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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

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Skol

Galley Anarchy

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Anarchists, let's talk about ... the galley. What are the top two or three things -slash- modifications you can't live without in the galley?

I'm full time liveaboard now on my small Ericson and I have to start from scratch. Important to me is to have a galley that is not dependent on shore power nor lots of battery juice. Most important is that it's laid out to work the same while underway as it does at the dock.

With that said, a few things I'm currently working on are ...

 

* converting old princess alcohol stove to kerosene by retrofitting new burners. these are hard to find, but I feel like it'll be worth it.

 

* ice box mods: insulate the box externally so block ice and / or dry ice last longer. Find some kind of non-rusting rack to make better use of the space ... any ideas?

 

* stackable, non plastic food containers for leftovers and common items like deli meat. is there something out there that's impact resistant and isn't plastic? I can't stand plastic, especially ziplock bags.

 

* gimballed 1 burner stove for soup 'n coffee while underway.


* leather sleeve for a single 10" chef's knife. keep 1 paring knife in drawer and ditch the rest.



What have you found useful? I really like CA's tendency for longer threads that meander all over the place. Galley porn in photos or anything else related encouraged.

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The ice box insulation project has been slowly making it up my list. May actually get done this season. My plan is to drill dome holes in inconspicuous places and spray in a bunch of expanding foam. Hopefully should work flawlessly...........

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Skip the kerosene conversion. Search Craigslist for an Origo NON-pressurized alcohol stove. Get yourself some cast iron cookware. Done.

 

The Origo is safe, simple, cheap. the cast iron cookware gathers and retains the heat, to provide an excellent cooking experience within a reasonable time frame.

 

That's my live aboard experience.

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If you're living on board, get propane. The risk is WAY overstated with a proper installation and it works just like home.

 

Or.... since you're in Cali, where I understand CNG is readily available, go for that instead.

 

Living every day with kerosene or alcohol would totally blow.

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Skip the kerosene conversion. Search Craigslist for an Origo NON-pressurized alcohol stove. Get yourself some cast iron cookware. Done.

 

The Origo is safe, simple, cheap. the cast iron cookware gathers and retains the heat, to provide an excellent cooking experience within a reasonable time frame.

 

That's my live aboard experience.

Even though you have correctly assessed the merits of cast iron cookware it has one big problem for a boater. The stuff rusts. Get off the boat for a few months and you will come back to brown stains everywhere in your pot locker.

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Skip the kerosene conversion. Search Craigslist for an Origo NON-pressurized alcohol stove. Get yourself some cast iron cookware. Done.

 

The Origo is safe, simple, cheap. the cast iron cookware gathers and retains the heat, to provide an excellent cooking experience within a reasonable time frame.

 

That's my live aboard experience.

Even though you have correctly assessed the merits of cast iron cookware it has one big problem for a boater. The stuff rusts. Get off the boat for a few months and you will come back to brown stains everywhere in your pot locker.

Not if you buy enamelled cast iron cookware. It's the bee's knees!

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My casserole is enameled cast iron - Chasseur if anyone is shopping. It's 90% as good as Le Creuset and half the price. I wouldn't recommend the enameled frypans because they are so hard to clean. On the other hand they do cook well because the heat is even all over the base.

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I'm moving back to Puget Sound at the end of the summer and figure it's going to be a cold winter having been acclimated to NorCal for the past 5 years. My reasons for preferring kerosene are many - the nostalgia of having used kerosene stoves and lanterns for some 30 years, the extra heat over alcohol, much better fuel efficiency, and the fact that I already use kerosene for my lantern. There's also the plus of being able to easily carry extra fuel without any safety worries. A 27 foot boat pitches more than bigger ones. If I had a heavy 30+ foot cruiser with a nice propane locker it would be a no brainer.

 

I agree that the Origo is a fantastic stove and is my Plan B if my conversion fails. I've seen them on friends boats and they've had good things to say about 'em.

 

I tend to like stainless steel, aluminum cored pots and pans. Much depends on how you cook. pork chops and fried potatoes - cast iron no doubt. I like pastas, and end up cooking a lot of sauces and doing a lot of sauteing; none of these are high points for cast iron. The added mass of a cast iron pan is more inertia to fly off the stove while under way to I don't consider it to be a good choice while underway. They also smoke up like crazy if you're not careful with the heat.

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I'm a knife guy, but wouldn't you miss a filet knife, oyster/clam knife, and a good serrated blade? Don't forget your stones.

 

Kero has its merits but requires involvement, propane is simple but deadly-I may have both.

 

An on deck bbq makes for some great meals and keeps the lobster stank out of the cabin.

 

Well done 12v reefers work, ice is for daysailing.

 

Ya gotta eat, it may as be well....

 

 

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I'm a knife guy, but wouldn't you miss a filet knife, oyster/clam knife, and a good serrated blade? Don't forget your stones.

 

Kero has its merits but requires involvement, propane is simple but deadly-I may have both.

 

An on deck bbq makes for some great meals and keeps the lobster stank out of the cabin.

 

Well done 12v reefers work, ice is for daysailing.

 

Ya gotta eat, it may as be well....

 

Refrigeration seems unlikely for me, but I highly encourage others to post up with their experiences. In my case I just don't want to fool with it on such a small boat. My dock mate has some kind of bilge water based cooler on his Yankee 26. It's not a bad setup at all but neither of us are really sure what makes it work as the boat is still new to him. He also has a bigger hatch down into the bilge than I do.

 

This doesn't work in warm places, but for chilling a few beers at the dock or on the hook I use a netted nylon bag with a lanyard about 5' long. I just cleat it off the stern and lower them into the chilly water and wait an hour. Simple, effective, and doesn't need juice.

 

re: filet knife, yeah! I have one in its own pouch that lives in a locker with what's left of my fishing gear (which is next to nothing). I do need a good whetstone. I have one of the sharpening rods and it works well enough for general cooking use. I haven't dared fishing in SF bay but look forward to it when I get back north.

 

A stern rail BBQ is on the list but not high in priority. I'd like to find a way to quickly stow it in the lazarette, which is cavernous on my boat. I hate the look of them hanging off the rail.

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I like the small Magma grill - have bought a few from the used boat parts store (keep giving them away). The gas burners wear out, leaving a perfectly good charcoal grill for under $50 - with mounting clamp. It goes on the Stern rail in the evening, and I use a little charcoal for dinner. Even the small bag of 'match light' is good for a week's meals - with maybe a bit of alcohol from the Origa to kick it off. By morning, I can dump the ashes in a bag for disposal, and the grill goes back in the Laz.

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Cook with garlic.

 

definitely. speaking of things savory, does any body do their own pickling? I haven't done it in a long time but it was fun.

 

What about canned food storage? I've read that people used to wax dip their cans to rust-proof them. I haven't noticed anything rusting in a matter of weeks, but haven't yet had to deal with seawater ingress into the holds.

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I will second the recommendation for a non-pressrized alcohol cooktop. Mine is a cookmate, a bit less expensive than the origo. I have not used a kero cooktop, but had a kero bulkhead heater, over time the smell got to be a bit much, and finding parts to service the burners became almost impossible, so converted to propane.

 

For the icebox I use perforated plastic bins I found at storage store (the local one is called storables), they help organize things but still let in the cold.

 

You can buy stainless containers shaped like tupperware, they are heavy, pricey and have plastic lids, but very strong. I have a few I use for coffee and such. Despite your dislike of plastic, it really is the best way to go.

 

I have a gimbaled single pot cooker similar to one made by forespar, I use it all the time for coffee, soup, and to heat water for washing up. works great.

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The ice box insulation project has been slowly making it up my list. May actually get done this season. My plan is to drill dome holes in inconspicuous places and spray in a bunch of expanding foam. Hopefully should work flawlessly...........

 

H.A. - I take it you don't have access to the ice box from below? Is there some kind of liner that the box sits in? I can see most of mine ice box after removing the cabinet drawers and fascias. I don't really have much of an idea of what I'm going to use to insulate it at this point because I haven't consulted the googles.

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I bought a mini fridge and stuffed it into the q-berth with a microwave oven. I strapped it to the bulkhead for daysails. I put it in my car and used the icebox when cruising. It wasn't that arduous.

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I will second the recommendation for a non-pressrized alcohol cooktop. Mine is a cookmate, a bit less expensive than the origo. I have not used a kero cooktop, but had a kero bulkhead heater, over time the smell got to be a bit much, and finding parts to service the burners became almost impossible, so converted to propane.

 

For the icebox I use perforated plastic bins I found at storage store (the local one is called storables), they help organize things but still let in the cold.

 

You can buy stainless containers shaped like tupperware, they are heavy, pricey and have plastic lids, but very strong. I have a few I use for coffee and such. Despite your dislike of plastic, it really is the best way to go.

 

I have a gimbaled single pot cooker similar to one made by forespar, I use it all the time for coffee, soup, and to heat water for washing up. works great.

 

Steele - like this one? I assume that the flush mount stove has the same innards. Looks pretty solid. I will check out the perforated bins. You're probably right about plastic.

 

 

 

ICN-3100.JPG

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Many many moons ago we (my dad) converted a pressurized Kenyon alcohol stove to kerosene. It worked a treat, much better than the Origo we have in our current boat.

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Mmmmmm filet knife ! High on my bucket list is buying a Marttiini knife from the factory.

 

The best !

 

As for fuel - propane is the best and I wouldn't have anything else. A 9 lb bottle will last a month of heavy use and should fit your boat. Part with the buck$ and buy an aluminium bottle which should last 10 years easy. Mount it on deck during use if you have to and take it below while sailing.

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The ice box insulation project has been slowly making it up my list. May actually get done this season. My plan is to drill dome holes in inconspicuous places and spray in a bunch of expanding foam. Hopefully should work flawlessly...........

 

H.A. - I take it you don't have access to the ice box from below? Is there some kind of liner that the box sits in? I can see most of mine ice box after removing the cabinet drawers and fascias. I don't really have much of an idea of what I'm going to use to insulate it at this point because I haven't consulted the googles.

No access. There's a bulkhead behind it, a settee in front of it and some finished cabinetry beside it. If I could get access I would use the blue foam panels and glue them together and tuck tape the seams all up to get as close to air tight as possible. One of my piss offs is the previous owner removed the 2 burner propane stove and all the related plumbing and wiring. At least he installed a brand spanking new 2 burner Origo that he never used. And I do havee a propane locker if I ever need one again. Also take a look or send Gatekeeper a PM for the pictures he had of his BBQ mount. He had made one using an old winch handle. Wasis nice.

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I bought a mini fridge and stuffed it into the q-berth with a microwave oven. I strapped it to the bulkhead for daysails. I put it in my car and used the icebox when cruising. It wasn't that arduous.

 

Ajax - yeah, it's not that bad, I'm just following a different school of thought. One of the first things I did was to throw the microwave and mini-fridge out onto the metal recycling trailer in the boat yard. I'm going to be splitting time between 2 ports once I get north so the boat will see a lot of active use. Everything should have it's long term place and must be secure.

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Mmmmmm filet knife ! High on my bucket list is buying a Marttiini knife from the factory.

 

The best !

 

As for fuel - propane is the best and I wouldn't have anything else. A 9 lb bottle will last a month of heavy use and should fit your boat. Part with the buck$ and buy an aluminium bottle which should last 10 years easy. Mount it on deck during use if you have to and take it below while sailing.

 

Probably not for me, but the aluminum tank is a good idea. Do you ever have issues with corrosion on fittings with external tank setups?

 

*whistle* mines just a cheapo plastic jobber. The Marttiini is very nice.

 

filet_c_900.jpg

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http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/porcelain-rectangular-food-storage-containers-set/

 

re: containers. I found these over at yuppie central. $39 for a set of 4. They're porcelain and the lids are plastic with 4 latches and a silicone seal. oven / microwave safe and can double as a serving dish.


img54o.jpg

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I will second the recommendation for a non-pressrized alcohol cooktop. Mine is a cookmate, a bit less expensive than the origo. I have not used a kero cooktop, but had a kero bulkhead heater, over time the smell got to be a bit much, and finding parts to service the burners became almost impossible, so converted to propane.

 

For the icebox I use perforated plastic bins I found at storage store (the local one is called storables), they help organize things but still let in the cold.

 

You can buy stainless containers shaped like tupperware, they are heavy, pricey and have plastic lids, but very strong. I have a few I use for coffee and such. Despite your dislike of plastic, it really is the best way to go.

 

I have a gimbaled single pot cooker similar to one made by forespar, I use it all the time for coffee, soup, and to heat water for washing up. works great.

 

Steele - like this one? I assume that the flush mount stove has the same innards. Looks pretty solid. I will check out the perforated bins. You're probably right about plastic.

 

 

 

ICN-3100.JPG

Mine is the drop in version, but they are otherwise the same, the one you pictured can be gimbaled (I think), which for space reasons was not an option for me.

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I have the drop-in Origo too. I really like it except that it doesn't work when sailing since I can't gimbal it. Earlier this spring a colder sailing day with an early start really made me want coffee and I ended up reefing and going hove-to just to use the stove. That lead to me making a gimbal mount for my Jetboil to allow using it while underway. It mounts in the cockpit so that I can keep an eye on it while sailing. I've used it a number of times since finishing it last month and it's great. Since you wanted photos:

130455886360084276-L.jpg

 

A good cooler is essential. I'm lucky that mine works well (it'll keep a block of ice for about 5 days), but if it didn't I'd be figuring out better insulation. My previous boat's cooler only kept a block of ice for a day or two and it was much more annoying to use.

 

I like these containers:

http://www.boaterspal.com/

 

They are everywhere in Seattle (the importer is local). The mounting brackets let you mount them under shelves, companionway stairs, or other out of the way places. We keep basics like tea, sugar, snack bars, and spices in them.

 

My galley has a single deep drawer. I'd love to read how others organize something like this, two shallow drawers would be a lot more useful.

 

My 28' boat has a table located around the compression post (it is a "euro-inspired" aft head layout). Someday I'm going to make a new middle for it that has embedded storage for utensils and other items. Some of the J/boats with aft-heads have that and it's a nice feature.

 

A good light mounted over the stove would be a nice upgrade in my boat.

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Alex, many thanks for the link. These look extremely practical.

P1010010.jpg


Their glass containers seem to be a better version of the porcelain things I posted earlier, too.

* light - oddly enough, the lone 12v lamp aboard Skol is in the galley. I intend to mount only 1 more, and that'll be in the head and call it a day. The prior owner had installed no less than 8. And 5 110v outlets. that's another story :/

* your gimbaled jetboil is sweet! nice work. I think a single burner gimballed on 2 axis is more useful while underway than a gimballed 2 burner stove in only 1 axis. The likelihood of spillage while pitching in a moderate sea with a short boat seems too high to justify upgrading the 2 burner.

James Baldwin of Atom Voyages fame uses a single burner kerosene stove with a custom gimbal he designed. There are links to sketches of the pot holder in his blog page for the Atom kerosene stove. http://atomvoyages.com/cys/atomstove.html

here's a shot of it

10172783_10203458021107962_4157938453425

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Alex, many thanks for the link. These look extremely practical.

 

P1010010.jpg

 

 

Their glass containers seem to be a better version of the porcelain things I posted earlier, too.

 

* light - oddly enough, the lone 12v lamp aboard Skol is in the galley. I intend to mount only 1 more, and that'll be in the head and call it a day. The prior owner had installed no less than 8. And 5 110v outlets. that's another story :/

 

* your gimbaled jetboil is sweet! nice work. I think a single burner gimballed on 2 axis is more useful while underway than a gimballed 2 burner stove in only 1 axis. The likelihood of spillage while pitching in a moderate sea with a short boat seems too high to justify upgrading the 2 burner.

 

James Baldwin of Atom Voyages fame uses a single burner kerosene stove with a custom gimbal he designed. There are links to sketches of the pot holder in his blog page for the Atom kerosene stove. http://atomvoyages.com/cys/atomstove.html

 

here's a shot of it

 

10172783_10203458021107962_4157938453425

 

 

Keeriste - I hope that knife block is a rare earth or electromagnet or something - hate to be below during a knockdown otherwise.

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Mmmmmm filet knife ! High on my bucket list is buying a Marttiini knife from the factory.

 

The best !

 

As for fuel - propane is the best and I wouldn't have anything else. A 9 lb bottle will last a month of heavy use and should fit your boat. Part with the buck$ and buy an aluminium bottle which should last 10 years easy. Mount it on deck during use if you have to and take it below while sailing.

Probably not for me, but the aluminum tank is a good idea. Do you ever have issues with corrosion on fittings with external tank setups?

 

*whistle* mines just a cheapo plastic jobber. The Marttiini is very nice.

 

filet_c_900.jpg

 

 

I'll let you in on a knife secret - Rapala knives are made by Marttiini.

 

My aluminium propane tanks are 10 y/o and still going strong. I did have to pay to get them re certified but the guy tested only. Nothing needed fixing. They live in a locker, so fortunately outside is not an issue for me. My previous boat used space under a cockpit seat for the tanks. Quite a few boats have an underseat locker in the cockpit that drains back into the cockpit floor. If you have one then all you have to do is run a gas line across to the galley and make up a bracket to hold the tank steady. An electric solenoid would be a good safety feature.

 

If you are living aboard a fuel stove is crazy. Leave it to the racers.

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I had a great bbq on the hook last night, those disposable canisters last a dozen meals for me. The small round kettle style rail mount is big enough and would stow easy. A must have for cooking.

 

Something other than the stove for hot water is a real luxury.

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Keeriste - I hope that knife block is a rare earth or electromagnet or something - hate to be below during a knockdown otherwise.

 

The photo that he posted seems to be from the boater's pal website and just shows them in use in a normal household kitchen.

 

I like the Atom Voyages stove. I didn't want to dedicate any limited counterspace to it (and didn't want to give up my two-burner stove for use at anchor), so that's why my design is a little different. I agree that a double gimbal single burner stove is a great way to go when cooking while sailing.

 

The backpacking stoves with built in heat exchangers on the pots (like the Jetboil) are very efficient and boil water really quickly. They aren't so good for much else because the pots have major hotspots. It's amazing to put your hand around the stove while it's going full roar and barely feel any waste heat. The downside is that I now have a 3rd type of fuel onboard (alcohol for the Origo, green can propane mounted on my stern pulpit for the cruising BBQ, and these backpacking propane/butane canisters for the Jetboil).

 

Speaking of BBQs, my Magma kettle-style one sucks. It is mostly rusted through, has no heat control (it's just on full blast) and there is no storage for the lid when it's off of the grill...just a piece of wire holding them together. On my previous boat I had a Dickinson Sea-B-Q and it was much nicer. I do like the smaller size of the Magma, the quality and design just suck.

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SloopJonB - I believe that's pictured on a powerboat but I grabbed it because it showed food. The sailboat photo from their page was full of non-galley junk.

 

Savoir - I indeed have room in the lazarette but it drains straight to the bilge. I'd have to build up a fiberglass enclosure to create a proper locker, separate from the rest of the space to mitigate the risk of leaks settling down into the bilge.

I think what frightens me most about propane on a smaller boat is that it'll get bounced around more and be at a higher risk for leaks. 33+ ft and 12k to 15k+ displacement? no arguments, it's clearly more convenient - burns cleaner, hotter, and no pre-heat ritual.

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Speaking of BBQs, my Magma kettle-style one sucks. It is mostly rusted through, has no heat control (it's just on full blast) and there is no storage for the lid when it's off of the grill...just a piece of wire holding them together. On my previous boat I had a Dickinson Sea-B-Q and it was much nicer. I do like the smaller size of the Magma, the quality and design just suck.

 

I must be a sucker, I just ordered a Kettle 2 since it was on sale on West Marine. It appears to fix most of my issues (interior is stainless now, lid pivots, burner is supposed to be improved) and it's smaller and fits in my lazarette better than the Dickinson.

 

Skol: I have a similar sized boat and don't want permanently plumbed propane either.

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My wife got me the updated Magma as a gift last season (she had probably listened to my profane response to the superheated lid falling off the old one onto my hand too many times). The hinged lid is much better, the ignitor works, and the burner is better. It is still too hot on the lowest setting but more controllable than the old model.

 

Alex, as a side note you should consider a limited production run of your jet boil gimbal. My much loved single cooker uses gampgaz canisters that are no longer available. The Forspar one I mentioned above is really too tall to fit in a smaller boat.

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Speaking of BBQs, my Magma kettle-style one sucks. It is mostly rusted through, has no heat control (it's just on full blast) and there is no storage for the lid when it's off of the grill...just a piece of wire holding them together. On my previous boat I had a Dickinson Sea-B-Q and it was much nicer. I do like the smaller size of the Magma, the quality and design just suck.

 

I must be a sucker, I just ordered a Kettle 2 since it was on sale on West Marine. It appears to fix most of my issues (interior is stainless now, lid pivots, burner is supposed to be improved) and it's smaller and fits in my lazarette better than the Dickinson.

 

Skol: I have a similar sized boat and don't want permanently plumbed propane either.


A BBQ is just one of those things that makes life a little better. Despite my objections to crap hanging off the stern rail, I agree that it's a solid investment given the price. My old house was in "Frellard" for many years. I think I grilled more during the rainy season than I did in the summertime. There's something a little magical about standing in the drizzle while sipping on a cold Nightwatch and tending to 2lbs of mussels and then a thick fillet of salmon.

Fish and seafood markets here in SF bay are a cruel joke. What you can find that's decent quality is crazeballs expensive. By far that's been one of my biggest disappointments about living here.

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steele: It was mostly hand work and isn't cost effective for me to make more of them. I could maybe be convinced to do a half-day "let's make a batch of them" workshop in my basement working semi assembly line style making 3 or 4 for friends. It would probably be really cheap for a marine company to mass produce overseas. I can help you in the meantime -- the camping store on Bainbridge Island (it's under the used book store on the main drag) has at least a few year supply of the gaz fuel canisters. I was surprised to see them when I was over there last week.

 

I'm glad to hear that the new Magma is better than what I've got.


Skol: One nice thing about the Magma BBQs is that the rail mount is fast to use and leaves nothing behind when the BBQ is off of the rail. I usually keep it in my dock box or lazarette instead of mounted on the boat. I don't like having a lot of clutter on my stern rail either, and there is already more than enough with the solar panel and lifering.

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Well insulated icebox. Deep sink (it can be narrow, like a bar sink). Unbreakable thermos.

 

Soves... The Origos are inexpensive and easy to use. Alcohol is $ and doesn't put out much heat, though. I have an old Force ten kero. Works fine, but kero is getting harde for mer to get and as expensive as alcohol. Pressurized alcohol is the worst of both worlds, but I've seen a couple old Kenyons converted to propane using torch bottle. Not up to regs, but very convienient and easy to use. Living aboard in PNW, is coal an option? That would also give off a nice dry heat in cabin. Whatever main stove, a gimbled single-burner propane using a torch cylinder (like Forespar) is great for making coffee/ heating up soup/etc without dealing with main stove. A necessity if main stove isn't gimbled.

Its pretty damn hard to find a good marine stove that doesn't cost a fortune. A couple boats I sailed on I just used a propane camp stove for weekend cruising and deliveries. It was adequate for such occassional use, but not suitable for permanent/liveaboard use. Plus, they rust pretty quickly.

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I have the drop-in Origo too. I really like it except that it doesn't work when sailing since I can't gimbal it. <snip>

 

Alex, my Origo is also not gimballed, but that doesn't stop me from using it underway. You can buy "pot clamps" for the stove, that clamp onto the sides of the stove, and grip your coffee pot or whatever you set on the burner.

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I have the drop-in Origo too. I really like it except that it doesn't work when sailing since I can't gimbal it. <snip>

 

Alex, my Origo is also not gimballed, but that doesn't stop me from using it underway. You can buy "pot clamps" for the stove, that clamp onto the sides of the stove, and grip your coffee pot or whatever you set on the burner.

 

I have those pot holders on my left burner. They don't fit on my right burner due to the fiddle design in my Pearson.

 

I've found that it only works safely if the boat has under about 5 (maybe up to 10) degrees heal. Anything much more than that and flames start coming out of parts of the stove that they shouldn't be coming out of. My boat gets to 15 degrees heel pretty quickly before the form stability kicks in and stiffens it up. The gimbal is a lot safer to use underway.

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I had a great bbq on the hook last night, those disposable canisters last a dozen meals for me. The small round kettle style rail mount is big enough and would stow easy. A must have for cooking.

 

Something other than the stove for hot water is a real luxury.

 

Ah, that reminds me, hot water-

 

When you're at the dock, on shore power, one of those rapid-heat, electric kettles are excellent for hot washing-up water, to clean your dishes.

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I'm also a fan of the non-pressurized stoves. I found the Cookmate drop-in fit the exact hole as the original Kenyon Homestrand; the Origa has slightly different dimensions. I did have to relocate the counterweight on the gimbal to make it sit level.

Here's a picture of it in the galley of my I-28:

 

cookmate_zps6e4e4568.jpg

 

I'm quite happy with it - No, it's not super hot, but it cooks just fine while being simple and safe.

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The ice box insulation project has been slowly making it up my list. May actually get done this season. My plan is to drill dome holes in inconspicuous places and spray in a bunch of expanding foam. Hopefully should work flawlessly...........

Be carefull with expanding foam. I think you can find non expanding foam. Just for neat sake, sheets of foam on any accessible surface will give a better finish.

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cookmate_zps6e4e4568.jpg

 

I'm quite happy with it - No, it's not super hot, but it cooks just fine while being simple and safe.

 

I like that recessed gimbal.

 

If you pull those flame diffusers off of the burners it will put more heat into the pot and less into the surrounding air. That makes it a lot hotter, at the risk of scorching items in a thin frying pan. I wonder how many people who find the non-pressurized stoves "cool" are always using the diffusers?

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If you don't want propane aboard, Taylor Paraffin Stoves are the way to go.

 

They're expensive, but you can't get any better.

 

Note: Taylor also make a few gas models but I've not used them but I assume they are just as well made as their paraffin models.

post-106106-0-00034700-1402334758_thumb.jpg

post-106106-0-88700700-1402334772_thumb.jpg

post-106106-0-50654200-1402334780.jpg

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The ice box insulation project has been slowly making it up my list. May actually get done this season. My plan is to drill dome holes in inconspicuous places and spray in a bunch of expanding foam. Hopefully should work flawlessly...........

Be carefull with expanding foam. I think you can find non expanding foam. Just for neat sake, sheets of foam on any accessible surface will give a better finish.

Yeah, I'm aware of the possibilities. Have done some research. One interesting tidbit that I heard was that if you can keep it warm/hot expanding foam will stay soft while it expands. Considering tossing a heater in the icebox whilst foaming it up.

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If you don't want propane aboard, Taylor Paraffin Stoves are the way to go.

 

They're expensive, but you can't get any better.

 

Note: Taylor also make a few gas models but I've not used them but I assume they are just as well made as their paraffin models.

 

coming around full circle :) I've lusted after the Taylor 079K cabin heater for awhile now and it's on my list of possibilities. Failing that, a Dickinson diesel cabin heater with kero jets can be had for un-crazy money. I'd rather avoid solid fuel as I think it would be cumbersome for day-to-day use. In either case, the heater must be a sealed combustion chamber. Venting a small cabin for a heater at 20 degrees is a losing battle.

 

The 028k stove pictured 3rd in the list is the bees knees. Love the griddle and flat surface. As nice as that is, I've discovered that Primus / Optimus 155w can be had for 300 euros from an outfit in Germany. http://hytta.de/kocher/index.htm It is gimbaled, comes with the sea-rail, uses the quiet type burners and is all SS construction. Not a bad deal at all for a good stove, actually.

 

Optimus-Petroleumkocher-155W-Optimus-par

 

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http://www.scanmarineusa.com/products/stoves

Some more digging turned up another non-propane option in Wallas brand stoves, a Canadian outfilt, available through Scan Marin out of Seattle. These look really nice because they feature a sealed combustion chamber and there's no open flame. If not going the kero route, a diesel heater drawing from a common tank is equally appealing and fuel is much easier to come by. I do like the idea of not having to deal with moisture in the cabin and venting all the CO2 externally. It retails $1,700 for the stove only, plus the other bits to plumb the exhaust, vents, and fuel. Given that I don't have a mortgage or rent anymore the price is still pretty attractive for something that's well made and need to rely on day-to-day.

 

6377377684783104.png?k=lIyP7x1GZGNwljbEE

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I liveaboard a 29ft and I can't live without a 2 burner + oven stainless steel propane stove.

I also have an italian coffee machine you use on the stove. Oh yes, and a Terrible Towel to dry dishes.

 

 

stove1.jpgstove2.jpg

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If you have the space and power, a trash compactor is a wonderful galley thing. There was one installed when we bought a 2 year old boat 16 years ago. I figured we would get rid of it, but after our first long trip from Cape Cod to Ireland, with 5 people on board, throwing nothing over the side that wasn't food waste, we walked ashore with a single bag of trash, albeit quite heavy, Need to rinse food containers carefully to avoid smell with time, but it seriously manages the trash pile up situation. It also allows you to pick and choose where you offload trash, saving it for bigger places with a municipal system that can handle it. One time I placed a full compacted bag in a dumpster in a town. Things were pretty threadbare there, and the quality of the compactor plastic bag was such that the next morning the full bag had been emptied on the street and the bag repurposed..... We still have the unit and compact whenever cruising for more than a weekend.

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If you have the space and power, a trash compactor is a wonderful galley thing. There was one installed when we bought a 2 year old boat 16 years ago. I figured we would get rid of it, but after our first long trip from Cape Cod to Ireland, with 5 people on board, throwing nothing over the side that wasn't food waste, we walked ashore with a single bag of trash, albeit quite heavy, Need to rinse food containers carefully to avoid smell with time, but it seriously manages the trash pile up situation. It also allows you to pick and choose where you offload trash, saving it for bigger places with a municipal system that can handle it. One time I placed a full compacted bag in a dumpster in a town. Things were pretty threadbare there, and the quality of the compactor plastic bag was such that the next morning the full bag had been emptied on the street and the bag repurposed..... We still have the unit and compact whenever cruising for more than a weekend.

 

any idea of what the brand is? power requirements? seems like I've read more negatives to the compactors than positives. bags of loosely packed garbage festering in the lazarette is definitely less than optimal. I had one break once on a day trip. man that sucked to clean out of the laz.

 

strongly agree with your tips on food stuffs and rinsing containers. this mitigates the actual garbage quantity by a large degree.

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I liveaboard a 29ft and I can't live without a 2 burner + oven stainless steel propane stove.

I also have an italian coffee machine you use on the stove. Oh yes, and a Terrible Towel to dry dishes.

 

 

stove1.jpgstove2.jpg

 

Psycho' looks like you've got a nicely sized galley. I'd have to reconfigure the port side settee and lockers to fit a full size stove like yours. Are you able to refill propane at your marina? Do you ever notice moisture buildup with day-to-day use on your 29?

 

One of my big drawbacks to propane, for me, is that I've long since gotten rid of my car. Around here you have to drive somewhere At least with kerosene I can order 5 gallon containers of K-1 and have it shipped. Diesel would be optimal. Another big problem with propane in a big metro area is that the common Blue Rhino and tank exchange programs are colossal ripoffs. There are 2 places you can go to in the East Bay for bulk refills with your own tank, but it's about a 2hr round trip from my marina with your own wheels.

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I liveaboard a 29ft and I can't live without a 2 burner + oven stainless steel propane stove.

I also have an italian coffee machine you use on the stove. Oh yes, and a Terrible Towel to dry dishes.

 

 

stove1.jpgstove2.jpg

 

Psycho' looks like you've got a nicely sized galley. I'd have to reconfigure the port side settee and lockers to fit a full size stove like yours. Are you able to refill propane at your marina? Do you ever notice moisture buildup with day-to-day use on your 29?

 

One of my big drawbacks to propane, for me, is that I've long since gotten rid of my car. Around here you have to drive somewhere At least with kerosene I can order 5 gallon containers of K-1 and have it shipped. Diesel would be optimal. Another big problem with propane in a big metro area is that the common Blue Rhino and tank exchange programs are colossal ripoffs. There are 2 places you can go to in the East Bay for bulk refills with your own tank, but it's about a 2hr round trip from my marina with your own wheels.

My columbia 29 came with a side dinette which is also our double bunk on port side and the long skinny galley on starboard. We preferred this layout over other options with classical two side berths. To fit the stove we had to rip out two drawers and do some minor carpentry modifications. We didn't lost too much storage because pots and pans live in the oven when not in use, still it was a difficult decision but we are happy we made it.

 

You are right Skol, for some reason US is the worst place on earth to refill your propane tank. It's also a place where you are screwed if you don't have your own wheels. In South America, Caribbean and Europe it's less of a problem to find propane.

 

A full tank lasts about 3 months, so when it's 2 months since last refill I start to think about it and look for a refill, so I have a month time to find the best situation. If I had enough storage I would have a spare tank, but it's not my case. Anyway I always find a way to get a lift or a to get to a close enough hardware store to refill my tank. Marinas also deal with propane addicts so they are able to arrange something for you.

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Do you ever notice moisture buildup with day-to-day use on your 29?

 

 

 

 

It definetely gets steamy in there but I always cook with hatches and companionway open even during winter time so no buildups.

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If you have the space and power, a trash compactor is a wonderful galley thing. There was one installed when we bought a 2 year old boat 16 years ago. I figured we would get rid of it, but after our first long trip from Cape Cod to Ireland, with 5 people on board, throwing nothing over the side that wasn't food waste, we walked ashore with a single bag of trash, albeit quite heavy, Need to rinse food containers carefully to avoid smell with time, but it seriously manages the trash pile up situation. It also allows you to pick and choose where you offload trash, saving it for bigger places with a municipal system that can handle it. One time I placed a full compacted bag in a dumpster in a town. Things were pretty threadbare there, and the quality of the compactor plastic bag was such that the next morning the full bag had been emptied on the street and the bag repurposed..... We still have the unit and compact whenever cruising for more than a weekend.

 

any idea of what the brand is? power requirements? seems like I've read more negatives to the compactors than positives. bags of loosely packed garbage festering in the lazarette is definitely less than optimal. I had one break once on a day trip. man that sucked to clean out of the laz.

 

strongly agree with your tips on food stuffs and rinsing containers. this mitigates the actual garbage quantity by a large degree.

It is a Broan. Never had any issues with it except it tried to launch itself across the cabin when I hit a rock doing 6 knots. In terms of power it wont run on an 1800 watt inverter. It did run fine on a 4 kW genset - we now have a 6 kW Northern Lights. So as i said. You need good power. But I have often thought about building a manual version. Adequately geared down, have a winch handle socket in the front face, and have it so that you can crank the ram up and down with the handle. No one is going to get rich selling such a thing but it would make it simple for cruisers to toss less trash overboard.

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I liveaboard a 29ft and I can't live without a 2 burner + oven stainless steel propane stove.

I also have an italian coffee machine you use on the stove. Oh yes, and a Terrible Towel to dry dishes.

 

 

stove1.jpgstove2.jpg

 

Psycho' looks like you've got a nicely sized galley. I'd have to reconfigure the port side settee and lockers to fit a full size stove like yours. Are you able to refill propane at your marina? Do you ever notice moisture buildup with day-to-day use on your 29?

 

One of my big drawbacks to propane, for me, is that I've long since gotten rid of my car. Around here you have to drive somewhere At least with kerosene I can order 5 gallon containers of K-1 and have it shipped. Diesel would be optimal. Another big problem with propane in a big metro area is that the common Blue Rhino and tank exchange programs are colossal ripoffs. There are 2 places you can go to in the East Bay for bulk refills with your own tank, but it's about a 2hr round trip from my marina with your own wheels.

My columbia 29 came with a side dinette which is also our double bunk on port side and the long skinny galley on starboard. We preferred this layout over other options with classical two side berths. To fit the stove we had to rip out two drawers and do some minor carpentry modifications. We didn't lost too much storage because pots and pans live in the oven when not in use, still it was a difficult decision but we are happy we made it.

 

You are right Skol, for some reason US is the worst place on earth to refill your propane tank. It's also a place where you are screwed if you don't have your own wheels. In South America, Caribbean and Europe it's less of a problem to find propane.

 

A full tank lasts about 3 months, so when it's 2 months since last refill I start to think about it and look for a refill, so I have a month time to find the best situation. If I had enough storage I would have a spare tank, but it's not my case. Anyway I always find a way to get a lift or a to get to a close enough hardware store to refill my tank. Marinas also deal with propane addicts so they are able to arrange something for you.

 

Nice work shoehorning in that stove. The side galley layouts are a definite plus I think. A buddy of mine has a Rawson 30 that is configured very similarly and it definitely seems to work better than the miniature L-shaped galleys typically found on boats our size.

 

re: propane availability - It seems like it's just the coastal cities. Back in the interior states where I grew up, propane is a very common fuel source for homes in rural areas and can be had inexpensively virtually anywhere. You could just about flag down one of the trucks if you were to wait an hour.

 

 

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Adequately geared down, have a winch handle socket in the front face, and have it so that you can crank the ram up and down with the handle. No one is going to get rich selling such a thing but it would make it simple for cruisers to toss less trash overboard.

 

Some kind of pawl based drum and 3' of leverage on the handle would probably suit this purpose just fine. Hydraulic ram and a rack and pinion setup? It's kind of surprising that such a thing doesn't exist. This might be an interesting project. My prior hobby was off-roading - taking off on multi-day trips to the backcountry, and dealing with garbage is no less cumbersome than on the boat. Some kind of manual device would serve both purposes pretty well.

 

A quick google search returned this. I don't think I'm going to trust that to work out too well against a fiberglass liner or removable flooring.

 

trash-bin.jpg

 

Garbage management is one of the less fun things I have yet to sort out. It's the grocery stores that are the culprit. Everything is over packaged to the hilt, and there's no way to get rid of it until you're putting food away. I just have a garbage sack inside a stiff paper grocery bag that gets set out into the cockpit at night. Which is all well and fine until the raccoons find it. I need to remember to hit eBay for an ammo box to use for food waste sometime this week.

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that thing must have a stove top the size of a VW beetle. probably comes with two privates to keep the fire hot!

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One of my big drawbacks to propane, for me, is that I've long since gotten rid of my car. Around here you have to drive somewhere At least with kerosene I can order 5 gallon containers of K-1 and have it shipped. Diesel would be optimal. Another big problem with propane in a big metro area is that the common Blue Rhino and tank exchange programs are colossal ripoffs. There are 2 places you can go to in the East Bay for bulk refills with your own tank, but it's about a 2hr round trip from my marina with your own wheels.

 

I've refilled a lot of propane using my bicycle. It's not hard to find gas stations in Seattle who can refill propane (there is one near my house) and propane cylinders are easy to carry in a bicycle trailer. Bicycle trailers are supremely useful if you are car free, it's often the only way to get large packages home.

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Anyone ever used silicone bakeware? I don't have an oven so haven't tried it, but a friend who sailed around the world loved the stuff- didn't rust when stored and could be stored compactly.

 

post-24720-0-66961300-1402408636_thumb.jpg

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Anyone ever used silicone bakeware? I don't have an oven so haven't tried it, but a friend who sailed around the world loved the stuff- didn't rust when stored and could be stored compactly.

 

attachicon.gifsilicone.jpg

 

I have a silicone muffin pan that works quite well.

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Alpes in Italy makes the most exquisite marine stove I've seen. Impossible to find, and ordering from Italy would have cost more than the Bluestar in the house.

 

But dayumm, it sure is purty.

 

p-cucinette.jpg

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Anyone ever used silicone bakeware? I don't have an oven so haven't tried it, but a friend who sailed around the world loved the stuff- didn't rust when stored and could be stored compactly.

 

attachicon.gifsilicone.jpg

Also have a muffin pan, and it's Ok. It gives off alarming hot plastic smells if the oven is too hot. Not for use on the stovetop.

 

There are a variety of silicone kitchen items that can collapse to save space, e.g colanders.

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Anyone ever used silicone bakeware? I don't have an oven so haven't tried it, but a friend who sailed around the world loved the stuff- didn't rust when stored and could be stored compactly.

 

attachicon.gifsilicone.jpg

Also have a muffin pan, and it's Ok. It gives off alarming hot plastic smells if the oven is too hot. Not for use on the stovetop.

 

There are a variety of silicone kitchen items that can collapse to save space, e.g colanders.

 

I don't think I've used my pan at more than 350 degrees.

 

Silicone is definitely not for stove top use, nor for broiling!

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On my E-27 I insulated the sink. Easy access to beer while single handing.

 

that is good thinking, but I'm too OCD to disable a hand washing station. :lol:

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Anyone ever used silicone bakeware? I don't have an oven so haven't tried it, but a friend who sailed around the world loved the stuff- didn't rust when stored and could be stored compactly.

 

attachicon.gifsilicone.jpg

 

great suggestion on silicone-ware in general. I like the hot pads on land. grippy is good on a boat.

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Alpes in Italy makes the most exquisite marine stove I've seen. Impossible to find, and ordering from Italy would have cost more than the Bluestar in the house.

 

But dayumm, it sure is purty.

 

p-cucinette.jpg

 

Bruce King drew nice lines for my little boat. I love her dearly, but she is not worthy of such an object. I mean, where would it stop? Italian marble countertops? A Baby Blake in the head? Eva Green washing up the dishes? oh hell, where do I buy!

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speaking of baking, does anyone have experience with an Omnia stove top oven? I could see it being pretty handy for those of us without a proper stove.

 

OmniaStoveTopOven.jpg

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another item high on my list is a pressure cooker. saves a lot of fuel, and you can't beat a one-pot meal with all fresh ingredients. any recommendations for something that won't destruct the first time it bounces off the stove? here's one way to do it:

 

alternative-fuel-pressure-cooker.jpg

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another item high on my list is a pressure cooker. saves a lot of fuel, and you can't beat a one-pot meal with all fresh ingredients. any recommendations for something that won't destruct the first time it bounces off the stove? here's one way to do it:

 

alternative-fuel-pressure-cooker.jpg

 

 

Your MAGMA kettle looks like mine did after I made a large batch of "Spam a L'Orange" for some co-workers.

 

If interested, here is the normal size recipe (serves 2).

 

Ingredients

* One can Spam

* One box Mac & Cheese

* One small jar of Tang

 

Cooking

* Fry the Spam

* Boil the macaroni

 

Preparation

* Mix the Spam in with the Mac & Cheese

* Stir in Tang to taste

 

ps: The grease from the 12 cans of Spam I fried literally welded the burner to the kettle bottom. Not even a blow torch was able to loosen the threads.

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speaking of baking, does anyone have experience with an Omnia stove top oven? I could see it being pretty handy for those of us without a proper stove.

 

OmniaStoveTopOven.jpg

Hey, that's clever. Wish I had one when I was living aboard. A pressure cooker is a good idea too.

 

QB- You had me until you added Tang to the recipe. I'm skeptical. ;)

Spam is the U.S.'s version of Vegemite. People don't understand it, many people hate it. My view is, it's not healthy for you but its durability makes it good to keep on the boat, and it can be a primary ingredient in a variety of recipes.

 

For my ocean sail in August, I'm planning on cold cut sandwiches, MRE's and Starbuck's VIA (instant coffee) while sailing. Oh- for breakfast I make these mini, egg white/veggie quiche-like things in a muffin tin. Drop one or two of them into a bowl of hot grits- Breakfast done. They keep very well if kept cool enough, and they're healthy.

 

If I can boil water for grits and coffee while underway, I'll be totally satisfied.

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speaking of baking, does anyone have experience with an Omnia stove top oven? I could see it being pretty handy for those of us without a proper stove.

 

OmniaStoveTopOven.jpg

Hey, that's clever. Wish I had one when I was living aboard. A pressure cooker is a good idea too.

 

QB- You had me until you added Tang to the recipe. I'm skeptical. ;)

Spam is the U.S.'s version of Vegemite. People don't understand it, many people hate it. My view is, it's not healthy for you but its durability makes it good to keep on the boat, and it can be a primary ingredient in a variety of recipes.

 

For my ocean sail in August, I'm planning on cold cut sandwiches, MRE's and Starbuck's VIA (instant coffee) while sailing. Oh- for breakfast I make these mini, egg white/veggie quiche-like things in a muffin tin. Drop one or two of them into a bowl of hot grits- Breakfast done. They keep very well if kept cool enough, and they're healthy.

 

If I can boil water for grits and coffee while underway, I'll be totally satisfied.

 

Tang, is the "L'Orange" in Spam a L'Orange!

 

As such, Tang is a necessary ingredient.

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speaking of baking, does anyone have experience with an Omnia stove top oven? I could see it being pretty handy for those of us without a proper stove.

 

OmniaStoveTopOven.jpg

Never used that particular model, or one on a boat, but something similar canoe camping in Northern Canada. Works about as well as any stove top baking contraption. And much better than a solar oven. You can accomplish the same thing with nesting pots & pans by keeping the smaller inside pot elevated off the bottom of the bigger pot with a rack or even a handful of beach stones.

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another item high on my list is a pressure cooker. saves a lot of fuel, and you can't beat a one-pot meal with all fresh ingredients. any recommendations for something that won't destruct the first time it bounces off the stove?

 

I think most pressure cookers will stand a decent drop- they are designed for powerful forces. I'd just look at the little bits and make sure there isn't anything in the safety valve, etc. that could get damaged easily. For a lot of simple quick meals you can essentially heat them up to full pressure and then just let them slow release off heat, which means the pot can be in the sink or somewhere safe.

 

I've asked this before, but this might be a better thread. Does anyone have experience with thermal cookers- essentially you heat up the pan and food then place it in an insulated container and get a crockpot like effect without needing a heat source- it seems ideal for a boat, but I've never tried it. Thermos and others make them.

 

Here is a great simple boat food recipe for summer. Around noon time, halve a bunch of cherry tomatoes and put them in a container with some chopped garlic, chopped basil, salt, pepper and olive oil. and red pepper flakes. Amounts of each to your taste. Don't refrigerate, and by supper time you will have a fine sauce for pasta- if the tomatoes are great, you will have a great summer meal.

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How small of a pressure cooker is still useful in the boat galley? My pot storage space is about full, but I've always been interested in seeing what these can do.

 

Making a stovetop oven using two pots is a great idea and something that will work well with my existing Magma cookware. That is great stuff too, and hasn't been mentioned in this thread. I have the 7 part kit which gives you a nesting set appropriate for a 2 burner stove. The bottoms are thick and distribute heat well, so it works nicely on the Origo. It takes up little space when packed, and there is enough room inside the smaller pot to fit a useful 1.5qt sauce pot.

 

41qnZApH9VL._SY300_.jpgrv-cookware-magma-1.jpg

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I've asked this before, but this might be a better thread. Does anyone have experience with thermal cookers- essentially you heat up the pan and food then place it in an insulated container and get a crockpot like effect without needing a heat source- it seems ideal for a boat, but I've never tried it. Thermos and others make them.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Saratoga-Jacks-Thermal-Cooker-Deluxe/dp/B00824XGH0/ref=cm_lmf_tit_5

 

this one seems to get good bang-for-the-buck reviews. Pretty intriguing concept. Seems perfect for stews. Has the ability to cook two different items at the same time. I dig it.

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I have to admit, the kit that AlexW posted sure looks nice. I understand that they have thick bottoms for heat retention, so maybe they'll make a good substitute for cast-iron.

I might give it a go.

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How small of a pressure cooker is still useful in the boat galley? My pot storage space is about full, but I've always been interested in seeing what these can do.

 

Making a stovetop oven using two pots is a great idea and something that will work well with my existing Magma cookware. That is great stuff too, and hasn't been mentioned in this thread. I have the 7 part kit which gives you a nesting set appropriate for a 2 burner stove. The bottoms are thick and distribute heat well, so it works nicely on the Origo. It takes up little space when packed, and there is enough room inside the smaller pot to fit a useful 1.5qt sauce pot.

 

41qnZApH9VL._SY300_.jpgrv-cookware-magma-1.jpg

 

 

There are a lot of threads over on CF and SN that talk about the pressure cookers. Cooking meals for 2, it seems that many like the 2.5 quart size. 4qt cookers seem to be the most common for those who want to do some canning occasionally. Frequent canners and cooking for bigger groups 6 qt.

 

Those Magma sets do look pretty nice.

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Bruce King drew nice lines for my little boat. I love her dearly, but she is not worthy of such an object. I mean, where would it stop? Italian marble countertops? A Baby Blake in the head? Eva Green washing up the dishes making french toast? oh hell, where do I buy!

 

Better.

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Bruce King drew nice lines for my little boat. I love her dearly, but she is not worthy of such an object. I mean, where would it stop? Italian marble countertops? A Baby Blake in the head? Eva Green washing up the dishes making french toast? oh hell, where do I buy!

 

Better.

 

I need a visual. This one will do. She wants to know where her french toast is.

 

 

Eva-Green-hot-21.jpg

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Alpes in Italy makes the most exquisite marine stove I've seen. Impossible to find, and ordering from Italy would have cost more than the Bluestar in the house.

 

But dayumm, it sure is purty.

 

p-cucinette.jpg

 

Bruce King drew nice lines for my little boat. I love her dearly, but she is not worthy of such an object. I mean, where would it stop? Italian marble countertops? A Baby Blake in the head? Eva Green washing up the dishes? oh hell, where do I buy!

so where are the fiddles and pot rails??? While at anchor, a passing jet ski will roll a hot pan off that thing, pretty as it is.

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