

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One of the strangest valuations I ever did was for the small change that T.E. Lawrence kept under the petrol cap (below the cap, above a primitive fuel filter) for emergency fillups on GW 2275, his terminal Brough Superior SS100. Found and kept by the mechanics who dealt with the wreckage while he was dying. Entirely genuine, unlike many TEL souvenirs.

 

Oh, and by the way, can someone give me a warning? I seem to be the only person who has a counter for "warning points", which stands at zero, leaving me feeling both guilty and cheated. Bah.

 

Oh, got it - am I the only one who can see that? Like my invisible friends?

 

No, we can all see yours. Smarten up. Post some tits or something.

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Found some empty1986 soda and beer cans laying behind a sealed bonded compartment which we were enlarging. That odd sound we could hear while at anchor is gone. Empties rolling around under the quarter berth. LOL

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I feel cheated. I've never found any cool stuff on my new boats.

 

 

You may need to buy junkier boats. Here's a quick test: if you can break any mooring line that is in use using only your hands, it's a Gubbin Goldmine! ;)

 

 

aha

 

as a brit I have never heard the use of the word gubbins in the singular

 

goodonya for bending the language

 

a gubbin

 

sounds good to me

 

D

 

Beginner's luck. I had never seen the word before this thread and still have no clue what it means.

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gubbins = doohickeyes, gimcracks, thinga-majigs, - various & sundry bits & pieces of varying value.

 

See: your grandmother's kitchen "etc" drawer.

 

Most gubbins tend to be either filthy and/or of indeterminate use.

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gubbins = doohickeyes, gimcracks, thinga-majigs, - various & sundry bits & pieces of varying value.

 

See: your grandmother's kitchen "etc" drawer.

 

Its a polite word for 'shite'.

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Shortly after buying my boat I was cleaning out the 'behind-the-berth' lockers and found about 10 quart containers of Parmalat box milk - all of it about 10 years past the 'use by' date. Fortunately, none of them leaked, and gently shaking them showed that there was liquid inside. I was tempted to open one, but the potential badness easily overcame my curiosity.

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Shortly after buying my boat I was cleaning out the 'behind-the-berth' lockers and found about 10 quart containers of Parmalat box milk - all of it about 10 years past the 'use by' date. Fortunately, none of them leaked, and gently shaking them showed that there was liquid inside. I was tempted to open one, but the potential badness easily overcame my curiosity.

 

I would have shot one from a safe distance in an area that I did not mind contaminating until the next rain. Just to see.

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Shortly after buying my boat I was cleaning out the 'behind-the-berth' lockers and found about 10 quart containers of Parmalat box milk - all of it about 10 years past the 'use by' date. Fortunately, none of them leaked, and gently shaking them showed that there was liquid inside. I was tempted to open one, but the potential badness easily overcame my curiosity.

 

I would have shot one from a safe distance in an area that I did not mind contaminating until the next rain. Just to see.

Well, eons ago in an earlier life (college days), my roomie (of course) let a sealed half gallon of milk sit out on a windowsill until the carton started getting soft. Then one night he gingerly took the carton and dropped it from a 4th floor window onto the ground right next to a couple of guys standing around BSing.

 

They wound up throwing away their clothes, and that area still had a distinctive odor when I graduated a couple of years later. (Never did get caught.) I wasn't about to test my karma by opening one of those puppies up - especially on my boat.

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