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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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fhrussell

RIP - Hobie Alter

85 posts in this topic

Sad day....fair winds Hobie and condolences to the Alter family.

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Sad news. A great man whom I had the opportunity to meet and talk to. Always sad when a Legend passes.

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I met Hobie when I did some consultant work for him on a few law suits. We was the real deal.

 

The world of sailing is a better place for your efforts Hobie.

Maybe full battened mains will catch on some day.

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it's getting thinner in the legend group each day.

RIP

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I wouldn't be sailing if it weren't for hobie. Had fun racing jr and jeff in alter cup qualifying, and hobie 16 nationals. The 18 nationals are still a highlight in my sporting career.

 

Thanks hobie.

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So sad and Fair Winds, Hobie. You gave us all the attitude that sailing is fun, and put that aspect into our sport. Thanks for all you have done!

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.

...I can't think of anyone that did more to bring the general populous into sailing.

 

 

....certainly Hobie Altered my life :rolleyes:

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i shall refurbish my hobie 16 in your honor sir.......RIP

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Our very, very long interview with Hobie from back in 2009; one of my first really big interview pieces and AFAIK the only really wide-ranging interview with him in two decades. From the Coolest Cat thread:

 

Part One

 

Part Two

 

Part Three

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We all knew it was coming sooner rather than later. Laurie A. said he had been going downhill since the "Hobie, Master of Water, Wind and Waves" book launch party back in December. (http://www.amazon.com/Hobie-Master-Water-Wind-Waves/dp/097042289X - buy it, it's pretty amazing.)

 

Still, it's a physical blow.

 

The sport has lost a great visionary. Condolences to Hobie P., Jeff, Paula, Susan and all the grandchildren.

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RIP Hobie, every kid with a cooler strapped to the mast and 2 girls in bikinis on a 16 will be thanking you for years to come. Thank you sir and Have Hobie Day!!

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RIP Hobie..Thanks to your 16, you introduced me to sailing and a love affair with the wind and water interface.

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Proudly keep going to fly his logo in the big boat off-shore race scene. His design and inventions became an evergreen and has been often copied by big name designers.

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A sad day. My family was just getting into sailing in Dana Point when he was doing the development of the Hobie 33. The attention to detail those guys were going through was amazing......it's no accident that it ended up such an iconic design.....and I wanted my folks to buy one when they came out sooooooo bad!!!

 

RIP Hobie

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A big loss. It's hard to think of a guy like that getting old - he'll always be a 30 year old surfer in my mind. He certainly lived a great life, on his own terms.

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Our very, very long interview with Hobie from back in 2009; one of my first really big interview pieces and AFAIK the only really wide-ranging interview with him in two decades. From the Coolest Cat thread:

 

Part One

 

Part Two

 

Part Three

 

 

IIRC, there's a quote of his to the effect of: "Don't let the hot racers run the racing program, they will ruin it" somewhere in there.

 

Savvy.

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Had a 14' Hobie Kat for Many years and took it everywhere

 

It was my 1st Jacuzzi as I would get it going and hop off hanging on to the tiller cross bar to fly (be dragged) through the water

 

after about 3 years of watching 16's Fly by thinking a 14' couldn't fly a guy goes by the other way Flying a 14 :o

 

Well I pulled it in till I was Flying a hull too and that was that from then on :rolleyes:

 

I'v had other Bigger Faster Kats but had Waaaaay more Fun on the 14'

 

Hobie had Perfect timing and the Right Ideas

 

At their Peak the Kats that Ruled Mission Bay and just about everywhere else Hobie, Prindle, NACRA Etc. were only possible as people lived in houses with Yards and Shores had Beach Storage

 

More Fun was Had on OPB's @ Night = Kat's along the shore in the 70's & 80's when you could have Open Fires and drink on the beach

 

Than was Ever had out on them on the water during the Day :)

 

It's a Better World for Hobie having done what he did when and How he did it !!!!!!!!!!!!! B)

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Who would have though that creating boats that made it fun for boys and girls to go sailing together off the beach would catch on?

 

So much fun for so many people.

 

Who wouldn't want that for their legacy?

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"Sell them a toy, and give them a game to play with it."

 

Thank you, Hobie. We'll miss you, and we'll keep playing the game.

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rip Hobie, thank you.

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Back in the late 70s I sold Hobies at a dealership, whilst I never raced them in any way, they were fun and introduced lots to the sport.

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Thanks for linking back to the interview, Mr. Clean. What a guy. I've held him up as one of the great American inventor/entrepreneurs for a long time, but his comments really underline how much he understood the importance of culture and the social context for which he was developing gear. The idea that the 16 was developed exactly to be sailable by a typical male/female as opposed to two guys is one of those subtle insights that's hard to have, especially when you're a guy, but key to success in the kind of Apple vs. Blackberry sense. Likewise many of his mechanical details, including the sand casted parts, have held up technically up to today.

 

It's sad that people go, and go they will, but I think Hobie Alter's spirit will always be there at the beach, when the sun's out and the water's warm. If you want to feel it, go rig a sailboat and go sailing, just for fun.

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Hobie 14 was the first cat I ever sailed, Hobie 14TJ the first boat I personally owned, bought from Kerli at Sailing Scene.

 

Hobie, your boats blew my teenage mind and changed my view of sailing. Thankyou!

 

 

 

Fair winds and clear skies.

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Our very, very long interview with Hobie from back in 2009; one of my first really big interview pieces and AFAIK the only really wide-ranging interview with him in two decades. From the Coolest Cat thread:

 

Part One

 

Part Two

 

Part Three

 

 

IIRC, there's a quote of his to the effect of: "Don't let the hot racers run the racing program, they will ruin it" somewhere in there.

 

Savvy.

Yep. Amongst a pile of other gems. I consider myself quite lucky to have had the chance to spend 6 hours on the phone with the man.

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As a kidde I sailled withe plentey groane ups. Mr Alter gotte me offe my asse an sailing with frendes. Thack you.

 

Hobie is aheroe of mine. RIP

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Never met the guy; but we had mutual friends. Hobie made cats that unwashed masses understand it's a great sport and fun. His cats made the common folk as Kirby did with the Laser in monohulls.

 

Sail on Hobie and we'll have a "Hobie Day" for you.

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What a tremendous contribution to the world he has left. He will be missed. His name and products will live on.

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We oughta take a lesson from those things that Hobie considered important - he wasn't out to get rich, he wasn't out to be famous, he wanted to help people enjoy themselves, and those other things were by-products of his ultimate goal. RIP, sir - you put smiles on many faces, and we could all hope to do as much w/our lives.


The H16 was my second sailing experience, after being a 4th mate on my uncle's Skipjack. It was *that* boat that taught me that sailing was somethin' other than work.

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What a bummer

 

10 years of my life misspent but never, ever regretted.

The parties, the friends. The Hobie life...

 

  • Whales sliding inches under the bows while laying on the bow made for a battlestar galactia scene off Bush I's Kennebunkport house as planes ferried above for GW I.
  • Grenading a rudder cam in a gale on Long Island Sound and sitting on the leeward hull for 45 miles getting plastered as a flatlander from Iowa on his 2nd boat ride ever learned how to trap off a wing in real time.
  • Beating a donzi in rough seas as they had to keep backing out as their props came out of the ocean.
  • Flying hulls past passing ferry boats. As the tourist started taking photos of the pretty boat, dropping the shorts, turning, and waving waiting to see how long for the cameras to drop along with their jaws.
  • Bet you didn't know you could pitchpole a Hobie 16 in 3 knots of wind if you try hard enough.
  • Single handing a f-18 with a-kite and doing donuts around a 45 foot racing monohull in a race. Rail meat laughing until the owner flipped out.
  • Sneaking up and flying hulls over the sterns of unsuspecting fishing boats and Rhodes 19s..
  • The parties that got so out of control.

 

You want to know how to save sailing?

Go study Hobie. He knew what had to be done.

Didn't need so help from US Sailing either.

Ask your parents about the Hobie life. Maybe they will share their stories with you.

The zenith of sail participation in the US.

 

Low cost, even racing.

The Hobie life was more important than some specialized do-dad.

Yet he introduced loose footed mains and rotating masts 20 years before the big boys caught on.

 

Fair winds Hobie.

And Thank You!

 

Forever

 

Got it up lately? Go fly a Hobie Cat.

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Owned Hobie 14 hull # 3766, sail # 4107 in 1971...

 

Put a jib on it before the turbo was invented.

 

There was the time I had half the JV cheerleader team aboard...

 

And we pitchpoled.

 

I Learned About Sailing From That!

 

Those were the "Golden Years" for sailing looking back on it all.

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When I was an early teenager I took off from Capo beach on an aqua cat on a windy day. I tight reached for all I could and hooked up with what I had previously considered a beach myth, the first Hobie cat proto. We engaged and broad reached off for miles as it got windier. I pitch poled and in my fourteen year old brain realized as i bounced off the mast that I had no idea how to get a cat back on its feet. I floundered trying to get the boat back up.

 

No worries, Hobie turned around and talked me through it all. For a fourteen year old surfing/sailing kid in 1964, well it was like BB King showing up in your worst moment and teaching you how to string and saving your life, all at once. I will never forget how gracious and helpful he was.

 

 

God Bless him and what an amazing amount of rides we gave the world.

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Sailed the 14 and 16 all the way through high school and college. Some of the most fun I've had racing all over southern CA. You will be missed. RIP

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The guy was possibly the most influential force sailing has ever had.

 

That kind of concept is impossible to quantify but I'd bet if you took a sailor's poll,

"Have you ever sailed on a Hobie?"

you would up with more yes than no responses.

Who else could say that.

 

I had an 18 back in the eighties. Some of my best days ever . . .

 

RIP Hobie

Wishing you Eternal Overhead with an offshore breeze.

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Having been involved with beach catamaran racing for over two decased I am hugely grateful to Hobie for creating one of the most enduring sailing classes in the Hobie 16. Certainly not that cutting edge anymore, the class still inspires competitive racing across the globe unlike many other classes. The friendliness and good times around the class are legendary, a bit of SoCal beach party.

 

Fair Winds

 

Also a good obituary by the LA Times:

 

www.latimes.com/obituaries/la-me-hobie-alter-20140331,0,2131754,full.story

 

edited to add LA Times URL

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Any Chance we could All use Hobie's mission in life as an answer to all the Questions about "What & How" to Save Sailing


self righteous <mid fleet racers have called me out for Not Playing their game (Na couldn't possibly ever have sailed)


Let's get sum Beach Kat, Fun Sailing Events going on our shores and I'll be out Sailing too (Again)


Ya the Pros wanna Barge the RC Boat or the Pin-End and Fark everyone over into "The Room"


HOBIE Was about None of That Shit !!!!!!!!!!!!


Ya he built Faster boats as requested - BUT I Loved what he started with "The 14" that I could sail on my own = Drunk w a Drunk Hottie laying out on the windward hull ahead of the tramp


Ya Back then No One Cared what you were doing out on the water


The Hobie 16 required a 2nd person to "Be Sailing" (No One Rides for Free)


I Preferred the 14 as a Guest could just Enjoy being out on the water often for the first time


No Muzic, No Cellphonz, No Top, No Problemz


​Those were daz where inventions exceeded and enhanced regular life and people enjoyed Enjoying Life


I have a world of respect for "most" all Racers - but those who think that those who don't race can't have ever sailed HA - Ya Gut No Fucking Idea !!!!


Hat's Off to the Hobie Fleet 19 in San Diego (Back in the Day)


I personally never found the fun of a Hobie 14: in my Hobie 16, Hobie 18, Prindle-18 or NACRA 7.2


They were All So Much MORE than the 14 - BUT it was Never the Same having to go out with Guys or Yelling for Babes to do something to get around


I Truly Feel the Hobie 14 was the Ideal Boat as Hobie desired to bring to the Masses


If You knew how to sail a Hobie 14 and had whatever it took to have a HAWT Babe desire to come along


you could rig the boat at the ramp - load the ChillyBin and head out for a Sail and a Root someplace out in the middle or off out of the way somewhere


Ya Klub Racing is where it;s at these daz - :lol:


Hobie You Brought me the Most Fun (and perhaps gave a start to many children) of my Sailing Daz on the water


as well as the Boat-ties on the Sand of South Mission Beach on those Hot Summer Nights of my Youth :o :o


I had before my Hobie 14 and still have to this day other sailboats - BUT None Other Brought me More Fun Times much less in as many places as did my Hobie 14 (w No Jib)


How About we Honor the Sprit and Intent of Hobie Alter and Kick off some FUN Sailing Events !!!!!!


Using Hobie's Thoughts and intents as the deed of gift


Get Ready to TRICK Out Your Hobie 14 (with a Babe and a PicnicBasket)

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i met hobie at the south african hobie nationals in the early 80's,

my dad crewed for him + they did pretty well.

 

hobies got me sailing properly + were the centre of a well mis-spent youth

 

25 years later + i'm back on a hobie 16

 

r.i.p. hobie

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Thanks for all the boats, and especially for changing the world by employing those Ketterman bros.

 

Never thought I'd live to see the venerable paddle rendered obsolete, but that's what the paddle on my Hobie Adventure Island is.

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another break through was the Hobie 17

A high performance single hander for those racing captains so obnoxious on the water they could not keep a crew. ;<)

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First boat I ever sailed on was a Hobie 16- dad used to take us out and flip the boat on purpose while we were on the trapezes- he used to tell us to dive as far as we could and try to land on the "H" logo on the mainsail as the masthead hit the water. Ripping around on that thing was the best- Years later it was the first boat I ever sailed by myself.

 

Been in the sailing biz ever since.... Can't imagine doing anything else-

 

Thanks Hobie- fair winds.....

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I only met him once; there was warmth and friendship in his handshake.

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Taught me how to surf, in 1957. Good guy, will be missed.

 

Cheers,

 

MikeR

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Hobie Sr really got it. Sailing wasn't so much about the boats as it was about the people, the parties and the culture. He took what he knew (Surfing and making boards) and gave us all some of the funnest, innovative craft ever seen at the time. In 1971 I sailed my first Hobie cat in Denmark. It was an experience that changed my need for speed on the water forever. Thank you Hobie. Condolences to Jeff, Hobie Junior and the rest of the Alter family and friends. I would normally say fair winds and following seas but in Hobie's case- 20 knot winds and huge surf to you Mr. Alter...That's way more your style.

 

Mark Michaelsen

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Hobie Alter's reach went far beyond life on the water. I'll never forget Clive Fessler delivering the

keynote speech at the annual American Sail Advancement Program dinner in Atlantic City in 1993

or 1994. Fessler was the VP of Marketing and Sales for Harley-Davidson Motorcycles, and was

widely credited with saving Harley. He gets up and begins his speech by saying he has no idea

why ASAP invited him to speak on the subject of how he saved Harley. He says he learned

everything from Hobie Alter. Then he runs through a litany of things like how he stole the idea

for HOG (Harley Owners' Group) from the Hobie Class Association. And licensing merchandise

with the Harley name from the same stuff Hobie did 20 years earlier. etc. So he asks where

is Hobie Alter and would he come up and take a bow. A couple of the old guard began running

for the exits, while a couple of us cat and dinghy sailors hanging out in the back just laughed.

Of course, none of the old guard thought to invite Hobie Alter. Maybe that's why sailing is the

rut it's in.

 

Thank you Mr. Alter. Your importance to sailing and beyond can not be overstated.

 

I agree with Dry Armour, may the surf be knarly and the wind nuking wherever you are.

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Here's to a truly great man in the world of sailing and surfing. I sailed/sold Hobies in my younger days and had a chance to meet him at a dealer convention in SD. Nice guy. He'll be missed.

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For so many of us - myself included - our first boat was a Hobie Cat. Hobie's vision and creativity led to a machine that transformed my life, and led not to just a long term relationship with sailboats, but also to a life-long friendship with someone who happened to be walking down the beach one day and helped me launch the cat in return for a sail.

 

RIP Hobie - your mark has been indelibly inscribe upon all of us.

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Everybody should go sail on a Hobie Cat at they very next opportunity. Doesn't matter how beat up and bedraggled the boat may be. If you can hoist a sail on it and make it go Hobie would approve.

 

No shirt, no shoes, no boredom. Sail/surf/smile on, Hobie.

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Hobie had a house on Beach Road in Capo Beach. My father had a house in Shore Cliffs and then later on the cliff above Beach Road. We used to keep an Aqua Cat on the Beach at Poche and then later a Unicorn A Class catamaran. I recall Dad and Hobie used to draw systems in the sand to bounce ideas off each other. Occasionally, Jeff or Hobie Jr. would be out sailing when I'd be out on our Unicorn and we'd line up against one another. While we have only been acquaintances over the years, it has been a privilege to have known Hobie and his family over the years. He definitely made sailing more accessible to the general public.

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16 years old and Catalina on the horizon.

 

What do you do with a Hobie 16?

 

Have lunch on the island.

 

We made it back to Cabrillo by sailing to the bonfires on the beach.

 

Thank you Mr. Altier...

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I worked for Hobie Cat in the early 80's...new factory was open in Oceanside running two shifts to keep up with demand...R&D was still in Capistrano, they were dizzy years...Hobie and the Wake brothers were working on the 33, and Phil Edwards and him were at the same time working on the Hobie Power Skiff which gets left out of sa lot of discussions but was/is a helluva toy...got to spend a lot of time with himself, Jr. and Jeff...gonna miss you "Pops"...

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first mutihull i've (as hundreds ou even thousands of people) ever sailed was a hobie 14. it was a no-return path - i've become a multihull addict.

 

thanks mr. alter for having brought multihulls to the masses.

 

r.i.p. and fair winds.

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Hobie Sr really got it. Sailing wasn't so much about the boats as it was about the people, the parties and the culture. He took what he knew (Surfing and making boards) and gave us all some of the funnest, innovative craft ever seen at the time. In 1971 I sailed my first Hobie cat in Denmark. It was an experience that changed my need for speed on the water forever. Thank you Hobie. Condolences to Jeff, Hobie Junior and the rest of the Alter family and friends. I would normally say fair winds and following seas but in Hobie's case- 20 knot winds and huge surf to you Mr. Alter...That's way more your style.

 

Mark Michaelsen

 

definately.

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RIP An amazing man.

 

I was into his surfboards before I knew what a sailboat was. I still have

my last custom Hobie (9'8" stringerless beauty) hanging in my living room.

 

It was an honor to be his customer.

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I remember, waaay back in the mid-60's, when Yachting magazine was actually about sailing and racing. The magazine held an annual invitational event to race high-speed dinghies side-by-side to answer the "who's fastest" argument. I-14s, FDs, 505s, etc. The A-scow always won.

 

Until Hobie showed up with his little Hobie 14 beach toy and blew them all away. They treated him pretty much like the NYYC treated Herreshoff with Amaryllis. "Please go away."

 

I'm glad he was around to see the AC in foiling cats. He must have enjoyed having the last laugh.

 

But, what a missed opportunity for sailing not to see what he was doing.

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A big loss indeed. I had no idea that Hobie was short (?) for Hobart. Clearly destined from birth to change sailing.

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A big loss indeed. I had no idea that Hobie was short (?) for Hobart. Clearly destined from birth to change Alter sailing.

 

fixed

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My first sailboat was a Hobie 16 and had some of my best times sailing on her. Even named our dog after the boat and thus the Hobie Dog roamed this earth.

 

Thank you for all your contributions to both surfing and sailing, both sports are better off because of your life's work. RIP

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First sail at 10 years old on a H16 out on the trapeze, got hooked instantly for life. Have fun where you are now.

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I surfed a green and grey Hobie 10-2 on the North Shore of Oahu in 1965 before I ever saw a Hobie 14 in 1969. But in Florida, the 16s were multiplying by 1976 and I had to have one. Later I met Hobie at the second Hobie 18 Worlds at Treasure Island Hotel, Daytona Beach, 1982. We went up on the roof with a radio to help out the rescue crews looking for 18s in trouble in the nasty offshore storm. (There weren't any). Hobie was a great guy, and I will always smile whenever I hear his name. I spent many happy hours working hard for prized trophies back in the day with all of them- 14T, 16, 17, 18 and 20, and it was great wonderful fun.

 

Hobie, may you always be trapped out on a H16 in 16 knots forever, or until you want to surf a big one into the beach, and slide up with a goofy grin. Goodbye buddy.

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My first sailboat race was on a Hobie 16 in the early mid 80s. Had only windsurfer prior to that. Genuinely sad news. RIP....

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Fair winds & following seas, amigo. Thanks for the memories! Lanikai & Kailua beach = perfect parking spots for yer boats waiting for a young kid & his girlfriend to go out sailing for an afternoon.

 

peace, bro!

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Sailed a '16 for years and years.

Some of my happiest sailing memories.

The '16 was responsible for somegreat travel within the UK, and into Europe, too.

 

Met an ageing relative from Florida a few years back, just after i bought a new '16, back in 200 or so.

He had owned one of the first 3 Hobie 14's.

 

HA himself gave him a brand new boat in exchange for the old one, as he wanted one of the very first boats 'back in the fold'.

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As a SoCal kid, Hobie loomed large in my life, basically who I wanted to be when I grew up.

 

I learned to sail on a 14 (thank you, Newport Beach Parks & Rec), raced 16s & 18s through high school and college, rode Hobie skateboards as a kid, flew a Hobie Hawk RC glider, and wore Hobie sunglasses.

 

Thanks Hobie, for the inspiration, for all that neat stuff, and for all the joy that came with it.

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I worked for Hobie Cat in the early 80's...

and Phil Edwards and him were at the same time working on the Hobie Power Skiff which gets left out of sa lot of discussions but was/is a helluva toy...

 

 

 

+1! A friend has one of those. I never noticed them when they were being produced and admit to being a bit skeptical when I first saw the boat with the Hobie logo on it. A Hobie powerboat? How good could that be?

 

It's good, bordering on great for the size.

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One of my older(!) friends (a WWII artillery officer) met Hobie in Detroit at a 1970 boat show, having never even seen a fiberglass cat before. Hobie had driven his old stationwagon from Dana Point to Detroit with a 14 on a trailer and another on the surfboard rack, My friend Austin Freye, bought #005 on the spot, and Hobie drove to and delivered it in Muskegon. Many kids had their first cat ride on this #5 green boat surfing in Lake Michigan, and some of us have kept up this fun cat craziness even today.

 

I think Hobie was the Henry Ford of catsailing. Thanks Hobie.

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He definitely followed Henry Fords idea of what a production line should look like. A square rail track around the room, production started just outside of the spray booth where the guy spraying gelcoat would pop the finished parts out, polish up the molds (p-s decks p-s hulls) and then apply the gelcoat, in the next corner was first layup, in the next corner was vacuum (where the foam core was installed) and the last corner was second layup and then back to the first station where the parts would be popped out while somewhat "green" still and the process would repeat itself. In between each corner station was a set of molds that were in the curing process of what had just been applied.

 

One building had the 14's another large building housed the 16 and 18 shops (hated doing first layup in the narrow bows of the 18's) and a large room where using patterns the rolls of fiberglass material were cuts and all packaged up so you always had your material all ready to go.

 

The real fun was out in the yard (lunch runs to Pete's Liquor Locker!) where the hardware was installed, hulls with defects were repaired and the truck was loaded for shipment up to the Irvine factory where they were mated up with their masts, sails, etc....

 

The plug and first hull for the 33 was built in the dagger board shop, while in process Hobie would come in with one of those large thermal coffee cups that and (not kidding here) would squat atop of one of those tall metal stools with the round tops and drink his coffee and just look at the plug/hull. You could see where the board shaper in him was seeing things as they progressed.

 

Eventually ended up over in the R&D building doing mold repair and misc stuff.....at the time it was heaven for me.

 

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How Hobie Alter influenced my sailing:

 

I started sailing in a Naples Sabot when i was 8. I progressed to the FJ when I was 12. I was enamored, tho, with the P-Cats and Malibu Outriggers that I would see at some regattas. They were so fast and cool.

 

The summer of 71 we spent 4 weeks renting a house near Pines at Hanalei Bay. I was 14. There were 4 or 5 Hobie 14s on the beach down near the pier. I was given access to one and took it out often during that vacation. I weighed about 110 lbs. Flying a hull (which definitely puckered my sphincter), surfing little waves at Middles, racing the other H14s using a big tri with naked girls on it as one of the marks.....I became fully hooked on multihulls. That Christmas Santa brought me and my older brother a Hobie 16. We named it Hanalei and raced it successfully for several years.

 

I still sail on mono-slugs occasionally, but I have been a devotee to multis for over 40 years. And it all started on a Hobie 14. With my Weta, I have come full circle: like the H14, it is a small, light, singlehanded, simple multi that is tons of fun. Thank you Hobie.

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I had been racing little sabot like boats on Sydney Harbor back in the 70's, A friend brought a H14'to the beach, Southerly was up and I launched from Rose Bay right into a screaming reach. And that was the end of that.

 

I worked at a sailboat rental in MDR, CA when I was in highscool that rented 16's, When business was slow we would take them out and reach across the basin couple hundred yards. We would race eachother to do tricks like stalling in mid air and doing back flips into the water, we got it so we could stand up and while flying and one guy did a handstand once. Owner didn't mind. It brought it business.Those boats took a lot of abuse.

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Good morning,

 

When our first child was born I decided the boy would need a boat for bath time. So I bought the kid a H14 Turbo! Like all kind Hobie sailors my son immediately gave me permission to use his Hobie as if it was my own. The whole "sharing is caring" thing.

 

And then like so many other families we went through two family dogs called Hobie.

 

Our kids referred to the boat as the "boat with two arrows". We were hooked on boats with lots of arrows. In later years we got two more boats with three arrows. A Dragonfly and a Farrier tri.

 

All started with our humble Hobie.

 

Fair winds.

 

Regards,

Multisail.

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I'm sure Mr. Hobie was a decent guy and surely he had done a lot for sailing...

 

So I really don't want to pee into your decaf latte, but still...

 

Back in the nineties me and a couple of sailpunks bought an old Pantercraft Tornado, too battered and rotten to be competitive in class regattas and therefore cheap as feces. Any time we got sober enough to actually take it to the lake, we used to sail circles (literally!!!) around those would-be hipster couples on their new, slow, yellow, ugly, daggerboardless, banana-shaped Hobie 16's. - Any time. Any lake. Any wind.

 

Anyway. RIP Hobie! Fair Winds and watnot!

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Surf breaks daggerboards. Glad you were having fun. No question there are better cats than the old Hobie designs, but how many changed the world as much?

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Wow....breaking news....a Tornado is faster than a Hobie 16.

 

Sorry I missed the paddle-out. From the pics it looked like maybe Mantis (the sister to his Hobie 60 Katie Sue) was out there? Very cool that they had Hobie 14 #4 right in the middle of the action. Looked like a fitting tribute to a great guy!!!

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Motored past Hobie's place in the San Juan Islands this weekend, past where Hobie used to keep his power cat, and thought of all the good times I had with my wife on our Hobie 18 #116 back in the day (the 16th ever made!). Named it "911" for the sail number when we capsized. Which was often.

 

When I got back to the marina, there was a dad and his kid sailing in on their Hobie Wave.

 

Hobie's everywhere there's water and a bit of breeze it seems.

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Motored past Hobie's place in the San Juan Islands this weekend, past where Hobie used to keep his power cat, and thought of all the good times I had with my wife on our Hobie 18 #116 back in the day (the 16th ever made!). Named it "911" for the sail number when we capsized. Which was often.

 

When I got back to the marina, there was a dad and his kid sailing in on their Hobie Wave.

 

Hobie's everywhere there's water and a bit of breeze it seems.

 

I'm not usually that big a fan of funny boat names, but that may be because most just aren't that funny to me. 911 is a riot. :lol:

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