Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Editor

what is it?

Recommended Posts

Nice, but a lot of work....

 

Fife design style, early 1900s?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

not a fife, timing might be right. still looking into it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if water was cheese this would be from wisconsin...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

French from late 19th century for river racing on the Seine at Paris. Perhaps designed bei Caillebotte (sp?)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever it is, it's beautiful. Love the lines. But yeah, drag-tastic. Run the lines though a VPP.

Any more shots? Partcularly the transom...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

40.7 ? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caillebotte, France, 30 feet Roasbeef !

Got more? Source?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hubert or Herbert Spagnol/Stagnoll ??? was building a Fife/Caillebotte and had previously set up for building boats on spec[ chantier??]

The GFC hit and may have lost business but I recall he was struggling to keep big boat..... memory is a bit loose but liked Fife designs and was trying to create interest/market for highend boatbuilding using traditional means. In Sydney there are two small 30ft Fifes

"planks on edge" Kelpie the oldest built by George Ellis Duke St East Balmain. She was built from full length teak planks on hardwood frames and launched in 1884, where she was raced; but she also covered a lot of sea miles offshore in the Tasman and Coral seas .

Ben[bob] Lexcen had a thing for her and would go close/follow " to see how the water would go round her" The boom offshore must have been dragging even with flattening "lift" reef but she looked special. There was a great photo of her front cover of Aust Boating and Classic Boat or Wooden Boat in the 80s 'sailing under NorthHead at sunrise'; after which she was rebuilt by shipwright Ricky Wood for J.Wood [no relation] and has been the drawcard of many Sydney Wooden Boatshows The second is called Jenny Wren and both have been partipants in the SASC Gaffers Race. They are lovely boats from another era ..... Pretty as a Picture !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A mini "Volunteer" replica

2708_1sloop_volunteer___1895.jpg

 

I believe that photo is actually VIGILANT

 

Same era as the Caillebotte design, pre-dates the Universal Rule (J, M, P, and R classes among others) which was American anyway, never caught on in Europe. That's a beautiful boat, never knew the famous painter was also a yacht designer... things to learn!

 

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's quite pretty, and it is recommended that the owner also have an indentured servant for upkeep.

 

It would make the perfect father's day present.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Standing lug & jib. Bit wacky. Interesting that the French came up with the idea of a sail area only rule 18 years before the Swedes. As the French did this, the Brits went for the Dixon Kemp's length and sail area rule.

 

COPIE%20BLOG%20SUZANN%20%2816%29.jpg

 

Now THIS is a half model.

 

roastbeefinal.jpg

 

(This one of Tuiga is even more impressive:)

 

tuiga.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you were ever an avid reader of Woodenboat 10 years ago, you's immediately recognize Roastboef!

 

Cracks me up some of the suggestions above. But that's why these threads are fun :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is indeed a photograph of Gustave Caillebotte's 30 sq. meter racing yacht, The Roastbeef. Designed for the 30 sq. meter class of the Cercle de la Voile de Paris-Parisian Sailing Circle) Specs: 1891-92; length = 8 meters; waterline= 5.28 meters; displacement = 1379 kilograms (of which 1000 kilograms is ballast). His last designed boat, Mignon (1893-94) had a very similar keel and bow design, but was 12 meters in length. This is The Roastbeef, as it was replicated in the late 1980s-early1990s (?). I saw this beautiful vessel outside of Paris in Chatou where it was being stored in a shed owned by the French Nuclear Energy Co. He named it The Roastbeef, because it was a highly British word and the Brits were the foremost regattiers of the time. Daniel Charles's book, "Le mystère Caillebotte"(1994 Glénat-in French) is a complete accounting of the painter's passion for sailing and designing racing yachts, which were small as competitions were held in Argenteuil on the Seine River (famous spot for the Impressionist painters) and along the French side of the English Channel (La Manche).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caillebotte for sure! There was just an exhibit at the Peabody Essex Museum here in Mass this last winter that featured marine related work of French Impressionists. While I'm not generally into impressionism, the exhibit was really fantastic, and in large part due to the good amount of attention given to Caillebotte's life, paintings and deep interest in naval architecture. They had some of his "magazines" that he published on yacht design (large leather volumes that I think he published monthly), and of course they had images of Roast Beef on hand, with this being my favorite:

 

...notice the one finger on the tiller

 

ImpressionistsontheWater_p070.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hubert or Herbert Spagnol/Stagnoll ??? was building a Fife/Caillebotte and had previously set up for building boats on spec[ chantier??]

The GFC hit and may have lost business but I recall he was struggling to keep big boat..... memory is a bit loose but liked Fife designs and was trying to create interest/market for highend boatbuilding using traditional means. In Sydney there are two small 30ft Fifes

"planks on edge" Kelpie the oldest built by George Ellis Duke St East Balmain. She was built from full length teak planks on hardwood frames and launched in 1884, where she was raced; but she also covered a lot of sea miles offshore in the Tasman and Coral seas .

Ben[bob] Lexcen had a thing for her and would go close/follow " to see how the water would go round her" The boom offshore must have been dragging even with flattening "lift" reef but she looked special. There was a great photo of her front cover of Aust Boating and Classic Boat or Wooden Boat in the 80s 'sailing under NorthHead at sunrise'; after which she was rebuilt by shipwright Ricky Wood for J.Wood [no relation] and has been the drawcard of many Sydney Wooden Boatshows The second is called Jenny Wren and both have been partipants in the SASC Gaffers Race. They are lovely boats from another era ..... Pretty as a Picture !

I guess that you are thinking of Fyne the larger Fife built by Stagnol for himself.

 

"Fyne" was lucky to get out of the yard problems and was bought by Jacques Caraes former pro sailor in the Whitbread and RTW records, now a pro race director (previously Figaro now the IMOCA New YorK Barcelona race)

He keeps her very shipshape in front of his house, here.

post-6361-0-91171100-1401898775_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neat boat and initial Anglo reaction was early Hershoff, next though was fife as others mentioned, one look at trailer tells you it is not in US. Looks like Chorus got it, for sure a pretty boat any way you slice it (no pun intended on name).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're right MidPack! What do I win ?

gratitude ?

a SA sticker ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kinda looks like a yard dart on a trailer...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

kidding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Moody Frog for the follow up; its great to see Fyne fully realized and looking good at home. Do you have any links

to the boat and or owner, love to see her sailing. I originally came across the river racers because of a lovely Morgann ply kitboat

by Jean Yves Manach, do you know if he is still sailing and designing. I remember that a fiberglass version was put into production,

but don't remember who was building them, but the ply one was very quick and looked great to boot. I normally associate your name with performance boats but it seems your interest is all maritime. thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great to see Fyne lying to a mooring... the only proper way for such boats to be seen... Some Marc Turner pics of her sailing at the 2008 Fife Regatta here:

 

http://marcturner.photoshelter.com/#!/index/C00006TXO6Babekg/G00008FH0qd9i8Xs/1

 

Does anyone have any up to date photos of Hubert Stagnol's current project:.. a replica of G.L. Watson design no 274... the 1893 design that developed into the 1894 PEGGY BAWN? http://peggybawn.wordpress.com/2014/03/02/a-new-watson-for-the-weekend-no-274/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hilarious is the word: the impressionist painters were a group of merry bachelors with voluminous cellars and many mistresses.

At one point Caillebotte designed and built two new racers to I do not remember which class.

One was called "Condor" (like the vulture bird, club officials thought), but.... the merry guys knew that in French this pronounces the same as "Golden Cunt" and to further the joke Caillebotte named the second one "Cul Blanc" (White-Ass).*

 

Both boats sported silk sails !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Moody Frog for the follow up; its great to see Fyne fully realized and looking good at home. Do you have any links

to the boat and or owner, love to see her sailing. I originally came across the river racers because of a lovely Morgann ply kitboat

by Jean Yves Manach, do you know if he is still sailing and designing. I remember that a fiberglass version was put into production,

but don't remember who was building them, but the ply one was very quick and looked great to boot. I normally associate your name with performance boats but it seems your interest is all maritime. thanks

I do not think that the boat has a website, it is mainly THE love of a group of ex-racers.

The lead-owner and his wife run a P/R, incentive and sailing adventures business at: http://www.kaori.fr/

 

"Morgann" you'll find them at http://www.cnfranckroy.com/index.htm

 

Jean-Yves Manac'h is older than I am, so I guess that he is not too active anymore but I believe that he still sells drawings including those of the plywood Morganns.

 

A number of years ago I got tired of the invasion of so-called pros and "sausage" courses and turned to classic yachts, just to find a big number of my former fellow competitors in there, hence the interest. Then it turned into a vintage collectors game and I moved again. I guess that the great thing about sailing is that its scope is so wide that one can change interests without leaving the sport.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hilarious is the word: the impressionist painters were a group of merry bachelors with voluminous cellars and many mistresses.

At one point Caillebotte designed and built two new racers to I do not remember which class.

One was called "Condor" (like the vulture bird, club officials thought), but.... the merry guys knew that in French this pronounces the same as "Golden Cunt" and to further the joke Caillebotte named the second one "Cul Blanc" (White-Ass).*

 

Both boats sported silk sails !

drole, tres drole..... :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of speculation about the designer but not about the design.

Its not very big, maybe 30ft, its on a 4 wheel trailer so can ot weigh more than 2 ton. Pretty light for its type. There is a pretty tight turn of the bilge unlike all the Fyffe wedge on edge types so the keel can not have very much weight or the water line would be a lot higher. So it has a small mount of ballast slung deep down on a thin keel made of wood no doubt. It has about 2 acres of wetted surface in that huge keel. Not much righting moment from the small amount of ballast, probably iron. But the thin keel probably has structural issues, which ,might explain why its on a trailer. And as its mostlikely wood it its been on the trailer for long it will not likely float for very long, no matter how much paint it has on it.

And it did actually last long enough to hoist sails, I think 4KtSB might be the appropriate category.

Summary, a folly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of speculation about the designer but not about the design.

Its not very big, maybe 30ft, its on a 4 wheel trailer so can ot weigh more than 2 ton. Pretty light for its type. There is a pretty tight turn of the bilge unlike all the Fyffe wedge on edge types so the keel can not have very much weight or the water line would be a lot higher. So it has a small mount of ballast slung deep down on a thin keel made of wood no doubt. It has about 2 acres of wetted surface in that huge keel. Not much righting moment from the small amount of ballast, probably iron. But the thin keel probably has structural issues, which ,might explain why its on a trailer. And as its mostlikely wood it its been on the trailer for long it will not likely float for very long, no matter how much paint it has on it.

And it did actually last long enough to hoist sails, I think 4KtSB might be the appropriate category.

Summary, a folly.

Boat was designed to be a river-racer.

The one on the pic is a recent replica built to sail on the river Seine in vintage "races"

 

PS: trailer: those sail from the most beautiful french yacht-club, mooring on the river is unallowed so - for ages - boats are kept on cradles in a purposely built huge ventilated shed with mast clearance. Luxuries of the early 20th century and before.

post-6361-0-11023300-1402043924_thumb.jpg

post-6361-0-25130200-1402043948_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites