Bob Perry

10 mill$ poweryacht capsize during launch in Anacortes

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Northern Marine has endured many struggles over the past fifteen years. Buyouts, change of management, downturn in the economy, etc.

 

The current incarnation of the company rose from the "ashes of the previous". A good look at that picture suggests the hull form is the same as the previous Northern Marine expedition trawlers (used the previous molds). But that superstructure is new and looks more substantial than the original NM designs.

 

I understand previous models on that hull do have internal ballast. Question is, was the ballast adjusted to compensate for the larger superstructure?

 

Also, the previous launchings by Northern Marine I have witnessed over the years always involved a "two wheeled" dolly fore as well as aft. I wonder if this "tricycle" dolly arrangement contributed to the disaster (seems plausible to me).

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I agree, the design just looks absurd and doomed. The launch procedure might have had nothing to do with what happened.

 

Still, the single point of support at the bow, visible in the video when the boat is being moved (and in the bow-on screen shot posted earlier), looks very wrong. Especially when a far superior support system with two widely spaced sets of wheels is visible at 2:00 in the same video (below):

 

Baden_bow2.jpg

 

Which one did they use for the launch?

 

Baden_bow.jpg

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There's a lot of discussions of the 'whys' in this thread, but you all seem to have missed the obvious.

 

That thing is fuckin' hideous, it's so nasty it stripped every branch off the ugly tree when it fell into the yard.

 

The best thing that could of happened was that it was never built, the second best thing would have been to have strangled at birth, which is effectively what happened.

 

There really is someone up there looking out for us, and he was on top of his game last night.

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This was my thought too. Absolutely no need for persons aboard during the launch. Put tag lines out to grab from a towboat and take it to the berth.

 

Any guessing on tonnage here? 230+? That dolly system is seriously undersized.

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So, perhaps, launching off a travel lift may have been a better choice. ?

As a complete bit of serendipity, over the long weekend I was smoking a cigar watching the gong show that takes place at the municipal boat ramp and a pair of guys managed to turtle their dinghy right on the ramp. Never even got it unhooked off the trailer.

 

It was impressive how quick it flipped with only the stern floating a few inches off the bunks. I imagine it was similiar, just in miniature.

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All the inherent stability of a tricycle.

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That is fuckin' ridiculous - that thing would be unstable on a lake. Picture a couple of dozen drunks on the top deck and dozens more on the other decks. An accident that couldn't wait to happen.

 

I don't know any details about this one, but it looks just like one of the floating apartments ind Discovery Bay here. I am told most of them dont actually move, other than to go to the yard every year or so. Everything runs off shore power (vs 12/24v) and there is only enough battery for a short time and a generator that covers a fraction of the load for the 'boat'.

 

Still you think it would float for a bit.

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I think LeeJerry has it right. The IOR boat analogy is a simpler way of putting it. Not having a cradle to support the bow may have been a costly mistake.

 

How do we know they didn't launch bow first? Or maybe it would have worked better if they had?

 

Hard to believe that stern lifted much weight before it would have been submerged. Then again, with the limited support at the bow, it probably wouldn't take much to make it unstable.

 

There has to be video of the launch somewhere... What is taking so long to see it?

 

P.S. Here's a vid of a smaller Northern Marine 58 being launched stern first at the same ramp?

 

Load that sucker up with crabpots and it would be more tippy than the one that flipped.

 

And a few of them have done that too.

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Just read the blog entry posted earlier. I think I was clearly off base with the first post.

 

I'll put money on the stern was floating while the bow got pushed up thing those guys were talking about earlier.

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.

 

...holy FAAK'nFugly!....did someone bumble with the blueprints and stick in an extra floor?!?

 

.....you build ugly--you deserve what you get!

 

 

......certainly noooo thought to appeasing sea-gods with this design,,,something that shipbuilders in Taiwan take so seriously that each 3rd year they build a very fine large boat,,,and BURN it!!

...if you don't occasionally stop and make an offering,the gawds will -take- one as they wish!! :huh:

 

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB125315178060618481

 

AW-AH283_burnbo_D_20090917081851.jpgAW-AH283_burnbo_D_20090917081851.jpg

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That seiner appears to have a very different hull form than the flipper. I think I see a deep chine on the seiner. Compare the relative amounts of boat above and below the DWL.

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Compare the relative amounts of boat and crabpots above and below the DWL.

 

Thats how I was thinking of it.

 

I see the chines though. I have just seen how many pots those guys can stack on a deck. To me it seems, once she was loaded up, to be similar proportions to the flipper. And those are USUALLY ok.

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The seiner looks like they got the bulb turned upside down when they stuck it on the hull! A bulb is supposed to push the bow wave up earlier to 'fool' the water that the hull has a longer waterline for a higher hull speed. This bulb looks more like one of those round rubber toe brakes that you used to see on roller skates for braking. The bulb certainly looks like it would accomplish that. Bob will tell you that you can't really 'fool' the water anyway...

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Compare the relative amounts of boat and crabpots above and below the DWL.

 

Thats how I was thinking of it.

 

I see the chines though. I have just seen how many pots those guys can stack on a deck. To me it seems, once she was loaded up, to be similar proportions to the flipper. And those are USUALLY ok.

 

What I noticed, on the fishing boat, was much, much more hull under the water.

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So. Why was someone in the engine room during the launch?

 

Round here that's a big NO NO!

 

Standard procedure here to have someone in the engine room as soon as the seachest intake and major through hulls are under water, BUT we launch with a large travelift or for the larger yachts a synchrolift and the launching procedure is stopped while the boat is immersed but still supported by the slings or chocks. Nobody is allowed aboard before this point in the launch process though. The reason for doing it this way is to check every through hull, packing gland etc for leakage before putting the boat all the way in. After that the generators, then main engines are started and the boat is driven from the slings under her own power.

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Compare the relative amounts of boat and crabpots above and below the DWL.

 

Thats how I was thinking of it.

 

I see the chines though. I have just seen how many pots those guys can stack on a deck. To me it seems, once she was loaded up, to be similar proportions to the flipper. And those are USUALLY ok.

 

What I noticed, on the fishing boat, was much, much more hull under the water.

The seiner has a lot more hull in the water in the pic. But after you load her up and the WL hits the chines and displacement per inch of submersion (sorry I dont know the technical terms here) goes up. Once you have 4-5-6-7 (however many they go) layers of pots stacked all the way to the stern, wont the proportions be more similar?

 

I don't know. I was a carpenter once, but I cant hang a picture without a level, so maybe my eye isnt so good.

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There is just a lot more boat, as BJ says, under the water on the seiner. So there is more volume and more stability. Those chines move volume outboard and can generate a lot of Rm when heeled. Compare that to the soft bilge turn of the flipper boat. Load the seiner up and you'l have even more hull in the water. It's "pounds per inch immersion". Maybe "submersion" is the correct term for the flipper.

 

I agree with Rasper, that is one funky looking bulb of mystery. It's kind of like a Smurf nose.

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There are all sorts of bulbs. One of the problems of fitting a bulb to a 58 ft limit seiner is that the boat cannot be any longer than 58 ft (the limit) to fish salmon in Alaska. With these boats being almost all waterline these days it can be tough. The bulb I designed for our 58 ft seiner is sort of the oposite of the one on the NM seiner. Skippers of our boats reported big shudders when the boats pitched into a wave. It was caused by the water collapsing over the top of the bulb where it intersects the stem. We basically filled the area in over the top of the bulb creating the big shnoz. Since these bulbs are more for pitch attenuation on these seiners (whose l/b is now approaching 2) we were not too worried about increased economy but the boats are still more efficient than non bulbed ones.

 

post-25831-0-81873000-1400599481_thumb.jpgpost-25831-0-88736500-1400599457_thumb.jpg

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With modern computing facilities getting an accurate stability polar for any vessel just takes getting the numbers to crunch.

To get it so wrong means some one screwed up big time.

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Under the circumstances, this is the best possible thing that could have happened. From the former captain's blog:

 

 

We were commissioned with building an exceptional yacht for an exceptional man with the sole, ambitious purpose of a complete global circumnavigation.

 

Much better to have it fall over where you can easily wade ashore, rather than 1000 miles out in 10,000 ft. deep water.

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Well, all the indications are that it failed the recommended inclining test at launch.

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Just goes to show looks can be deceiving and photographs can mislead. The huge cartoonish superstructure makes the underbody look inadequate but the stability report does indicate the boat meets USCG stability criteria, at least on paper. This makes the bad launching preparation scenario seem like a more likely cause. Time will tell.

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It would not be the first weight study that was wrong and with the VCG wrong the stability study is not worth much.

 

Is the boat still being supported by the launching trucks at this point? It doesn't look to me like there is enough boat in the water to replicate those stability figures.

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Tad:

VCG 7.57' above DWL?

 

7.57 ft above Baseline Bob. I think they are using the bottom of the keel for baseline, that's what we do.

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Ok, that puts the VCG right about where I estimated it, at the lower half of those hull windows.

I also see the weight study mentions 17 LT of ballast to be added. I don't think that would have been there at launch. Although it appears that ballast only added 3 degs to the max Rm

 

What do you think Doug L.?

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Tad:

VCG 7.57' above DWL?

 

I'm taking "draft midships" as the baseline, the weights are all positive and up from baseline. Yacht designers think of VCG in relation to waterline, and usually only consider one load case, naval architects look at VCG in relation to a baseline, often the fairbody line at midships. This is done as the waterline is a moving target, and when the boat carries 15,000 gallons of fuel you must consider various load cases and waterline heights.

 

Draft at lightship is 5.879' and page 2 of the Stability Evaluation gives VCG at 8.7'....so VCG is 2'10" above waterline at lightship. The numbers for full load are different(she was launched at less than lightship). At full load draft is 6.49' and VCG is at 7.57'...VCG is 13" above waterline at full load. This seems unlikely to me, in a boat this shallow and this high I would expect VCG to be at the main deck or above a bit. But Jose has more experience than I on this type of boat.

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Baden_roll1.jpg

 

 

This picture makes it look like the keel may not even be wet yet (although the pic is fuzzy with a boat in the way) and she is already on the way over. Therefore, it does not look like a launch stability problem anymore, but more like a problem with the trailer system:

  • Did they drive off the side of ramp?
  • Did the blocking on the port side give way (slide or crush)?
  • Did the suspension fail?
  • Tires blow out?
  • Other?

 

As I said, this now looks like the failure was before she hit the water. (Not sure this is consistent with eye witness accounts, but they are often erroneous.)

 

 

Where’s the video the stills came from?

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I've attended launches from off of the beaches in the Virgin Islands and Grenadines of big native sloops and schooners and one gringo built APaul Johnson 'Venus' ketch. They are dragged on log rollers (these days they use FG reverse osmosis cartridges from the resort water plants!) and then kedged through the shallows laying over on their sides in much the same attitude that the NM boat exhibits. Then after a big pig roast with plenty of rum, the whole community lines up and the ballast pigs and stones are transferred out to the awaiting vessel in a sort of 'bucket brigade'. Gradually the vessel rolls increasingly upright and gains its stability and the process stops shy of fully ballasted. The builders don't do final ballast and trim until the spars and outfitting are completed so the boat sits a bit high on her lines but nowhere what we have seen in these two examples of launchings by NM. One neat trick I learned from one of the old timers was to not take the first ballast right down to the keel but to stack it on the rail in order to make the boat actually heel over more at the beginning. I inquired why and he told me that the gunnel would get higher and it would be a lot more work lifting the ballast over the rail so they get the rail right down to the water before then starting the transfer the ballast over to the centerline along the keel. The last of the ballast is on board long before the boat starts coming back upright. You can learn a lot from those old Island boatbuilders, they didn't have much in the way of machinery and fancy engineering, but worked from a long tradition handed down from the boatwrights of the Royal Navy and the New England whaling fleet.

 

carriacou_launch1.jpg

 

Launch party on St John

 

20120707-133039.jpg

 

 

Here is a good article on the building of the 'Breath' on St John.

 

http://southjerseyexplorer.com/category/the-story-of-the-sailing-ship-breath-st-john/

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I just got VALIS back from the boatyard in Anacortes -- they launched us on Monday morning. They had to use an alternate launching ramp, since this giant capsized power yacht, barges, and cranes were "occupying" the regular ramp (the boatyard I used has a fancy fork-lift for haul-out and launching). There were helicopters buzzing overhead and reporters swarming the docks -- we were less than 100 yard from the thing.

 

One of the boatyard employees told us that they had to snake a garden hose into the boat to get fresh air to the guy trapped in the engine room. I also heard that one of the stabilizer vanes may have been punched through the hull during the launch. If true, this probably didn't help matters.

 

Anyway, we had a nice trip back to Friday Harbor. Some motoring, some sailing, some tacking, and some more motoring. We're almost ready for the Pac Cup!

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Would make sense that those stablizer wings would damage the hull if it rolled far enough during the launch. The roll may have been OK but the stablizer probably was the final nail in the coffin for that thing.

 

Perhaps the husband figured out a way to keep the wife off the boat? Make the super structure high enough that she gets sea sick just sitting on the sun deck at the dock. bingo hubby gets a wife free zone? At least till the heavy side ends up being the bottom side?

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Where’s the video the stills came from?

I have no idea if the still photos were originally from a video or not. I grabbed them from the video in the same post.

 

There _HAS_ to be better video and photos of the launch than what we've seen so far...?

 

If you look very closely at the three stills I posted, the boat appears to be further into the water in the second and third pics than in the first one, and I don't think the camera position moved much. That would be consistent with the photo and eye witness account by Wes Fridell, that the boat tilted, everyone stopped for awhile, and then proceeded to launch.

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Rasper:

Is that you fourth from the left in your younger days?

 

 

No Bob, but I know most of that motley crew in that photo. I was shocked to stumble across this white guy building an Airex boat on the old fishermans beach at Haulover Bay on the far East End of St John. There was a makeshift shed of tarps and scrap tin out behind a little ramshackle West Indian cottage and I poked my head in expecting to hear adzes and caulking irons ringings out. No, a guy in a paper suit with a big grinder making noxious clouds of FG dust! When he knocked off and we got to talking I asked why in the world he would build a FG/Airex boat out here at the ends of the earth and he just smiled and said, "Because I live here..." Cant argue with that! I'll see if I can find a link to a book he wrote that you might enjoy, a real 'different drum' kind of guy.

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anyone familiar with the term "Top hamper"... ?

 

Top·hamper

 

[top-ham-per]

noun Nautical .

1. the light upper sails and their gear and spars, sometimes used to refer to all spars and gear above the deck.
2. any unnecessary weight, either aloft or about the upper decks.

 

In this case, most of the boat. Considering how little hull there is below the waterline on this thing, it'd be most of the superstructure.

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I've heard it used to describe a well endowed female, as in 'ample top hamper'. I think this boat qualifies. There was something about the name 'Baden' which translates as 'Blood Baron' but I think it will be known as the 'Overly Bodacious Baden' after this.

 

Bull-and-shield-MASTER.png

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Family:

I used "toplofty" in my blog.

 

If you haven't checked my blog recently please do. I just added some interesting photos.

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Geez--

Not since yesterday. Slow down will you? My lips are getting chapped from having to form the words while following along...

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Crap. I hope there's not gonna be a pop quiz. I missed the "toplofty" reference the first time I read it.

I'm taking notes next installment.

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The designer must have been more of a Vegas plastic surgeon than a naval architect. I've you're going to put "Bolt-ons" that big onto the deck, you best have some junk in the trunk to balance things out.

If not...herein is Exhibit 1 for the malpractice suit to follow...

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From the videos, it looks like this may have blocked Icon in it's slip. Hope they get it cleared out so that Icon can get to Swiftsure.

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Coming in late to this, I did note that someone that was quoted that the stbd stabilizer was heard to hit some rocks (probably meant the port one given the port lean in photos) and also that the flooding started before she was rolled to the point where the gunnel would be going under. So i'll speculate that the stabilizer (which is as seen is huge) took a bunch of the weight, more than it was designed for and got pushed in and the flooding started that way.

 

JMHO

 

 

TOG

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Thanks raspy, Jose, bob, tad and everyone fer all that teknikal learnin' I gettin' here.

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I've heard it used to describe a well endowed female, as in 'ample top hamper'. I think this boat qualifies. There was something about the name 'Baden' which translates as 'Blood Baron' but I think it will be known as the 'Overly Bodacious Baden' after this.

They can play this one when the insurance and law types start arriving...

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Welcome aboard AYC.

No telling what you will find here.

I think we are all trying hard to learn something from this. We are boat guys. We need to know.

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So, I joined this forum to watch some uneducated carpenter's plywood catamabarage sink at launch and end up watching an Annapolis educated naval architect's $10m yacht instead. Oh, the irony!!

Hah, hah! Referring to the Flyin' Hawaiian? Ironic indeed. That's what makes this launch incident so fascinating. Professional program and $10m wasted! This has to affect boat insurance rates far more than the abandon Rebel Heart, eh?

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Has the name of the designer been determined yet?

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10 mill POS. Should have named it the Turtle. Why in the fuck would you want to pile on deck after deck on that shallow hull. Why in the fuck would any yacht owner want to worry about the fuel level ever. You would think that the insurance world would stop that shit in its tracks. My bet is that thing didn't conform to any yacht engineering standards. Shit that thing would blow over sitting on jack stands in the yard.

 

You can't fix stupid but Darwin can

 

 

being made for a korean owner?

 

what's sad is that it looks like a lot of the new cruise ships..

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Wait a minute... there's talk of a caved in hull from the stabilizer, and something about chainsawing the side to get a guy out of the engine room....

Are they trying to FLOAT it?

 

I think the right tool for the job is a match.

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Kir:

Not sure about the stabilizer although I heard the boat was "resting" on it.

They punched out a hull port to get the guy out.

 

As is where is, our price cheap.

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Kir:

Not sure about the stabilizer although I heard the boat was "resting" on it.

They punched out a hull port to get the guy out.

 

As is where is, our price cheap.

.

...sometimes cheap toooo much,,,,sowwy :P

 

...please make 'where-is' elsewhere,,,so Icon can make the swiftsure......or is that part of the plan!?

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i know almost anything can be made "good as new" but I somehow doubt the wallet who commissioned this thing wants it now. Even spiffed up.

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i know almost anything can be made "good as new" but I somehow doubt the wallet who commissioned this thing wants it now. Even spiffed up.

.

.....maybe chop it at the WL,,put it on a farm,,,,,,it'd make a really nice goat-shed

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i know almost anything can be made "good as new" but I somehow doubt the wallet who commissioned this thing wants it now. Even spiffed up.

Just call the carpet cleaners in do a little wipe down. Do you think the owner will notice? I doubt that thing ever leaves the slip. It would be cheap water front condo down in Socal but they would need to put it on a barge or ship to get it down to socal.

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Two thoughts:
I would never even think of taking that thing out in the river on a windy day, so NFW is it any kind of "expedition yacht".

The system they were using to launch it was about .4 asses short of half-assed.

Half-assed-photoshopping.jpeg

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i know almost anything can be made "good as new" but I somehow doubt the wallet who commissioned this thing wants it now. Even spiffed up.

Just call the carpet cleaners in do a little wipe down. Do you think the owner will notice? I doubt that thing ever leaves the slip. It would be cheap water front condo down in Socal but they would need to put it on a barge or ship to get it down to socal.

 

I don't know, the wake from a Portland Pudgy might well knock her over again.

post-106106-0-01047400-1400712636_thumb.jpg

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Has the name of the designer been determined yet?

 

We'll know their name as soon as the law suit is filed.

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Still in the sling, held up by the crane? Wonder how they'll test stability without risking another flip?

 

14229295961_f098c7316f_o.jpg

Simple - there was another great thread explaining how islanders loaded new hulls with ballast rocks when they get launched off the beach. In this case the boat gets renamed to Reef X when they get done adding the proper ballast rocks ;-)

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Still in the sling, held up by the crane? Wonder how they'll test stability without risking another flip?

.

....I'm betting on the theory that it didn't get wet before it flipped,,,marina liable,,unless it's the builder's launch system

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They really needed to put some positive spin on this, like "a baptizing".

 

Yeah, that's it, we roll them over to make sure they don't go upside down. Yeah, sure, you can live on it like that. We put velcro on the walls.

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....I'm betting on the theory that it didn't get wet before it flipped,,,marina liable,,unless it's the builder's launch system

I'm believe it was at least partly floating. I can't find it again now but read one report that they started the engine to back it off the cradle.

 

Wade Benda, the yacht's mechanic who was on board and one of those rescued from the engine room said they tried to “thrust” the boat back into deeper water, but the yacht tipped over anyway.

 

Wes Fridell, representative of New World Yacht Builders, d.b.a. Northern Marine, was there during the launch and said:

Once it floated in the water, it went over.

Ah - the report above says "The main engine was running when she went in, and that's not a good thing".

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How come we go from a 110 T Lightship to 130 T full load with nothing in the tanks... It's all fixed weights. Very odd to me. Or maybe 130 T = LS + ballast??

 

OK went back and re-read. 130 T is with 17 T extra ballast. I like that there is 4T of "Stonework", That's a new category for me!

 

Frankly I think the weight estimate is really rather basic i.e. not detailed enough, for a boat this size. And I don't believe only 800 lbs of wiring for a boat this size but then I've never been able to find electricians who know how much cable goes into a ship. They just pull it off by the kilometer and call the job done.

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Right after it goes over, at about 3:00 into the video, you can hear people actually clapping.

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I'm done speculating. Seems like everything I have speculated has been wrong so far.

I was a bit surprised to see the boat being launched without a single mooring line on deck, that I could see.

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Agreed BP, there are lots of details yet to be filled in.

 

From the launch video, it certainly wasn't a high tide - seems they ran out of ramp before she was afloat. The bow was still teetering on a forward single dolly.

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This somewhat reminds me of this fiasco but at least they had the presence of mind to stop the launch and address the issue (I guess).

 

YACHT.jpg

YACHT2.jpg

absolu80_zps4ecd8172.jpg

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Agreed BP, there are lots of details yet to be filled in.

 

From the launch video, it certainly wasn't a high tide - seems they ran out of ramp before she was afloat. The bow was still teetering on a forward single dolly.

even so, there was enough boat in the water to be stable, assuming designed correctly, no?

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