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It tends to go hand-in-hand. Fleets mean knowledge, enthusiastic supporters and promoters, secondhand boats, spare parts, etc. A boat doesn't have to have fleet sailing/racing to be successful, but it does need some of the aforementioned aspects.

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They would have my deposit already if I knew that there was a fleet of them racing weekly on Puget Sound. The boat looks awesome, but I don't want to make the investment if I'm the only one with one. Having a fleet means having 5 owners ready to race at Shilshole every Thursday.

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They would have my deposit already if I knew that there was a fleet of them racing weekly on Puget Sound. The boat looks awesome, but I don't want to make the investment if I'm the only one with one. Having a fleet means having 5 owners ready to race at Shilshole every Thursday.

.

 

 

...umm,,why not take that 'they',,,make it a 'we',,,,,,,,talk to some friends!!!

....no builder or dealer can force things on their own

 

 

....there's a certain amount of taking things in one's own hands that can come up with surprising results--juss'saying! :huh:;)

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I should give myself my own deposit? That would be interesting.

 

I understand your point. I'm more interested in sailing than in driving adoption of a new fleet from zero people. If I knew of a couple of others in Seattle buying them and interested in racing them at Shilshole or SSP then I'd do my best to get a couple extra people interested.

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Alex - From some informal conversations I've had with some Seattle sailors, this boat is of quite some interest.
Time will tell, but I've got my GoPro packed and I've promised a number of SLF customers a full report on the boat after our testing them next month.

 

There is some talk of RS expanding the intro offer to the first 500 boats, as demand looks to hit that at least in the first year, but their call.

We are already have orders for the boat here, so in the next year when it actually arrives in North America, there could be *quite* a few heading this way.

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I'm saying they should do it for their own benefit - so they make a lot of money, instead of just a little money!

Good Lord. This company has successfully launched several successful classes in what is probably the most competitive dinghy market in the world. They do actually have a clue.

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We bought a Fleet Purchase of 5 Megabytes in 2006. Initially the class grew to about 8 boats making for great one design racing for a few years. Then people moved on and the used boats went elsewhere, so there was no longer one design racing. We attempted to get a realistic Portsmouth rating so that the Megabyte could compete in the open class, but the provisional rating killed this, as very good sailors were beat by mid-fleet racers in other old established classes with favorable ratings. You knew if a XXXX showed up, you had little possibility of placing in the open class due to the rating correction, so why bother. Before I risk another $7K on a new boat, I want to see how it does in both in a one-design setting, and and open class setting. I also think that the Portsmouth rating system needs to encourage, rather than discourage new classes. Their provisional rating tends to rate new classes faster than they really are and only through years of data is it slowly adjusted up to where it should have been. Likewise these old classes with sailors that routinely smash the ratings need to start over and be redone. Once years of data is collected on these old classes, the rating never gets adjusted much. US Sailing has designed a system that discourages new classes and encourages pimping out old tugs. Try getting 5 boats to show up for a regatta so you can have one design when the entire fleet is 8 boats - it is really hard.

 

The Aero looks perfect - can I lease one for a few years with the option to buy?

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The Aero looks perfect - can I lease one for a few years with the option to buy?

 

 

at that launch price you effectively could do that.... factor in the depreciation on something else over say, 4 years and the Aero's paid for itself- and you get to keep the boat.

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Is the D Zero a viable alternative in the States, or is that seen as aiming for a different market?

 

 

We probably should post this in the D-Zero thread, but yes - AIUI it will be available Stateside.

 

Might be worth hooking up with Roman at Devoti Sailing to find our who/where/how etc.

 

I won't add a link given the thread this is in - google if you want it.

 

As for different markets- subtle difference will shine through and manifest into customer preferences. That's natural, but they are essentially both nice little beach boats for folks to enjoy simple, hassle free sailing. Pick the one you like, sail against the guys in the other ones too.... Why the hell not, the best sailor will win and buy the first beer for the privilege of line honours....

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Fleet 3 +1. One aspect of sailing and ownership that is not static or controllable, unless boat are club-owned.

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The resale market is very fickle. With the Megbyte resales here on the West Coast, some sold quickly at a slightly below reasonable price, others in the same condition had no takers and were sold at a fraction their value or donated to clubs/schools. The Megabyte is a fantastic boat so what happened? Initial adopters don't want to get stuck with a new design boat that after a few years has no resale value. So Jwlbrace is right but only if there is a healthy resale market. This doesn't happen if the boats don't get a critical mass in an area and there is no local dealer support. This "valley of death", not enough initial sales in an area, little or no resale market, means even a $7000 entry price can be a big hurtle. I'd be money ahead if I chartered a boat at $250 per weekend.

 

I can't point to a single new design in the dingy market that has really taken off in the last 20 years. What are we doing wrong and how can we make great boats like the Aero succeed here in the US? Why are we stuck in crappy 1970 or earlier designs? Or are new dinghy's simply a small boutique market here in the US? If that's the case we should work on encouraging open class competition in new boats. Too bad fiberglass doesn't deteriorate completely after 30 years so these tired old designs would go away.

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Perhaps the Interclub and other dinghies are not so crappy...and people are finally figuring that out? Trends do not mean much, in the long haul, something else lmakes for sustainabi.lity,,,like class, wordplay intended.

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I'd suggest in Europe at least, dozens of dinghy classes have been launched successfully in the last 30 years.

 

Additionally, in the US we've added 29ers (hundreds), O'Pen Bics (thousands), RS Fevas (hundreds), Wetas (hundred), Teras (hundreds) in just the last 10 years.

Sure, it's not the same as the '70's & 80's when everyone was getting a small fiberglass boat for the first time, but dinghy classes are alive and well in the US.

 

What will impact a boat like an Aero will be the ability for sailors to see a significant advantage to move from their existing class to this one.

Historically, like Fleet3 points out, people who have made the change have gotten burned... which makes people reasonably gunshy about trying again on another new model...

 

--

That said, I'm looking forward to sailing the Aero this month and generating a lot of video footage. We're going to interview the design team as best we can and get an indepth look at the design and setup of the boat.

I'm racing my Laser actively again to be able to effectively compare both boats.

 

Even looking at the J/70, you start to realize the right company, with the right product, can hit a grand slam and build fleets rapidly....

I've been selling and supporting small sailboats exclusively for almost a decade now, and I have something that tells me that boat could be the Aero.

 

We will find out soon enough... !

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Good points - UK does have many successful single handed new designs, we just can't seem to make it happen in the US. I think a measure of success, at least for one design racing here, are sales in the thousands, not hundreds. There were nearly 400 Megabytes sold, but exceedingly difficult to get 5 to show up at a regatta. There were 8000 Banshees sold and only two fleets left. I've never seen an RS Feva or a Teras at a regatta and I would consider Wetas and 29ers outside of the single handed dinghy category. So other than Laser, what is a single handed adult dinghy class typically at regattas that was designed in the 40 years?

 

Certainly all sailing does not need to be in a regatta, but part of the fun is spending the weekend with your friends and regattas are a good excuse. My point is that we need to encourage regattas to embrace new designs. Why did the editor get so mad about not getting to sail his new Shaw at the High Sierra Regatta? They are not set-up to take one-off boats and the Forest Service 150 boat limit makes it so the open class is the first thing to go. Crappy to spend so much on a boat and not be able to race it.

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it's totally pointless to race dinghies any way other than one design.

 

I have absolutely zero interest in buying a dinghy that i can't race one-design on the day i buy it.

 

If I want to sail for fun, I windsurf - the best single handed sailboat ever invented.., in my opinion anyway...

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I've seen Wetas single handed and double handed with a child. They are really nice boats just not my thing. Wetas have done very well here in Northern California and I agree they are a solid success. They didn't replace any old dinghy designs, but rather filled in between dinghies and multihulls. I want a modern one design monohull to replace my old Banshee.

 

My criteria when selecting the Megabytes was a 13-14' monohull, single handed, single hoisting sail, modern carbon rig and self draining cockpit. The Megabyte did well on 4 out of the 5 criteria (it had damn bailers), and we have 4 other people in the group purchase. The Aero hits all five of the criteria and uses e-glass for light weight.

 

Maybe RS Sailing, DZero and other manufacturers could write US Sailing and let them know to encourage open classes at regattas and to not penalize new boats with overly fast provisional ratings that take years to get to where they should be. People making an investment in a new boat should be allowed a venue to sail and compete, while not being penalized with a harsh provisional rating. US Sail should encourage innovation and new boats, not be a protector of the status quo.

 

Certainly one design racing is the only way to go in the long run, but you need venues to compete until a critical mass is established, otherwise new replacement modern designs don't have a chance. The best way to encourage new boat designs to take off is to have them win in the open class being driven by good sailors, rather encouraging pimped out 1960 vintage designs being driven by good sailors, that take advantage of their generous, but statistically "accurate" rating.

 

What is the Aero's Portsmouth's rating and how many people in Northern California are signed up to by one? I'm very interested, just cautious having been burned once already betting on a new class.

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A couple things. Firstly, you simply can't compare the US with the UK. The entire island is smaller than California. If you drive for more than three hours over there most locals consider you crazy. In the US or Canada, driving from coast to coast lugging a couple boats behind you is going to be 36 - 48 hours driving time. So in the UK you have every single sailor and sailing location likely within an 8 hour drive - and that is pretty extreme. In the US and Canada, boats and sailors are spread very thin, with a few areas of concentration. Additionally, sales and distribution of boats and parts is nowehere near as complex in the UK. The result of the concentration of sailors, boats, and venues is larger regattas for all sorts of boats.

Secondly - the Aero is a great looking boat, and should get some traction. Interestingly, though, as pointed out by WestCoast, there will need to be migration from other classes - with some extremists citing the death of the Laser. So the net effect will be the shrinking of some classes as the Aero grows. That's OK - the market will do what the market will do. But I don't think it is fair to herald the Aero or any other boat as any kind of a saviour. The RS folks are certainly not suggesting that.

So there are some cool new boats on the market. That's great but is really going to stimulate new growth in sailing?

,

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So in the UK you have every single sailor and sailing location likely within an 8 hour drive

England, Scotland and Wales are small but not that small. Road distance John o'Groats to Lands End is 847 miles. It's been done in a shade over 11 hours on a motorbike but that was in the 1980s. With the speed cameras in operation these days, the fines you'd get attempting to beat that don't bear thinking about.

 

You might get a bit wet attempting driving to Northern Island, which is also part of the UK. As are the Isles of Scilly, which is certainly a "sailing location".

 

As a realistic example, people do tow boats from the south coast to do the Scottish Series and that's going to take 14 hours without much time for stops, bearing in mind much of the mileage north of Glasgow will be at 30mph.

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.....once went lands end to scotland somewhere with some englandians,,towing a trailer,,

,,,,when the car broke-down on the return trip,,the Auto association was called,

,,,,,,,,we ended up getting car ,trailer delivered back to lands end,driving through the night as we slept in the back

 

..............always wished they had the same service in NA :rolleyes:

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So in the UK you have every single sailor and sailing location likely within an 8 hour drive

England, Scotland and Wales are small but not that small. Road distance John o'Groats to Lands End is 847 miles. It's been done in a shade over 11 hours on a motorbike but that was in the 1980s. With the speed cameras in operation these days, the fines you'd get attempting to beat that don't bear thinking about.

 

You might get a bit wet attempting driving to Northern Island, which is also part of the UK. As are the Isles of Scilly, which is certainly a "sailing location".

 

As a realistic example, people do tow boats from the south coast to do the Scottish Series and that's going to take 14 hours without much time for stops, bearing in mind much of the mileage north of Glasgow will be at 30mph.

 

 

only the most committed would do that.... not sure many prospective 'Aero' owners would. RS classes have traditionally been relatively south coast centric when it comes to major events (except winter events at the same 5 puddles within 2 hours of London).

 

I know the 300 boys like Prestwick (and Filey), but they're a bit special.... in a good way.

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It must surely be immensely easier to achieve critical mass for a new class in a much smaller country with a vastly more concentrated population, though. I'm planning a Traveller's Trophy next year for our region; it contains the national capital yet has less than a 30th of the population density of England; the only region in the Uk with a lower population density is the Scottish Highlands. It's hard enough to get critical mass when you are dealing with the most popular established classes; getting class racing in a brand-new class would be close to impossible.

 

The low popularity of sailing in the US must also have a similar effect, surely? Yeah, they are packed together like sardines :D but they're almost all non-sailing sardines, so how could you get a fleet of a new class together?

 

On a bit of a tangent - is it fair to say that most major sailing countries bar the US have a Laser alternative that is NOT a SMOD? I'm thinking about UK/Dutch Solos, German Finns/O-Jolles, Scandinavian Europes and OKs, Kiwi Zephyrs and Aussie Sabres and Impulses, and OKs in lots of places. Is it better for a country to have a Laser alternative that is a "normal" multi-supplier one design, rather than having a Laser alternative that is also a SMOD? Is the lack of a boat that fits in the Solo/Sabre/OK niche a major problem for US sailing as a whole, because it may reduce choice and the small supplier? It would surely hurt Oz and British sailing if we didn't have Solos, Phantoms, Impulses and Sabres.

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If I were a wet boat fan, and younger-Aero! the price seems right for younger set and boat has appeal.

 

And, I think I am typical dodger...

 

Alas, I older and prefer boats I can stand on...or in and whereon I can swill...

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It must surely be immensely easier to achieve critical mass for a new class in a much smaller country with a vastly more concentrated population, though. I'm planning a Traveller's Trophy next year for our region; it contains the national capital yet has less than a 30th of the population density of England; the only region in the Uk with a lower population density is the Scottish Highlands. It's hard enough to get critical mass when you are dealing with the most popular established classes; getting class racing in a brand-new class would be close to impossible.

 

The low popularity of sailing in the US must also have a similar effect, surely? Yeah, they are packed together like sardines :D but they're almost all non-sailing sardines, so how could you get a fleet of a new class together?

 

On a bit of a tangent - is it fair to say that most major sailing countries bar the US have a Laser alternative that is NOT a SMOD? I'm thinking about UK/Dutch Solos, German Finns/O-Jolles, Scandinavian Europes and OKs, Kiwi Zephyrs and Aussie Sabres and Impulses, and OKs in lots of places. Is it better for a country to have a Laser alternative that is a "normal" multi-supplier one design, rather than having a Laser alternative that is also a SMOD? Is the lack of a boat that fits in the Solo/Sabre/OK niche a major problem for US sailing as a whole, because it may reduce choice and the small supplier? It would surely hurt Oz and British sailing if we didn't have Solos, Phantoms, Impulses and Sabres.

.

 

...that's an interesting irony you point out Chris--even though the overall demographics are stronger in England,,,a new design competes with all the choices available!

.....maybe it's true all over that the best way for a class to gain traction is when a few sailors get together in an area,,,make a group decision as to what they focus on

 

 

If I were a wet boat fan, and younger-Aero! the price seems right for younger set and boat has appeal.

 

And, I think I am typical dodger...

 

Alas, I older and prefer boats I can stand on...or in and whereon I can swill...

.

...a good reason there's so many designs to choose from!

 

.

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.....maybe it's true all over that the best way for a class to gain traction is when a few sailors get together in an area,,,make a group decision as to what they focus on

 

In my limited experience trying to do this, what happens is that either 1- a super-salesman type convinces everyone to buy a boat that is not well suited to local waters and/or the persons'physiques/temperament, and the class dies quick or 2- a group convenes and begins a shouting match over "we need the XYZ 15" ... "no no that's a terrible boat, anybody who doesn't want a ABC 15.1 is an idiot" etc etc and nothing at all happens.

 

Anyway, the Aero looks like a good idea. The boats promise both uniformity and longevity which is less common in US one-design boats. The price will seem a bit steep when people are comparison shopping because you can get a 30-foot fixer upper for the same number of dollars.

 

FB- Doug

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OK, OK - I didn't include the Northern Island or the Isles of Skilly. But I didn't contemplate St.John's Newfoundland either, which is 800 miles closer to London than it is to Vancouver... But I think my point is understood. This link shows the numbers of boats at the UK Nationals last year. 20 classes had at least 50, and 10 had 90+. And many of these boats would have been unheard of outside the UK. http://www.yachtsandyachting.com/class/attendance.aspx

It's fun (in a sailing-nerd kinda way) to analyze these numbers and try to determine trends. But how many classes in the US can boast a fairly steady 50+ at their nationals? It would be great if the Aero could accomplish this over time!

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Maybe RS Sailing, DZero and other manufacturers could write US Sailing and let them know to encourage open classes at regattas and to not penalize new boats with overly fast provisional ratings that take years to get to where they should be. People making an investment in a new boat should be allowed a venue to sail and compete, while not being penalized with a harsh provisional rating. US Sail should encourage innovation and new boats, not be a protector of the status quo.

 

Certainly one design racing is the only way to go in the long run, ( disagree, in some areas you will never have effective OD racing but handicap racing is better than none. And, a more effective system would make the handicap racing that much better)but you need venues to compete until a critical mass is established, otherwise new replacement modern designs don't have a chance. The best way to encourage new boat designs to take off is to have them win in the open class being driven by good sailors, rather encouraging pimped out 1960 vintage designs being driven by good sailors, that take advantage of their generous, but statistically "accurate" rating.

 

 

US Sailing has been approached and by their total lack of effective response, has no interest in doing what is necessary to promote portsmouth handicap racing. With today's technology handicaps could be adjusted, updated and epublished every week. What is needed is a new organization to take a pro active approach and get -r-done. UK and OZ are much better in this area than US

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Another activity that's much different in the UK. Handicap racing and pursuit racing (slower boats start first; fastest last) are extremely popular. From Y&Y: "The Bloody Mary Pursuit Race was held for the 41st time this weekend at Queen Mary Sailing Club attracting 332 entries in 66 classes from 110 clubs all around the country." And this is for a single race - not a weekend series. How fun would this be? I bet there's a pint or two involved....Now this is an extreme example, but there are several pursuit races in the UK over the entire season that appear to be well-attended. I would think RS will have some Aeros at these events!

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.

 

...to me H'cap racing loses meaning,,but a fun boat is fun,,even on one's own!

 

..I think many of us have gotten accustomed to sailing un-fun boats--hence the need of a fleet of same to make them interesting and relevant. :mellow:

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Another activity that's much different in the UK. Handicap racing and pursuit racing (slower boats start first; fastest last) are extremely popular. From Y&Y: "The Bloody Mary Pursuit Race was held for the 41st time this weekend at Queen Mary Sailing Club attracting 332 entries in 66 classes from 110 clubs all around the country." And this is for a single race - not a weekend series. How fun would this be? I bet there's a pint or two involved....Now this is an extreme example, but there are several pursuit races in the UK over the entire season that appear to be well-attended. I would think RS will have some Aeros at these events!

See how that works? We have the beginnings of such here in Texas, and at the HPDO, just need to promote more and attend more, look at the front page with the drag race at SC, now that looks epic fun!

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If you haven't read the Aero design brief, it's in a PDF and available online.

Pretty cool to see the development team and their thoughts made public.

 

RS Aero Design Brief

 

--

I know there are already Aeros that will be in Texas. Not sure how many are pre-ordered, but it's already underway :)

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Great stuff George, looking forward to trying one when they come, keep us posted and share vid!

And great design brief, very interesting reading!

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So, is it outhaul and cunningham to each side, and vang to the middle?

 

The action shots are nice, but some close-ups of the hull and rigging would be pretty informative for people wondering how it compares to their current boat.

 

does the bevel make it more comfortable to hike than, say, a Laser?

 

Will there be one in New England to demo anytime soon?

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.

 

...to me H'cap racing loses meaning,,but a fun boat is fun,,even on one's own!

 

..I think many of us have gotten accustomed to sailing un-fun boats--hence the need of a fleet of same to make them interesting and relevant. :mellow:

 

 

but when it comes to sailing dinghies, i mostly want to race..,

 

i'm not going to buy a dinghy just to sail it for fun

 

i'm not interested in handicap racing - i'd rather race an un-fun boat OD

 

like i said above, if i want to sail a singlehander for fun, i will windsurf.

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So, is it outhaul and cunningham to each side, and vang to the middle?

 

The action shots are nice, but some close-ups of the hull and rigging would be pretty informative for people wondering how it compares to their current boat.

 

does the bevel make it more comfortable to hike than, say, a Laser?

 

Will there be one in New England to demo anytime soon?

 

I hear that Scott Hardy of the Boat Locker in CT will have a couple of RS Aeros to demo this summer. First customer orders are scheduled for delivery in North America in March 2015.

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Here in Oz there is a separate handicap that's usually used for 14ft beach cats, it's based on a particular club but uses results gathered from a lot of the other 14 ft clubs. It recognises different builds from different era's SCH as glass v foam cored cats. Makes racing much better.

 

Edit. Konnawarra bay handicap

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I don't know what soe of you guys are worried about price for, i am hearing 3rd hand that it be $10 - 11,000 in Aus

 

can someone from RS confirm price ?

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Anybody else wary about multiple rigs? With 3 rigs, RS is in a way marketing 3 boats. The Laser Radial probably did more damage to the size of Laser fleets than anything else. Actually there are more Radials now than Standards at most regattas. A 10 boat purchase at a club could actually be 3 small, 4 medium and 3 large. I suppose that's better than 0, 4 and 0, but still...

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Does the shift to more Laser Radials just reflect aging sailors still at it?

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Does the shift to more Laser Radials just reflect aging sailors still at it?

 

i'm getting one....

 

not so much age, as weight - I weigh ~160-65-lbs/75kg, and i'm fully powered on the full rig at 7 or 8kts.

 

never considered it before, because there was no one to sail against!

 

now that there are good sailors in the radial fleet, i'm going to give it a try.

 

so, what's changed is that the radial is now a viable one-design fleet, where it wasn't in the past.

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I think you are right 7070, I just checked the last Masters World's site and there were actually more Standard rigs (97) than there were Radials (87). I weigh 205 and am well into my Masters years. I would get smoked if I raced a radial.

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I don't know what soe of you guys are worried about price for, i am hearing 3rd hand that it be $10 - 11,000 in Aus

 

can someone from RS confirm price ?

If they follow existing clases & clothing/software/imac aussie gouging then with cover & dolly incl GST it will be $22,395

+ shipping with a 3 month lead time

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Anybody else wary about multiple rigs? With 3 rigs, RS is in a way marketing 3 boats.

 

 

yep- totally wary given history with the RS100. At least this time around RS are making it very clear they are 3 separate classes from the outset, but the bottom line for those only seeking class racing from a dinghy, take any 'sale figures' floating around the internet with a pinch of salt, or at the very least unscientifically divide by 3.

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I don't know what soe of you guys are worried about price for, i am hearing 3rd hand that it be $10 - 11,000 in Aus

 

can someone from RS confirm price ?

If they follow existing clases & clothing/software/imac aussie gouging then with cover & dolly incl GST it will be $22,395

+ shipping with a 3 month lead time

 

So, now your complaint is basically "Why didn't they start building them 2 years ago, so I can have one NOW" ??

 

Seems logical

;)

 

FB- Doug

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Just saw a North American Order Form. $6,940 for the first 200 ordered in NA. After that it's $7,499. Dolly $600, top cover $300. Extra rig (can't figure out what size) $1,690.

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one interesting thing is that on the Aero web site, it says that at ~165lbs, i am at the top of the weight range for the 7.0, and at the bottom of the weight range for the 9.0!

 

A laser full rig is 7.0, and i'm no where near the top of the weight range for that...

 

but the Aero beam is the same as the Laser beam.

 

So the rig must de-power better than the laser rig, or something...

 

The tri radial sail might hold it's shape better than a laser sail too.

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A carbon mast with a tri-radial sail (with 2 full battens and a square top) depowering more efficiently than a laser rig? Who would have thought? The sail probably flattens out easily and bleeds off in gusts nicely, plus it's probably a more comfortable boat to hike in a blow allowing you to hike harder/longer...

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That's a nice way of saying that Laser is a piece of dated, antiquated shit and if dinghy sailors had anything about them, a boat like this could really show Fuzzy and Crusty exactly what we think of all their legal bullshit ruining the game we love....

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That's a nice way of saying that Laser is a piece of dated, antiquated shit and if dinghy sailors had anything about them, a boat like this could really show Fuzzy and Crusty exactly what we think of all their legal bullshit ruining the game we love....

 

what are you talking about?

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I think the legal bullshit is going to die on the vine. It's only been a distraction. Local Laser dealer is getting spars directly from Selden so he actually has stock! Not sure of any 45 year old design that isn't dated...The Aero sure looks great today, but flash forward to 2059 and I doubt it will look as fresh!

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RS Aero Australian launch price is AUS $9,995 - trolley $649 - top cover $349

 

The first batch for Australia is scheduled to leave the UK in July and will land in September (early season) - and will include some boats for test sailing and a few available to order.

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one interesting thing is that on the Aero web site, it says that at ~165lbs, i am at the top of the weight range for the 7.0, and at the bottom of the weight range for the 9.0!

 

A laser full rig is 7.0, and i'm no where near the top of the weight range for that...

 

but the Aero beam is the same as the Laser beam.

 

So the rig must de-power better than the laser rig, or something...

 

The tri radial sail might hold it's shape better than a laser sail too.

 

Having sailed the 100(obviously much wider but a similar rig in some ways) I was barely hiking in 12-15 with an 8.4m2 sail - and I'm only 5'6" ~155. Even with the narrower beam of the Aero it's an incredibly tune-able rig. And with the light weight of the aero the boat will accelerate quicker rather than loading up and heeling over.

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RS Aero Australian launch price is AUS $9,995 - trolley $649 - top cover $349

 

The first batch for Australia is scheduled to leave the UK in July and will land in September (early season) - and will include some boats for test sailing and a few available to order.

Will pass that on to a bunch of guys I know who might be keen.

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Thanks jfunk - and yes atefooterz the launch price includes Aus GST.

 

Forgive me but can't help telling you that we're literally taking more Aero orders every day - exciting time!

I'm not surprised... with a new Spiral running at about $8k, you're offering a very good deal.

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Signed up to say that I’ve plunked down my 500 beans to reserve an RS Aero.

 

I’m an ex-Laser racer and an ex-windsurfer looking to get out on the water again in a sporty, simple boat and do a little casual racing. I considered getting another Laser, but try as I might, I simply can’t get excited about the Laser design anymore. Strike two against the Laser: my club’s fleet has diminished to the point that Frostbiting and other weekly racing is no longer offered. I've discovered, however, that the other club in our bay organizes weekly open-class dinghy racing using Portsmouth handicapping, so that could be fun.

 

To me, the Aero looks like the perfect combination of performance, simplicity, and practicality. I’ll be very interested to read more reviews and view more video footage in the coming months to see if the Aero is everything it’s cracked up to be. (Looking in your direction, West Coast Sailing.)

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Signed up to say that I’ve plunked down my 500 beans to reserve an RS Aero.

 

I’m an ex-Laser racer and an ex-windsurfer looking to get out on the water again in a sporty, simple boat and do a little casual racing. I considered getting another Laser, but try as I might, I simply can’t get excited about the Laser design anymore. Strike two against the Laser: my club’s fleet has diminished to the point that Frostbiting and other weekly racing is no longer offered. I've discovered, however, that the other club in our bay organizes weekly open-class dinghy racing using Portsmouth handicapping, so that could be fun.

 

To me, the Aero looks like the perfect combination of performance, simplicity, and practicality. I’ll be very interested to read more reviews and view more video footage in the coming months to see if the Aero is everything it’s cracked up to be. (Looking in your direction, West Coast Sailing.)

 

Suggest mounting a GoPro to your boat and sharing (+ write reports here too). Please don't attach the GoPro, as it generally produces awful footage.

 

Enthusiasm can be addictive.

 

Happy sailing.

 

Fish

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Here is a new boat, made in UK, I believe, and shipped to US with an intro price of $7K, with a solid build, good resin/glass sched, modern spars and sails, rigged for racing, and a modern design...

And you want a cheaper price for fleet building?

 

And they say that Walmart and its ilk have not ruined the consumer mentality...

Would guess it's probably going to be made in Thailand, alongside the other RS boats, by renowned builder CMI who build Nacras and RS dinghies.

 

It's a very interesting boat for sure, could be something that would make me consider dinghies again....lots to like about it!

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I heard it was going to be made on the Isle of Wight in the UK and that RS aren't doing much with CMI these days

 

- Martin may or may not wish to confirm

 

either way, great to hear that someone else has got the guts to look beyond the Laser at something far more exciting for their sailing.

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Going to be built in the UK as far as I know.

 

 

Zagabog - Leaving for England tomorrow to test sail the Aero out at Hayling Island. Very excited.

Report when Phil and I get back.

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shouldn't cost too much to bring one back as checked baggage, just 60 pounds :D

.

 

......sounds like a great plan, George! ummmm,,wait a minute :mellow::huh:

 

 

 

 

 

...........have a great time,,,have a couple of pints fo'me!

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Yay, another vid! Keep 'em coming.

 

At 75kg/165lbs, I fall right in between the suggested rig sizes, so I'm interested in hearing more about about rig tunability, hiking comfort, and upwind performance.

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Yay, another vid! Keep 'em coming.

 

At 75kg/165lbs, I fall right in between the suggested rig sizes, so I'm interested in hearing more about about rig tunability, hiking comfort, and upwind performance.

Your choice may also depend on what conditions you expect, smaller rig for bigger conditions.

 

It should be interesting to hear how well the rig depowers if they get any days that are nuking. WestCoast, if you get a chance while you're there could you try taking a big rig out on a really windy day to see how well you can deal with being completely overpowered?

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It looks nicely set up. However, all we ever see of promotional video taken of new boats is them planing on a reach. It doesn't tell us much as all boats are stable when planing. Can we please see Aero's upwind and downwind performance? How well does it sail by-the-lee downwind? Such footage would be really useful if RS have experienced sailors in mind.

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+1.

 

The latest video seems to be a directors cut of the same footage used for the previous one. It will be interesting to see more "how to" type videos that show the boat on different points of sailing.

 

The boat does look very good, and far more interesting that a Laser. At 60kg it's nearly twice the weight of a Moth so unlikely that many will lug it up the beach on their shoulder, certainly not in any sort of breeze.

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Jesus christ,

 

This boat looks like an old OK dinghy.

Def. not a boat of this time when you look at the bow.

 

Aesthetical wise they should have invested some more

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A smaller Phantom... here you go:

 

Ovington Solution

 

http://www.ovingtonboats.com/index.php/shop/solution.html

 

I think the Aero does look very modern- it's clean and simple, but agree about the video, it's a bit form over function. I want to see it going upwind, ideally next to a reasonably sailed Laser and Laser Radial.

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Jesus christ,

 

This boat looks like an old OK dinghy.

Def. not a boat of this time when you look at the bow.

 

Aesthetical wise they should have invested some more

It's all right, you can stick with your OK. Mind your back and the ramp and in the boat and enjoy the varnishing.

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A new OK is a lovely boat, it's twice as expensive as this Aero though so it ought to be.

 

I'm not sure that it will deliver twice as much fun mind, not unless you've got a fleet of them to sail against....

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very true- having carried big windsurf kit up the beach (which is a shedload lighter than an RS Aero), it's not as easy as it looks... especially in a bit of breeze.

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.

 

...to me H'cap racing loses meaning,,but a fun boat is fun,,even on one's own!

 

..I think many of us have gotten accustomed to sailing un-fun boats--hence the need of a fleet of same to make them interesting and relevant. :mellow:

 

 

but when it comes to sailing dinghies, i mostly want to race..,

 

i'm not going to buy a dinghy just to sail it for fun

 

i'm not interested in handicap racing - i'd rather race an un-fun boat OD

 

like i said above, if i want to sail a singlehander for fun, i will windsurf.

 

Sounds to me like you don't enjoy sailing

 

Not a slam, I know a lot of people in the same boat so to speak. I probably would be myself, except that somewhere in the long years I woke up to the fact that just plain sailing is actually fun. You just need a boat that isn't literally a flaming pain in the ass (as well as metaphorically a PITA).

 

About the Aero- I am kind of on the fence about pre-ordering one. Ovington Solution (linked above by jwlbrace) looks like a better, fancier boat, but it is also much more expensive and there aren't any here. Their site lists one 2nd-hand for 5,500£ which is over 9,000$US so guess how much a new one must cost.

 

FB- Doug

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a bit harsh Doug- since when is windsurfing 'not sailing'?

 

I quite get us7070's perspective, given enough decent wind and a bit of 3-dimension in the water, then, imho, the purity and freedom of windsurfing is far, far superior to that of freeriding a dinghy, or even racing dinghies, especially under handicap conditions.

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a bit harsh Doug- since when is windsurfing 'not sailing'?

.... ...

 

Since there were two seperate words, "sailing" for the one and "windsurfing" for the other. Both are propelled by sails, yes, but then so are iceboats.

 

 

 

... ...

 

I quite get us7070's perspective, given enough decent wind and a bit of 3-dimension in the water, then, imho, the purity and freedom of windsurfing is far, far superior to that of freeriding a dinghy, or even racing dinghies, especially under handicap conditions.

 

 

Oh I "get" his perspective also. I'm not going into the issue of which is superior, frankly I windsurfed for a few years largely because I had some good friends who really liked it, but I enjoy sailing a real boat much more.

 

Personal taste, not superiority.

 

But then I have no need to claim that my favored activites are somehow superior to others, just like I don't feel any need to claim the music I like is superior to music that other people like. However I don't feel shy about saying that sailing some boats are like beating oneself in the shins with a 2x4 while having ice water poured down one's neck. Not quite the same as saying those boats are inferior, somewhere there are people who think that's fun too. But most of us will think it's less fun than sailing a boat which is less painful.

 

FB- Doug

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i guess that's why folks who do express an opinion on what they find nicer/superior usually couch it in such terms as 'in my humble opinion' as we respect other people's view may differ, as you say, personal taste. :-)

 

Btw, windsurfing is still sailing, as is ice yachting and kite boarding come to think of it.

 

Don't believe me? Fine, ask ISAF... or the RYA or whomever you want really. They're about as an 'official' endorsement as we're likely to get on the definition.

 

Back to the RS Aero... the video makes a point of the mast being forward but the volume distribution further back to ride higher. Sounds interesting, kind of stokes the embers of the whole COE vs CLR thing a bit.

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