rogerball0

Westerly Anarchy

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Continuing on from Dylan Winter's picture quiz conundrum, i felt i should move my ramblings to a separate page and with a little inspiration from Greg for the title this will be the spot to post all things regarding this esteemed marque from the 1970's which stood for stoutly (read overbuilt) constructed, (some) very boxy-looking, (others looking so 'distinct' as to question the designers mental state and the cost and availability of psychotropic substances of the time) family sailboats.

 

That said some of Westerly's most popular designs were formulated in the late '60's, so there could be some leeway there (pun intended) that said these exceptionally seaworthy designs (read scaled-down battle cruisers for ex-dinghy sailor' first forays into open water sailing) were known in gale force conditions to reach a face-bending 5- 6 knots! who said the '60's wasn't about progress.

 

Heres a picture of what i've done to my Westerly (1971 Centaur called Solway Cloud) this week - i started putting the interior back in mine and now i've picked up much needed paid work i was thinking about building the insides out of foam although this maybe as pointless as Marcel Marceau's voice coach, i'm starting to worry about the amount of weight thats already gone into the boat via the 5 'c' packs of Wests i've bought (and used) over the last few years.

 

This week I used 2-part pourable foam then topped off the slight unevenness with Wests before fastening the marine ply down with A2 screws and PU adhesive.

 

WP_003210.jpg

 

The rest of the pictures are here: https://picasaweb.google.com/110182886418433827802

 

Cheers

 

Roger

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What was the purpose of filling the bigle with foam?

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Imagine yourself in a time and place on the internet in the mind of Roger Ball. A place were a heirloom Westerly Centaur has sexy lines, a modern stylish interior and a sail plan featuring a square top main and bow sprit.

 

Bravo Roger keep up the great work.

 

Makes me want to sit back, drink another beer and work on Something Else!

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Seriously though, you filled the bilge with foam? Where does the water go???

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Sculpin - I could be wrong, but I think ... the Westerly is a twin keeler, so the bilge ain't in the middle. it's out parallel to the beam.

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Sculpin - I could be wrong, but I think ... the Westerly is a twin keeler, so the bilge ain't in the middle. it's out parallel to the beam.

 

I'm just quoting this so you can't deny it when you're sober.

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Imagine yourself in a time and place on the internet in the mind of Roger Ball. A place were a heirloom Westerly Centaur has sexy lines, a modern stylish interior and a sail plan featuring a square top main and bow sprit.

 

Bravo Roger keep up the great work.

 

Makes me want to sit back, drink another beer and work on Something Else!

 

Having sailed for six days and five nights with Roger I can confirm that he is a most remarkable bloke

 

keeps his energy level up - apart from when sleeping/snoring

 

amiable bloke

 

good sailor

 

can steer a straight course

 

I would invite him aboard for another long trip should I do one

 

.......

 

I admire his diligence with the dad boat project

 

 

but.......

 

speaking as the sort of bloke who likes to do the maximum amount of sailing for the minimum amount of maintenance then I could never spend six years working on a boat

 

but I am really looking forward to having a go on it when he finishes the super centaur - assuming I live long enough

 

Centaurs do have a reputation for being a bit sluggish as a sailing boat however the hull does drive along really easily. She will do four knots with bugger -all wind

 

it does not like being sailed on its ear but we have had six knots through the water out of mine

 

they also go to windward much better than they should

 

LG spent a lot of time tank testing the keel design

 

he should have spent a bit more time testing keel attachment which has been a real problem to westerly owners over the years and the costs of doing the repairs ultimately contributed to the demise of the company

 

Mine has been strengthened but still suffers from damp locker syndrome when sailing hard

 

however having a boat that can take the ground is a wonderful thing

 

. 26 feet and plenty of room - even though it looks like a caravan

 

I am currently in Orkney with mine and she has proven herself to be an excellent sea boat

 

on my marina tours there always seems to be a Centaur sitting there

 

 

D

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What was the purpose of filling the bigle with foam?

Well its less than 3" at the deepest point with little access to clean or mop so decided to fill the gap.

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Hmmm you are aware I hope that many Centaurs have had structural issues where the keels are mounted.

 

I am not sure that covering that area with foam is wise unless you are absolutely certain that the reinforcing operation has been done and done well.

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Interesting - I was thinking those keels looked a lot better reinforced than most current boats.

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The keels and stubs on mine are way better than Westerly ever built them, i'm only too aware of the keel problems this boat has.

The keels formed the basis of the project. Initially after my dad died it was decided the boat needed a cosmetic tidy up however after being lifted off the ground in yard many moons ago both keels slump towards the centreline, (structural problems) boat bought home keels removed.


Boats wetted area gets planed and dried using home-brew hot vac system, especially the stubs, blisters as big as 60mm across begin to appear after the keels are removed exposing previously closed surface of keel stub. This caused in part from massive compression forces from successive boat yards 'curing' the problem by overtightening the keel bolts and thereby crushing the stub floor via the spreading washers allowing the slow disintergration of the laminate.

Internally just as bad - lots of bodged (and from the receipts i have in the boats history file) very expensive repairs removed using air chisels and hammers! By the time i got back to something resembling solid laminate some of the stub was around 3mm thick and required substantial amounts of wests and bi-axial cloth.

Keels got rebuilt, they were stripped, chemically bathed and etched then primed filled and faired using Wests and templates i made to get the original shape then sheathed under vacuum in three layers of cloth, i cut and fitted new A4 keel bolts adding 10mm thick A4 spreading washers that couldn't be bent by manual overtightening, the old ones were 5mm and each one dished and buried in the laminate and a gold sovereign put in each keel (an offering to poseidon) bolted back onto to newly made keel stubs and then everything sheathed and the joint faired in.


Pictures to accompany the above can be found here

P.S. Because i removed the internal moulding last year i have had to unpick some of the reinforcing work i had done previously which will pick up the new internal structure once built, hope that fleshes it out for you

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Hmmm you are aware I hope that many Centaurs have had structural issues where the keels are mounted.

 

I am not sure that covering that area with foam is wise unless you are absolutely certain that the reinforcing operation has been done and done well.

Twin keeler. The keel bolts appear to be accessible, the starboard bolts are at upper screen right.

One of the folders on his linked site show the work done to the keels. Pretty impressive work.

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Sculpin - I could be wrong, but I think ... the Westerly is a twin keeler, so the bilge ain't in the middle. it's out parallel to the beam.

 

I'm just quoting this so you can't deny it when you're sober.

 

LOL. IPA logic. 2 keels, 2 bilges. makes perfect sense!

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Sounds like the keel problem has been dealt with.

 

Nice work.

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Anybody want a nearly free Nomad? Eastern NC? Owned by my father in law x >40 years. A progressive demyelinating disease has finished his ability to get aboard ever again. Save him the slip rent. 9.9 Evinrude outboard with maybe 100hrs (I'm sure it needs a going over in the fuel system as it has sat for years), full instruments including radar (yikes!). AP, nice galley, surprisingly roomy. Very overbuilt and ugly as ass.

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Hi Roger. IMHO it makes sense to fill in the 3" 'bilge' for a number of reasons:

- It is a 1" thick FRP hull between the keel stubs...what could leak?

- If water did accumulate, it would sit and stink, because it is essentially impossible to get a bilge pump pickup to keep it dry.

- You fixed your keels, so they will not leak.

- If you took on water, via portlights, companionway or hatches, I am sure you will have methods of dealing with this via alternate pumps.

One of my mantras in refitting my 1969 Centaur has been 'no voids': If a space serves no function and is difficult to access (of which there are few), it gets filled with 2-part foam, thus becoming a structural part of the hull. Consider the strength you have with the 1" FRP hull/1-3" thick 4lb/cf foam/12mm ply sole, glued and screwed to tabbed frames.

Keep up the good work!

Eric

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IMHO, filling in the bilge means that your ply floor will be sitting in water - where else can the water go. And even epoxy sealed ply will go off eventually. Now, I will admit to only having flown over the UK, but it is my understanding that it does rain there more than a bit - so water will get into the boat.

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OK sculpin. You appear to have an opinion based on actual experience...COOL. Tell us more...!

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Sculpin i don't pretend to have all the answers but as Eric and several other owners have mentioned; the shallow bilges are a ballache especially when diesel and oil gets to them, my boat stank like the engine bay, even after regular power-washing of the engine bay when i removed the back end of my boat the smell still came back.

 

It was only after painting the bilges out with 2 part epoxy floor paint did the odour ease, regarding moisture i dont doubt they'll be some but i'm fairly confident in wests after all i've used it when constructing wet-rooms in houses using exactly the same materials / method as i have on the floor of my boat - the last one i did was some five years ago and is used every day with no problems.

 

As you'll be only too aware moisture in boats is normally down to leaks and poor ventilation, i feel i have sorted most of what could leak and intend venting things like lockers and settee bases directly into the cabin to circulate via vents in the structure, i've spent many hours of my life reading books on the subject calculating air volumes and observing the best places to install active vents.

 

That said the only time it was noticably damp was a resent delivery trip on Dylan Winters Centaur, with the three of us in soaking wet oilies you needed heat and an open companionway to get the dampness out which we duly did.

 

All i can say is time will tell.

 

cheers

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Keeping on the topic of what constitutes a bilge in a twin keel hull design...

 

My Centaur had already had the inboard engine removed when I bought it. What remained was a stinky, greasy engine compartment, complete with old hoses, wires, etc.. My solution, after stripping the engine compartment down to the bare hull and having it steam-cleaned, was to remove (intact) the last 18" of the cabin/companionway/bridge deck/combing winch pads. 24" was then removed from the remaining cockpit, the aforementioned section was reattached to the cockpit and the 24" gap rebuilt to the cabin. This section was also raised 6" (using the riser piece that originally transitioned the coach roof between the main and forward cabin sections).This allows standing headroom, despite the hull beginning to sweep up toward the stern. The cabin is now 3.5' longer. The cockpit is still 5' 10" long (as am I).

 

The floors and sole of this new section occupy the center 24" below the new companionway, extend forward to the original companionway entry and then steps down to the original cabin sole (now lowered and filled with foam). Two 6" wide x 2" high scuppers are cut into the face of the step, which would allow any water ingress to drain into the space "bilge" under the new sole. There is also a bilge under the bridge deck, with identical scuppers that are immediately below the companionway, to allow drainage to this bilge. High and low capacity bilge pumps are installed to empty these spaces, which can hold about 40 gallons of water. Two removeable floor boards allow access to the bilge and the scuppers permit airflow.

 

This is a much better bilge solution than was possible in the original design.

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Hi Rodger

I do respect the quality of your work, and lord knows I don't have all the answers. But to me the idea of putting plywood in direct contact with a surface that will get wet is not a great one. Were it my project I would probably have left a "bilge" gap in the middle, with an access hatch, and I would space the floor slightly up over the foam so as to allow drainage. I know in my boat water gets dragged below on foulies, things get spilled, fittings may not leak today but will tomorrow...

 

And if you have sorted all the things that can leak into a boat - you are a better man than I.

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Kymeric - got any photos of your mods? Have you switched to outboard power?

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Hey, look what I found in Southern Maryland!

Do you think it was shipped here, or sailed here?

 

post-42428-0-11011300-1404778667_thumb.jpg

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Hi mrming. You can find earlier construction photos on the Bristol27.com site. Look in the Everything Else section at Eric's Westerly 26. I have a lot more pics, so now that I know there is some interest, I will get those posted in the near(er) future. I plan on using a Honda 15hp extra long shaft with electric start and the 4 blade high-thrust prop. It will be able to be lifted and tilted, to get the prop out of the water. I would like to have the ability to rotate the engine, but that system design is in queue for a future brainstorming session.

 

Thx for your interest.

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Hey, look what I found in Southern Maryland!

Do you think it was shipped here, or sailed here?

I'd say sailed and if not will need a watertight explanation! Very tidy looking one that, from the looks of it a real early one too (probably '69 boat) looking at the grey topsides, if not grey then very dirty.

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Hi Roger.

Regarding your sail plan modifications; I had seen that you plan to use a full roach mainsail. I am curious as to your plans for your headsail configuration. I seem to remember that you are going to add a bowsprit. Any thoughts on materials, construction, etc..

Best wishes.

Eric

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Hi mrming. You can find earlier construction photos on the Bristol27.com site. Look in the Everything Else section at Eric's Westerly 26. I have a lot more pics, so now that I know there is some interest, I will get those posted in the near(er) future. I plan on using a Honda 15hp extra long shaft with electric start and the 4 blade high-thrust prop. It will be able to be lifted and tilted, to get the prop out of the water. I would like to have the ability to rotate the engine, but that system design is in queue for a future brainstorming session.

 

Thx for your interest.

Thanks Kymeric - looks like some epic mods going on. Looking forward to seeing how it looks compared to a normal one when it's all done.

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Hi Roger.

Regarding your sail plan modifications; I had seen that you plan to use a full roach mainsail. I am curious as to your plans for your headsail configuration. I seem to remember that you are going to add a bowsprit. Any thoughts on materials, construction, etc..

Best wishes.

Eric

Hi Eric

 

The Sailplan you see on Eric (Sponberg's) site was copied and overlaid from a mini transac boat and then slightly tweaked to fit the picture, it was primarily drawn to illustrate to Eric S what i wanted to achieve. The bowsprit on his advice will probably be a Selden kit although for full retro feel i will get it re-anodised in gold to match the mast and a new composite boom i'll build. i did like the idea of a carbon sprit using 2" tube modified with some end fittings and a ring fitting to bolt to the bow roller but cost is a factor as the selden kit is a few hundred quid all ready to go, i'll more than likely hire Eric S to design the sail plan when time and money permits.

 

The headsail config will be standard although when chatting to Eric S about the babystay i enquired about removing mine from its location on the front of the forecabin roof and splitting it either side taking the chainplates (and therefore rig loads) down to the forecabin bulkhead but Eric reckoned there was little need and was also a pain in the arse to set up. The rig i will step is a different config to what you see on his site as i now have the main and inners coming down to one fitting mounted outboard thru bolted horizontally in the hull at strake height.

 

The asymmetric; well one of the ideas is to get this boat moving in light airs and so want something rather large although from my experience of sailing frisky dinghies may get a couple made for differing conditions, well thats the plan anyway as i have bought and have yet to fit the two sets of winches to the coaming, bought 30st and 16st for some multiple sail fun, could end up in a mess or it could be a bit of a laugh.

 

The pogo structures boats are where i'm heading with the rigs design as this is the closest i can see to what the final design will be for mine, you'll understand i wont publish any pics of the drawings as they cost me a few quid to have done. I can thoroughly recommend Eric S to anyone wanting to undertake similar ideas of crazyiness, his work's a testament to his genius.

 

Roger

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Is it feasible to square off the top of the fwd bulkhead opening to the same shape as the aft one? Looks a bit funny with two different designs there. Just my .02.

 

Cheers Dave.

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Dave, the front bulkhead will be getting completely redesigned, the forecabins gonna be pretty tasty and yes the opening will match the main one, one pair of hands and all that.

 

Dylan, thats where the rig loads will be going through the hull, (8mm thick solid epoxy/bi-ax plates bonded to the hull) its the very first stage of the reinforcing process, a load of cloth, resin and a vacuum to follow which i'll start tomorrow.

 

Cheers.

 

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Great job Roger! Progress is a good feeling.

How did you solve the wood vernier problem going around the curved bulkhead?

Now you have to cover it up so it doesn't get paint or epoxy on it.

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Great job Roger! Progress is a good feeling.

How did you solve the wood vernier problem going around the curved bulkhead?

Now you have to cover it up so it doesn't get paint or epoxy on it.

Hi Greg cheers mate, yeah pushing forward at my normal glacial pace, the veneer bending proved a bit of a ballache, i took the last 250mm of the aeroply that wrapped the curve and feathered it from 1.75mm down to 0.5mm not before wasting a load materials on the first go but thats life, and yes i've ordered a load of brown packing paper and pipe insulation to protect panels and exposed edges respectively.

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WP_003816.jpg

 

Still waiting on a few bits before i install the motor so toddled on with my new low-slung super comfy sofa / decent-sized, double berth. Just need to make the pull out front piece tomorrow then will dry fit everything early next week.

 

How i got here: https://picasaweb.google.com/110182886418433827802/LoungingCompartment?authuser=0&feat=directlink

 

Au revoir.

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Hey, look what I found in Southern Maryland!

Do you think it was shipped here, or sailed here?

 

I saw a Centaur on a trailer here on Connecticut the afternoon.

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Nice workmanship. I like the little curvy bumpout.

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Hey, look what I found in Southern Maryland!

Do you think it was shipped here, or sailed here?

 

I saw a Centaur on a trailer here on Connecticut the afternoon.

They get everywhere don't they.

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Nice workmanship. I like the little curvy bumpout.

Cheers, had to hide the two shakewells that reside there, was a bit of a pain to make but worth it.

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BTW since this topic is Westerly Anarchy, are you all familiar with Bob Shepton? He's just completed the NW Passage both ways in his Westerly Discus, as well as a remarkable history of rufty tufty sailing, done with great cool.

Www.bobshepton.co.uk

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BTW since this topic is Westerly Anarchy, are you all familiar with Bob Shepton? He's just completed the NW Passage both ways in his Westerly Discus, as well as a remarkable history of rufty tufty sailing, done with great cool.

Www.bobshepton.co.uk

Thought the name rang a bell, his boat Dodo's delight has been all over, just checked out his site; now thats ballsy sailing!

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Looks good. Nice workmanship, god everything takes ages when you are doing the whole lot yourself, right.

 

Tell me about it, five years and counting! That settee module has taken almost ten days from start to finish over the past month, it has helped motivate me though. Been struggling in recent months trying to maintain paid work as a chippy and keeping the cash coming in for the boat as well as finding the time to work on it, and everything inbetween - definately a modern malise everyone is familiar with:

 

Time / money; when you have one you seldom have the other!

 

Still this little bit of joinery has perked me up somewhat so this week i'm hoping to make the battery compartment and get the last few ancillaries for the engine compartment delivered so i can fit the motor, gonna fire the motor up on its crate seeing as its been stood in my workshop brand new, un-used for some 6.5 years then pending a good outcome will hoist into the boat.

 

Been conducting some pretty scientific tests lately regarding how much weight i can suspend from the boat shed roof by hanging off the ridge beam and making like a monkey, i weigh about 115kg and the engine weighs 105kg so i'm fairly confident things should be okay.

 

Think i'll use a lot of protective foam and ply and some props too should the worst happen, as long as i can get it into the cockpit the rest is basically wrestling it down onto its bearers.

 

Cheers

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Whoa..first I've seen this thread. Nice work Roger. I don't quite understand the foam and marine ply in the bilge either, but good on ya..keep it all dry and you should be fine!

 

Lots of old boats like ours have lots of wood in them, and while they don't last as long as the glass, the wood lasts a while!

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Whoa..first I've seen this thread. Nice work Roger. I don't quite understand the foam and marine ply in the bilge either, but good on ya..keep it all dry and you should be fine!

 

Lots of old boats like ours have lots of wood in them, and while they don't last as long as the glass, the wood lasts a while!

it appears the lowest part of the bilge. as someone stated. its a twin keeler and so the lowest part would be just a hole. am irrelevant space that collects water, that s hard to get to. he sees to know what hes doing.

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Cheers guys, the bilges seem a little controversial but the standard bilge in mine was only some 4" at its deepest and so lowering the floor by another 2" made things nigh on impossible to maintain, i've sealed it with bucket loads of wests and pu adhesive so it should see me out, just have to bung the bilge up in front of the main bulkhead opposite the heads. Fwiw there was a fair amount of marine growth on the inside of the hull where there was a cavity between the internal moulding and the hull - like a black sludge so that was also a factor in sealing up voids, i know the foam i used isn't the best quality in terms of its structure but i'm happy with what i've done.

 

As i type this (stopped for some soup) i'm covering the boat in a protective layer of MDF where the engine will travel through the air over the boat so from the stern, over the cockpit and companionway is now protected, i have visions of the engine getting a swing on and turning into a wrecking ball.Gonna start making the new crate later today to test fire the engine tomorrow or wednesday, all being well then i'll get it aboard although i'm still waiting on this bloody sound insulation which i want to fit before the engine.

 

WP_003917.jpg

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Nice to see a new engine where they haven't sprayed paint over everything.

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Nice to see a new engine where they haven't sprayed paint over everything.

 

Makes a change although i'm having murders trying to get a touch-up paint for it as the company i bought it froms gone bust, have to get something mixed to order.

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Jaysus. Someone who could do that paint job, God knows what they'd be capable of in the rest of the refit. Maybe it was done for a bet.

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A colour scheme that'd make a glass eye run!

Just fucking dreadful, i stand firm on the abolition of capital punishment but every now and again i'll see something that makes me question that, its clear the owners suffering from some kind of occular condition or indeed an undetected neurological problem, regarding the boat............................

 

Why?

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Maybe the boat is sailed in Clear Lake, California, and they are worried about being run over by a drunken sheriff's deputy...

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Does this qualify for the ugly boat thread?:

 

4811128_20140910055652811_1_XLARGE.jpg

 

Advert here: http://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/1990/Westerly-Oceanlord-2761836/Grenada#.VGPj0fmsV5N

 

Boat looks OK - paint job looks like something John Lennon and Keith Richards would've collaborated on.

 

Thats why I asked the question as the lines of the Westerly Oceanlord are pretty inoffensive but the paint job; just ugly, if it was painted like Lennon's Roller that'd be ace, not too unlike Rob Hoffmans Pageant but this, this is just very terrible i'm afraid.

 

I wish I had a photo of my J 24. Orange hull with a blue deck! Hideous.

 

Oh my god Bob... really, was that in the '70's?

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I wish I had a photo of my J 24. Orange hull with a blue deck! Hideous.

I really like orange & blue spinnakers but there IS a limit. :D

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Hi Bob, cheers.

 

Na its a Volvo MD2B, the guys that lent a hand have the same lump in their Centaurs, a big 'ole cement mixer of a lump, its funny as i was looking at the literature of mine this morning and it produces another 6hp (29) and is half the weight of the Volvo; 115kgs.

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With diesel engines, especially in boats, weight is your friend.

 

If you took that monster flywheel off the Volvo the two engines would be a lot closer in weight.

 

Nice new engine room - the standard has been set.

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Here's some more:

 

WP_004055.jpg

 

Spent the last couple of days mocking this up in MDF as i can't afford to waste any marine ply then cut and fitted it today. Just need to paint out inside where the bolts are one last time then screw and bond the top down and tab to the hull, this is what the galley module will be mounted to and unlike Westerly' i've made the keel bolts accessible although there will be a removable vented panel in front of this one with the access holes in.

 

WP_004058.jpg

 

Got to sort the floor out this week too as its a mess, think i'm going to hit the worst of the undulations with 410 then fabricate with marine ply and lashings of neat west's

 

Other pictures of last week here

 

cheers

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cheers mate, just got finished putting the first hit of 410 fairing compound on the floor turns out its quite a complex little shape that strip that runs down the starboard side, the floors now basically a slab of epoxy encapulated foam with just a soupcon of ply although if i can get the shape decent i'll lay a piece of 1.5mm over the lot on an epoxy bog so it makes the floor finish easy to fit.

 

Almost out of money so the last hoorah before xmas will be c pack no. 7 from east coast fibreglass then new year back out to the world of work to get some more money for what i'm hoping will be the final push..

 

cheers for looking in...............

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Roger..money is always the issue!

 

I am thinking about a band saw to make cutting new windows easier, but I could likely do the same work with the jig saw I already have, but it wouldn't be as much fun!

 

Keep at it mate..one question in case I missed it...are you protecting/sealing all this wood going in the boat? Any new piece of teak ply I've replaced has had 10-15 coats of Helmsman polyurethane brushed onto it to seal it (this is a Minwax product available locally here on the US East Coast). Sometimes, if it is not a visible application, it gets coated with West System..which doesn't look as nice, but is actually a little more expensive probably.

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Roger..money is always the issue!

 

I am thinking about a band saw to make cutting new windows easier, but I could likely do the same work with the jig saw I already have, but it wouldn't be as much fun!

 

Keep at it mate..one question in case I missed it...are you protecting/sealing all this wood going in the boat? Any new piece of teak ply I've replaced has had 10-15 coats of Helmsman polyurethane brushed onto it to seal it (this is a Minwax product available locally here on the US East Coast). Sometimes, if it is not a visible application, it gets coated with West System..which doesn't look as nice, but is actually a little more expensive probably.

I had plans to upgrade my bench saw and also get a band saw but the money that would cost would buy a lot of materials so for the time being i'm making what i've got work, would love a band saw, although the capping i'm using for the interior joinery is 100 quid for a 50m roll and that was the principal reason for me getting a band saw..

 

The interior is essentially plywood thats capped and veneered in American white oak the plan is then to do 2 - 3 coats of wests on the visible surfaces then 5 - 6 coats (starting out thinned by 50% to final coat thinned 25%) to finish in a satin PU, internal surfaces i probably go round with the white epoxy 2k paint i've used in the bilges as its hi-solid content makes it a good candidate to thin and still get good coverage.

 

The only thing i'm a bit wary of is coating decorative grade veneers in wests and then having to wash the blush off, not keen doing that on veneers, biggest mistake i've made and i have plenty to choose from was using wests, really wish i'd gone for a non-blushing product or used vinylester but you learn by your mistakes eh?

 

Everything thats been bonded to the hull has been set up on a cabosil-thickened mix of wests, so the actual end grain all the new structure is taken care of, i was originally going to just varnish everything but seeing as i've bitten the bullet and bought another c pack of wests today i may as well do it properly.

 

Had a look at what you've been upto HB, very impressive mate and really like the boat, i think here in the uk catalina's were built under licence by Jaguar yachts marketted with the same name, but IIRC they only offered a 22, 25 and a 27 here. Can't believe how much volume you have in that 30 ft hull of yours, i find that interesting from a design perspective as uk designed boats of the same era are very narrow-gutted and not nearly as sociable down below.

 

I'll post some pics of the companionway compartment i've finished today (just needs veneering and coating,) got to tidy the workshop up as its a fucking mess and shoulder deep too.

 

cheers

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As promised, 'exciting' pics of more things i have made from plywood: this week the companionway cabinet

 

WP_004114.jpg

 

Old and new

 

WP_004135.jpg

 

New and old

 

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Everything dry fitted together.

 

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Open sesame!

 

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I think it bears an uncanny resemblance to a fireplace surround, might mount a small LCD TV on it playing a continous loop of a log fire.

 

Loads more pics of my plywood/hardwood folly here.

 

A bientot

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Totally - you're going to have the best Centaur on the planet.

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Merry Christmas Rog, hope the New Year brings you fair winds and continued progress on your Westerly.

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Merry Christmas Roger! We UK types will be queuing up for a sail on the ultra-Centaur when she's done. :)

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Happy new year to you all!

 

Finally cracked the 'getting-plywood-to-conform-to-a shape-i-want' mystery, admittedly not quite the same cache as cracking the secrets of the pyramids i'll grant you but a bit of a personal victory nonetheless seeing as i wasted alot of materials last year trying to get to the gold with no success.

 

Have done this to aid the fabrication of a curvy euro interior for my Centaur but couldn't face the arse-ache i had making the curved settee berth corner (foam, vacuum, skin ply etc). So used good old mechanical force in the form of screwing hardwood battens over the workpiece into the jig to hold its shape whilst the epoxy set plus a lot of brain boggling getting the perfect kerfing pattern to make it conform to the jig in the first place - all proved a rather roaring success!

 

The making's of a jig:

 

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Bit of trial and error:

 

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Finished piece:

 

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The bit that made my brain hurt:

 

WP_004186.jpg

 

The finished article, holes still visible where i screwed an oak batten the length of the work piece on each side of the radius.

 

WP_004188.jpg

 

The gingery one.

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Roger

 

the standard of your work just blows me away

 

D

Me too. It's superb.

 

I just can't help feel a little sad that it's all going into a chunky hull, rather than something more svelte.

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Roger

 

the standard of your work just blows me away

 

D

Me too. It's superb.

 

I just can't help feel a little sad that it's all going into a chunky hull, rather than something more svelte.

 

 

Roger

 

the standard of your work just blows me away

 

D

Me too. It's superb.

 

I just can't help feel a little sad that it's all going into a chunky hull, rather than something more svelte.

 

 

careful old chap

 

you speak of an english classic

 

it stands beside a landrover and pincess anne

 

D

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Roger

 

the standard of your work just blows me away

 

D

Me too. It's superb.

 

I just can't help feel a little sad that it's all going into a chunky hull, rather than something more svelte.

 

 

 

 

Roger

 

the standard of your work just blows me away

 

D

Me too. It's superb.

 

I just can't help feel a little sad that it's all going into a chunky hull, rather than something more svelte.

 

 

 

careful old chap

 

you speak of an english classic

 

it stands beside a landrover and pincess anne

 

D

 

 

I'm not a chap :)

 

But I do agree the Centaur is a classic, like a LandRover.

 

However, I don't have much time for Mrs Windsor her family. Anne is the least worst of a bad bunch, but she's nowhere near as fine (or as pretty) a device as a Landie.

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If anyone would like to see what the cabin looked like before R got his hands on it

 

here is a cabin tour of my Centaur - yours for £9,800 and falling by £100 a week until it goes

 

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Cheers, for the comments - you're right it is a classic but dont be sad regarding all this for a Centaur for thats the point: a boat as common as muck but with a few surprises inside and out, as the project is now a cheerful insanity of mine i may as well throw everything at it to make look as far removed from the original (inside) as possible, as the kids would say; go big or go home!

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Cheers, for the comments - you're right it is a classic but dont be sad regarding all this for a Centaur for thats the point: a boat as common as muck but with a few surprises inside and out, as the project is now a cheerful insanity of mine i may as well throw everything at it to make look as far removed from the original (inside) as possible, as the kids would say; go big or go home!

 

 

goodnya mate

 

as you say - 3,000 of the suckers around - and yours is likely to survive longer than most

 

D

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May be while yet FS as its below freezing where i am and nothings curing very quick, had to bring the compaionway / engine hatch indoors after it sat in the vacuum for a couple of hours with an IR heater on it looks pretty good, just wish it was warmer to do other stuff, apologies for the shitty picture:

 

WP_004241.jpg

 

When it was warmer on Saturday (2 degrees C) i finished off the curved bits for the interior, sanded then filled with with a mix of West 410, cabosil and swearing then veneered with aeroply.

 

WP_004209.jpg

 

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WP_004236.jpg

 

Fame 'n' Spear

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Nice work!

How are you treating the edges? Banding tape? Or are you making your own from the same veneer you're using on the face?

 

 

 

Edit: Can't really see the treatment in the photo of the engine hatch assembly...

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Yes the pictures rather shit. The edges will get a 2mm solid oak wood cap matching the veneer, have decided to finish any edges physically in contact with the floor with wests then shoot half a dozen coats (HVLP) of 10% matt AC lacquer over everything else, i wasn't originally gonna spray as i thought i'd be making most of the joinery insitu but realised i can do everything off the boat so will set up a booth in the old shop.

 

Originally was gonna coat everything in Wests then lacquer but a) cant be arsed waiting for epoxy - especially in this cold weather - to kick plus theres a good chance the lacquer will eat the epoxy anyway, so think this is the most practical approach to maintain the momentum.

 

I've come up with a little detail so theres a 1/4 inch shadow gap on any of the front edges of joinery abutting the floor, this so as to keep the veneer and capping physically up off of it.

Cant stand seeing water stains in timber - bugs the hell out of me - especially knowing the finishing technology thats out there, that said most of the galley modules will be a good six inches up off the floor on the base i made a while back, its just things like the engine hatch & settee berth, sorta high traffic stuff.

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