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wizard

Sassy? Anyone know her history?

141 posts in this topic

Big and slow...I mean HUGE and slow. She lost her rig in the Chi-Mac a few years back. Bought by some polish fella that had her down in Chicago. She looked a little rough last time I saw her. I saw her side by side with a J-35 two days after the start of the Mac race last year.

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Was she named something else during the Maxi days?

 

I know and raced on number of the old tin cans, but dont recognise this one?

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No, always been Sassy until it was sold, is now called Juliana and based in Chicago. The boat never really ventured out of the lakes much beyond the first couple years, I think it did a SORC or two, and the arrival of the SC70s in the late eighties pretty much stole the thunder. Looked pretty beat up in the Chi Mac last year.

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I think that the name has always been the same. Looks impressive but was built too heavy and they could never get the weight out...second on the post of SLOW.

 

I think they took it to Europe-maybe Finland or something-for a year for some race. I know someone who sailed with them-will have to ask

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It didnt rate -81, it rated more like -57, at least in 2002. As far as it looking beat up, who owns it is irrelevant, it pretty clearly needed work, and had a ton of growth on the bottom.

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This boat is a Fat Tub.

 

Was on a Tripp 40 for last year's Mac Race and we passed it downwind in light air.

When the wind picked up it gained about 2 hours on us in about a 80 mile run, however we caught up and passed it again in the light air upwind near the finish.

 

And Yes, the boat didn't look in very good shape at all. Sails were shot and boat looked real bad..

 

With all the maintainance on this boat, sails, etc. + the speed factor, I would run away from any sort of purchase or even sailing on the boat. But that's me..

 

Good Luck...

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It didnt rate -81, it rated more like -57, at least in 2002.  As far as it looking beat up, who owns it is irrelevant, it pretty clearly needed work, and had a ton of growth on the bottom.

typo. sorry dude. it's been corrected. -57 still aint slow

 

and it does make a huge difference who owns and maintains a boat like that. If you don't keep up with it, even one race can beat up a boat like that. trust me. The boat was always in perfect condition when the Schmidts owned it.

The topsides were patched and very faded, and a ton of other stuff. That doesnt happen in two years of sitting on the hard. When was the last time you saw the boat? I would be happy to post pics I took before the Chi Mac last year. And FWTW, -57 is not very fast for a 78 foot boat, and I highly doubt it could even sail to that without a lot of work and money.

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I've sailed in the 70 fleet against Sassy for a while now. They have always had a hard time sailing that thing to it's rating. While it may be light for a Maxi it's way too heavy for the Great Lakes.

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GL

 

I fully agree that the big Sass was impressive in her day, but take the age out of it. Is -57 for a 78 foot boat really fast? When the SC70 Pied Piper arrived in 86 with the same vintage technology, it was faster at ten feet shorter. I am not dumping on Dutch, the boat was well maintained in the day and an awesome sight, but those days are long gone. The amount of money it would take to get it back would be huge, you could probably fund a good 40 foot program on the sails alone.

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Yeah, I've got some bad news. That posting is pretty old. The area code for Active Yachts hasn't been 810 in about 4 years or so. Plus that boat is still in the heavy lift at Sassy Marina.

If I recall correctly, the boat was finally moved after the heavy air Chicago Mac when the rig dropped near the Straits. Some Europeans bought it for the Daimler Atlantic Challenge or whatever that thing was called. Put a new rig in (seems shorter than the original) and did the race. Boat survived, I can't imagine anything ever damaging that hull.

One thing to remember, that boat has a keel bulb that weighs about as much as an SC 70 (slightly exaggerated, you get my point) so in light air from any point of sail, a ULDB, or IRC maxi, or Mac 26 (+/- 50 hpr) is going to be faster. Even moreso if the replacement rig is shorter.

She definitely did look pretty rough last year and with the 70's, as Moxie can tell you, we got through her in about 30 mins or so from the start. So there's something to be said for sailing the boat well. It looked to us as though maybe there weren't even battens in the main and there was definitely a look of cruiser when the hit the course last year.

A beautiful boat when she was maintained, and a shame to see what she's become.

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I use to race agains SASSY when there were only 3 SC 70's on the lakes. If we got a beat in the MAC she would power by us. As the SC 70's evolved we got faster and learned how to sail them up wind. Sassy just got slower and slower. They seemed to be using original sails and just never were a factor. I remember in one race on Stripes we turned on the radar to find the class and wow did Sassy light up. She was once the queen of the lakes. SASSY crew still had the best race shirt ever "Just give us the island and no one gets hurt".

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Agree on the $$$$$$ actually it would be more like $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

 

PP was not the same vintage technology. A behemoth IOR slug out of aluminum vs a ULDB that I believe has some carbon (could be wrong). Yes the days are gone, by about 20+ yrs but when built, it was state of the art and did well against comparable boats.

 

Let's take it a step farther, aren't the SC70s dog slow? TP52's eat them for lunch. Each dog has its day and Sassy's was a short one but it did exist.

I dont believe there was any carbon in PP when it showed up. The original boat I think was hull #1, now currently Nitemare. My point was that the two boats came from the same era, although radically different design philosophies. And yes, by the latest yardstick the GL70s are slow. And in ten years I'm sure we'll be saying the same about the TP52s

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I've sailed in the 70 fleet against Sassy for a while now.  They have always had a hard time sailing that thing to it's rating.  While it may be light for a Maxi it's way too heavy for the Great Lakes.

yes - it's very hard to sail an upwind boat (as almost all IOR boats were) to it's PHRF rating in a Mackinac Race. Mackinac Races tend to be more down wind than upwind.

 

just exactly what makes it "too heavy for the Great Lakes"??????? Do you know what it weighs? Do you know what it's sail area/displacement ratio is? Do you know what a more appropriate SA/D ratio would be for an IOR Maxi in "Great Lakes trim" would be? Do you know how much righting moment Sassy has?

 

Making a the blanket statement of "It's too heavy for the Great Lakes" is ridiculous. So it's not too heavy for San Francisco Bay or Fremantle Austrailia sailing? Or does it need to put in an "big breeze" weight/keel pkg? When did you last study Sassy's IOR Cert and compare it to other Mid-'80's IOR Maxis? Any retard can throw out the statement of "it's too heavy", or "it's too light", or "the spinnakers are too small". Try educating yourself jerkoff.

 

and last I checked, finishing 4th Overall out of like 100 boats in the PHRF section does not equate to "not sailing to it's rating"

Look, coachizzorules don't get your panties in a bunch. No one is insulting your masculinity.No one is saying the boat sucks, only that it's too heavy and slow. Which it IS!

Does it matter whether I've studied her certificate? Plain and simple the boat was overbuilt and underpowered for the Great Lakes, as were many designs of the time. Even the old 50's ala Sorcerer (ex Natissima) Champosa etc... were overbuilt and underpowered for the GL. And yes, Sassy would be in her element at the Gage Roads or Bass Strait, or a Hurricane, or...

 

 

BTW, Michigan State is a great school. I really like what they're doing there. I firmly believe that everyone should have a chance to go to college.

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Agree on the $$$$$$ actually it would be more like $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

 

PP was not the same vintage technology.  A behemoth IOR slug out of aluminum vs a ULDB that I believe has some carbon (could be wrong).  Yes the days are gone, by about 20+ yrs but when built, it was state of the art and did well against comparable boats.

 

Let's take it a step farther, aren't the SC70s dog slow?  TP52's eat them for lunch.  Each dog has its day and Sassy's was a short one but it did exist.

I dont believe there was any carbon in PP when it showed up. The original boat I think was hull #1, now currently Nitemare. My point was that the two boats came from the same era, although radically different design philosophies. And yes, by the latest yardstick the GL70s are slow. And in ten years I'm sure we'll be saying the same about the TP52s

PP is hull #4. They all have carbon in the hulls....even Nitemare, which used to be Blondie, which is hull #1.

Austin is right, all the 70's have some carbon in them. The later hulls had a larger % of carbon and some had nomex cores (Chance) as opposed to the Baltek of the earlier hulls,

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Let's take it a step farther, aren't the SC70s dog slow? TP52's eat them for lunch.

Yeah, the 52's are nice. They're 15 feet shorter and they have no problem walking us until it's blowing 16-18 where they get overpowered.

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It didnt rate -81, it rated more like -57, at least in 2002. As far as it looking beat up, who owns it is irrelevant, it pretty clearly needed work, and had a ton of growth on the bottom.

When the Pole (insert jokes here) who bought the boat left Sassy Marina with it (I was there that day) it was in very good condition. He and his "crew" (they'd earned the nickname "the Polish Navy" at the yard) had spent the previous several weeks making their mods and getting it (and themselves) ready to take her directly trans-Atlantic, and when the new rig showed up and was stepped they left. Dutch and Karl took great care of the old girl right up until they sold her, it was a shame to see her condition when she re-appeared last year. On her worst day under Shmidt ownership she never looked half as bad as she did last summer.

 

wt

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Agree on the $$$$$$ actually it would be more like $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

 

PP was not the same vintage technology.  A behemoth IOR slug out of aluminum vs a ULDB that I believe has some carbon (could be wrong).  Yes the days are gone, by about 20+ yrs but when built, it was state of the art and did well against comparable boats.

 

Let's take it a step farther, aren't the SC70s dog slow?  TP52's eat them for lunch.  Each dog has its day and Sassy's was a short one but it did exist.

I dont believe there was any carbon in PP when it showed up. The original boat I think was hull #1, now currently Nitemare. My point was that the two boats came from the same era, although radically different design philosophies. And yes, by the latest yardstick the GL70s are slow. And in ten years I'm sure we'll be saying the same about the TP52s

PP is hull #4. They all have carbon in the hulls....even Nitemare, which used to be Blondie, which is hull #1.

Austin is right, all the 70's have some carbon in them. The later hulls had a larger % of carbon and some had nomex cores (Chance) as opposed to the Baltek of the earlier hulls,

The later hulls, ie. Equation, Blondie did, but I thought the early boats were just glass.

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BTW, Michigan State is a great school. I really like what they're doing there. I firmly believe that everyone should have a chance to go to college.

 

That's the funniest thing I've heard all day.

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This thread rocks.

 

Every time we passed Julianna, or whatever they called it, moored in Monroe, we all commented on the green weeds growing on the bottom waving at us as we went by.

 

I would not have wanted to be on the boat when the rig came down in '02. Fucking scary shit. That rig looked like a telephone pole. (no offense)

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Thanks Anarchists. Sad too hear she's beaten up!

 

Reminds me. Raced on Kialoa V in late 80's. Then got a chance to race on her in 1999. Different owner not Kilroy Snr, some english ponce.

 

In fact Kilroy Snr was at the same regatta on Kialoa III. He walked down to KV and said to the english owner. "Do me one favour, put a V on that mainsail cover". The cover just had Kioloa on it.

 

Kilroy was always a class act!!!

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This boat is a Fat Tub.

 

Was on a Tripp 40 for last year's Mac Race and we passed it downwind in light air.

When the wind picked up it gained about 2 hours on us in about a 80 mile run, however we caught up and passed it again in the light air upwind near the finish.

 

And Yes, the boat didn't look in very good shape at all. Sails were shot and boat looked real bad..

 

With all the maintainance on this boat, sails, etc. + the speed factor, I would run away from any sort of purchase or even sailing on the boat. But that's me..

 

Good Luck...

Which Tripp 40 were you on?

 

I agree Juliana was not moving to well....but they put out a great effort just to get the boat ready to sail and race. I think it would be a full time job to prep the boat!

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They all have carbon in the hulls....even Nitemare, which used to be Blondie, which is hull #1.

 

Nightmare is not Blondie. Jennings used to own Blondie for a while (as well as PP), and I believe she was sold to a team from Mich City?

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Christ there is a hell of a lot of shit on this board today.

 

First Sassy:

I love the Spartans and therefore look to coach izzo as a friend, but wow, get off your knees. Sassy was a tragic mistake as a design and boat in general. Beautiful in her day, but never a successful boat. After she was built Dutch was telling people that he designed her and built her. After her first outing down south she went so slow that Ron Holland started calling her a Schmidt 78 and Dutch started calling her a Holland. No one wanted to take credit for her design.

As for the GL 70 v IOR Maxi... and the 70s not built to a rule. What the fuck are you talking about. The SC/GL 70 were built to the IOR rule which had a maximum rating of .... 70... and that is why a 68 foot boat is called a 70 and why all the big Maxis were called so because they all rated almost max IOR 70.

In the early days Sassy would go up wind better than Pied Piper and the early Sleds. Over the years the Sleds made changes and increased their speed. Now they pretty regularly beat Sassy boat for boat. Sassy's best angle is up hill. All of the sleds have made changes to their boats and now none of them, even Windancer which is the slowest rated boat in the class would not rate into the IOR rule as they are too fast. Sassy may still rate in, maybe?

As for the construction of the sleds. No carbon at all in the early sleds. In fact, the only boats with carbon, and that is in their decks, not the hulls, that I am immediately aware of, are Equation (now in England), Blondie nee Pywacket, and possibly Evolution. Nitemare, hull number one and nee Blondie and Pied Piper have no carbon in them. And Holua has always been Holua and is not the former Equation...

 

Last word on Sassy. Under Dutch, always a great looking boat. It is hard to say that she is fast or slow now as she races PHRF and such a rating is a performance rating system. She could never sail to her IOR rating. As classy as her look was, her first time in Chicago they could have made a better impression. They did not even want people to look at the boat. No rafting... Times soon changed.

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Sam, I may be wrong... but I heard that SC 70s weren't designed at all to IOR. When the first one went to race Transpac, it didn't measure under IOR within the max allowed at the time, so a chainsaw was taken to her stern. PP had her stern restored to the original design (or close at least).

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Re: the presence of carbon in sleds...

 

For the record:

Hull # 10 from the Bill Lee factory (Chance) was THE First SC70 with ANY carbon in it...(namely, a carbon skinned deck) the hull is glass

Hull #11 (Evolution) was Bill Lee's first venture into carbon for hull AND deck.

 

Hull #10's deck actually was built AFTER hull #11's owner-to-be asked for a new deck layout/ design.

 

The decks for #10- on were MUCH more bouy racing friendly.

Hull #1 ( the ORIGINAL Blondie) was very much a one-off, by the time #2 (Kathmandu) & 3(Citius) were born the layout was better established for offshore (minimal crew on-deck) and with slight mods stayed much the same through hull #9.

 

Excluding aftermarket mods/ repairs/ re-designs there is NOT ONE THREAD of carbon in SC 70 Hulls #1 through #9.

 

signed,

someone who ACTUALLY knows

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How about some real Sassy history.

 

A boat this old has to have some good stories surrounding it.

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Dutch always treated the crew great...nothing better than flying off the island in a private plane while the rest of crews are on I-75. Dinners were spectacular too. Who cares if you weren't the fastest at least you were sailing with some top notch people.

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They all have carbon in the hulls....even Nitemare, which used to be Blondie, which is hull #1.

 

Nightmare is not Blondie. Jennings used to own Blondie for a while (as well as PP), and I believe she was sold to a team from Mich City?

Wrong. I think this is how it goes (but I might be mistaken too). Nitemare is Hull #1, nee Blondie and Pied Piper (the one they kept in the Caribbean). It was briefly chartered, as Blondie, by the team from Mich City. However, they ended up buying Chessie, nee Pyewacket and renamed it Blondie.

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Deez, you are correct. Sammann bought the old Chessie turbo and brought it back down to "roughly" GL70 legal. Nitemare is the old Piper South, #1. All the current (and a few former) GL 70's can be found with a rough history on www.greatlakes70.org That and Sam has the insider scoop on all these things since I believe he still runs the website, but it could use an update (nudge, nudge). Race results are pretty current though.

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How about some real Sassy history.

 

A boat this old has to have some good stories surrounding it.

 

One of the more amazing stories I've heard was that when they lost their rig in the Chi-Mac, the only injury was a lost finger. That's pretty incredible when you think of the loads and stress associated with that.

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How about some real Sassy history.

 

A boat this old has to have some good stories surrounding it.

 

One of the more amazing stories I've heard was that when they lost their rig in the Chi-Mac, the only injury was a lost finger. That's pretty incredible when you think of the loads and stress associated with that.

Easpecially when there were aliminum shards all over the boat after the mast exploded!!!!

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How about some real Sassy history.

 

A boat this old has to have some good stories surrounding it.

Depends what kind of story you're looking for. Any boat with a crew that fun will have some stories worth remembering. There was the year in the late 80's/early 90's (someone help me on this one) that the Port Huron side was a walkaway for Sassy, she held the race record until Alchemy came and snagged it two years ago. Or there's always the time in Chicago when the "boat management coordinator" decided to see if he could get Sassy up close and personal with CYC Monroe. Any of you who have looked down and seen bottom right at the dock there can pretty much figure how that story ended. I believe the quote was "Can you see the bulb?"..."You have a bulb?"

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Re: the presence of carbon in sleds...

 

For the record:

Hull # 10 from the Bill Lee factory (Chance) was THE First SC70 with ANY carbon in it...(namely, a carbon skinned deck) the hull is glass

Hull #11 (Evolution) was Bill Lee's first venture into carbon for hull AND deck.

 

Hull #10's deck actually was built AFTER hull #11's owner-to-be asked for a new deck layout/ design.

 

The decks for #10- on were MUCH more bouy racing friendly.

Hull #1 ( the ORIGINAL Blondie) was very much a one-off, by the time #2 (Kathmandu) & 3(Citius) were born the layout was better established for offshore (minimal crew on-deck) and with slight mods stayed much the same through hull #9.

 

Excluding aftermarket mods/ repairs/ re-designs there is NOT ONE THREAD of carbon in SC 70 Hulls #1 through #9.

 

signed,

someone who ACTUALLY knows

Anybody know what ever happened to Citius and Hotel California (SC 70s)?

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ABC

I stand corrected. Pulled some old IMS certificates today and indeed, some of the later 70 have carbon in the hulls. My bad. I will say though that the carbon used in the early 80s was not compareable to the carbon today. Kind of splittin hairs though. I was WRONG.

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Anyone know any history on this Maxi. I dont recognise her?

 

Sassy - Ron Holland design, built by Palmer Johnson in 1984?

 

 

http://www.activeyachts.com/xbrokerage/lis.../84pjholland78/

Big slow piece of shit............ From the 1980's something... when build owner tried to campain her around the world but never got it going as the boat was a dog.....

 

Lost her rig in 2002 Chi-Mac...

 

Sat all last year in harbor in Chicago.... did Mac thats about it....

 

don't touch it!!!

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"yes.... but the SC70 was designed to sail downwind in big breeze, and was not constrained to a Rating Rule. Sassy and the other IOR Maxis were deigned to race upwind and downwind, and were constrained by the IOR Rule. Of course a 26,000 lb boat is gonna be "faster" in a Mackinac Race and be able to achieve much faster speeds off the wing than a 70,000 lb boat. I'll take an IOR Maxi upwind in 25k with huge waves any time. In that condition the IOR Maxi is going to a LOT "faster"

 

you are comparing apples to oranges. ."

 

 

 

in fact, most of the sc 70's were designed to a rating rule...rather...constrained by them. they had to rate under IOR 70 and thats why they had those little teeney rigs in them.

 

as for sassy...i hear that she is just too narrow for a maxi and is too tender.

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Citius became Ole which went all over Europe for awhile then came back stateside.... I think (I do not know for sure) that it is now one of the GL70 gang...Anyone?

 

As for Hotel California....The Wintersteen family sold the boat to Ed McDowell and it became Grand Illusion (which it still is to this day) and is still sailing on the West Coast where these surf machines really BELONG!!! How these things 'caught on' for 'lake sailing' is truly beyond me!

 

Other than the TP52's, there really is nothing quite like a 70 surfin' to Oahu. It's really a shame they all left :(

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ABC

I stand corrected. Pulled some old IMS certificates today and indeed, some of the later 70 have carbon in the hulls. My bad. I will say though that the carbon used in the early 80s was not compareable to the carbon today. Kind of splittin hairs though. I was WRONG.

Damn, I need to print this post. I can see it over the nav station of a certain GL70 now :lol:

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Citius became Ole which went all over Europe for awhile then came back stateside.... I think (I do not know for sure) that it is now one of the GL70 gang...Anyone?

 

As for Hotel California....The Wintersteen family sold the boat to Ed McDowell and it became Grand Illusion (which it still is to this day) and is still sailing on the West Coast where these surf machines really BELONG!!!  How these things 'caught on' for 'lake sailing' is truly beyond me!

 

Other than the TP52's, there really is nothing quite like a 70 surfin' to Oahu. It's really a shame they all left :(

The reason they caught on for lake sailing is pretty simple...refer to PP's '87 Mac Record. I think that's when the arms race really began. For the record...that particular PP was an Andrews 70...not an SC70 (I believe).

 

Seriously though...what is coach izzo so wound up about?!?

Put the rifle down and step down from the ledge!

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NO Pied Piper that set the record is the SC 70. The andrews 70 is a slow dog / pig of a crusing boat. Beautifull to look at.

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Say Coach, any firsthand stories on the '02 Chi-Mac?

 

I remember when first seeing Sassy on the lakes, and she was very impressive. At the time, there was nothing comparible in size, and she looked great.

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Anyone know any history on this Maxi. I dont recognise her?

 

Sassy - Ron Holland design, built  by Palmer Johnson in 1984?

 

 

http://www.activeyachts.com/xbrokerage/lis.../84pjholland78/

Big slow piece of shit............ From the 1980's something... when build owner tried to campain her around the world but never got it going as the boat was a dog.....

 

Lost her rig in 2002 Chi-Mac...

 

Sat all last year in harbor in Chicago.... did Mac thats about it....

 

don't touch it!!!

#1) Sassy is not "big". Sassy is a small Maxi

#2) Sassy was NOT campaigned around the world. It did the SORC twice. Other than that, it's lived in the Great Lakes.

#3) there is not enough data to determine wether or not the boat is a "dog" as compared to other Maxis of the day. It only did a handfull of races against IOR Maxis.

 

As for the rest of you on this board - I'm not excatly sure how you all became Maxi boat experts. So unless you've sailed on one, shut the fuck up.

1986 line honors for the Jamaica race isn't bad. Condor should have beaten us by hours. In her early years, Sassy was never a rocket but was certainly not a dog. Of coarse we were slower than the other maxi's, they owed us 2.5 ior feet. We got the big boats plenty of times.

 

All of you guys ragging on Sassy probably weren't sailing FJ's when we were sailing down south. And if the Tripp guy wants to talk about passing Sassy, after the Schmidt's sold her the yardstick dropped to the floor.

 

I enjoyed every mile on her. The Schmidt family were great to sail with.

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More sled 'history' re: carbon and timeline of its appearance ...

 

The big push for SC70's was based around the 1989 Transpac.

 

Hull # 10 (1st carbon deck) & #11 (1st carbon deck & hull)were in the Bill Lee barn at the same time (very late 1988 trickling into early 1989) Hull #10 (Chance) splashed just in time to make the March '89 Cabo San Lucas Race along with the Reichel/ Pugh sled 'Taxi Dancer'....The paint was barely dry on either of them for that race...SC70 #11 ('Evolution') missed the March Cabo Race and ended up using Ensenada as their 1st race...

 

Transpac '89 was incredible as far as sled participation goes....Between NM66's(Prima, Swiftsure, etc) , NM68's (Maverick, Pye, etc), a Peterson 66 design (Cheetah), RP (Taxi), and all the SC70's there where over 20 (maybe 24?) on the starting line that year!

 

Cal Cup (California Yacht Club) had three or so years as well with sled participation in the high 'teens'. Seeing all those 70's tied stern-to at the dock side by side was neat.

A side note to Cal Cup was the novelty of parking a 70' foot boat in a fifty foot slip, with an afternoon cross breeze in the teens with roughly 3 inches of slack between slip width and beam max. No one ever surpassed the ability of Zan on Mongoose for single-handed docking and NO CONTACT with with the dock. SWEET! ;)

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Hey, IOR Fan, the only reason you beat us to Mo Bay was that we spent 3 hours off the corner of Long Island tethered to the bottom. Bloody cray pots round the prop. Good party afterwards, though. And if you see Peter Grubb on your travels, say hi from me.

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As the man said, Sassy was a bit smaller than the other maxis, as is evident here. Photo of Boomerang, Sassy & Matador taken from the Paradise Island Bridge in Nassau after the 86 SORC Miami-Nassau Race.

post-1-1110567564.jpg

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As the man said, Sassy was a bit smaller than the other maxis, as is evident here. Photo of Boomerang, Sassy & Matador taken from the Paradise Island Bridge in Nassau after the 86 SORC Miami-Nassau Race.

Thanks for the pic to put her in perspective to the other maxis. She always looked huge up at Mackinac Island.

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They all have carbon in the hulls....even Nitemare, which used to be Blondie, which is hull #1.

 

Nightmare is not Blondie. Jennings used to own Blondie for a while (as well as PP), and I believe she was sold to a team from Mich City?

Wrong. I think this is how it goes (but I might be mistaken too). Nitemare is Hull #1, nee Blondie and Pied Piper (the one they kept in the Caribbean). It was briefly chartered, as Blondie, by the team from Mich City. However, they ended up buying Chessie, nee Pyewacket and renamed it Blondie.

I believe you are correct. These were my thoughts also.

Sassy is currently on the hard at eldeans in holland mi.

It looks pretty nice on the hard (from 1/2 mile away).

Looks good from far and far from good.

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More sled 'history' re: carbon and timeline of its appearance ...

 

The big push for SC70's was based around the 1989 Transpac.

 

Hull # 10 (1st carbon deck) & #11 (1st carbon deck & hull)were in the Bill Lee barn at the same time (very late 1988 trickling into early 1989) Hull #10 (Chance) splashed just in time to make the March '89 Cabo San Lucas Race along with the Reichel/ Pugh sled 'Taxi Dancer'....The paint was barely dry on either of them for that race...SC70 #11 ('Evolution') missed the March Cabo Race and ended up using Ensenada as their 1st race...

 

Transpac '89 was incredible as far as sled participation goes....Between NM66's(Prima, Swiftsure, etc) , NM68's (Maverick, Pye, etc), a Peterson 66 design (Cheetah), RP (Taxi), and all the SC70's there where over 20 (maybe 24?) on the starting line that year!

 

Cal Cup (California Yacht Club) had three or so years as well with sled participation in the high 'teens'. Seeing all those 70's tied stern-to at the dock side by side was neat.

A side note to Cal Cup was the novelty of parking a 70' foot boat in a fifty foot slip, with an afternoon cross breeze in the teens with roughly 3 inches of slack between slip width and beam max. No one ever surpassed the ability of Zan on Mongoose for single-handed docking and NO CONTACT with with the dock. SWEET! ;)

Ah, the heyday of the west coast sled. Transpac 87 was pretty wild too - Transpac row was packed with N/M and S/C sleds. A sight to behold. Prima and Swiftsure were 68's, BTW. I sailed on Prima a fair bit in the '86 - '87. Heard she was sold to a Japanese owner and is rotting in Japan somewhere with a sad looking hard dodger bolted on. Too bad - she was a beautiful boat, Texas flag and all. Good times.

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As the man said, Sassy was a bit smaller than the other maxis, as is evident here. Photo of Boomerang, Sassy & Matador taken from the Paradise Island Bridge in Nassau after the 86 SORC Miami-Nassau Race.

What a great shot. Heavy Metal!

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As the man said, Sassy was a bit smaller than the other maxis, as is evident here.  Photo of Boomerang, Sassy & Matador taken from the Paradise Island Bridge in Nassau after the 86 SORC Miami-Nassau Race.

What a great shot. Heavy Metal!

Look at those tight asses. Oh, my!

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On the upside, she is clearly winning the laundry day!

And it looks mostly like the PVC Line-7 stuff (even an L7 bag on Mat). Now that was some shit that didn't leak! Didn't breathe... but didn't leak!

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As the man said, Sassy was a bit smaller than the other maxis, as is evident here.  Photo of Boomerang, Sassy & Matador taken from the Paradise Island Bridge in Nassau after the 86 SORC Miami-Nassau Race.

What a great shot. Heavy Metal!

Man, I get bruises just looking at that.

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I agree Juliana was not moving to well....but they put out a great effort just to get the boat ready to sail and race.  I think it would be a full time job to prep the boat!

Being a spectator to the start of last year's race, I would have to say they were not really prepared even after they got out on the water. They were over early at the start. It took them about 2 minutes to hear their number being called. They then sat head to wind for a minute or two waiting for all the other boats to go by. Having lost all boatspeed by this point they vvvveeeerrrrrrryyyyyy slowly bore off to head back. After passing below the line, it then took them about 1 minute to head back up again. Even after having done that, I think it was close to 2 more minutes before the headsail was trimmed in.

John Boyle was onboard...

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if i was a millionair i would throw some more wood down bellow and hydolics in the deck and make it a cuiser....is that the same boomerrang thats over at USMMA now? if it is...holly shit when that thing goes around the bouy's this spring with the acadamy boys on it...duck and cover...

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As the man said, Sassy was a bit smaller than the other maxis, as is evident here. Photo of Boomerang, Sassy & Matador taken from the Paradise Island Bridge in Nassau after the 86 SORC Miami-Nassau Race.

And the day or two after this pic was taken, Matadors rig came down in the Lipton Cup.

 

Huge loud-mouth-soup party after that. Myself and another guy from our crew walked up to the middle of the bridge and jumped...we didn't want anyone to jump from higher than we did. Swam over to the boat, got helped out of the water, climbed into a rack and stayed there for 24 hours. Good times!

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As the man said, Sassy was a bit smaller than the other maxis, as is evident here. Photo of Boomerang, Sassy & Matador taken from the Paradise Island Bridge in Nassau after the 86 SORC Miami-Nassau Race.

By the way, nice pic. Thanks for the flashback.

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Well, it just happens that I managed to take the day after photo as well. Note the burgundy barge in the background.

 

What apparently happened was at the windy bottom mark, when they rounded and cranked on the jib and main: to get the last bit of main trim on, they linked in the pedestal behind the helmsman, usually used for the runners. They didn't notice that the runner winch was still linked in, so as the 4 guys sweated in the mainsheet the runner winch was still turning in low gear. Over-runnered & inverted the rig, and away went the top of it.

 

This was the most electroniced boat in history. Somewhere near fifty 20/20 displays on deck, gyro compass repeaters, the lot. They had spent months wiring every conceivable piece of standing rigging to strain gauges so they could monitor what went on. I casually asked Lou afterwards what the D4 and runner readings were showing when it all broke, but he wasn't amused.

 

Good times.

 

By the way, you can see that the boys up the mast went up Sassy's alongside and then swung over. The old bus was good for something, then. ;-)

post-1-1110609762.jpg

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what happened to that third maxi in the picture...i think the name was matadot??

Matador is in the Whitsundays

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Well, it just happens that I managed to take the day after photo as well. Note the burgundy barge in the background.

 

What apparently happened was at the windy bottom mark, when they rounded and cranked on the jib and main: to get the last bit of main trim on, they linked in the pedestal behind the helmsman, usually used for the runners. They didn't notice that the runner winch was still linked in, so as the 4 guys sweated in the mainsheet the runner winch was still turning in low gear. Over-runnered & inverted the rig, and away went the top of it.

 

This was the most electroniced boat in history. Somewhere near fifty 20/20 displays on deck, gyro compass repeaters, the lot. They had spent months wiring every conceivable piece of standing rigging to strain gauges so they could monitor what went on. I casually asked Lou afterwards what the D4 and runner readings were showing when it all broke, but he wasn't amused.

 

Good times.

 

By the way, you can see that the boys up the mast went up Sassy's alongside and then swung over. The old bus was good for something, then. ;-)

Great pics. I've told this story many times over the years and very few have believed me. Do you rermember the dock party?

 

I did time on Matador as well. The electronics you mention were no joke. I remember the constant electical hum and 20/20 clicking. We were not allowed to turn off the electronics. She had a huge glass topped chart table with a giant plotter under it. Probably weighed more than a Melges 24.

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As the man said, Sassy was a bit smaller than the other maxis, as is evident here.  Photo of Boomerang, Sassy & Matador taken from the Paradise Island Bridge in Nassau after the 86 SORC Miami-Nassau Race.

What a great shot. Heavy Metal!

Man, I get bruises just looking at that.

Just sliced up my hands, thinking about the old wire to rope sheets!

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Well, it just happens that I managed to take the day after photo as well. Note the burgundy barge in the background.

 

What apparently happened was at the windy bottom mark, when they rounded and cranked on the jib and main: to get the last bit of main trim on, they linked in the pedestal behind the helmsman, usually used for the runners. They didn't notice that the runner winch was still linked in, so as the 4 guys sweated in the mainsheet the runner winch was still turning in low gear. Over-runnered & inverted the rig, and away went the top of it.

 

This was the most electroniced boat in history. Somewhere near fifty 20/20 displays on deck, gyro compass repeaters, the lot. They had spent months wiring every conceivable piece of standing rigging to strain gauges so they could monitor what went on. I casually asked Lou afterwards what the D4 and runner readings were showing when it all broke, but he wasn't amused.

 

Good times.

 

By the way, you can see that the boys up the mast went up Sassy's alongside and then swung over. The old bus was good for something, then. ;-)

Burgandy Barge? Soveriegn or Sorcery??

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wasn't Sassy part of a series.. I seem to recall a "Brassy" too that was a sister ship or predecessor

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Remember the sound of galvanized wire jib sheets easing off of stainless winches? Upper end of the H-1....ouch.

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wasn't Sassy part of a series.. I seem to recall a "Brassy" too that was a sister ship or predecessor

Sassy C&C 61 became Brassy.

 

The Schmidt's also own and currently sail Sassy's Lee, an old 2 ton, I think Peterson. It used to have a tractor drive shaft setup, shaft pointed forward so prop was right behind keel and pulled the boat.

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wasn't Sassy part of a series.. I seem to recall a "Brassy" too that was a sister ship or predecessor

If I remember correctly, the only sister to the Holland Sassy was Drum, Simon LeBons effort for the Whitbred. Lost its keel prepping for race. Some of the crew from Drum ended up sailing with us on Sassy.

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what happened to that third maxi in the picture...i think the name was matadot??

Matador is in the Whitsundays

 

The Matador in the Whitsundays is the next one, the 84' ish fractional rig super-heavy boat that wiped the floor with all the IOR maxis and killed the class.

 

The Matador in the pic is the previous Matador, ex Huaso IIRC, a Frers mastheader about 80' LOA. Great pics and info, thanks guys.

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Coach Izzo is apparently still in love with the old fat girl. Nobody is trying to take any personal jabs at anybody, but the boat is a TANK!

 

A Transpac 52 could kick it's ass all over the race course...uphill, downhill, long distance...you name it. The thing is a battleship. It takes 12 dudes just to get a headsail on deck. No Thanks.

Apples and Oranges!

 

Let's compare a 78' IOR Maxi to a 52' Box Rule Carbon Sportboat (essentially)....

 

 

You sir are an idiot.

 

And Coach Izzo does not in fact rule.

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Here's the Whitsundays link:

 

http://www.sailingwhitsundays.com/sailing_...d_raceboats.htm

 

Showing Matador, Siska and a couple more................

 

so thats where the old IOR maxi's go when they die....thats a shame...i would like to detract that cruising comment i made earlier....these boat ought to be raced...

i went out with a buddy of mine that was running one of these in 2000...convinced him and a couple other captains to do a pursuit race...damn scary to hear all the creaking a groaning going hard on the wind. I did mast and runner grinder....talk about nearly puking....there is a reason they used to recruit NFL linebackers to race.

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I did that SORC on sassy and that's me standing at the shrouds next to Matador...

 

Sassy was truly a lead barge. She pointed 5 degrees lower than all the other modern maxi's. The only point of sail we found that was faster than matador or boomerang was dead ass down wind in 20 plus kts. with a chicken chute up. Ran all the way from FL to Nassau screaming at 12 to 15 kts. That was really, really fast on that boat and in those days.

 

All the afterguys and jib sheets were wire. I was a trimmer. Meat hooks were a way of life.

 

The party after the regatta was one for the history books....

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The PJ78 Sassy was the queen of a long list of Sassy yachts throughout the years. Dutch really had the boat looking great, and it does help if you have your own marina that you can keep the boat out of the water and splash it for a couple of races. She is old now and needs more than a face lift. Too bad, as she is a pretty boat.

The soft costs in owning a boat like that is the tough part. I'm sure today's owner bought the boat for a good price, just tough to keep in good shape.

The boat is a winch farm and everything is very heavy. The boat loads up a lot and nothing can make is easier. It does take several people just to get a jib on deck. You certainly don't want to be grinding at the top end of the heavy #1 genoa.

The other problem is that the boat is heavy and tender. Really doesn't like a stiff breeze as it lays over pretty good. In its day, the boat performed better in lighter breeze. Wouldn't happen today sailing against the GL70's and certainly the TP52's. Let's face it, we do it all the time, unlike boats sailing against each other.

Sassy was never spectacular, perhaps that is why her nickname was "Lassie".

Let's not pick on the old girl, but go ahead and pick on the owner for not keeping her in shape. That is the real shame.

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I own both a SC 70 and the old IOR mini maxi Obsession. SC 70 faster in every direction. Hull #12, carbon deck and hull, also deep keel and bigger rig. Built for IMS. Does not fit in GL box rule. If the old Sassy is looking for some good used sails at a good price I have a lot of them. Kevlar main, several #1's and some chutes. I can be contacted through www.sailseattle.com

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Seems like I remember a gentleman from Dayton, Ohio built several boats with the name Sassy in the 60's - 70's. I think the name was Jesse Phillips.

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I seem to remember an old cover of Sail or was it the predecessor to SW. that had a great stern shot of Charisma going upwind. I want to say it was a fold out or something???? I remember Dayton, OH distinctly on the transom. Bit confusing for wee lad of 8 or 10 at the time.

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Thanks for the correction with the Charisma owner, Phillips. Didn't one of the Sassy boats become Brassy, perhaps in the early 80's?

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C & C 61 owned by Buzz Van Kuiken at the MBYC in Holland MI.

Mike Keeler bought the 61' from Dutch and named is Brassy. Speaking of C&C 61's, what ever happened to Kohinoor?

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C & C 61 owned by Buzz Van Kuiken at the MBYC in Holland MI.

Mike Keeler bought the 61' from Dutch and named is Brassy. Speaking of C&C 61's, what ever happened to Kohinoor?

ahhh... the great frac rig C&C 61.

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Mike Keeler bought the 61' from Dutch and named is Brassy.  Speaking of C&C 61's, what ever happened to Kohinoor?

I think it may have changed hands and become Triumph (or Brassy, nee Sassy, did - don't exactly remember). Also, remember Kahili, the other "big blue boat" that usually duked it out w/ Sassy (C&C) ?

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forgive my not knowing here, please ... those pictures, are the of sassy, brassy, kahili or just some boat that fits the mold of an old IOR anti-sled? :huh:

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that blue boat in the pictures from Raider....was that a C&C 61? bc if it is....I WANT ONE!!

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Mike Keeler bought the 61' from Dutch and named is Brassy.  Speaking of C&C 61's, what ever happened to Kohinoor?

I think it may have changed hands and become Triumph (or Brassy, nee Sassy, did - don't exactly remember). Also, remember Kahili, the other "big blue boat" that usually duked it out w/ Sassy (C&C) ?

Triumph came from the west coast to the lakes in the early 80's.

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