Bob Perry

10 mill$ poweryacht capsize during launch in Anacortes

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Sadly she sits dilapidated and rotting in a yard in Port Townsend because the twit that bought her for his restaurant in Salinas let her sink, twice, and she sat on the bottom for some time.

 

Here is a link to the story. I don't know if it wii work since I am on my tablet.

http://www.montereyherald.com/ci_23652435/former-steinbeck-boat-coming-back-monterey-county-mdash

 

My families shipyard built the Western Flyer by the way.

That's neat for sure.

 

Yes, many of the pics I browsed showed its ignominious end.

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I had a Western Flyer circa 1964 - '65.

 

11634835_1_l.jpg

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Latest

 

http://www.goanacortes.com/news/article_ecb314aa-eb66-11e3-9c34-001a4bcf887a.html

 

“Since the accident, the project naval architect/professional engineer has confirmed that the yacht, as designed, had adequate stability with the amount of ballast aboard at the time of launch, provided that ‘severe heeling moments’ were not induced during the launch,“ the statement said.

 

“Unfortunately, it appears that just such a severe heeling moment did occur during the launch. While investigations as to the cause of the capsizing are continuing, the physical evidence on, and adjacent to, the launch ramp suggests that the dolly carrying the weight of the port stern of the yacht may have suddenly dropped off the edge of the boat ramp during the launch, causing the vessel to experience a sudden list to port from which it could not recover in its light condition for launch.”

 

Shit fight on the way, bring popcorn and a few sharks (er, attorneys)

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It's a head scratcher. The stability studies for ballasted and unballasted conditions show an angle of max Rm between 68 and 70 degrees. But in the video the boat just blows by that angle and flops on its side. I'm having a struggle putting the builder's claims of adequate stability together with what I see in the video.

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From what I recall reading, they did put some ballast in it before launch. I do wonder if they put all they should have? Could it be they did not and someone just shrugged and said, "eh, it will be fine....."

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As attorney for the plaintiff, I call esteemed NA Bob Perry as an expert witness....

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It's a head scratcher. The stability studies for ballasted and unballasted conditions show an angle of max Rm between 68 and 70 degrees. But in the video the boat just blows by that angle and flops on its side. I'm having a struggle putting the builder's claims of adequate stability together with what I see in the video.

I think the theory that the yacht was partly supported by the launch trailer is the most likely other than complete incompetence that resulted in a yacht that naturally rests on her side.

 

I also wouldn't be surprised at all if she was launched many tons lighter than the numbers used to calculate the launch Rm. Though if the yacht was still supported at the bow and possibly the starboard side the Yacht would be more like a 3 legged stool with one leg missing than a boat afloat and the result could have been the same no matter how fully or lightly ballasted the yacht was.

 

The questions would be if the port dolly wheels fell off the ramp and left the port aft end completely unsupported at what angle of heel would:

 

1. the starboard side come completely free of the support of the dolly (I assume less than 68 degrees but perhaps close. Would the boat shift/slide to the starboard and maintain contact with that part of the dolly for a longer time)

 

2. what angle of heel would the bow come free of the trailer, assuming it mainland contact longer than the starboard side.

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It's a head scratcher. The stability studies for ballasted and unballasted conditions show an angle of max Rm between 68 and 70 degrees. But in the video the boat just blows by that angle and flops on its side. I'm having a struggle putting the builder's claims of adequate stability together with what I see in the video.

Yes. Thankyou for pointing me to the stability calcs earlier, btw. Max stability, loaded and unloaded, appeared to be just past 60 deg, and there was still pos stability at 89 deg (which was a surprise to me). And the salvage company reported the boat was unstable sitting upright in

the straps, so it would appear to be a bigger problem than just a launching accident.

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Flash:

I have done expert witness work before. That's how I got to know Hobie. Remember when I helped Laurie Davidson in his AC "trial"?

 

But if I were the the opposing attorney I would have one question for Mr. Perry,

"Mr. Perry, I understand that you are an accomplished sailing yacht designer, but have you ever designed a large, expedition style motor yacht?"

Mr. Perry, "No I have not."

"Thank you Mr. Perry. No further questions."

 

You need someone like Jose for a case like this. He works with big powerboats all the time. I'm just an observer here, another old fart on the dock with his theories.

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It's a head scratcher. The stability studies for ballasted and unballasted conditions show an angle of max Rm between 68 and 70 degrees. But in the video the boat just blows by that angle and flops on its side. I'm having a struggle putting the builder's claims of adequate stability together with what I see in the video.

Yes. Thankyou for pointing me to the stability calcs earlier, btw. Max stability, loaded and unloaded, appeared to be just past 60 deg, and there was still pos stability at 89 deg (which was a surprise to me). And the salvage company reported the boat was unstable sitting upright in

the straps, so it would appear to be a bigger problem than just a launching accident.

Was the boat pumped dry when it was unstable in the straps? Is it possible that the submerged parts of the yacht absorbed enough water to affect the stability once it was righted? Given this boats history I don't think you give it the chance to list more than 10 depress when slacking the straps so maybe it would have sat comfortably at 15 degrees of heel once righted.

 

While it doesn't shock me that the boat could capsize it would shock me if the design was so far off that it couldn't not capsize.

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Flash:

I have done expert witness work before. That's how I got to know Hobie. Remember when I helped Laurie Davidson in his AC "trial"?

 

But if I were the the opposing attorney I would have one question for Mr. Perry,

"Mr. Perry, I understand that you are an accomplished sailing yacht designer, but have you ever designed a large, expedition style motor yacht?"

Mr. Perry, "No I have not."

"Thank you Mr. Perry. No further questions."

 

You need someone like Jose for a case like this. He works with big powerboats all the time. I'm just an observer here, another old fart on the dock with his theories.

Or Ed Monk jr. I suppose. Ed's local and Greg Marshall too; well in Victoria.

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If I were a lawyer, I would invite everyone aboard the boat. When the slings are loosed and the boat dumps the jury in the water, I would say "I have no further questions" :lol:

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Kent has a good idea. If, as has been reported, the boat still can't float upright without the slings then I would think that would be the end of the stability argument.

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Overhearing some comments at the AYC over the weekend, they apparently needed to keep 6,500 lbs. on the port slings to keep it from "flopping" again while trying to re-float it?

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It's a head scratcher. The stability studies for

ballasted and unballasted conditions show an angle of max Rm between 68 and 70 degrees. But in the video the boat just blows by that angle and flops on its side. I'm having a struggle putting the builder's claims of adequate stability together with what I see in the video.

Yes. Thankyou for pointing me to the stability calcs earlier, btw. Max stability, loaded and unloaded, appeared to be just past 60 deg, and there was still pos stability at 89 deg (which was a surprise to me). And the salvage company reported the boat was unstable sitting upright in

the straps, so it would appear to be a bigger problem than just a launching accident.

Was the boat pumped dry when it was unstable in the straps? Is it possible that the submerged parts of the yacht absorbed enough water to

affect the stability once it was righted? Given this boats history I don't think you give it the chance to list more than 10 depress when slacking the straps so maybe it would have sat comfortably at 15 degrees of heel once righted.

 

While it doesn't shock me that the boat could

capsize it would shock me if the design was so far off that it couldn't not capsize.

It was reported upthread about the straps. I do not know status at the time, but given the situation I assume the salvage company pumped the boat dry and removed whatever weight possible from the upper decks.

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Overhearing some comments at the AYC over the weekend, they apparently needed to keep 6,500 lbs. on the port slings to keep it from "flopping" again while trying to re-float it?

So, a plausible theory could be that one of the dollys fell off the ramp causing some of the ballast to shift?

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Overhearing some comments at the AYC over the weekend, they apparently needed to keep 6,500 lbs. on the port slings to keep it from "flopping" again while trying to re-float it?

So, a plausible theory could be that one of the dollys fell off the ramp causing some of the ballast to shift?

A boat which has ballast that shifts when its not sitting flat? Just a theory but if ballast can shift and stay shifted on a boat I think maybe it needs to be sent back to the design office and the concept of waves be discussed.

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6,500 lbs. of flotation from a nicely designed outrigger would do the job. Paint it blue and Bob's your uncle.

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Overhearing some comments at the AYC over the weekend, they apparently needed to keep 6,500 lbs. on the port slings to keep it from "flopping" again while trying to re-float it?

 

So, a plausible theory could be that one of the dollys fell off the ramp causing some of the ballast to shift?
A boat which has ballast that shifts when its not sitting flat? Just a theory but if ballast can shift and stay shifted on a boat I think maybe it needs to be sent back to the design office and the concept of waves be discussed.

I am not sold on the shifting ballast theory but if they for some reason used shiftable temporary ballast for the launch it could help explain what happened. They wouldn't have predicted a boat being launched into a calm harbor off a dolly would heel like it did. So they might have used temporary ballast without securing it. it would make extra work to secure it and then break it loose after the launch to remove. The port dolly tires go over the edge, boats lists to port, the ballast starts moving that way and makes the problem worse until the full capsize.

 

Like I said I am skeptical of the moving ballast but it would help explain the boat capsizing and the boat listing in the straps. some of the ballast would shift back to centerline upon righting but depending assuming it wasn't 10 tons of ball bearings it wouldn't equalize unless the boat was tipped past centerline back to starboard.

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"the dolly carrying the weight of the port stern of the yacht may have suddenly dropped off the edge of the boat ramp during the launch"

 

If that is the case, still sounds like the builder screwed up the launch. Word was they missed the original planned launch time, on a high tide. They decided to launch on the next high which was not as high as the original.

 

Methinks the higher the tide, the less likely the dolly would fall off the edge (of an already short ramp). So, changing the launch time may have had something to do with it.

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Pure conjecture, but what if the boat was loaded on the dollies without ballast, tires squished flat, and decision was made to dely installing 17t ballast until after launch? Pretty risky, but apparently the builder was operating on a thin margin (according to allegations in the other lawsuit).

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There is so much "pure conjecture' here I thought I would add my own.

 

I think they should have launched when the moon was directly overhead. If you check any astronomy app you can see that the moon was low on the horizon at the time of launch. Lateral forces applied by the gravitational pull of celestial bodies must have been a contributing factor. Why would any prudent builder launch a vessel like this when the moon was not at least 80Deg overhead, if not exactly overhead?

 

OR - they forgot to make an offering to Poseidon.

 

Or Aliens. I'm sure the Zenobians are involved too.

 

It will be very interesting when (if) the facts come to light.

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I have watched the vid a few times and it certainly looks like the boat was fully or as good as fully afloat when it tips. Look at how the bow lifts immediately as the boat tips. How could this happen if it was not floating? Look from the 2:50 mark.

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6,500 lbs. of flotation from a nicely designed outrigger would do the job. Paint it blue and Bob's your uncle.

 

I bet you thought you were joking.

 

powerproa.jpg

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heres another one

 

ASEAN-LADY-2.jpg?image_id=59308&k=f0ad&w

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heres another one

 

ASEAN-LADY-2.jpg?image_id=59308&k=f0ad&w

Shoot, that's one HELL of a lot better looking boat than the Blood Baron!

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heres another one

 

ASEAN-LADY-2.jpg?image_id=59308&k=f0ad&w

Shoot, that's one HELL of a lot better looking boat than the Blood Baron!

.

.....UGH!!....eyebleach!! :blink:

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Uh......windage?

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From the brokerage story:

 

"She’ll be launching in April and delivered in May,” says Josh Gulbranson, a sales broker with Fraser Yachts Worldwide who has listed the boat at $9.2 million. “The individual who is building it changed his life plan and is going to do other things. That’s why it’s for sale.”

 

It sounds like the original owner took an honest look at this boat, and decided they'd best get rid of Flipper if they wanted to live!

 

I suspect that the builder, "Capsize Yachts" will not do well in court.

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Training wheels are probably the only thing that could save the boat. I especially like the asymmetrical ones, like the weird planes the Germans made in WWII;

 

BV141-400.jpg

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The NTSB will be investigating this capsize.

 

http://www.yachtingmagazine.com/yachts/investigation-shifts-in-capsizing

 

That's a waste of tax money. The thing capsize because of unchecked stupidity.

 

In large, expensive, complex endeavors such as designing and building a 10m$ yacht, or planning a war, generally there are a few people with sense and ability somewhere near the top of the organization. Once in a while, you get such things happening in which the boneheads run rampant. Then you get operations like this which was easily seen as a clusterf*** from miles away, and screwed up at least three or four ways from Sunday.

 

At least in this one, nobody got hurt. Good for a laugh. Although I am an enthusiastic capitalist, I use stuff like this to point out the raw fact that being rich doesn't necessarily make you smart.

 

FB- Doug

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I wonder if the ancestor's of Flipper's designer, designed these aircraft wonders?

 

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That is so cool.

 

Symmetry is boring.

Andy Rooney (of 60 minutes fame, among other things) said that. Fine Woodworking did a profile of him years ago, one of his comments was that things he build didn't have identical legs - because symmetry is boring.

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Training wheels are probably the only thing that could save the boat. I especially like the asymmetrical ones, like the weird planes the Germans made in WWII;

 

BV141-400.jpg

 

Burt Rutan still does.

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That is so cool.

 

Symmetry is boring.

Andy Rooney (of 60 minutes fame, among other things) said that. Fine Woodworking did a profile of him years ago, one of his comments was that things he build didn't have identical legs - because symmetry is boring.

 

Let this idea go too far and before you know it someone will put a companionway off center.

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Training wheels are probably the only thing that could save the boat. I especially like the asymmetrical ones, like the weird planes the Germans made in WWII;

 

BV141-400.jpg

 

Burt Rutan still does.

 

 

True...

boomerang7.jpg?itok=1mVGKqwF

 

But mostly, they look like they are flying backwards... (NTTATWWT)... I like weird.

 

http://www.hooked-on-rc-airplanes.com/images/Beachcraft-starship.jpg

And I ran across this one that's just silly... and circles back to my WWII reference:

 

http://www.aerofiles.com/rutan-b17.jpg

 

 

(and the editor is giving me fits)

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The NTSB will be investigating this capsize.

 

http://www.yachtingmagazine.com/yachts/investigation-shifts-in-capsizing

 

That's a waste of tax money. The thing capsize because of unchecked stupidity.

 

In large, expensive, complex endeavors such as designing and building a 10m$ yacht, or planning a war, generally there are a few people with sense and ability somewhere near the top of the organization. Once in a while, you get such things happening in which the boneheads run rampant. Then you get operations like this which was easily seen as a clusterf*** from miles away, and screwed up at least three or four ways from Sunday.

 

At least in this one, nobody got hurt. Good for a laugh. Although I am an enthusiastic capitalist, I use stuff like this to point out the raw fact that being rich doesn't necessarily make you smart.

 

FB- Doug

The boat should have been named Market Garden...

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The NTSB will be investigating this capsize.

 

http://www.yachtingmagazine.com/yachts/investigation-shifts-in-capsizing

 

That's a waste of tax money. The thing capsize because of unchecked stupidity.

 

In large, expensive, complex endeavors such as designing and building a 10m$ yacht, or planning a war, generally there are a few people with sense and ability somewhere near the top of the organization. Once in a while, you get such things happening in which the boneheads run rampant. Then you get operations like this which was easily seen as a clusterf*** from miles away, and screwed up at least three or four ways from Sunday.

 

At least in this one, nobody got hurt. Good for a laugh. Although I am an enthusiastic capitalist, I use stuff like this to point out the raw fact that being rich doesn't necessarily make you smart.

 

FB- Doug

The boat should have been named Market Garden...

 

Why? Was someone named Montgomery in charge?

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Maybe they should have launched it like this?

 

 

That seems highly strange. Any idea why they did that?

 

FB- Doug

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That seems highly strange. Any idea why they did that?

 

FB- Doug

 

 

Just a guess, but it is *much* easier to build something like that "upside down" in terms of assembly and welding than to always be working underneath the thing you are building. Overhead welding is difficult.

 

Some Navy ships are built "upside down" in modules then turned right side up and assembled.

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they did it this cause if they launched it upright (flat side up) the prop would have sheared off..

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Northern Marine founder issues statement to Trade Only

Posted on

June 4th, 2014

In the wake of the May 18 launch and capsize of a custom 90-foot expedition yacht in Anacortes, Wash., the founder and former owner of Northern Marine issued a statement.

Richard “Bud” LeMieux founded Northern Marine in 1995. LeMieux said in a statement emailed to Soundings Trade Only that he built 31 boats before he sold the business in August 2006.

In the statement he said:

“My past customers have been sending me the links on the articles that have been appearing throughout the media. … The 90-foot vessel that rolled over and sank during its launch here in Anacortes, Wash., is not or was not a Northern Marine vessel. It was sold and built by a company called New World Yacht Builders LLC here in Anacortes. I, after talking with past customers like Bruce Kessler, would like to … make that distinction very clear. The only portion of Northern Marine that built that vessel was the ‘assets,’ being the tools and information, which were under a purchase contract by a separate entity that was leasing them to New World Yacht Builders.”

LeMieux continued:

“I built and launched 17 full-displacement trawler yachts, of the 31 boats that I built from 1995 until I sold the business in August of 2006, on that very ramp, starting with the Spirit of Zopilote and ending with the Julianne (Show Boats Boat of the Year for its category). None of the launches ended in disaster or even near disaster. … The ramp got extended from 0-foot elevation to a minus-6-foot elevation in 2007 (after I sold the business), making it much easier to launch the vessels. I had to back down the ramp and actually drop into a hole at the end of the ramp to launch the boats. …

“I respectfully ask you to correct the name in the articles to both reflect the truth, as well as show some respect to the owners of the ‘Northern Marine’ vessels that are successfully out there in the world.”

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Company president offers his take on why yacht tipped over

 

ANACORTES — Northern Marine Industries’ massive production facility at 310 34th St. in Anacortes is a lot quieter these days.

The towering superstructure in which a 58-foot-long hull could be formed stands almost to the high rafters, bereft of workers. Giant mobile cranes, powered man lifts and forklifts sit dormant, collecting dust.

After an accident occurred during a test launch for a brand-new, 90-foot yacht left the boat sideways in the water near the ramp on May 18, 50 of the company’s 54 workers were laid off within the first 48 hours, said company Human Resources Manager Wes Fridell.

“Those of us who remain are hoping to get something going to bring them back. Collectively they brought a lot of talent and workmanship to the work they do,” he said.

Fridell said that roughly $10 million project had another four to six weeks of work left before it would be completed, including installing furnishings, interiors and electronics.

Company President Andy McDonald said contrary to speculation across the Internet and social media, the boat’s design is sound. He said it is nearly identical in size and shape to a 95-foot yacht successfully launched in 2012 and similar to a commercial fishing vessel launched in 2013.

McDonald said in a procedure standard for his company’s yacht launches, the vessel did not have full ballast, minimal fuel and no water in its water tanks.

The launch ramp used goes from a wider section to a narrower section near the water.

Through an internal investigation, McDonald said he believes the cause of the problem is that one of the wheels of the aft, port-side dolly fell off the end of the wider section of ramp instead of meeting the narrower section of ramp.

When the dolly wheel fell, the boat listed to the side. A long strut protruding downward from the hull dropped onto the ramp, holding the boat upright and scraping the ramp as the boat was backed toward the water, he said.

Fridell, who was on the launch team, said at that point the team had two options: wait and adjust ballast or try to get the boat in the water while the tide was up and let buoyancy do its work.

He said the boat was too heavy to pull back up, and the team collectively reasoned that if they waited, the boat could fall over anyway.

As the boat moved down the ramp, Fridell said the strut that was holding the boat up may have dropped into the same depression the wheel fell into earlier. At that point, the boat was listing in the water and eventually fell over.

McDonald said the National Transportation Safety Board is conducting an investigation of the incident, though he said the results of that investigation may take months to produce.

After the incident occurred, work on the three other projects in the facility came to a halt.

Fridell said these massive projects are funded in phases.

“When this incident took place, people went, ‘Whoa, let’s not jump in with both feet,’ ” Fridell said.

McDonald said he is waiting to hear back from his company’s insurance carrier to see what the next step is for Northern Marine.

“We have to go forward. I don’t have a choice,” McDonald said. “It definitely has put things on hold for a short period. The intent is to move forward and continue operations.”

Fridell said he was crushed while watching two and a half years of work list over in the water, but he still felt lucky no one was hurt or killed in the incident.

“We’re all just absolutely mortified, but so, so happy everybody’s OK,” Fridell said. “I’m just totally spent because your life’s in this thing, and you’re just watching it slip away.”

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^ "...the vessel did not have full ballast..."

 

How much ballast did it have? Did it have ANY of the 17 T recommended by the engineering firm?

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^ "...the vessel did not have full ballast..."

 

How much ballast did it have? Did it have ANY of the 17 T recommended by the engineering firm?

 

I would consider betting real money that it did not.

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Company president offers his take on why yacht tipped over

 

... A long strut protruding downward from the hull dropped onto the ramp, holding the boat upright and scraping the ramp as the boat was backed toward the water, he said....

 

WTF?

 

Perhaps an attempt to describe one of the stabilisors?

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Sounds to me like the stabilizers only worked when they were in hard contact with concrete...

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Company president offers his take on why yacht tipped over

 

... A long strut protruding downward from the hull dropped onto the ramp, holding the boat upright and scraping the ramp as the boat was backed toward the water, he said....

WTF?

 

Perhaps an attempt to describe one of the stabilisors?

I had to reread the strut sentence to understand it but yes I think it is the stabilizer. The article appears to be written by someone with no understanding of boats, see the description of the launch as a "test launch" I think the journalist asked for clarification when the builder talked about the stabilizer hitting the ramp and this long strut is what he got from the explanation. I also thought it was odd to use the term "crushed" to describe the emotional state of the builder so close to talking about only minor physical injuries. it would have sounded better to use devastated.

 

in future launches down questionable ramps a few underwater cameras mounted to the dolly/trailer with live feeds showing where the wheels are headed would be a wise move.

 

still I think the problem was ultimately an unstable boat as launched. the problem with the launch dolly should not have resulted in a capsize.

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The explanation provided above about the launch dolly falling off the ramp is inconsistent with earlier statements that after recovery the boat needed to be supported in slings at all times to keep it from rolling over again.

 

A slip-up during launch doesn't explain what appears to be a fundamental lack of stability.

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What got me was this...

 

He said the boat was too heavy to pull back up, and the team collectively reasoned that if they waited, the boat could fall over anyway.

 

Seems to me the ability to "abort" a launch for whatever reason is critical. That includes "pulling it back up".

 

More accurately, was it that the "boat was too heavy" or was "the tractor too weak"??

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We're back to the stabilizer dragging on the concrete?

 

I still think that's the kind of thing that might just cause a leak. You aren't supposed to use them as boat stands.

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A properly engineered fin stabilizer installation should be strong enough that the shaft of the stabilizer sheers before any catastrophic damage is done to the boat. i don't think dragging it across the concrete ramp with the boat partially afloat would have enough force to sheer the shaft or punch the shaft past its seals. The key words being "properly engineered". Not sure where New Whirled Yachts falls in that regard.

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More accurately, was it that the "boat was too heavy" or was "the tractor too weak"??

 

or that a wheel had gone off the end/side of the ramp.

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How do you know beer wasn't involved?

 

I still think stabilizers would work well on that vessel, provided both of them were in constant contact with the bottom.

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Have they launched this model successfully previously? Or was this hull #1?

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Punter:

I heard that this boat was a stretch of another model. To my eye the entire hull shape below the DWL is funky.

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That's another one of those super technical naval architect phrases that you're going to explain, right?

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Fam:

I'm no big powerboat designer but I have looked them hard since I was a kid. There is nothing about that hull that looks right to my eye. It's midsection is too shallow and too flat, like a barge. The stern sections are just bizarre. Again too flat with no deadrise and an odd turn to the bilge. Funky.

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FUNKYFORM ™ I've just registered this hullform name inspired by these recent events and the comments of the eminent designer Bob Perry. If Doug Lord can coin phrases and then make them his own in Foiling Anarchy ™ then I can too!

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So a company big enough to build boats this size has an accident launching one and everyone is fired, company is done?

Stick a fork in them.

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Stick a "FUNKYFORM ™" fork in them......

 

 

Where do I send the royalty check? Do I make it to you, or Bob? It was his definition after all.

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Have they launched this model successfully previously? Or was this hull #1?

Yes there was at least one, perhaps more, built from the unstretched mold. The one I know about was fairly successful from what I have heard.

 

Punter:

I heard that this boat was a stretch of another model. To my eye the entire hull shape below the DWL is funky.

There was a 5 ft midbody stretch done to this boat. There are draft restrictions in many parts of the Carribean which dictate how deep the hull is in many designs. This also leads to tucking the hull up or creating tunnels to provide room for the props. In order to get some volume in the hull there is not much deadrise. The bigger these large yachts get the more shiplike their hulls become. I don't think this hull looks too terrible.

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I just looked at some pictures of the hull again an the turn of the bilge does look pretty slack in the after sections and the bow sections are sort of fine so maybe they were going for an easily driven fuel efficient low Cp hull form.

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I just looked at some pictures of the hull again an the turn of the bilge does look pretty slack in the after sections and the bow sections are sort of fine so maybe they were going for an easily driven fuel efficient low Cp hull form.

 

More likely they were just going for an easily expanded mold and it didn't really matter what the previous intent had been. Besides, going longer just 'improved' the beam/length ratio no matter what the shape was. IIRC, this is an 85'er, stretched from an 80'er----so was the 80'er a stretch of something previous??? All told, I suspect that it wasn't the stretching that was the problem but the additional top hamper on this one, compounded by said tophamper being even bigger due to the hull lengthening. (Okay, that was obvious)

 

What is also obvious is that shortcuts were taken, assumptions were made that bit them in the R-C-cola! It's too easy to believe that with this much effort and moola involved, the basics were still observed. Ah well, not my $$$$ but you know that there are a bunch of folks a bit PO'ed, heartbroken and much poorer. One or two little shortcuts and-- 52 employees unemployed, 1 or more insurance companies squabbling over who will have to take the hit, a business owner out of business and possibly financially ruined personally, an owner, a wife and a young daughter seriously bummed out. That little girl tha christened the boat is likely traumatized at the sudden turn of events.

 

But, the lawyers ---they'll devour the carcass of anything with a few bucks left on the bone.....!

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That mold was not designed to be easily stretched judging from the extent of the fairing compound seen on the unpainted hull in the vid on page 1 of this thread. And the ends haven't much to do with the stretch anyway. Done it before a couple of times.

 

Tophamper in and of itself on this boat doesn't necessarily mean it will be unstable given enough ballast and proper eeight control although it does contribute. From what I know from talking with people involved with the project a lot of extras were added to the boat and perhaps not accounted for in the weight study.

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I just looked at some pictures of the hull again an the turn of the bilge does look pretty slack in the after sections and the bow sections are sort of fine so maybe they were going for an easily driven fuel efficient low Cp hull form.

 

So ---After reconsidering, "FUNKYFORM ™", yes?

Send the check to Bob, I'm not so sure about the Rasputin dude......

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Too bad the company has gone under.

The Funkyform 85 has a nice ring to it.

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Too bad the company has gone under.

The Funkyform 85 has a nice ring to it.

 

I'm sure you could take over the assets including moulds for a song by now, start up Funkyform Yachts...

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I can't help thinking I can see this crap all day long at a launching ramp, but usually beer is involved and tens of dollars of damage are done.

 

I think that pretty much sums it up.

 

And most of those people aren't 'modifying something that they sort of got away with last time' as ther basis for what they've just built themselves. Or sometimes they are, but there's another thread for that.

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boat-launch-fail-2.jpg

 

I can't help thinking I can see this crap all day long at a launching ramp, but usually beer is involved and tens of dollars of damage are done.

 

I think that pretty much sums it up.

 

And most of those people aren't 'modifying something that they sort of got away with last time' as ther basis for what they've just built themselves. Or sometimes they are, but there's another thread for that.

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A properly engineered fin stabilizer installation should be strong enough that the shaft of the stabilizer sheers before any catastrophic damage is done to the boat. i don't think dragging it across the concrete ramp with the boat partially afloat would have enough force to sheer the shaft or punch the shaft past its seals. The key words being "properly engineered". Not sure where New Whirled Yachts falls in that regard.

 

 

That makes sense, just like daggerboards are supposed to break before damaging the trunk.

 

 

... From what I know from talking with people involved with the project a lot of extras were added to the boat and perhaps not accounted for in the weight study.

 

 

 

It sure looked toppleheavy in that video.

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The FUNKYFORM ™ FLIPPER 85. Has a nice ring to it.

 

On the stretching topic, such mid body additions are more common than one might think in powerboats. I'm presently doing a 3d model of a 220' 'donor' hull which is getting a 26' mid body plug with an additional 6' of false bow planted on for a better looking profile. A whole extra top deck is being added as well so the top hamper is increasing. Glad I don't have to sign off on stability but the donor vessel is a Gulf 'Mud Boat' with massive tanks which will have a few hundred tons of concrete poured into them after re-launch.

 

Here is a the first stretch job that I modeled from GHS files a couple of years ago. This boat had served its role in the Gulf of Mexico servicing the offshore oil rigs and was in the Alaska King Crab fleet. Talk about needing stability. The eventual owner and his skipper were watching 'Deadliest Catch' and he was so impressed at the pounding it was taking on the show with crab traps stacked 30' high that he bought it at the end of that season and has done 3 refits to it. Carries all his toys in a big hangar and it is the 'Shadow Yacht'to his fine Dutch built yacht. They cruise in tandem and the toy hauler can carry more than enough fuel for both of them for just about any passage. These boats are actually so stable that they have what is known as a 'flume tank' that sits up relatively high in the superstructure that us filled with ballast water to slow down the snappy roll that they get when the mud tanks get pumped dry.

 

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You're lucky to be working with a boat that (I think) pretty much has a parallel mid body Rasp. Easy to stretch. When we stretch our molds production wants a direct transverse cut while cutting along the curve formed by points of tangent would work better. Of course if there is any drag angle to the keel it gets a bit more complex and the sheer line in the aft portion of the hull needs to be raised. On our latest 130 mold I created a transverse cut line with true tangent all the way around, as if creating a parallel mid body vessel without the mid body. Now to lengthen the hull we just need to pull the ends apart and fill in the gap. Easy peasy, sort of.

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Cheoy Lee insisted I butcher a really sweet Witholtz double ended trawler design in much the same manner. The original design was based on your PNW gillnetters and they used to build it as a 68'. I tried to pick the tangent points much as you describe and the resulting cut was skewed from vertical. I think they opened it up to 80' feet. Such a shame and I'm sure Charles was rolling over in his grave.

 

Wittholz66LRMY.jpg1_3.jpg

Just looked at the Cheoy Lee page and it was actually a stretch from 68' to 83'! Turned out that their mold was so distorted and assymetrical that it was worth doing the stretch. I begged for and finally got them to do a laser scan of the mold and send me and when I modeled a a surface model from the laser point cloud and mirrored one side to the other we were all shocked at how out of whack it was. They did have me do a swim platform/ planing trim tab extension on the canoe stern and they built a few at 68'. That platform looked like the tail of a platypus but did keep the boat from squatting at speed and was functional. What they did to the traditional superstructure from some Australian auto industrial designer was a travesty. Tried to put the 'Italian Sunglasses' look on a traditional double ender design, I still cry thinking about it...

 

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This local is not buying the stabilizer digging into the ramp excuse.

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