• Announcements

    • Zapata

      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Roy Miles

Overhauling the rigging on a Searunner 40

Recommended Posts

Hi. I am in the process of completely overhauling my rig and deck gear on my Searunner 40, which I built and launched in 1978 (sail number 68). As a 35+ year-old boat, a lot of stuff has already been replaced with more modern gear and materials, but I did start out being one of the first West System boats in L.A.

 

I won't get into the non-rig related stuff I've done (unless anyone actually wants to know), but I'd appreciate hearing some comments and suggestions regarding this phase of my project. I recently retired as a shipwright in San Diego and am preparing to cruise full time one year from now. Hence the rig overhaul.

 

I am going to be changing out the mast (or heavily modifying the existing one) to actually be a cutter rig, with internal halyards, full-batten main, and roller furlers on the jib and staysail. I am replacing all of my old winches and replacing with new Harkens: The halyard winches (using banks of clutches) will both be 35.2 STA units, the genoa sheet winches will be 50.2 STAs as I am older than I was when I built this craft. The main sheet is going to be a 40.2 STA, and the two staysail sheet winches will be an older set of 22s, also STAs.

 

My traveller, about 10 feet long, spans the cabintop and connects with the boom about 3/4 of the way out. The gooseneck will be fixed at about 8 feet above the cockpit (currently it's a slider, about 7 feet up), since I'm adding a Bimini, to accompany the new hard dodger in the works.

 

All sails will be new, with the exception of the existing assymetric. I may, or may not, consider a code 0.

 

Any observations or comments?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All sounds like good ideas so far.

 

What sort of track system iff any will you use with a full batten main? With a fixed backstay do you really need full battens to support the roach? We have a roughly similar mainsail on our 40' cat and went with 2 top battens full and lower ones overlength. Still harder to get the sail down to reef when sailing downwind than our old mainsail with short battens.

 

Considering using dyneema standing rigging like the fellow with the Searunner 34?

 

Sails - make sure your sailmaker understands multis and the higher loads they put on sails. No heeling and higher apparent wind = more stress

 

Are you going to sail her a true cutter (yankee + staysail) or genoa mostly and then staysail when it blows hard?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You picked the right questions. I haven't made the plunge, but am about to, in the next couple weeks. I have four basic options: recycle the existing mast section, which involves replacing the mast head assembly to achieve the internal halyards, as well a other major surgeries; go whole hog with a new Selden with all bells and whistles, or an intermediate choice of a local mast builder, using Harken t-track and splitter, with my own work; or, fourth, using the Tides Marine system. Decisions, decisions. Probably will use the Dyneema for the running backs, but not the shrouds or stays, too chicken. I am using Amsteel for my existing Edson steering cable system.

 

yes, my local sailmaker, Chuck of Ullman in San Diego, knows multihulls, as well as my rigging advisor, Fritz Richardson of Pacific Offshore Rigging, who owned a sister ship several years ago and has had considerable multihull sailing experience (CRUSADER around Cape Horn). I am going to have both the yankee and the genoa and figure out which is best under what conditions. I'd like to be able to remove the staysail when I'm under genoa alone to ease the tacking issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just an FYI - on my Contour 34 I had synthetic water stays, runners and main shrouds, but wire diamonds. Worked really well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

except of diamonds all ColligoMarine stuff on the boat ( F 33) works nicely

 

give John a shout he will be able to help

good guy

 

thot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just re-rigged completely in over braided heat set Dyneema terminated in turnbuckles. The weight saving was enormous - 73% decrease and the new rig is much stronger than the old. The only place I'd be concerned is with roller furling headsails.

 

Best decision I ever made...and to quote another person I spoke to during the process of deciding: The question is not "should you do it?" the right question is "why would you ever use anything else?"

 

Only caveat is where are a heavy displacement monohull.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just re-rigged completely in over braided heat set Dyneema terminated in turnbuckles. The weight saving was enormous - 73% decrease and the new rig is much stronger than the old. The only place I'd be concerned is with roller furling headsails.

 

Best decision I ever made...and to quote another person I spoke to during the process of deciding: The question is not "should you do it?" the right question is "why would you ever use anything else?"

 

Only caveat is where are a heavy displacement monohull.

How did you terminate? Any photos? Did you pre-load after splicing to take out construction stretch (not sure if that's the rights term)? I agree that this is the way to go, but a boat I recently sailed on was still having trouble getting the right tension using lashing (they have Dux on lowers only), and thought that turnbuckles were the way to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any specific concerns with rigging the diamonds with dux?.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

only concern I had was with the point load at the spreader and the construction stretch. I believe both could be managed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it was a bit of a pain for the water stays, especially when new, but do-able over time. Much easier on the running backs as there was a block/tackles. Main shrouds also had adjusters as it's a folder. For a fixed rig, I'd think about turnbuckles on the main shrouds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, so I've listed the mast, boom, all sails and Navtec turnbuckles on Craigslist San Diego, and have had two hits already. It's a package deal for $2500. This may be your last chance to get this killer deal. The first cash deposit of $500 seals the deal. I won't need to pull the rig until August, so you have time to get stuff together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay. I've got a local guy who is definitely interested in this deal, so if anyone else is considering it, don't let the grass grow under your feet. Also, I've got two Barient 26 2-speeds and a Barient 16 2-speed as a package for $500.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC a Searunner or similar was a test boat for Colligo rigging and they sailed it down in Mexico with all the UV etc. I think most people are ditching the lashings on bits with a lot of steady rig tension and using turnbuckles or similar. Other than that it's the way to go. Cost effective and easy to DIY.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites