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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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dacapo

favorite hot sauce...whatcha got?

101 posts in this topic

went nuts shopping for a bunch of hot sauces last week....

 

I'm digging :

 

Analyze This XX garlic hot sauce (great for wings)

Dave's Gourmet Roasted Garlic hot sauce

Heartbreak Dawn's Mango Habanero (grilled pork me thinks)

 

not so much:

bacon Hot sauce (a fail for bacon lovers)

 

bought some old reliables :

Dave's Insanity

Endorphin Rush

 

 

tabasco, Franks Red Hot, Sriracha are fridge staples and go on almost everything

 

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Tapatio is a good staple.

 

Amazon Caribbean Habanero is pretty good.

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went nuts shopping for a bunch of hot sauces last week....

 

I'm digging :

 

Analyze This XX garlic hot sauce (great for wings)

Dave's Gourmet Roasted Garlic hot sauce

Heartbreak Dawn's Mango Habanero (grilled pork me thinks)

 

not so much:

bacon Hot sauce (a fail for bacon lovers)

 

bought some old reliables :

Dave's Insanity

Endorphin Rush

 

 

tabasco, Franks Red Hot, Sriracha are fridge staples and go on almost everything

 

Add Texas Pete, and you've got my go-to sauces. I like many of the boutique stuff that's out there, but, it's hard to beat plain old McIlhenny Tabasco

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a bunch of good sauces already listed.

 

I like Dave's Hurtin Habanero as well. good balance of heat and flavor.

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Tabasco is a solid. So is Pickapeppa. Lately I have been grooving on Tropical Pepper's Ghost Pepper sauce.

 

BTW, Texas Pete is not a hot sauce.

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Booth turned me on to El Mexicano Salsa Taquera. Insanely good on tacos and huevos rancheros. Reminds me strongly of the stuff you get from a street taco vendor at 3 AM after finishing the Ensenada race. Freakin' ambrosia.

 

Ricky found it in a hole in the wall Mechican grocery in Pedro. Now, LA WalMarts are stocking it for $2.70 or so. I buy 3 bottles at a time - never want to run out.

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can add Melinda's XXXXX habanero sauce... it'll hold up..

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I always have Sriracha, Susie's (from Antigua) and Encona for everyday use.

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Sriracha because it makes ketchup so much better, a bottle of Frank's at work (3 coworkers take turns restocking) and a bottle of Xtra hot @ home if i am making wings, Dinosaur "Devils Duel" and a bottle of Try Me "Tiger" sauce.

 

I'll rotate others, but those are my base sauces.

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mango chili sauce!

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My collection is pretty static. I venture out and try new stuff but these are my "go to" salsa's and sauces. (I also make my own habanero salsa but that's another thread altogether). The only one missing from the picture is sriracha.

 

photo_zps5bb4e445.jpg

 

 

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Sinsin Garlic Chilli Sauce. I bring it back from Singapore. Not scorching hot but very nice flavor.

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Anyone seen that hot souse with flames shooting out of the cartoon characters ass?

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went nuts shopping for a bunch of hot sauces last week....

 

I'm digging :

 

Analyze This XX garlic hot sauce (great for wings)

Dave's Gourmet Roasted Garlic hot sauce

Heartbreak Dawn's Mango Habanero (grilled pork me thinks)

 

not so much:

bacon Hot sauce (a fail for bacon lovers)

 

bought some old reliables :

Dave's Insanity

Endorphin Rush

 

 

tabasco, Franks Red Hot, Sriracha are fridge staples and go on almost everything

I'm with you dacapo. Those sauces are staples but for other reasons and uses. Tabasco is thin but can pack a punch; always use it for making other sauces like a tomato based red sauce - it brightens it up. Frank's for day to day whatever as it sticks to stuff better as it's thicker. Sriracha for any asian stuff however I have lots of asian sauces that are based with chili oil at one end and some of them are a little sweet but there's heat in them. Some of them from Szechuan or Thai. We have a huge asian influence here so we get the real deal.

 

I've tried a Dave's Insanity and a bottle of it in the fridge but not really used it in anger yet. A bottle of scotch bonnet too. I use a chipotle sauce or Bufalo for sausages or Brawts. But I'm not afraid to try something new.

 

Might not be a hot sauce but I love this salsa. Mrs. Renfro's habanero salsa. Great on scrambled eggs on toast. That'll get your morning going! http://shop.renfrofoods.com/collections/salsa/products/habanero-salsa

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blair's death sauce

only tried it out for the first time a week or so ago when the restaurant didnt have tabsaco, and i was not let down! have had it a few times since at various eateries, will probably be getting a bottle online shortly now that its on my mind again. Decently hot, a little syrupy, and great flavor.

 

 

On the subject of hot stuff, anyone ever have jalapeno wine? There's a local winery that sells it, and, i have to say, its quite good. It's almost too hot to enjoy, but with the right dish its perfect.

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love the Tabasco chipotle... wish they sold it in the big jars in the grocery store...

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My collection is pretty static. I venture out and try new stuff but these are my "go to" salsa's and sauces. (I also make my own habanero salsa but that's another thread altogether). The only one missing from the picture is sriracha.

 

photo_zps5bb4e445.jpg

I like the Cholula hot sauce.....

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anyone ever try Mayanik habanero? I was given three bottles of it (red, green orange) and it seems to work fine when I can't get fresh habaneros or scotch bonnets for my jerk chicken, but this is all pretty new to me and I'm certainly no expert.

 

all this other stuff you guys are talking about has got me curious, but I've never seen any of it around here. Maybe I'm just not looking, though...

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I've had a couple of these and they mostly made what I was eating inedible.

 

 

 

HSC-Ass-In-Tub-Gift-Set-2.jpg

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Melinda's XXXX is really good. For some more heat, Melinda's Red Savina habenero

Marie Sharps habenero/grapefruit

Walkerswood scotch bonnet and Walkerswood Jonkanoo for slightly less heat

Grace scotch bonnet

Matouks calypso and if you want to bump it up, Matouks salsa flambe. None of those are killer hot and none have pure capsaicin added like the novelty sauces do. I've tried a lot of those novelty/boutiqe/silly hot sauces. Some have a great flavor (Blair's after death) but are just so hot, you can't enjoy and others are just ridiculous.

 

Of course there's always a bottle of sriracha and tabasco chipotle nearby.

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My favorite sauce is the one sauce that I've never found bottled for some reason. I have to make it fresh, and it doesn't keep, which is never a problem because I'm happy enough to eat the stuff straight. I would perform Heimlich on a greasy Hobo for a spoonful of this sauce.

 

Aji Verde, Huacatay, and other names, but it's all variation of that gorgeous green-on-green sauce. Usually needs difficult-to-find Peruvian herbs, but I can make a quick Gringo version with simple ingredients in 3.5 minutes In a blender or magic bullet:

 

- 2 jalapenos or habanero peppers (or soon, Da Woody peppers)

- 1/2 bunch of cilantro, stems and leaves

- few sprigs of mint

- a scallion

- mayo (about a tablespoon or two, add enough to make the sauce the color of a mint green Cadillac, not too dark, not too light.)

- garlic powder or fresh garlic

- salt to taste

- tablespoon lime juice

 

I hope to improve this by switching the regular peppers with Da Woody's special magic peppers which are poised to become the new star in my garden. The seeds smelled like something that fell from heaven.

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I don't think I've ever tried any scotch-bonnet based sauces - using Habanero and Tabasco as reference points, where would they fit?

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I don't think I've ever tried any scotch-bonnet based sauces - using Habanero and Tabasco as reference points, where would they fit?

They are related very closely to the Hab. Close cousins I'd say. People say the SB is a little sweeter but I'm unable to discern that differance myself. Habs are already quite sweet when the heat is toned down properly, that's when the full flavor of the pepper comes through. I've made jerk with the SB and the Hab. Didn't really taste a differance.

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A bunch of great sauces mentioned above. Love the Tapatio, Sriracha and Tabasco for staples. When I can find it one fo my favorites is RIng of FIre Chipotle Roasted Garlic. Here is one of my favorite websites http://www.mohotta.com/ . . . they have many hard to find sauces.

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I don't think I've ever tried any scotch-bonnet based sauces - using Habanero and Tabasco as reference points, where would they fit?

They are related very closely to the Hab. Close cousins I'd say. People say the SB is a little sweeter but I'm unable to discern that differance myself. Habs are already quite sweet when the heat is toned down properly, that's when the full flavor of the pepper comes through. I've made jerk with the SB and the Hab. Didn't really taste a differance.

 

I never noticed much difference in pre made sauces, but the times I've grown Habaneros and Scotch Bonnets myself, I'd say you can manipulate either to be sweeter with soil conditions. Bonnets have a little more zing on average I'd say. Habs are drier heat.

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I don't think I've ever tried any scotch-bonnet based sauces - using Habanero and Tabasco as reference points, where would they fit?

They are related very closely to the Hab. Close cousins I'd say. People say the SB is a little sweeter but I'm unable to discern that differance myself. Habs are already quite sweet when the heat is toned down properly, that's when the full flavor of the pepper comes through. I've made jerk with the SB and the Hab. Didn't really taste a differance.

 

I never noticed much difference in pre made sauces, but the times I've grown Habaneros and Scotch Bonnets myself, I'd say you can manipulate either to be sweeter with soil conditions. Bonnets have a little more zing on average I'd say. Habs are drier heat.

 

PB, Dog - thanks! Doin' some ribs tonight, and I think I'll have to swing by Foodmax to get some dried scotch bonnets to add into the dry rub...

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I don't think I've ever tried any scotch-bonnet based sauces - using Habanero and Tabasco as reference points, where would they fit?

They are related very closely to the Hab. Close cousins I'd say. People say the SB is a little sweeter but I'm unable to discern that differance myself. Habs are already quite sweet when the heat is toned down properly, that's when the full flavor of the pepper comes through. I've made jerk with the SB and the Hab. Didn't really taste a differance.

 

I never noticed much difference in pre made sauces, but the times I've grown Habaneros and Scotch Bonnets myself, I'd say you can manipulate either to be sweeter with soil conditions. Bonnets have a little more zing on average I'd say. Habs are drier heat.

haaaaaaaaa. drier heat...kinda like Arizona ;-)

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I don't think I've ever tried any scotch-bonnet based sauces - using Habanero and Tabasco as reference points, where would they fit?

They are related very closely to the Hab. Close cousins I'd say. People say the SB is a little sweeter but I'm unable to discern that differance myself. Habs are already quite sweet when the heat is toned down properly, that's when the full flavor of the pepper comes through. I've made jerk with the SB and the Hab. Didn't really taste a differance.

 

I never noticed much difference in pre made sauces, but the times I've grown Habaneros and Scotch Bonnets myself, I'd say you can manipulate either to be sweeter with soil conditions. Bonnets have a little more zing on average I'd say. Habs are drier heat.

 

PB, Dog - thanks! Doin' some ribs tonight, and I think I'll have to swing by Foodmax to get some dried scotch bonnets to add into the dry rub...

wear gloves and afterwards don't touch your face, and wash b4 taking a piss (unless there's a gopro at the ready ) :P

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I don't think I've ever tried any scotch-bonnet based sauces - using Habanero and Tabasco as reference points, where would they fit?

They are related very closely to the Hab. Close cousins I'd say. People say the SB is a little sweeter but I'm unable to discern that differance myself. Habs are already quite sweet when the heat is toned down properly, that's when the full flavor of the pepper comes through. I've made jerk with the SB and the Hab. Didn't really taste a differance.

 

I never noticed much difference in pre made sauces, but the times I've grown Habaneros and Scotch Bonnets myself, I'd say you can manipulate either to be sweeter with soil conditions. Bonnets have a little more zing on average I'd say. Habs are drier heat.

 

PB, Dog - thanks! Doin' some ribs tonight, and I think I'll have to swing by Foodmax to get some dried scotch bonnets to add into the dry rub...

wear gloves and afterwards don't touch your face, and wash b4 taking a piss (unless there's a gopro at the ready ) :P

 

Not joking.

 

...and do not absentmindedly pick your nose.

 

but, isopropyl alcohol does not a bad job of cleansing the oils from your fingers...

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haaaaaaaaa. drier heat...kinda like Arizona ;-)

 

Dude, they say that shit is a drier heat, but when it's 115 degrees I don't give a damn if the humidity is a negative number, it's fucking hot out!

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WTF, 42 posts and no Boothiachi? Better send out a search party, El M may be trapped in the hacienda by a herd of mad cows with nothing to drink but water (or Coors, same thing). :o

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Not sure if this guy is still around, but at the time his 'VIRGIN FIRE' sauce was the going thing. He named it after the Trimaran 'Virgin Fire'.

 

 

Bob Kennedy is the maker of the underground classics called Virgin Fire hot sauces. His line includes the tangy, sweet sauce called Pineapple Sizzle and the ferocious liquid lava known as Dragon’s Breath. Kennedy lives on the eccentric island of St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

Bumping around the island’s dirt roads in his Jeep, Kennedy gives me a tour on the way to his pepper farm. Two-thirds of St. John is national parkland and the rest is inhabitated by a gang of self-professed oddballs, he explains. Stopping at a beach along the way, Kennedy points to the bumper sticker on back of a parked Jeep. It reads: “St. John U.S.V.I. We’re all here because we’re not all there.”

Kennedy cooks Virgin Fire sauces up thirty gallons at a time in his kitchen. His house sits on top of a hill looking out over much of St. John and the island of Tortola across the water. In the kitchen of his ramshackle hilltop duplex, Kennedy reluctantly agreed to part with one of the increasingly hard-to-find bottles of his legendary Pineapple Sizzle.

“The drought this year has ruined us,” complains Kennedy. “Water was so scarce, that at one point they were bringing water trucks over on the ferry from St. Thomas.” The water-poor Virgin Islands are a tough place to try and make pepper sauces. The tour of Kennedy’s garden was a requiem. Inadequate rainfall had killed the peppers and the fruit trees that once supplied his raw ingredients. The cost of trucked-in water makes irrigation financially impossible.

“We had to pull out of the Mo Hotta Mo Betta catalog because we just couldn’t keep up with the orders anymore,” Kennedy admits ruefully. He hates the idea of leaving St John, but Kennedy is determined to pack up his operation and relocate to Puerto Rico where he will have a constant supply of peppers and access to a bottling plant. He predicts that he will soon be able to supply all the Pineapple Sizzle and Dragon’s Breath anybody could want.

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A bunch of great sauces mentioned above. Love the Tapatio, Sriracha and Tabasco for staples. When I can find it one fo my favorites is RIng of FIre Chipotle Roasted Garlic. Here is one of my favorite websites http://www.mohotta.com/ . . . they have many hard to find sauces.

I see what they did there ...

 

And reminds me why I had to drop my Aji Verde habanero input from 8 peppers to 2.

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B

 

 

 

 

 

 

I don't think I've ever tried any scotch-bonnet based sauces - using Habanero and Tabasco as reference points, where would they fit?

 

They are related very closely to the Hab. Close cousins I'd say. People say the SB is a little sweeter but I'm unable to discern that differance myself. Habs are already quite sweet when the heat is toned down properly, that's when the full flavor of the pepper comes through. I've made jerk with the SB and the Hab. Didn't really taste a differance.

I never noticed much difference in pre made sauces, but the times I've grown Habaneros and Scotch Bonnets myself, I'd say you can manipulate either to be sweeter with soil conditions. Bonnets have a little more zing on average I'd say. Habs are drier heat.

PB, Dog - thanks! Doin' some ribs tonight, and I think I'll have to swing by Foodmax to get some dried scotch bonnets to add into the dry rub...

Sounds good! Remember, the heat is in the seeds and the white material along the ribs on the inside. The more of that you trim out before use the more sweet comes through instead of fire. I usually roast them on a non greased flat pan before trimming. Turn them each time the skin gets mottled black and the pepper just starts to soften. Be careful about inhaling too deeply just over the pan during this process. Then cut off tops and discard. Quarter the pepper and start trimming. I usually get rid of all the seeds and about half of the ribs but I like it a little warm. One of my kids hates any heat so I take out all the ribs before using in salsa etc. and she really enjoys the flavor.

 

Good luck.

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My collection is pretty static. I venture out and try new stuff but these are my "go to" salsa's and sauces. (I also make my own habanero salsa but that's another thread altogether). The only one missing from the picture is sriracha.

 

photo_zps5bb4e445.jpg

My go-to is Pico Pica red, back row, fourth from left. Deep mix of flavors, enough heat to perk up the food but not over the top, balanced vinegar component. I use it on many things but you can't beat it on eggs.

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I see Mr. Break has caught the Herdez addiction as well. Might I be so bold as to suggest you also try their tomatillo sauce, as well as their whole chipotle chiles?....

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Gaytor's submission, were he still here......

 

gaysaucesmall.jpg

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We've been trying a LOT of hot sauces on our way down the Caribbean and through Central America. Forget bringing rum back to the states if you go there, buy hot sauce.

 

EDIT: That is a wrong thought; buy rum too. But that is another thread.

 

The one problem is that every island and country had their own sauces, and you can only use so much of the stuff, some times we'd not try the sauce from one place before we left it leaving us in the unenviable spot of not being able to get any more.

 

One of our favorites was from Dominica, "Belo's" hot sauce I think it was, the bottle is long gone.

We found some home made sauce at a vegetable Grenada that was great, went back for more but the guy was never there. We found a couple of nice sauces this way.

 

Some sauces were good, but had disastrous side effects. One particular Grenadian hot sauce did this, we loved it but my lower unit simply could not handle it. It is odd how some of these sauces can bring tears to your eyes with no ill effects, yet others that are equally or less hot can leave you on the head for half of the next morning doing your eye watering then.

 

Currently on board we have (outside the ubiquitous Franks, Tabasco & Sriracha)...

DSCN6947.JPG

 

Trinidad "Scorpion" Sauce, made from Scorpion peppers (I think a 1.2M Scoville pepper?). Use in moderation, nice flavor but really, really hot. Of course in Panama we saw our canal adviser pour this stuff on a meat pie like ketchup and not break a sweat. A little goes a long way.

 

Red Heat "Aruba Heat" - this one promises to burn you twice. We've tried a little of this and its pretty good; that price is in Aruban Florins BTW, not USD. We had another really good sauce from Aruba, something "Red Woman's" sauce or some such thing. Didn't last long.

 

Panama - Tropic Pepper Co. "Xtra Hot Habanero"; we haven't opened this one yet as we've got several others going.

 

Panama - D'Elidas Picante Chomba, Habanero sauce. This isn't actually blindingly hot but does pack a nice punch. Found it in a restaurant, goes nicely on things like empanadas as it has a more interesting flavor.

 

Ecuador/Galapagos - Salsa de Aji "Oriental", which has a horribly racist caricature of a buck toothed slant eyed chef on it. This was on every table in the Galapagos and is an Ecuador product and doesn't taste so much like an Asia sauce as a pepper sauce. Nice kick, no side effects. At < $1.00 a bottle I should have bought more.

 

We have a couple of others floating around that we don't like quite as much that I won't dig up. I should have taken better notes, pictures of the bottles AND bought more.

 

Stateside - we used to make killer Buffalo wings starting with a base of Frank's pre-made wing sauce (used to get it by the 1/2 gallon at a wholesale club) then "tuned up" to actually get hot with Dave's Insanity Sauce.

 

That being said, I don't expect to be seeing any more good hot sauces for a long time. French Polynesia the food is fruity and sweeter, no hot sauces. Of course I've been rocking the Possion Cru...

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I see Mr. Break has caught the Herdez addiction as well. Might I be so bold as to suggest you also try their tomatillo sauce, as well as their whole chipotle chiles?....

 

Herdez? Really?

 

We tried some for the first time because it was the only salsa they had at a store we found on Virgin Gorda. Weak, watery and almost tasteless. Sadly we bought several jars because it was on special. The only way we could get through it was add other hot sauce to it to give it some flavor.

 

Maybe we got a bad couple of jars but I've since walked by every Herdez product I've seen on the shelves. Which is too bad because it is pretty common.

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I see Mr. Break has caught the Herdez addiction as well. Might I be so bold as to suggest you also try their tomatillo sauce, as well as their whole chipotle chiles?....

I do use their chipolte chilies for our slow cooker chipolte pulled pork butt and a few others. They are quite good.

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I see Mr. Break has caught the Herdez addiction as well. Might I be so bold as to suggest you also try their tomatillo sauce, as well as their whole chipotle chiles?....

 

Herdez? Really?

 

We tried some for the first time because it was the only salsa they had at a store we found on Virgin Gorda. Weak, watery and almost tasteless. Sadly we bought several jars because it was on special. The only way we could get through it was add other hot sauce to it to give it some flavor.

 

Maybe we got a bad couple of jars but I've since walked by every Herdez product I've seen on the shelves. Which is too bad because it is pretty common.

Depends on which herdez you buy and your personal taste I suppose. The casera is good for us for chip dipping. and quick flavor up for yellow rice. It is pretty mild but depends on which "heat" you choose. We use the medium for those things. We don't use it as "hot sauce"...its salsa.

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I see Mr. Break has caught the Herdez addiction as well. Might I be so bold as to suggest you also try their tomatillo sauce, as well as their whole chipotle chiles?....

 

Herdez? Really?

 

We tried some for the first time because it was the only salsa they had at a store we found on Virgin Gorda. Weak, watery and almost tasteless. Sadly we bought several jars because it was on special. The only way we could get through it was add other hot sauce to it to give it some flavor.

 

Maybe we got a bad couple of jars but I've since walked by every Herdez product I've seen on the shelves. Which is too bad because it is pretty common.

Depends on which herdez you buy and your personal taste I suppose. The casera is good for us for chip dipping. and quick flavor up for yellow rice. It is pretty mild but depends on which "heat" you choose. We use the medium for those things. We don't use it as "hot sauce"...its salsa.

 

That's the stuff we got, the Casera, the jar of salsa on the left. It was purchased as salsa for dipping chips, spreading on chips & cheese, etc.

 

We thought it was terrible for dipping chips.

 

That I suppose is why ice cream comes in flavors...

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I see Mr. Break has caught the Herdez addiction as well. Might I be so bold as to suggest you also try their tomatillo sauce, as well as their whole chipotle chiles?....

 

Herdez? Really?

 

We tried some for the first time because it was the only salsa they had at a store we found on Virgin Gorda. Weak, watery and almost tasteless. Sadly we bought several jars because it was on special. The only way we could get through it was add other hot sauce to it to give it some flavor.

 

Maybe we got a bad couple of jars but I've since walked by every Herdez product I've seen on the shelves. Which is too bad because it is pretty common.

Depends on which herdez you buy and your personal taste I suppose. The casera is good for us for chip dipping. and quick flavor up for yellow rice. It is pretty mild but depends on which "heat" you choose. We use the medium for those things. We don't use it as "hot sauce"...its salsa.

That's the stuff we got, the Casera, the jar of salsa on the left. It was purchased as salsa for dipping chips, spreading on chips & cheese, etc.

 

We thought it was terrible for dipping chips.

 

That I suppose is why ice cream comes in flavors...

Copy that!

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I get the feeling that a lot of you are eating much hotter than I do...

 

Out of curiousity, and since we apparently have an international standard : how much Tabasco per person goes into / on an average meal ?

 

(for me it would be 2-4 drops per person.)

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My collection is pretty static. I venture out and try new stuff but these are my "go to" salsa's and sauces. (I also make my own habanero salsa but that's another thread altogether). The only one missing from the picture is sriracha.

 

photo_zps5bb4e445.jpg

 

I see you have sambal oelek there as well, love the Asian hot sauces which aren't always quite as hot, but definitely more flavourful. Spicy banana sauce from the Philippines is usually found in my cupboard.

Good local sauces also found in Sichuan, Vietnam, Thailand and a few other places.

 

UFCBananaSauceReg.jpg

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The go-to:

 

sriracha2_wide-e4a7cac45f046cdc40cfa5842

 

 

For Carib curries:

matouk-combo-pepper-pk-01.jpg

 

 

For general seasoning, and Vietnamese:

31AbHG2bVfL.jpg

 

...or, just plain fresh off-the-vine 7-pot Yellow, NagaBrain, or any other of the 1M Scoville peppers that a friend of mine raises...

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12Pack_ALL.png

I'm in agreement with all the above, especially the sambal (the one that's sweeter, sometimes buy the wrong one that's just pure hot). A buddy from San Juans and coincidentally Humboldt days has started a hot sauce company that seems to be doing well, awards and such. I'm not much for the mango bastardization stuff but if I come across these in a store I'll buy 'em to try 'em. No, there's no dope involved.

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product-bufalo-chipotle-mexican-hot-sauc

 

Found it. Not on the nuclear side but very taste. I use it in baked beans and now it's right unless I have that. Really peps up the dish.

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I just spent the last two days paying for my indulgence of the chili I made with the Pueblo Dynamite peppers and a few other ingredients. Nuclear explosive liquid shit.

 

While I was managing the full spectrum of this colonectal disaster, I thought of a terrific name for hot sauce made with only Pueblo Dynamites ...

 

Bleeding Anus Hot Sauce.

 

Truth in advertising, what do you gents think?

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I get the feeling that a lot of you are eating much hotter than I do...

 

Out of curiousity, and since we apparently have an international standard : how much Tabasco per person goes into / on an average meal ?

 

(for me it would be 2-4 drops per person.)

 

couple teaspoons.

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Well I have a bottle of this Scorpion chilli sauce. Supposedly 15/10 HOT! That may be marketing

But it's fucking hot, addictive hot.

 

http://thechillifactory.com

 

That looks fantastic. I have to check if I can import the seeds here, haven't done any growing since my Ghost Pepper batch a couple years ago.

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D'Elidas of Panama has become and has remained my absolute favourite hot sauce. It's not hotter than Tabasco but tastes so much better.

 


D%27Elidas_Picante_Chombo_Hot_Sauce_-_Bo

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I agree on D'Elidas. I think they are out of business, but I loved a hot sauce out of Barbados called S-Bend. I believe the maker has passed. An airline pilot used to bring a stash back for us.

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i went out on a limb the other day and bought a bottle of Dinosaur BBQ's Devils Duel nothing special...........

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D'Elidas of Panama has become and has remained my absolute favourite hot sauce. It's not hotter than Tabasco but tastes so much better.

 

 

D%27Elidas_Picante_Chombo_Hot_Sauce_-_Bo

You guys are really brave; I tried one of those yellow hot sauces once and it was so painful I thought I was about to die! I'll stick with sriracha, thanks!

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Fellow I met a few years back was from South Africa. Sent him over a couple of pounds of Old Bay for crab and shrimp boils and he returned the favor with a quart bottle of "Peri-Peri" from Madagascar. The label read ( in very fine print 'tis true) this is a concentrate, mix with oil and vinegar. Not just peppers in there, other hot stuff, too. Absolutely stunning. Gave a pint to a Vietnam vet friend and he laid waste to a vet's motorcycle outing and barbeque. A coue of drops was enough to give a big pot of chili a serious kick n

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I agree on D'Elidas. I think they are out of business, but I loved a hot sauce out of Barbados called S-Bend. I believe the maker has passed. An airline pilot used to bring a stash back for us.

Hi G.Miller. As far as I know D'Elidas is still alive and kicking. Just Google " D'Elidas USA ". I will look for S-Bend as well. :-)

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suzies it pretty good,

 

there is one from the states call "Da Bomb" it has a dropper under the cap. it's da bomb, also "hemorrhoid helper" is a fine drop

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Peri-Peri... you can get a reasonable facsimile in the States, at Publix, they carry Nando's brand. Also, if you search 'Nando's commercials' on YouTube, they're funny

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I agree on D'Elidas. I think they are out of business, but I loved a hot sauce out of Barbados called S-Bend. I believe the maker has passed. An airline pilot used to bring a stash back for us.

Hi G.Miller. As far as I know D'Elidas is still alive and kicking. Just Google " D'Elidas USA ". I will look for S-Bend as well. :-)

Yeah, thanks. I didn't write very clearly, but I meant to say that the similar hot sauce S-Bend is no longer available. I had D'Elidas on my burger last night!

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Taco bell packets on ramen noodles,you can really taste the poverty.

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1 peck habanero peppers

1 clove garlic

2ish tbls olive oil

Vinegar

 

Pull the stems. Crush the garlic. Add oil. Blend till smooth. Lowest heat simmer ~6 hours. Keep adding vinegar to keep it from burning.

 

I canned it. Put in fridge. Months later it wasn't as harsh and had nice flavor. Still have some left.

 

I called it "Joy-Luck-Happy Sauce"

 

Nope. No reason. Just did.

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Taco bell packets on ramen noodles,you can really taste the poverty.

Wendy's has gratis crackers.

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Taco bell packets on ramen noodles,you can really taste the poverty.

Wendy's has gratis crackers.

One of the best places for poverty condiments is Chick-fil-A, a whole rack of assorted single serve condiments with smiling employees who keep telling you it's their pleasure.

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12 habeneros - seeded and cut into strips

1 ripe mango cut into cubes

6 scallions chopped

Brown sugar to taste (~1/4 cup)

3/4 cup apple cider vinegar

3tbls thyme

 

In a hot pan with veg oil, brown habeneros . Make sure there is plenty of ventilation and keep low.

When the peppers start to soften, Add the scallions and sauté until soft

 

Add all ingredients to food processor or blender. Liquefy.

 

Simmer in pan until slightly reduced.

 

When raw, it will be very hot. Brushed on virtually any fish and then grilled, it has excellent warm heat and flavor without burning your face off. Brush on it thicker than you think you should. The heat mellows the spicieness. Will keep a good while in the fridge.

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I've never tried it, but I like the name

 

13264301.jpg

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I agree on D'Elidas. I think they are out of business, but I loved a hot sauce out of Barbados called S-Bend. I believe the maker has passed. An airline pilot used to bring a stash back for us.

 

We just bought some D'Elidas in Panama before we left there a couple of months ago. Still around as of then.

 

I've never tried it, but I like the name

 

13264301.jpg

 

Its got a kick, peppery with a nice flavor but not super hot.

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I agree on D'Elidas. I think they are out of business, but I loved a hot sauce out of Barbados called S-Bend. I believe the maker has passed. An airline pilot used to bring a stash back for us.

 

We just bought some D'Elidas in Panama before we left there a couple of months ago. Still around as of then.

 

>>I've never tried it, but I like the name

 

13264301.jpg

 

Its got a kick, peppery with a nice flavor but not super hot.

 

 

You fuckin' Philistines....real BBQ needs no sauce... :ph34r:

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2nd vote for piri piri. It's delicious. Simple recipe to make own. Cook, blend and strain. Though I don't strain, as I like to leave it chunky and rustic..

 

1 1/4 cups olive oil
4 fresh jalapeno peppers, coarsely chopped, stems, seeds and all
2 fresh poblano peppers, coarsely chopped, stems, seeds and all
1 tablespoon crushed red pepper
kosher salt
ground pepper
minced garlic

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2nd vote for piri piri. It's delicious. Simple recipe to make own. Cook, blend and strain. Though I don't strain, as I like to leave it chunky and rustic..

 

1 1/4 cups olive oil

4 fresh jalapeno peppers, coarsely chopped, stems, seeds and all

2 fresh poblano peppers, coarsely chopped, stems, seeds and all

1 tablespoon crushed red pepper

kosher salt

ground pepper

minced garlic

 

 

Greate reccipe. Thack you.

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You fuckin' Philistines....real BBQ needs no sauce... :ph34r:

 

At least somebody knows what the fuck is going on.

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Choloula, Sriracha, Crystal are the staples in the fridge.

 

Can't abide Tobasco.

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007.jpg

This is delicious. No smoky taste at all like in some habanero sauces. And it's remarkably green.

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Wonder how that tastes with Irish whiskey? .....

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Any redhead aged between 20 and 45 years

Always spicy and passionate.

 

Even moreso if they were born somewhere between Tijuana and Tierra Del Fuego.....

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Valentina seems to be the standard in Jalisco where we spend 4-5 week each year. I like Cholula at home, and I'm usually disappointed with Tabasco, which has too much vinegar that seems to overpower the flavor for me.

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when mom and dad traveled they'd bring home souvenirs. mom, the spoon for the spoon rack. dad, hot sauces.

 

dad brought a sauce home from jamaica called bottled hell. he couldn't take more than a drop on his food. i found it zesty and zippy, but not hot. i could drink it. but i used the bottle up fast.

 

i just did a search for bottled hell and it looks like it's made in kentucky

 

http://www.hotsauce.org/hot/lifelist.html

 

http://www.hotsauce.com/

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My current favorite hot, hot sauce is Reaper from the Puckerbutt folks. It is a carolina reaper pepper puree. Great pepper flavor and hot.

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My aforementioned friend who grows the 1M Scoville peppers is friends with the maker of this sauce, and it's pretty good stuff:

 

 

 

s953264958171342158_p2_i2_w1570.jpeg

 

 

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