Recommended Posts

Hey Guys. Not sure if this best fits into multihulls, cruising or fixit. So mods feel free to move if its not in the best subsection.

 

Anywho we have a new boat. :D Its a 2002 Crowther 43. Design 226A built by the Cat Factory in WA out of divinycell foamcore, kevlar, glass and vinyester. It has daggerboards, twin 3GM30s (27hp) diesels with SD20 sail drives. Its accommodations rival that of a prod cat but with significantly less weight at 6500-7000kg lightship.

 

It has a large rig and sail area so I hope proves itself a good sailer. So far we have hit 15.94K according to the opencpn log on its second sail. We were reaching with the second reef (only has 2 reefs) and jib in 20-25K winds when we got hit by a 30+ squall. Seems promising considering it still has 3 blade fixed props and boots hanging off the sail drives. It seems to go to windward very well too when reefed in these conditions 8-9K.


We still have our trusty Hunter Legend 40.5 which served us well (fuck the haters :D ), but she will be up forsale soon.

We (well I biggrin.gif ) decided we should upgrade to a catamaran. Not that a cat is automatically up upgrade, but most would agree a 43" cat is going to be an upgrade to a 40" mono in most respects. How many of you have girlfriends that like the idea of a mono over a cat? :P I think in a couple of sails and a few weeks of cruising she will be a convert.

Nikki has always wanted to live on a boat, but I only like living on boats while cruising like our year cruise from CA to Brisbane. Day to day living is much better in a house than on a 40 foot mono. But possibly a 43 foot cat could be pretty comfortable for living on while living an urban working life prior to setting of again in a couple of years. Plus of course I have always been a fan of performance multihulls having owned a nacra 5.8 and various other fast cats. And I want to be able to beach the boat in my favorite spots I used to go to in my trailer sailer.

Finding the right boat which is affordable was going to be a challenge since cats usually cost more for any given living space/performance criteria simply because you can buy such a huge mono for the price of a 40 foot cat.

So we took a gamble and purchased a neglected boat where pretty much nothing was working and requires an exterior paint job. However the interior is in decent shape and does not require any work.

Fast forward only 3 weeks later and we fixed just about everything important besides the exterior paint work for what amounts to pocket change (against the expectations of some). Sure its still run down a bit but its coastal cruiseable and thats what I have been doing for the last week.

Here are some pics of what she looked like before she was neglected.

 

Crowtherdesign226_zps30db1f7a.jpg

 

withbimini21_zps25f568b3.jpg

 

outofwater1_zpsc00d1dda.jpg

 

Lift_zpsb40819a6.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great.... keep her light and she should be an excellent sailing cat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great.... keep her light and she should be an excellent sailing cat.

 

if you have (and you already said you do ;) ) any interest at all in a good sailing performance, adopt the above underlined and bolded sentence as a mantra.

 

and be happy with your very nice new boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys. I plan on doing what I can to keep her light. I wish I knew her true weight. The last owner told me 7000kg, the builder said from memory 6500-7000kg. And the crane recently said 9T, but they told me its out by quite a bit and can not be used for accurate measurements. The transoms are out of the water at rest with full tanks and beer. Fuel is 300L and water I think is 350-400L. However the bows are about 120mm immersed. Which is just above the antifoul line at the bow with full tanks (which are infront of the mast in the bridge deck).

 

It has padeyes for for a prodder, and they are underwater as they are only 100mm above the bottom of the bows. So I guess it sits lower than intended at the bows. I wish I had plans for it so I could know what the bow immersion should be. The port bow is the lowest. It has a full 80L holding tank of festering smelling shit up there with seized valves I am yet to replace so I can empty it. Plus lockers full of gear.

 

The batteries are wet lead acids cells and they are kaput. I plan on a full lithium bank when I live on board. It also has a spectra 12.5G/H watermaker so when cruising the tanks will be kept fairly low. The aft port hull has a queen bed which is the mancave with gear etc. The batteries, HWS, inverters etc are in a huge compartment in the aft sbd adjacent to the bathroom. Has isotherm fridge and freezer.

Pic of years ago. The bimini cover is gone now. Frame remains. I plan to put a light weight hard top on. Just strong enough to bolt solar pannels to and to walk on in the center to tend to the lazy bag. Its a huge PITA to tend to it ATM. One thing I have learned about sailing is that you will actually sail much more often if things are easy to use and less hassle.
withbimini1_zpsc9d21dae.jpg
Desalinator_zps65398bf8.jpg
Batterybank_zps488974a9.jpg
HWS_zps74cdaeaf.jpg
Stern_zpse0c1dd43.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yo could try too contact Stuart Bloomfield, I know he ended up with a lot of L.Crowther info, after he went on his own.

 

http://www.bloomfieldinnovation.com/about.html

 

I would guess your fuel tanks are forward, one in each hull up in the bows, and the water is in two side by side built in bridge deck tanks, L.Crowther designs placed most of the heavy weights, in the right areas for balance. I would start in the bows and take out and off the boat, all the accumulated stuff, then empty the fuel tanks, and then have a look. You would be shocked how much stuff can be accumulated in a good sized cat. You may also find you dont need to pack all that fuel, and water, as its really just weight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have a keeper there! I'm jealous. Like others have commented, you have to get ruthless on weight as it will accumulate especially with time. Keep that watermaker in good running order and don't sail around with lots of fuels and water even if you have the tankage. Think like a Spartan and enjoy the boat and simplicity that such a mindset brings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trust me. I will be a weight nazi. I have less than half a tank of fuel. The water tanks are full, but thats not how we will roll in the future. Its just because where we have it at the moment does not lend itself to easy water collection. I still have not taken all the old gear off.

 

You have to understand I only purchased this boat at this point in time thanks to my compulsion to look at internet boat sales for hours every night. I had planned to possibly buy a boat in a year or two after I sold my other boat, which needs a heap of work after this happened.

 

http://knottyladypacific.blogspot.com.au/search?updated-max=2012-09-24T00:22:00-07:00&max-results=7&start=2&by-date=false

 

The hours of looking at what boats come up for sale and at which price got me to jump on this. Its a rare kind of boat and I could be waiting forever to find something similar again at the right price. So I focused on getting everything working just so I could sit it somewhere for now, I didn't even have time to take everything out. It was costing me $350 a week at the hard stand which was 1.5H drive from my house and I had limited space in my mid size car.

 

Some more pics.

 

Avatar43_zps32dbc8b1.jpg

 

Helm_zps72e18eef.jpg

 

Davits_zps783e29a4.jpg

 

rearbeam_zps307cf4cf.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fuel tanks are not in the bows. Fuel and water tanks are in the bridgedeck forward of the mast. The only tank up fwd is the full of shit 80L holding tank. There is 60m of heavy chain (not sure on exact size but it looks big) and a 80lbs CQR as the primary and a 60lbs delta on the forebeam. I have emailed Bloomfield. He said design weight is 6500kg, and that the scantlings are seriously strong and its well over survey requirements so extra weight will not hurt the structure. But of course I don't want any extra weight for speed!

 

The boat was sold without running engines, and at a cost of $26K to replace them and the saildrives I took an educated gamble. But I was pretty confident I would get one or both working. All I needed was a spare battery and they both started right away lol. One pissed out oil everywhere thanks to rusted steel external oil lines (how can yanmar charge so much with crap engineering like this?). So we took the line off (thanks Shane for doing that shit job) and I tried to get a new one made up but apparently 8mm banjo fittings are impossible to get, so they reused the old ones. Cost $69. Yanmar price, $180 and air freight from OS.

 

So we just done some oil flushes, oil filters, primary and secondary fuel filters, upper and lower zincs, new start batteries and they all run fine! The engine bays were horrible so we degreased them and carchered it all. Checked the saildrive oil and it looked very milky. Yup salt water and oil. These can have a bad rep for being unreliable and expensive to fix compared to a shaft drive. But they take up less space in the boat and have less drag though the water under sail. Some have cone clutched which flog out, but these have dog clutches which is good.

 

When you take the prop off you can unbolt the crown wheel and it just slides off. 2 bearing style seals and a couple of big O rings is all that keeps the sea water out. I replaced all these seals, but when I dumped the sumpplug on one to drain the oil out. We found it had no O ring!!!! No wonder it was so bad. I was really worried when I re built it all that the oil went milky again straight away (you test it like an outboardwith a plastic bin full of water over the sail drive when the boat is on the hard stand).

 

So I done the old diesel oil flush on it. Put some gulf western motor oil in it and flushed it again with diesel and this time it was fine. It must have had a lot of sludge in it. So then I dumped that and put the proper gear oil in again. So thats pretty much it for the mechanical side. The engines seem to work well and are in good condition. One water pump pisses out salt water and will need a rebuild, but thats pretty much it.

 

Engine2_zps98b97d70.jpg

 

Engine1_zpscf849060.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few people thought I was a bit mad buying this. If the engines were stuffed it might not have been a very good deal. But I was pretty confidant it would be OK. They turned over by hand etc so they were not seized and it appeared no one had even tried to start them. I actually went swimming in the marina to check if there was zinc left on the sail drives lowers.

Here area few more pics.

You can see one where there is a pile of rust under the hydraulic lines. Not good. I got a new one made up for $60. But we still have a bad prob with the steering pump behind the wheel. It pisses out oil, but not so much we can't use the boat.

I guess I will need to take it off and dismantle it and fit new seals. This must have been a known prob as there was evidence of an elaborate setup for topping it up with plenty of auto trans fluid plus a lot of fluid in a void under the pump. This will have to do for now. I will take the steering pump off once we get the boat in its mooring.

The boat has 2 x queen beds up the front and one queen bed on the port aft, which is the "man cave" now and provides a large storage and work area. On the starboard aft is the bathroom an instead of a queen bed it has a huge utility room which has the batteries, HWS, change, inverter etc. Its big enough for me to get into.

On of the rudders was "repaired" when it hit a reef. The job was done so badly it was not funny. They just glassed some chopped strand mat over the area without even sanding off the antifoul paint. So I had to grind this all back and fix it properly.

I am paying someone to sand the rest of the bottom, spray antifoul on and epoxy barrier the bottom. As I am not confident the fairing compound they used is up to constant contact with sea water. Its going to cost $3000 but, the paint would cost me $1200, and it would take me ages and the hardstand cost is $70 per day. So I have been concentrating on other stuff so I can be launched on Friday. Sanding of poisonous antifoul is the worst job EVER. I just done this on my other 40 footer and do not want to do it again for a while. BTW I really need to fix that boat up and sell it!!! In restrospect the company I used done a shit job and the finish was like that of roll on antiskid and they done a seriously half ass job of sanding it.

 

The chart plotter and autopilot were not working either. But with some stuffing around I found it was just a faulty GPS sensor (I hope). The autopilot works again after I pulled apart the rudder position sensor and cleaned it.

 

sbdqueen_zps05ecc392.jpg

 

sbdcabin_zps862a3731.jpg

 

sbdcupboard_zps48ebccde.jpg

 

2ndBrm_zps521c569b.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was an amazing cruising cat "Audacious" That used to sail around Australia, got sold again in the past year or two, Crowther design, Built by Mike Baker, amazing boat builder, more minimalist design than this, and came in at an incredibly low weight, seems like a slightly newer design, but i could be wrong, kept everything to a minimum, even those the nice accom, no electrics, removable fridge, tiny engines, would effortlessly be in the 20 knot range over here, used to sail a dream, I'll look up some info, sadly when it was sold, i believe they took the weight from 6 to about 7.5 tonnes, put in a huge stupidly full book case, fridge, washer/dryer, sterns and bows went from 6 inches clear to well below. speed dropped off massively apparently :(

I'll look up some old stuff on it if i can find it lying round, by crowther is a great designer, keep her light, drive her hard, have a good nights rest!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The batteries can be strapped down. I wont be leaving the bay with dodgy stuff like that. There are quite a few dodgy systems onboard that need looking at. By the time we go cruising everything will be fully sorted.

 

This design is a performance CRUISER first, and is a late Crowther design, where the design 95 is more of a racer cruiser AFAICT, but that 95 is certainly pretty awesome! Also look at this. http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1991/Lock-Crowther-150-2536987/RI/United-States#.UxupO_mSx8o

 

This has accommodations that rival that of a Lagoon (no hobbit holes and 3 queen beds), but it can actually sail, but expectedly slower than a 95. We plan to live on it full time. This boat is not Audacious, which is also the first thing Bloomfield asked me :P Sounds like they really kept everything on that one very light!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No pics of the main bathroom unfortunately. I found the blue bench tops hideous at first but it has grown on me. Note the "seamless" installation of the brine hoses for the water maker in the guest hulls sink. Just another quality installation by the prior owner.

 

Kitchen is huge. My mother says it has more usable space than in her 5 bedroom house, and Nikki is very happy with it.

 

PortVanity_zpsc876401c.jpg

 

Kitchen1_zpsaa68fcb7.jpg

 

Kitchen2_zps5465cd9b.jpg

 

SmevStove_zpsb758f2cd.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I done up the folding props in hope of some decent speed to replace the fixed blades.

 

The props came with my boat in pieces and looked pretty ugly. I cleaned them with hydrochloric acid. They fizzed up like crazy, but it was only the oxidization melting away. (beware when doing this to the hubs as they contain alloy which could melt away with too much exposure).

 

I hit them with a wirebuff wheel and they looked like new. Cleaned with acetone, etch primer and 3 coats of cold gal zinc. After that I hit them with a heat gun and rubbed some candle (paraffin wax?) on with my fingers. It was really easy to get a consistent coat.

 

Water beads straight off. I doubt anything will stick to it. I guess it would work very well for a boat that was kept at a marina and only motored out the leads to sail. It might ware away pretty fast with a lot of motoring, but if it does the zinc is under it.

 

I refuse to use prop speed as it has an extortionate price, is a PITA to use and remove and mostly it does not seem to work!

Excuse the dodgy pic. I have lost my camera yet again and used my gopro.

 

When I tried to fit the props there seemed to be too much play in the splines and they rocked around too much, so I had to put the fixed props back on. Any tips on how to solve this prob would be awesome.

 

Also some saloon pics.

 

Volvoprops_zps46cb5292.jpg

 

Saloon_zps2b95c9a7.jpg

 

Couch_zps1f1c7160.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mate, so it turns out we actually had design 226b (or so we'll call it, it was slightly modified, stretched and lightened a bit, dry weight was 5.3 tonnes, sailing weight 6 tonnes, if you can go on a mission to find that weight, ditch the possible extra weight up front, possibly 4kilometers of chain and anchor you'll get it down pretty damn light!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers, are you talking about a boat you owned, or Audacious? How the hell do I find what these designs are suppose to even look like? The one I posted in my first post is 226, I have no idea what the differences between 226A-226B are or when they were designed.

 

I will go on a weight reduction mission for sure. Bloomfield told me the design weight is 6500kg. I am not sure if that is lightship or what.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, a bit harsh. If I was selling it would have been in bold at the top of the page.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My dad owned Audacious, we as a family owned it, it was exactly the same boat, re-done to be a little lighter, stretched a foot to make room for the layout we wanted over that initial design, and with slightly fuller plumb bows, we weighed it in at 5.3 tonnes, and it was about full gear with people sailing at 6 tonnes! The builder did an amazing job building it! It ended up being 43.5 feet long, max waterline of 44 i believe, and i have the drawings and line drawings here now, and a stack of pictures in-case you are interested.

Way way smaller battery bank, tiny hot water heater, powered by the engines i believe rather than a big water heater, and interior was done super minimalist, hardly a non-structural trimming, but same up looking sweet! and sailed a treat!

To be honest, thats probably the best estimated full sail weight, but most were built heavier, and had heavy gear and a big sail locker up front that added the weight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Man thats fucking sweet. Please post as many pics and details as you can! Mine is also 43". I think the fuller bows were a good idea given how this design appears to go bow down with weight. There is an insane amount of storage up there. You say your sterns and bows were 6" clear you mean above the water? :o My sterns are clear, just. Bows under by 6" :( But I guess since you gave it fuller bows it would be hard to compare by how it was floating? Was yours epoxy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Epoxy, Kevlar, Foam! Bows weren't too much fuller, id say chances are yours is stretched too, are the bunks clear of the main area like the drawing posted above, or are they just forward? I'll find a spot to post a few pics and link then if you like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice work Dennisail....awesome buy.....keep the progress pics coming.

If you need any genuine Yanmar parts, my kid works for them as a mechanic and I can get anything you need and post to WA.

Same applies to any multi freak here......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

very nifty boat. The pics of her exterior/hulls remind me very much of the earlier Catana (up to 1993), very similar in fact. Can clearly see the earlier Crowther design in the older Catanas.

 

On my Catana, I've done things like pull the between-cabin doors out. I replaced glass mirrors with acrylic ones. If it doesn't need to be on the boat, it ain't. Any objects aboard are eyed for their ability to serve more than one purpose and in the lightest weight possible. I don't have, nor will I install, a generator, A/C, TV, or anything silly like that. I have a minimalist stereo. I'm using lightweight Dyneema cored running rigging, textile lifelines, textile clutches. Only four winches on the whole boat. Sails are in Hydranet. Any chance I get to pull weight off the boat, I'll take it.

 

I used to laugh at people taking small things off boats to lose weight but weight is surprisingly cumulative...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jaybird, you are right, the boat in question is very similar to the original Catana's....I spent many ocean miles on board one called Simply The Best which in it's conditions was surprisingly quick but only due to weight shedding which the owner Peter would religiously do once a year buy cleaning out the boat and weighing everything as it exited on to the dock. It is amazing the things that find their way on board during the year.

The boat was also extended in the rear and bulbs on the bows which help in most conditions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great!

 

If you're in Brisbane it would be good to come for a sail in a few WAGS races once you get the boat in a nice trim - the racing is mild but it's a great way to see how it performs in company!

 

See you round the bay!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cheers guys. This boat has accommodations more inline (space wise) with a Catana 431 rather than the smaller lighter Crowther Catanas. But I am only going by pics and a mate who has cruised a 431. Even if its a little heavy (relative to Audacious) its still a few tons lighter than a 431! But it does have that early Catana look and feel. I think the styling is better than any Catana (IMO). Aside from the paint condition its one of the most attractive cats I have seen, which is good as you cant fix fugly with paint.

 

This weekend I fixed the holding tank and flushed it and took some other gear out of the bows, but there is still a lot up there and around 100kg of stuff in the port aft birth. The sterns are now certainly clear of the water by few CM, and the anti foul line is out of the water at the bows by about an inch rather than under by and inch. Probably only about 50-70kg of loose items the bows though.

 

I might be interested in getting my arse kicked at wags after I have everything dialed in a bit better :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What size ground tackle should I be using on this thing? It has a 80lbs CQR and about a 50lbs? delta on the bow. The chain is heavy gauge (need to measure it) and long. So what anchor and chain sizing would be safe for:

 

1: World cruising? (which is the whole point of this boat, but not for a couple of years)
2: Bay cruising? (which is what we will be doing until then)

 

Moreton Bay is shallow and sandy, easy anchoring. Can I get rid of the 80lbs CQR and use the 50lbs delta in the bay? I have a 30m length of 5/16 HT chain, so I could setup an anchoring system specifically for the bay. Our other boat the 40 hunter weighs more than this boat and we crossed the pacific with a 55lbs delta and 5/16 HT chain and it was great. Would 5/16 HT be considered to small for this boat for world cruising? Also this will be a PITA with the windless probably?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

50lbs delta should be OK and 30m of chain with extra rope would do for the bay. I would rather have 50m of chain always though - it just helps. With cats it's not so much the weight of the boat as the windage - they can move around on the anchor quite savagely in a decent blow and heaps of heavy chain is what you need to keep the anchor from being tugged around. A good bridle setup helps a lot too. I have a 44' cat and use 50m of 10mm chain and a 27kg delta is on my shopping list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That Crowther Cat is dead ringer to his first Catana style design, "Bagatelle", built for Lindsay Cummings in 1979-80.
Bagatelle was 15' shorter by the length of the scoop step at the transom, and had bulbs at the bottom of the stem, otherwise she is pretty well the same. She was a delight to sail, moving out in an effortless way. Unfortunately she was wrecked on the Great Barrier reef.
Lindsay was recompensed by the insurance company. The still floating wreck was bought by a Brisbane man who, after a long and arduous re-build now has her intact and sailing again. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The right bridle set up is the key to great solid multihull anchoring... set up properly the holding power is excellent. I use a nylon bridle, it takes all the load, with stretch, (its the same braided nylon line I used for the paratech sea anchor, 5/8s I think) lots of length, with a good shot of chain behind the point where the bridle is attached to the anchor chain, this gets the bridle lower in the water, and gives you a better angle for the anchor to pull into the bottom rather then out of the bottom. We sat through many strong blows, and always picked a proper spot to anchor, we used a manson 45 lb. I also used the same bridal for any moorings I picked up, rigged with a rope tail, I would use this to tie on with.

 

You should pick up Gavin LeSueur's book http://www.amazon.com/Multihull-Seamanship-Gavin-LeSueur/dp/189866031X

 

 

This is a great book for a new multihull sailor....... People should read all his other books as well..... lots of hands on multihull knowledge there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I removed my 60m chain from my mono and replaced it with 30m and rope (once we sailed into Bris from our Pacific cruise), which was fine for the bay. We pretty much never used the rope as its so shallow.

 

Bedar came with a bridal, but the attachment points are not well thought out. It joins the forward cleats which are back from the beam so the bridal has anti chafe gear on it because it rubs on the welded on alloy seagull striker attachment points. But it works well and the boat sits firmly pointed into the wind. Although this is no heavier than my 40' mono, I am sure the windage is much higher. But the thing is the cat sits into the wind and the mono used to sail around like crazy tugging the chain like mad. Also my mate (built a 44' cat) said the bridal is way too long as it is about 1.5 times the beam, he said each leg should be about the length of the beam. Should I shorten it?

 

I will have to check out that book. It might already be on the boat! It came with a bookshelf full of books which I am yet to look at since I have been too busy to even check them out. There are several multihull seamanship books in there though. I may as well take all the heavy books off anyway. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I removed my 60m chain from my mono and replaced it with 30m and rope (once we sailed into Bris from our Pacific cruise), which was fine for the bay. We pretty much never used the rope as its so shallow.

 

Bedar came with a bridal, but the attachment points are not well thought out. It joins the forward cleats which are back from the beam so the bridal has anti chafe gear on it because it rubs on the welded on alloy seagull striker attachment points. But it works well and the boat sits firmly pointed into the wind. Although this is no heavier than my 40' mono, I am sure the windage is much higher. But the thing is the cat sits into the wind and the mono used to sail around like crazy tugging the chain like mad. Also my mate (built a 44' cat) said the bridal is way too long as it is about 1.5 times the beam, he said each leg should be about the length of the beam. Should I shorten it?

 

I will have to check out that book. It might already be on the boat! It came with a bookshelf full of books which I am yet to look at since I have been too busy to even check them out. There are several multihull seamanship books in there though. I may as well take all the heavy books off anyway. :D

The bridal is correct at 3 x beam. Or 1.5 x beam for each side, same thing. I have heard this from many sources.

Great boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

 

Nice boat. We have a Richard Woods 40' cat. Simlar length and beam but much smaller rig. (Richard is from the UK where it is always windy so he draws smaller rigs).

 

I can't emphasize enough to try to keep weight out. I struggle because we live aboard. My wife thinks nothing of bringing home a nice 1 lb ironwood carving. Or a nice mask she bought. Or this or that. It creeps aboard sneakily.

 

Look into composite propane tanks if you don't have alum. ones. They are very light and on a $/kg weight saving ratio, they were one of the best items we bought to save weight. Ebooks and a tablet to have all your manuals in PDF format. Amazing how many have gotten off our boat. We have gotten my daughter down to ~100 books from ~300...

 

Re anchor size: ditch the CQR. Get a modern scoop type anchor (Rocna, Manson Supreme/Boss, Spade). Their holding power / weight ratio is much better. We cruised across the Pacific with a A140 Spade (33 lbs aluminum version of their 66 lb steel anchor). It has held in a ~90 knot storm on relatively short scope of about 4:1. We have supplemented it a 45 lb Manson Boss which has similar surface area. Get something like a 55 lb Rocna / Manson for your size boat.

 

Our chain is 150' x 5/16" high test, spliced to 150' of 5/8" rope. Crossing the pacific I always thought we had enough chain even for deeper anchorages.

 

Bridle - we use a 10mm climbing rope bridle. Each leg is about 5.5m long so nowhere near 1.5x beam - which would be 10m on our boat. Yes, your boat will sit into the wind like a rock if you use a bridal and reduce wind loads.

 

Interesting article on real world anchor loads on a catamaran.

http://www.practical-sailor.com/issues/37_17/features/anchor_testing_rode_loads_10784-1.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Zonker quote : "Yes, your boat will sit into the wind like a rock if you use a bridal and reduce wind loads"

 

All good info but...........Like a rock you say..?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just come across this thread.

There seems to be a bit of misinformation on here.

Stu Bloomfield is the man with the correct info.

Lock's own boats were D#72 Wahoo and D#150 Deguello

Bagatelle was D#62 and the hull shape may be similar to D#226 but the deck and layout and rig are completely different as would be indicated by the design numbers.

The "Catana 40" is D#106 and is called a 'Performance Design'

D#226 could be called a update of the D#106 with 2' increased length and the same beam, draft, sail area and displacement (5172kg).

IMO opinion Lock's best bridgedeck cat around 40'. I really like D#150 too. My all time favourite is D#72, I miss XL2 and given the cash I would have a new D#72 built.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's D#72:

 

 

post-33238-0-84770800-1394715440_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why don't you buy it back. It is just sitting there neglected, might get it for what you might spend on 2T s.

You use to campaign in it so well, it still has it in her.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

#72 looks like a mad ride. How long is she?

 

Zonker, seems most people would say 5/16 is undersized for this boat? But I do have 60m of it, however a gypsy change would be required. I also have a lot of climbing rope, which I guess might also be considered a bit light, but it is very stretchy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

D#72 was originally 37'. Mould extended to 39' for XL2.

New mould made for Free Spirit, 40'.

Buy it back? Not for sale. If it was I couldn't afford it. Can't afford what I am doing with TT either.

Then there is the cost of campaigning. Doubles approx' every 5' so to campaign XL2 would cost 4x cost to campaign TT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

D#72 was originally 37'. Mould extended to 39' for XL2.

New mould made for Free Spirit, 40'.

Buy it back? Not for sale. If it was I couldn't afford it. Can't afford what I am doing with TT either.

Then there is the cost of campaigning. Doubles approx' every 5' so to campaign XL2 would cost 4x cost to campaign TT.

Yer right. It is a shame just sitting there.

Every things for sale at the right price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deguello D#150 - Lock's own years ago but been with John Brierley for many years - is now for sale in Hobart. Had a heap of work done recently - new rig, motors etc. $270K.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Overlay, I thought there was only one other boat built to the design of Deguello - it was called (from memory) What's Up Doc a long time ago. But I suspect it had a name change as I think I did go on board in the late 90's when a new owner had it. Time is dimming the details which may in fact be wrong. I don't recall a boat named Hippo, and didn't know Mike Mackenzie. Sorry. Regards Terry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There were 3 #150s built in Tauranga N.Z., By Hutchesons. Excellent builders.

 

I owned, lived a board, and cruised Whats Up Doc full time for 7 or 8 years. I was the 2nd owner and found her for sale in New Caledonia.

So if you were on board her, it may have been me you were talking to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Every things for sale at the right price.

Not true. Some things are just not for sale and price has nothing to do with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Overlay, I do not know how exactly the plans were followed on my build as I have not seen the plans or even a study plan for a 226A! What ever they done certainly worked for an aesthetic standpoint at least.

 

I was keen on whats up doc, I have purchased a boat in the USA before and sailed it home. But whats up doc seemed a bit too high strung for me and the mrs. If you read the blog they have had a few rig failures etc. Seems more suitable for someone wanting to do more racing than what we want to do. But a pretty awesome bargain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's Up Doc isn't particularly high strung. I have quite a bit of time on her, both with Keith on board, and substantial time with the present owner aboard. The first dismasting was before the carbon wing was put on; Keith can elaborate on that situation.

Her rig failures of the past few years have undoubtably been due to operator error. I was supposed to be onboard for the delivery that dropped the rig, but had a dissagreement with the owner about a number of issues (mostly personal) and stayed ashore, marking my last time sailing with him. A couple days later I got word she lost her rig and was being rescued by a trawler. A rig tune went unchecked causing her to lose the leeward shroud under sail; the inexperienced crew allowed her to come to wind...and...

She has had a lot of money poured into her over the past 10yrs. The repairs after the second dismasting were done at Walter Greene's yard. As with many boats she's being listed for pennies on the dollar. If I thought I could afford her or had a pratical use, I wouldn't hesitate to buy her.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jangles13 and Keith,

 

I had wondered if design #150 was too much for your "typical" cruising couple to manage, particularly on longer legs. Unless I am mistaken it was initially designed for 2 reasonably competent couples, who enjoyed the performance aspect. I would be grateful for your opinion regarding on that aspect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keith I think it must have been you. Trying to remember where? NZ?

More than likely in Aus, I would spend the cyclone seasons on the east coast.

 

Is ice cat the same cat that sailed down to antarctic ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jangles13 and Keith,

 

I had wondered if design #150 was too much for your "typical" cruising couple to manage, particularly on longer legs. Unless I am mistaken it was initially designed for 2 reasonably competent couples, who enjoyed the performance aspect. I would be grateful for your opinion regarding on that aspect.

I would be happy to answer any questions you have about Whats Up Doc, I'm heading off to work for now, but can write more this afternoon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Likewise I am happy to try and give my impressions and answer what I can, perhaps another thread is in order (to preserve Dennis's project discussion). Alternatively you can PM/email me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Keith I think it must have been you. Trying to remember where? NZ?

More than likely in Aus, I would spend the cyclone seasons on the east coast.

 

Is ice cat the same cat that sailed down to antarctic ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes ice cat is excess, sailed to the Antarctic by Terry Travers and Robyn Chamberlin. Now owned by Terry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes ice cat is excess, sailed to the Antarctic by Terry Travers and Robyn Chamberlin. Now owned by Terry.

Cool, I thought that might be her.

I saw her in Aus, south of Brissy, after she came back from the deep south. I think, it was at the boat show. Robyn and or Terry may have been with her at the dock. I was amazed at the way the ice had chewed away the outer skin at the bows and along the water line, pretty awesome to take her that far south. I know I hung out and chatted with the guys at the boat. What an amazing adventure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think 5/16" HT chain is fine for this size cat. We sat at anchor in winds > 85 knots for over 1/2 hour on that size chain and it showed no sign of distortion or damage. I do not expect to do that often!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct Nuddy. But in a shed and not used for a few years. I'm a grandpa now so I use the power cat for the family and the Multi 23 I just got I have started sailing to remember what wet fun is like. :) Then go home for a shower!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's Up Doc isn't particularly high strung. I have quite a bit of time on her, both with Keith on board, and substantial time with the present owner aboard. The first dismasting was before the carbon wing was put on; Keith can elaborate on that situation.

 

Her rig failures of the past few years have undoubtably been due to operator error. I was supposed to be onboard for the delivery that dropped the rig, but had a dissagreement with the owner about a number of issues (mostly personal) and stayed ashore, marking my last time sailing with him. A couple days later I got word she lost her rig and was being rescued by a trawler. A rig tune went unchecked causing her to lose the leeward shroud under sail; the inexperienced crew allowed her to come to wind...and...

 

She has had a lot of money poured into her over the past 10yrs. The repairs after the second dismasting were done at Walter Greene's yard. As with many boats she's being listed for pennies on the dollar. If I thought I could afford her or had a pratical use, I wouldn't hesitate to buy her.

 

Repeated rig failures seems a bit too much for us since its priority one is cruising and there will be only us 2 on board. With one person awake at night there needs to be a pretty big buffer zone for operator error. Once again not bagging the boat. Its awesome, just maybe not the best for a cruising couple for their first large cat with limited funds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think 5/16" HT chain is fine for this size cat. We sat at anchor in winds > 85 knots for over 1/2 hour on that size chain and it showed no sign of distortion or damage. I do not expect to do that often!

 

What is the cruising weight of your boat and what anchor do you have?

 

Does anyone want to buy a 80lbs CQR (manson version)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Darth has sent me some pics of his old Amazing 226 Audacious.

 

NOT MY BOAT.

 

 

 

post-41781-0-00403800-1395523103_thumb.jpg

post-41781-0-28976600-1395523110_thumb.jpg

post-41781-0-25330800-1395523126_thumb.jpg

post-41781-0-39013600-1395523135_thumb.jpg

post-41781-0-48308100-1395523146_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you look at the port steps pic it shows what looks like the sterns are just clear of the water, which is about where I am at ATM with my weight reductions. Nothing to compare the bows with though.

post-41781-0-34005500-1395523342_thumb.jpg

post-41781-0-97479900-1395523349_thumb.jpg

post-41781-0-43626400-1395523357_thumb.jpg

post-41781-0-13931100-1395523364_thumb.jpg

post-41781-0-98385400-1395523370_thumb.jpg

post-41781-0-46109200-1395523377_thumb.jpg

post-41781-0-90425600-1395523384_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I broke my main halyard.

 

It looks to be 14mm. The outer layers have been in the sun too long and they broke off in a rope clutch.

Short of leaving the halyard on the self tailing winch, I need to use the rope clutch or regular cleat (which means I loose tension). How do you guys do it?

 

Well the halyard is broken and I guess I will be up for a expensive replacement. My sail comes with a large sheave at the head. I assume this if for a 2:1 setup but it was not used. This is the time to use it. If I do, I will need a longer line. But since it will be 2:1, it will have half the stress on it. So this means I can go smaller right?

 

Is going to a 2:1 a good idea?

If the old line was 14mm, what size should I use for a 2:1 setup?

 

I'm not sure of the sail area but its a full batten large roach sail. Its quite heavy and can only be pulled 2/3-3/4 the way up by hand when the track has been freshly sprayed and you have a large strong person or 2 to pull it up. It would be nice to be able to pull it all the way up, and a reduction in stress at the rope clutch would be nice.

 

Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats right cunt. I like saying cunt on forums which is why SA and PF are so awesome. :D Not sure if I can fix this with a dog food can though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Get rid of the old style clutch and install a Constrictor/textile clutch. Greatest things since sliced bread.

 

And while you're at it, don't go 2:1, go to a Dyneema cored line, which you can then downsize anyway, and you'll need the Constrictor to hold the hi-tech line. Don't add weight and complexity with the 2:1. My halyard (40S Catana) is 11mm (7/16") Warpspeed and I feel fairly certain that the sail will tear before the halyard...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got a 660 sf. Full battened, big roach, Main with a 2:1 halyard. I use 7/16 Warpspeed and a lewmar clutch. I can get it all the way up by hand , or within a foot or 2 if I'm feeling tired. I like the 2:1 because there is less compression on the mast, and less load on the clutch. Disadvantage is you can't change the halyard without going up the mast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was thinking about stretch, how is my dodgy theory?

 

Stretch distance = tension x the length of the line. Since a 2:1 setup has around half the tension, and when the sail is fully raised the halyard will hardly be any longer, wouldn't there be much less stretch distance with the same halyard?? Say you are reefed heavily, the tension would still be half, but the halyard is now longer on a 2:1 as it needs to go back up to the top of the mast. But its no where near twice as long, so there would still be much less stretch distance. So therefore you could use a much smaller halyard to equal the stretch of a 1:1 setup?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dodgy theory checks out in my books. Core cross sectional area is the dimension you will be comparing between your old halyard and whatever you replace with, any idea what your old halyard was, more specific than 14mm?

The sheave in your head block, is it just a polished SS friction ring or is a turning block? We went from a Tylaska halyard shackle http://www.rigging.com.au/yacht_fittings_online/proddetail.php?prod=Tyl-H12 to an SRS one with a turning block http://www.rigging.com.au/yacht_fittings_online/proddetail.php?prod=srs3 , the friction reduction was very noticeable. if you only have the friction ring in the headboard give some consideration to getting one of the SRS shackles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For this size mainsail I'd suggest 2:1. Very nice to raise it 95% of the way by hand and not have to SLOWLY crank it 1/3 the way up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not know what is at the masthead to connect a 2:1 to, so I better find out.

 

The sail itself has nothing like the pictured shackles. Its actually has something like a 4" plastic sheave between the alloy headboards. ATM there is just a loop of line going around it that the halyard clips onto, which seems a bit rough as it appears the head was designed for a 2:1. I have never seen a large sheave like this in a headboard before.

 

The surveyor said the halyard was spectra / polyester double braid. I know for sure its a triple braid though. The outer 2 layers broke at the clutch. And the middle layer was that brittle I could break it by twisting it. However the silky white core was still in good condition. I do not know enough to ID this line more than this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sydney rigging specialists has done excellent work for us in the past, and are pretty good about selling you the correct stuff rather than whatever was most expensive.

We have also used one of the riggers in the RQ yard, can't remember the name but his work was top notch, well priced, and he is local to you.

There are a lot of options available in modern ropes, and you can do things like a 90% vectran halyard with a bit of dyneema spliced in for the turning points, wear covers for the clutch points, thickeners to assist in holding the rope in the clutch. Any good rigger will be able to tell you about this sort of thing, buying off a general cordage store you won't get the same knowledge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ranti, I am sure that piece of info is great. But we have a huge hole where our money used to be already, so there will an emphasis on doing everything DIY on this boat. I might look into the cover for the first and second reef points at the clutch. Does anyone have a link for me to check out what sort of splicing I would need to learn? I actually like learning about this stuff and doing it myself anyway :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what else have I done? I have swapped the big CQR with the 44 delta. I also have a 65 delta on my mono which I will sell. I was thinking of trading the 44 for the 65 and leaving it as my primary for good which will mean I dont need to buy a new $1000 anchor later. Do you think the 65 delta will do? My last boat weighed a bit more than this one, but has less windage. We found the anchor to hold well in all but bottoms with rocky rubble.

 

I replaced my cracked 200W solar panel. The company Low Energy Developments came in well and replaced it for free (it was damaged by the courier). I now have 800W of solar and used a cheap charge controller which works well. My batteries are fucked, but I want to get my system fully dialed in before I go lithium. Even with the rain we had recently (no direct sun), the batteries were still fully charged at 5pm with the fridge running on full tilt all day (it gets turned off at night thanks to the bad batteries) .

 

So I expect that my solar system should do us well for a live aboard with good batteries. The max I have seen is 44A from them, which is their rated current of 11A each. That's only equals 150W, which is below their rated power of 200W, but the VMP is at 18V, which can only be gained under idealistic conditions with an MPPT controller. The controller would cost much more than an extra $200 panel.

 

I have done a lot of reading on MPPT and I am not convinced it is worth it for my setup. When MPPT controllers come down in price for decent units I may install one per panel, which is the best way to go since the whole point of MPPT is to adjust the opperating conditions depending on environmental conditions of each pannel. On a boat like mine there are shading issues so one MPPT controller for the whole lot does not sound like the best use of the technology.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/50A-LCD-Solar-Charge-Regulator-Controller-12V-24V-PWM-/221184115760?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item337f99c430

 

456610678_o.jpg

 

 

 

I have also upgraded some of my G4 lights for 1.5W LEDs which cost something like $1.60 each. They are pretty bright but not as bright as the halogens. I can turn all 6 of them on and not even get a reading on my power monitor. Turn on a few halogens and its 5A!

 

After I purchased the 6 of those to try, I put in an order for 10 more and I also purchased a few of the more expensive 7.5W versions which cost a whopping $4.80 each, but are yet to arrive. I expect them to be even brighter than the halogens they will replace.

 

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/360854968454?var=630229738633&ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649


CB013451-5-betterdeals255.jpg

 

CB013451-9-betterdeals255.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, if you feel like learning about ropes and knots, there is a thread in gear anarchy that is testing all sorts of rope knots, splices, stitching etc, It is a massive and comprehensive thread, so finding what you actually need might be a bit difficult. http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?showtopic=154025&page=1.

Evans, one of the majors contributors to that thread has summarized some of it on his website, and he has a list of links for various knots and splices at the bottom http://www.bethandevans.com/load.htm

If your masthead fitting for the 2:1 halyard can fit it, a good knot might be a better choice than learning to splice on something as important as a main halyard. Depending on what rope you go with will change the knot you choose, but the Estar (detailed in the second link) seems pretty good for most applications.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I broke my main halyard.

 

It looks to be 14mm. The outer layers have been in the sun too long and they broke off in a rope clutch.

Short of leaving the halyard on the self tailing winch, I need to use the rope clutch or regular cleat (which means I loose tension). How do you guys do it?

 

Well the halyard is broken and I guess I will be up for a expensive replacement. My sail comes with a large sheave at the head. I assume this if for a 2:1 setup but it was not used. This is the time to use it. If I do, I will need a longer line. But since it will be 2:1, it will have half the stress on it. So this means I can go smaller right?

 

Is going to a 2:1 a good idea?

If the old line was 14mm, what size should I use for a 2:1 setup?

 

I'm not sure of the sail area but its a full batten large roach sail. Its quite heavy and can only be pulled 2/3-3/4 the way up by hand when the track has been freshly sprayed and you have a large strong person or 2 to pull it up. It would be nice to be able to pull it all the way up, and a reduction in stress at the rope clutch would be nice.

 

Thoughts?

Strength of the halyard is directly related to the weight of the boat. XL2 weighed 3 tonnes (OMR) and we tried halyards with breaking strength of 3.2 tonnes and broke them (not at the clutch). Had to go to breaking strength of 5 tonnes.

We tried all clutch types, with 1:1 and 2:1 halyards with and without sleeves and could not find a clutch that would not chop through the cover.

Finally used a Spinlok ZS Jammer which would hold the rope without damage. Trouble was it could not be released under load, we had to load the halyard back onto the winch and winch it up a couple of inches, then release the ZS, then the main could be lowered. Also we would hoist the main to the top, close the jammer and we would lose a couple of inches as the ZS took up. So we took off the ZS and always left the main halyard on the self tailing winch.

Another alternative is to use a clutch and a horn cleat. winch the main up through the clutch then take the halyard off the winch and make it fast on a horn cleat just below the clutch, then open the clutch and keep it open (I use a little bungee loop to hold it open). You can release from the horn cleat under load but it is much slower than releasing from a S/T winch.

 

Not knowing the weight of your boat, I would guess at using a 10 or 12 mm halyard at 2:1 and if you are using ball bearing cars you should be able to hoist all the way by hand, just using the winch for final tensioning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dennis<br />Love your boat. I have always used anchor buddies on my heavier boats. Was a tip from an old sailor in TI. Because of their size and windage, especially the barge, I always ran out the full 110m of 16mm chain and then an anchor buddy, 60 lb CQR on a noose around the chain and 30 m of rope. The boat mainly swings on the smaller anchor trying to drag the main chain . Sat at Airlie for a week with a cyclone hanging off shore with all manner of craft sailing by dragging their anchors and moorings. The anchor buddy holds the main cable flat on the seabed and also drags it sideways creating a lot more friction. Strongest gusts were recorded at 65 knots. I think a small modern anchor of about 15 lbs would suit your boat. Any other suggestions/thoughts? I know this is added weight but if you are going cruising its handy to come back to the boat after a shore visit and not empty vista where she used to be. Also if you loose the main anchor at least you will have something to continue with. Main anchor on the barge is 200kg, you won't need one like this on your boat Den. And always a long snubber to take the shock loading but you appear to have a handle on this. See you next time you are in the yard<br />Cheers<br />Bottman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nearly had a fire on the boat. Lucky my mate was there to pick something up. The boat was full of smoke and stunk of rotten egg. One battery was bubbling away furiously and overflowing with steaming acid. It was pulling the voltage down to under 12V and when he disconnected it the voltage went back up to 13.9V. So it seems it had shorted cells in that battery and it was copping the full brunt of 800w of solar. Bit of a worry as it might have exploded if left long enough.

 

I am getting the volvo folding props sorted. They had worn splines, but I found someone who can put new splines in for $250 each, which seems a good deal. This should make a huge difference in performance I hope.

 

All I done with the anchors was to get rid of the huge CQR and then swapped the 44lbs delta for a 55lbs delta which is now the primary. I need a smaller Danforth style for a stern anchor.

 

Also we broke the main halyard, and now I have a 2:1 12mm halyard to replace the 1:1 14mm.

 

If anyone wants to swap 50m odd of blue 12mm spectra let me know as I only used half a roll and would like another colour for the other halyards.

 

Cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Deguello D#150 - Lock's own years ago but been with John Brierley for many years - is now for sale in Hobart. Had a heap of work done recently - new rig, motors etc. $270K.

Ice cat do you know what happened to the D#150 Hippo (shortened from Latin for sea horse) that was built by Mike Mackenzie in Fremantle.? The last I heard it was in Adelaide, and then sold after Mikes death.

Dennisail is your boat actually built to plan? I was always under the impression crowthers topsides had more of a flattened angled gunnel shear panel rather than the roll on your boat? Andiamo IV out of Melboure may have been a 226a. We shared an anchored at Wilson's Prom years ago with Andiamo IV and I recollect it as looking very different..Deguello advert here http://www.brierleymarine.com.au/catamaranForSale.php

Regards Phillip

 

 

Hi just found this post while looking for some info on crowther design 150 and thought I would answer the query....

 

Hippo was not sold after Mike's death I still have her moored in Adelaide and am planning to go cruising again in the next 12 months.

I haven't been able to sail her as much as I would like in the last few years but am on the way to change that.

 

The reason why I was looking for info was because I need to replace the shaft bearings and was wondering if I needed to remove the rudders to do this....any advice gratefully accepted......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally got to take our cat out. Here is a vid of Bedar fine reaching at 10-13K in 16-21K of wind. Sailing with a reefed main off Moreton island.

 

In a few minutes the wind came from the front a little more and we cranked the Jib sheet on the worn out Jib. We were going mid 14s at around 50 deg (daggers up) when the pendant on the tack of the jib broke due do UV damage and the whole sail ripped out of the track.

 

No problems as we backwinded it behind the main and dropped it. But the jib seems to turbo the main as we went a lot slower even though the jib is small compared to even the reefed main. Still getting antiquated with the boat. We only have probably 15 hours sailing time on her so far. But it seems promising.

 

Out little dog is still a little concerned from all the commotion when we ran into a few probs off Henderson Reef with the sails dropped. We were set to go fishing when the engines died due to lack of fuel (well now I know to keep the tank over 1/8 full according to the gauge). I was carrying jugs just for this reason. One engine was out of fuel and the other had a melted muffler and no raw water flow thanks to a stuffed belt. Both probs were sorted easy enough.

 

Still ironing out the bugs, since this boat was purchased with pretty much nothing working right at all from engines to nav systems, steering, fridges and beyond. Its almost all up to scratch now besides it needs a paint job and new sails.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites