Bob Perry

10 mill$ poweryacht capsize during launch in Anacortes

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Might very well be but watching the vid/audio it's a steel hull when Northern does glass. Delta maybe? They do steel. These "expedition" yachts are getting pretty generic. If not type forming.

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I think the Builder was known as Citidel. Polar Bear was their last and I think the Owner of the Yacht also ended up also owning the defunct ShipYard. Recessionary times ......... Polar Bear was a much used Yacht on the WestCoast with annual trips between the PNW and Mexico y Costa Rica.

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I think the Builder was known as Citidel. Polar Bear was their last and I think the Owner of the Yacht also ended up also owning the defunct ShipYard. Recessionary times ......... Polar Bear was a much used Yacht on the WestCoast with annual trips between the PNW and Mexico y Costa Rica.

 

There are more than one, it seems. We did the west coast of Vancouver Island more or less in lock-step with this one.

 

1107109.jpg

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Looks like The Joker with that giant stainless mouth.

 

the-joker-2-0-by-hot-toys-1.jpg?w=930

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Terra Winds stay upright! No similarity at all.

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Saw her last Friday, she's sitting out in the open by herself at the facility where Larry's monster tri was built......looking a bit forlorn.

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I think the Builder was known as Citidel. Polar Bear was their last and I think the Owner of the Yacht also ended up also owning the defunct ShipYard. Recessionary times ......... Polar Bear was a much used Yacht on the WestCoast with annual trips between the PNW and Mexico y Costa Rica.

Ah FR lives! How you doin' bud? Hot enough for you yet? Looks like an ugly storm coming at you: https://ca.weather.yahoo.com/mexico/jalisco/puerto-vallarta-137895/;_ylt=AwrTcay4YahTJkAAZu8XFwx.;_ylu=X3oDMTBsOXB2YTRjBHNlYwNzYwRjb2xvA2dxMQR2dGlkAw--

 

Take cover mate!

 

It sort of looked like a Delta but you can't tell by the open air grill aft of the sky lounge. But then then again there's so much likeness of these expedition yachts.

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Came across this update on the boat

 

 

So, what (and why) is this "YachtVid" thing? Is this some guys attempt to make money just shooting video of yachts? Is he trying to make money? I dont see any sponsors.

 

This guy is talking in the video like it is all personal and we are all a family, etc. etc. I mean c'mon. Who is his audience?

 

It sure cant be the rich folk who are buying this multi-million dollar boats. I doubt they have time to watch this guy's videos.

 

It ain't the low-wage people who build them. They cant afford any of this stuff they build.

 

Perhaps if the guy focused midrange market, but his videos are all of big multi-million dollar yachts.

 

WTF?

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Came across this update on the boat

 

 

So, what (and why) is this "YachtVid" thing? Is this some guys attempt to make money just shooting video of yachts? Is he trying to make money? I dont see any sponsors.

 

This guy is talking in the video like it is all personal and we are all a family, etc. etc. I mean c'mon. Who is his audience?

 

It sure cant be the rich folk who are buying this multi-million dollar boats. I doubt they have time to watch this guy's videos.

 

It ain't the low-wage people who build them. They cant afford any of this stuff they build.

 

Perhaps if the guy focused midrange market, but his videos are all of big multi-million dollar yachts.

 

WTF?

 

I doubt his audience are those spending millions of dollars. Most likely just trying to sell his video work to marina's, boat builders, etc.

 

However, as you can see from the screen shot of his website, his work is "Safe, Professional, and Efficient." There is no mention on the website as to who this guy is.

 

YachtVid.com

YachtVid.com

post-106106-0-59665600-1403549202_thumb.jpg

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That video just comes across as smarmy, catering to someone who will hire his services, whatever they are. I'm trying not to make this too snarky, but nothing in that video appealed to me. It just reeked of "rich people and their toys are good for the economy because they will buy dinner in your town and ride in your taxis".

 

Now I know that is too simplistic and I know I'm reading some of my own biases into this but, that's how it came across.

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This has been a fascinating thread to follow. I'm a nobody when it comes to boats (just got my first sailboat, a 1984 Cal 31) and have a ton of respect for the NAs here. I caught a pic and the video that have sparked a question.

 

First, not trying to debate potential stability of the design or the ballast on board when she rolled. I'm looking at the angle and draft of the stabilizer fins. They seem very low, almost even with her bottom, but that may be a camera angle issue. But if the stab was on the ramp (possibly keeping her upright) while dragging down, and eventually contacting the bottom as she rolled, would she "trip" on the stab? Look at the vid and note how the bow seems to come out of the water. Or is this a result of her simply laying on her side and the wide beam making it look like she is pivoting over?

 

Im not sure what impact this would have ultimately had. Just curious and looking for some perspective.

 

Tankersteve

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This has been a fascinating thread to follow. I'm a nobody when it comes to boats (just got my first sailboat, a 1984 Cal 31) and have a ton of respect for the NAs here. I caught a pic and the video that have sparked a question.

 

First, not trying to debate potential stability of the design or the ballast on board when she rolled. I'm looking at the angle and draft of the stabilizer fins. They seem very low, almost even with her bottom, but that may be a camera angle issue. But if the stab was on the ramp (possibly keeping her upright) while dragging down, and eventually contacting the bottom as she rolled, would she "trip" on the stab? Look at the vid and note how the bow seems to come out of the water. Or is this a result of her simply laying on her side and the wide beam making it look like she is pivoting over?

 

Im not sure what impact this would have ultimately had. Just curious and looking for some perspective.

 

Tankersteve

 

I wondered that also - but I think the most likely thing is where the weight was in the hull if they got the ballast figures screwed up enough to roll it good chance the fore and aft balance was wonky too.

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That video just comes across as smarmy, catering to someone who will hire his services, whatever they are. I'm trying not to make this too snarky, but nothing in that video appealed to me. It just reeked of "rich people and their toys are good for the economy because they will buy dinner in your town and ride in your taxis".

 

Now I know that is too simplistic and I know I'm reading some of my own biases into this but, that's how it came across.

 

I hate attempts at using economics to justify yachting. It's true that big yachts coming to towns can stimulate the economy, but it's hardly an efficient stimulus plan. If you must think about it from an economic standpoint, a big yacht represent an immense concentration of wealth. The same money spent by a lot of people on a bunch of smaller yachts would probably result in far greater stimulus, spread around more evenly (and in less ritzy places). But ultimately, that's not what yachting, big or small, is about.

 

I can't put it any better than Bill Garden. In Yacht Designs he writes:

Whether they are sail or power, we must remember that our yachts are toy boats — all yachts are the glint of a lovely brief bubble of time, a time of leisure and affluence for the middle class. A boat’s importance as an escape from reality, as a change of pace, as a theme for reflection, and as an art form gives it worth or value.

Boats the size Bäden aren't really for the middle class, but I think the point stands. Yachts are lovely things. I can't economically justify the Beethoven String Quartets or Steak au Poivre either, but I'd be very sad if they ceased to exist.

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I am in Anacortes, short walk over to the boat. There are newly and hastily erected No Trespassing signs all around the property it is on, but it looks like you could walk over there at low tide (public property, right?). Head on, there is a little more boat below the waterline than it looks like in the videos, but still not very much compared to the towering superstructure. A few scratches in the topside paint on the port side are the only visible evidence that it isn't new. There is zero activity around the boat, nor is it in a location where it could logically be worked on.

 

Some local hearsay to feed the mill:

 

Barge crane operator said that they let the straps go down to 6.5 tons tension and the thing started to fall over again, that's why they moved it with the barge crane in place.

 

Shipwrights that worked on the boat said there is all kind of heavy shit up on the third deck, hot tubs, heavy cabinetry and the like. 3rd party stability study was done using builder supplied data, very suspect.

 

All third hand but what the hell? Let's keep the rumor mill fed....

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Me too. I've heard from guys who worked on her about crazy-heavy shit installed up high like the floor-to-ceiling safety glass on that upper level vista sky lounge thingie. And none of it properly accounted for, modeled, or weighed out to check before installation. The predicted numbers may have been a complete fiction compared to what was actually installed.

In theory, there's no difference between theory and practice. But in practice, there often is.

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That video just comes across as smarmy, catering to someone who will hire his services, whatever they are. I'm trying not to make this too snarky, but nothing in that video appealed to me. It just reeked of "rich people and their toys are good for the economy because they will buy dinner in your town and ride in your taxis".

 

Now I know that is too simplistic and I know I'm reading some of my own biases into this but, that's how it came across.

 

I can't put it any better than Bill Garden. In Yacht Designs he writes:

Whether they are sail or power, we must remember that our yachts are toy boats — all yachts are the glint of a lovely brief bubble of time, a time of leisure and affluence for the middle class. A boat’s importance as an escape from reality, as a change of pace, as a theme for reflection, and as an art form gives it worth or value.

Boats the size Bäden aren't really for the middle class, but I think the point stands. Yachts are lovely things. I can't economically justify the Beethoven String Quartets or Steak au Poivre either, but I'd be very sad if they ceased to exist.

 

That comment of Garden's is one of my favourites - so true "Merely the glint on a lovely brief bubble of time" - it conveys both the beauty and the triviality of our boats.

 

That horror Baden doesn't qualify on either count - it's nothing but a failed penis extender.

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DDW

 

i'm also in Anacortes, you're hearing what I'm hearing.

 

If you don't have anything good to say, come sit by me.

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Are we reserving seats for the Group W bench now?...(can I join?)

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I have always believed that the marine engineer is more important than the interior designer/stylist when it comes to yacht design.

 

I noticed that the Maestro relied quite a bit on Tim Nolan and Jim Franken during the Sliver Project.

 

Kim: "Can we do this Bob?"

Bob: "Let's ask Jim and Tim."

 

That Bob guy is very smart. I am pretty sure none of his vessels have rolled over during launch.

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I figured out many years ago that I don't have to have all the answers and I don't have to feel bad that I don't. I just have to know where to get the answers. I have never hesitated to say, "I don't know, but I know a guy who will know."

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Me too. I've heard from guys who worked on her about crazy-heavy shit installed up high like the floor-to-ceiling safety glass on that upper level vista sky lounge thingie. And none of it properly accounted for, modeled, or weighed out to check before installation. The predicted numbers may have been a complete fiction compared to what was actually installed.

In theory, there's no difference between theory and practice. But in practice, there often is.

 

 

I'm moving to Theory. I hear everything works there.

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I have always believed that the marine engineer is more important than the interior designer/stylist when it comes to yacht design.

 

I noticed that the Maestro relied quite a bit on Tim Nolan and Jim Franken during the Sliver Project.

 

Kim: "Can we do this Bob?"

Bob: "Let's ask Jim and Tim."

 

That Bob guy is very smart. I am pretty sure none of his vessels have rolled over during launch.

But I bet his dogs roll over for a treat, during lunch.........

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Keith:

My dogs don't have to roll over for treats. I treat them very well. One of my clients is a big time, high quality dog treat maker, Cloud Star Buddy Biscuits. They are made in the USA. I had no idea what this guy did until one day a big box arrived on my doorstep. It was full of dog and cat treats. At first I thought it was a promo gift from the farmer's Coop where I spend millions of dollars each week. " Hey! I deserve this." Then I found a small card in the bottom, "Dear Maestro". My dogs love them. I trust that they are carefully made.

 

 

When your entire daily social circle is two dogs and a cat you treat them well.

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Keith:

My dogs don't have to roll over for treats. I treat them very well. One of my clients is a big time, high quality dog treat maker, Cloud Star Buddy Biscuits. They are made in the USA. I had no idea what this guy did until one day a big box arrived on my doorstep. It was full of dog and cat treats. At first I thought it was a promo gift from the farmer's Coop where I spend millions of dollars each week. " Hey! I deserve this." Then I found a small card in the bottom, "Dear Maestro". My dogs love them. I trust that they are carefully made.

 

 

When your entire daily social circle is two dogs and a cat you treat them well.

 

My day starts (I was woken at 3:00am this morning) and ends (I'm about to drop at any moment) with one dog.

 

However, my landlords have three horses, three goats, four dogs, and two cats most of whom Divinity & I enjoy chatting with.

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I love the quote in the video where the narrator is explaining the positive local job and commercial revenues which the visiting yachts provide. In it he says that they should think of the yachts as "floating economic stimulus packages". Made me laugh and cry.

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On the topic of lengthening boats and sinking, the boat in the movie Wolf of Wall Street was the ex Big Eagle (Bernie Little's yacht before he died) was also lengthened. I was on the boat once for a cocktail of Long Beach (ELIS). Boat did indeed break in half where it was extended, or so I recollect.

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I love the quote in the video where the narrator is explaining the positive local job and commercial revenues which the visiting yachts provide. In it he says that they should think of the yachts as "floating economic stimulus packages". Made me laugh and cry.

 

That's a pretty typical right wing "understanding" of economics.

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As someone who works in the design and construction of megayachts I havr seen all sorts of owners, from the guy who owned a major hardware store chain and bought the guys in the shop tools and personally paid for one of the guys cancer treatment to the couple who ran a family charitable foundation, to the guy who barely showed up for his boat's launch. Their personalities and their politics are not all the same.

 

The construction and operation of these vessels probably does not impact the general economy too much, but in a small town like Anacortes where the workers make up a significant percentage of the population the localized effect can be significant. Where I work, in Seattle, we employ between 150 - 250 people, not counting material suppliers, engine manufacturers, etc. Probably not a huge number of people in the grand scheme of things, but for me personally, it has a huge impact. It is my economy. So when people rail against mega yachts just remember it affects people just like you and me who make their living from them.

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That's a pretty typical right wing "understanding" of economics.

Take it to PA. There's a whole political sewer for you to play in over there, but please keep politics out of here.

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Just for reference, taking the piss out of right-wing bigots is done by intellectual elitist on mountain tops. The sewer is reserved for those spewing the shit.

 

But your point about PA is well taken ...

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That's a pretty typical right wing "understanding" of economics.

Take it to PA. There's a whole political sewer for you to play in over there, but please keep politics out of here.

 

Why? What have you got against Pennsylvania?

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That's a pretty typical right wing "understanding" of economics.

Take it to PA. There's a whole political sewer for you to play in over there, but please keep politics out of here.

 

Why? What have you got against Pennsylvania?

 

I think he's talking about Poofter Anarchy, just down the hallway.

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I love the quote in the video where the narrator is explaining the positive local job and commercial revenues which the visiting yachts provide. In it he says that they should think of the yachts as "floating economic stimulus packages". Made me laugh and cry.

 

That's a pretty typical right wing "understanding" of economics.

 

Textbook bigotry.

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This gal looks pretty tall for her LOA, but she made it up to Connecticut from Florida. Steel construction with a bit of rust showing here and there. I believe she is one of Reuben Trane's Florida Bay Coasters.

 

SANY0999 C

 

As vacation cottages so, she's got a lot on a small footprint.

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This gal looks pretty tall for her LOA, but she made it up to Connecticut from Florida. Steel construction with a bit of rust showing here and there. I believe she is one of Reuben Trane's Florida Bay Coasters.

 

 

As vacation cottages so, she's got a lot on a small footprint.

 

Don't let that thing get anywhere near Anacortes.

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I love the quote in the video where the narrator is explaining the positive local job and commercial revenues which the visiting yachts provide. In it he says that they should think of the yachts as "floating economic stimulus packages". Made me laugh and cry.

 

That's a pretty typical right wing "understanding" of economics.

 

Textbook bigotry.

 

No it's not, it's sociopolitical condescension from a mountaintop.

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Having made my living in the business since I was 21 years old yachts being built keeps me and my family alive. Simple as that.

Theorize this!

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Florida Bay Coasters seem to not capsize at all, but one did sink off of Baltimore light. I have worked with Mr. Benford on another project years ago and he knows his stuff.

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Having made my living in the business since I was 21 years old yachts being built keeps me and my family alive. Simple as that.

 

And Bernie Madoff made his living selling securities since 1960 ... simple as that ... only he was qualified ...

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I love the quote in the video where the narrator is explaining the positive local job and commercial revenues which the visiting yachts provide. In it he says that they should think of the yachts as "floating economic stimulus packages". Made me laugh and cry.

 

That's a pretty typical right wing "understanding" of economics.

 

Textbook bigotry.

 

No it's not, it's sociopolitical condescension from a mountaintop.

OK, bigotry with blinders.

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Having made my living in the business since I was 21 years old yachts being built keeps me and my family alive. Simple as that.

 

And Bernie Madoff made his living selling securities since 1960 ... simple as that ... only he was qualified ...

??????????????????

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Florida Bay Coasters seem to not capsize at all, but one did sink off of Baltimore light. I have worked with Mr. Benford on another project years ago and he knows his stuff.

Actually sailed past that boat Kent on our way to our home slip in the Magothy River just off Balt Light. It was the first time I ever saw one of them. Heard later it had sunk. Clearly there is a lot about powerboat/ship design that is not intuitive and I lack an understanding of. I remember wondering as I passed it, how on earth it stayed upright. Then you read the accounts of where they have been with those things and look at the drawing and I just can't align what I see with what those boats have done/where they have been.. and the statement from the designer that they are more stable than the typical commercial fishing vessel. I can only imagine/guess (??) that there is a LOT of HEAVY machinery down low and the materials used in the upper decks are really light.

 

I mean good grief; just look at the windage of what is above the waterline! I think that if I stuck a sail that size on a hull shape of what they have underwater that I capsize for sure so how do they do it??? :blink:

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Having made my living in the business since I was 21 years old yachts being built keeps me and my family alive. Simple as that.

Theorize this!

 

My original objection/observation was the argument that a yacht, simply by visiting ports is a stimulus worth mentioning. I found that laughable.

 

Now, the design and building of such toys (necessary or not -- that's a different argument); I totally get the argument for that. I've envied making a living doing something in the marine industry and I'm happy many of you are able to do that.

 

That isn't what I saw in the little promo clip I was responding to.

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The Florida Bay Coasters are pretty fat - form stability - and have engines, batteries, tanks, etc. down low while the upper decks are mostly air inside. They are NOT designed for ocean passages from what I know about them. Now if you added one more story and a ton of granite countertops to one..... :o As for sail area, likely no different than one of those motor-yacht things that I always hated docking in a strong breeze with their 2-3 stories of enclosures, 4 foot draft, and dinner-plate sized rudders. Of course I never got one with a bow thruster either :rolleyes:

 

AFAIK the one that sank had a battery get loose and knock a hose off a thru-hull.

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Yep, lots of form stability in those coasters. Think barge like. Well, modified barge. As I understand it they were meant for inshore like in the ICW, rivers, etc.

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I love the quote in the video where the narrator is explaining the positive local job and commercial revenues which the visiting yachts provide. In it he says that they should think of the yachts as "floating economic stimulus packages". Made me laugh and cry.

 

That's a pretty typical right wing "understanding" of economics.

 

Textbook bigotry.

 

No it's not, it's sociopolitical condescension from a mountaintop.

OK, bigotry with blinders.

 

Bigotry is the state of mind of a bigot: someone who, as a result of their prejudices, treats or views other people with fear, distrust or hatred on the basis of a person's ethnicity, evaluative orientation, race, religion, national origin, gender, gender identity, disability, socioeconomic status, or other characteristics.

 

 

I don't see contempt for sickeningly vulgar greed and ostentation in there anywhere. Blackjenner said pretty much what I was thinking.

 

I imagine when a pimp sets his trapline up in a town it's good for the cab companies as well.

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"simply by visiting ports is a stimulus worth mentioning. I found that laughable."

 

Donn: I can think of so many tiny towns that are kept alive exclusively by the tourism spending of visiting yachtsmen that would not know where to start listing them. Of course the places I am thinking would not consider yacht $ to be stimulus for their economy. They would consider yacht $ the entire economy!

 

I can't figure out what Jon is trying to say. Jon: Go read a Jack London story. Write like that for a change. Then even I can understand you. Does the pimp own a yacht?

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"simply by visiting ports is a stimulus worth mentioning. I found that laughable."

 

Donn: I can think of so many tiny towns that are kept alive exclusively by the tourism spending of visiting yachtsmen that would not know where to start listing them. Of course the places I am thinking would not consider yacht $ to be stimulus for their economy. They would consider yacht $ the entire economy!

 

I can't figure out what Jon is trying to say. Jon: Go read a Jack London story. Write like that for a change. Then even I can understand you. Does the pimp own a yacht?

 

Bob, I guess it is possible that some tiny town somewhere (I'm not mocking you by the way) gains benefit from mega-yachts fueling up, or getting some services in port. I just didn't really buy the argument the way it was offered in that video.

 

I can see the cruise ships visiting Sitka or Juneau, Alaska as driving some measure of their economy though the spending of the tourists. I get that.

 

I don't get the argument that the spending of the owner of the Baden (after build) or the recently visiting Vava II (here in Lake Union), really makes that much difference in the local economies.

 

My own perceptions do come into play here but, the tone I heard (maybe though my own blinders) was that we should thank the rich for visiting our local economies and spending their money. I don't buy that particular argument.

 

But that discussion goes down a long and winding road of wealth inequality being confused with class envy, economics most people would not agree are relevant, or being misunderstood as being jealous of the rich. I don't know if that kind of discussion would be useful.

 

I just thought the argument, as presented in *that video*, was pretty preposterous.

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"simply by visiting ports is a stimulus worth mentioning. I found that laughable."

 

Donn: I can think of so many tiny towns that are kept alive exclusively by the tourism spending of visiting yachtsmen that would not know where to start listing them. Of course the places I am thinking would not consider yacht $ to be stimulus for their economy. They would consider yacht $ the entire economy!

 

I can't figure out what Jon is trying to say. Jon: Go read a Jack London story. Write like that for a change. Then even I can understand you. Does the pimp own a yacht?

 

Not sure what the debate is about. In the video, the guy sitting behind his barn, on a bale of hay in his plaid workman's shirt did not seem like a rightist elitist or a capitalist. Rather, his axe seemed to be that local townspeople should welcome the yachting trade as it supports their jobs. He appeared to be arguing from the position of a beneficiary of such munificence, not the grantor.

 

Me, I just thought it was interesting and a bit tragic-commical. Tragic, because the sport we love is, indeed, outrageously expensive and comical because it's a 99%'er arguing in favor of yachts.

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don't get the argument that the spending of the owner of the Baden (after build) or the recently visiting Vava II (here in Lake Union), really makes that much difference in the local economies.

 

Since this discussion doesn't seem to be going to PA anytime soon, I may as well add my two cents here.

 

I think greater clarity is achieved by separating two separate but related phenomena:

 

1. Quirks in our financial system allow a few individuals to accrue a fortunes approximately 20,000 times the median household income.

2. Some of these individuals spend immense sums on yachts.

 

Whether the first should be true,and whether there is a moral issue for the country in allowing it to be true, are complicated questions. However, I think that given that it is true, the second is a good thing. From the standpoint of the common man, the worst thing a billionaire can do with his money is sit on it. Much, much better that he spend it, including spending on investment.

 

As to the quote above, Disney World is supported by visiting land yachts. Individually, they are not important. Collectively, they are crucial.

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I can point you at towns that live and die on the income from yachts all within a few hours sail of my house. Rock Hall, for one example, would be out of business without yachtie types spending their money and they have never been quite the same since 2008 when gas prices spiked and then afterwards when the big flush handle got pulled.

 

* yacht as in boat used for pleasure, even if 10 feet long ;)

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How about small Atlantic towns like Newport, Sag Harbor, Annapolis which derive significant (>10%?) amounts of their commercial and tourist dollars from yachting related visitors? Each yacht may make a small difference but the flow over time into a town which makes itself yachting friendly is going to grow and benefit locals. The obverse should be true as well. You may not like or approve of the boat owners, the boats, the source of their wealth but you've got to be in favor of having them spend their part of their budget in your town.

 

I think the guy in the video was specifically referring to all of the displaced workers who lost their jobs right after the sinking and was reacting to the media approbation. He seems to be saying, 'hey, it's a living, back off'.

 

Having said that, I did read the recent book about the yacht building in the gulf. From the way it's described, people die routinely from long term effects of inhalation of noxious fumes inhaled during yacht construction. That, obviously is heinous.

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What book is that?

http://www.gbruceknecht.com/books/grand-ambition/

 

In addition to Von Allmen and Marshall, Knecht describes the building of Lady Lindathrough some of the laborers and artisans who actually put it together. They include:

  • Shipfitter Gale Tribble, who had helped build everything from barges and oceangoing cargo vessels to naval destroyers and aircraft carriers. Having spent 43 of his 62 years crouching and crawling in cramped spaces, his body was literally falling apart, but he could not afford to retire.

  • Wayne Frierson, a pipefitter who saw a connection between his current work and his former life as an army sniper. “I have always liked precision work,” he told Knecht. Lady Linda required more than two and a half miles of pipes, more than seventy times the boat’s length.

  • Mitch Davies, who was working in Australia to create wood paneling and built-in furniture for Lady Linda’s interior. A New Zealander who not many years earlier had ranked as the country’s best eighteen-and-under surfer, Davies loved his work and was unmotivated by money. “If it wasn’t for rich people, I wouldn’t have my job. But it’s not a goal of mine. I don’t think it’s worth the stress.”

  • Osly Heinandez, a 21-year-old from Honduras who knew the work he was doing to give a lustrous finish to Lady Linda’s exterior surfaces would do irreparable damage to his lungs but who was unable to complain or find alternative employment because of his legal status: he was an undocumented immigrant.

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"simply by visiting ports is a stimulus worth mentioning. I found that laughable."

 

Donn: I can think of so many tiny towns that are kept alive exclusively by the tourism spending of visiting yachtsmen that would not know where to start listing them. Of course the places I am thinking would not consider yacht $ to be stimulus for their economy. They would consider yacht $ the entire economy!

 

I can't figure out what Jon is trying to say. Jon: Go read a Jack London story. Write like that for a change. Then even I can understand you. Does the pimp own a yacht?

 

Bob, I guess it is possible that some tiny town somewhere (I'm not mocking you by the way) gains benefit from mega-yachts fueling up, or getting some services in port. I just didn't really buy the argument the way it was offered in that video.

 

I can see the cruise ships visiting Sitka or Juneau, Alaska as driving some measure of their economy though the spending of the tourists. I get that.

 

I don't get the argument that the spending of the owner of the Baden (after build) or the recently visiting Vava II (here in Lake Union), really makes that much difference in the local economies.

 

My own perceptions do come into play here but, the tone I heard (maybe though my own blinders) was that we should thank the rich for visiting our local economies and spending their money. I don't buy that particular argument.

 

But that discussion goes down a long and winding road of wealth inequality being confused with class envy, economics most people would not agree are relevant, or being misunderstood as being jealous of the rich. I don't know if that kind of discussion would be useful.

 

I just thought the argument, as presented in *that video*, was pretty preposterous.

 

That's exactly what I was thinking - apparently you weren't irritated when you wrote yours. :D

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don't get the argument that the spending of the owner of the Baden (after build) or the recently visiting Vava II (here in Lake Union), really makes that much difference in the local economies.

 

As to the quote above, Disney World is supported by visiting land yachts. Individually, they are not important. Collectively, they are crucial.

 

And when people start showing up at Disney in 300' - $bazillion land yachts ones for that matter), I'll have the same opinion of THEIR gross extravagance. ;)

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Bigotry is the state of mind of a bigot: someone who, as a result of their prejudices, treats or views other people with fear, distrust or hatred on the basis of a person's... or other characteristics.

 

 

I don't see contempt for sickeningly vulgar greed and ostentation in there anywhere. Blackjenner said pretty much what I was thinking.

 

I imagine when a pimp sets his trapline up in a town it's good for the cab companies as well.

"I don't see... other characteristics."

Fixed it for you

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A question you could ask yourself is which provides more economic activity for coastal towns, one $10 million boat or 100 $100,000 boats? We have a declining upper middle class let alone the middle class and I don't think this trend is helpful.

 

I just read the whole thread finally and it's really interesting until the last bit. This coming weekend we are going to a lake with some other families at a place with some canoes and an old row boat. There are three ten year olds and the lake is warm so I'll get a couple of protractors and do a complete series of canoe stability experiments with various bow point load configurations. More soon.

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A question you could ask yourself is which provides more economic activity for coastal towns, one $10 million boat or 100 $100,000 boats? We have a declining upper middle class let alone the middle class and I don't think this trend is helpful.

 

Solid logic! And I agree.

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"The 85 design represents a collaboration between Northern Marine, Adriel Design, and the yacht’s captain, Aaron Pufal, who describes Blood Baron yacht on his blog as “an updated take on an expedition yacht.” With an extended superstructure that brings the pilothouse aft to create a large panoramic skylounge, the 85 will feature a voluminous interior similar to that of a motoryacht with plenty of space for entertaining and relaxation, but with the range and fuel efficiency of a long-range cruiser."

 

Blood-Baron.jpg

 

Blood Baron is the collaborative work of Northern Marine, Adriel Design, and the yacht’s captain, Aaron Pufal.

 

The design is a collaboration between Adriel Design and the shipyard themselves (Northern Marine).

 

slated to launch in the summer of 2013. Designated hull #8501, and named Blood Baron

 

Modern and sophisticated superyacht ‘Bäden’ is a beautiful and robust explorer, in-house designed collaborating with Adriel Design and her Captain Aaron Pufal.

 

Andy McDonald, president of Northern Marine said: “We were excited to work with a customer who was interested in doing something different.

 

Andy McDonald, the new president and owner of Northern Marine, is not a man to rest on his laurels. When asked what he does for a living, his response is simply that he is a boat-builder. But such a humble reply belies the fact that at 31-years of age, Andy McDonald is perhaps not only the youngest owner of a company building premier expedition style luxury yachts, but rapidly growing into the most knowledgeable.

 

http://www.charterworld.com/news/tag/northern-marine

 

I would guess that "panaramic skylounge" didn't help its stability much. And humble young Andy is lucky to be young as he may be able to reinvent himself in a different industry.

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Excuse the digression, but regarding this Jason fellow from YachtVid: Shouldn't that be a hairless cat on his lap?

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Excuse the digression, but regarding this Jason fellow from YachtVid: Shouldn't that be a hairless cat on his lap?

Photo shopped for sure.

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A launching that went very badly wrong on the River Clyde, Scotland, 130 years ago today:

 

http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuilt/viewship.asp?id=3340

 

And one Belfast-built ship that didn’t have the patience to wait to be launched in 1939; a situation that most probably could have ended up a lot worse:

 

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Whoa, she slid in fast! Thanks for posting that.

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I'm with Bob. Most of our small towns from Anacortes to Alaska, all along the coast are now pretty much relying on tourism via boaters. Sure, there is some logging still going on , but not a lot. No more gold digging or panning really. It isn't everything, but it would most definitely be felt if all the boaters left. Not to mention the boat builders in the PNW.

 

On the boat itself, watching it roll it just seems to me that it is floating way to high as it rolls over, it never really settled in the water where you would think a boat of that size would sit. Was it completely floating on it's own, or was it still being supported some? But hearing that it would roll when they took some strain off of the straps while it was in the water, I don't think any way you launched that boat it was going to float upright.

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To me, this looks like what happens when powerboat stability curves meet IOR Mk IIIa performance curves (downwind,of course).

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This cropped up on my Facebook. Seems to take two minutes to say not a huge amount, except for unsupported generalisations.

 

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As of this evening, Bäden was loaded up on a giant lowboy trailer and has been staged up towards the gate. Maybe they'll be moving it down the road tonight? They often seem to move these things late at night to minimize traffic issues, so I'll see if it's still there in the morning.

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They probably had to take down traffic lights. A few had to be removed late at night when they moved my house out here years ago.

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Change of Venue? Hide it for awhile, paint it a different color, and hope no one remembers? Or more like a witness protection program, whole new identity?

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Change of Venue? Hide it for awhile, paint it a different color, and hope no one remembers? Or more like a witness protection program, whole new identity?

 

More like park it somewhere safe where it can sit and grow mold while the owner, the builder and the underwriters spend a lot of money on lawyers pointing fingers and saying nasty things at each other.

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...and in a few years it just might show up in the Zombies thread

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If they took off a couple of stories with a sawzall it just might float.

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there's a large enough building in Anacortes where unfortunately not much is going on now.... they can probably hide it inside.

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