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      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

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Boo-Yah

Video 1983 SORC

127 posts in this topic

For any of you who want to take a trip down SORC/IOR Memory Lane you will see a lot of familiar boats and faces here. Maybe Clean or Ed can do some magic and get a cleaner higher quality version of the late Tom Leutwiler's (1948–1993) jump into the video tape market?

 

 

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Wow! Great stuff. I did this event when I was 18. That seems like a long ago. :unsure:

 

Thanks for posting!

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Wow! Great stuff. I did this event when I was 18. That seems like a long ago. :unsure:

 

Thanks for posting!

+1

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So good!

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I was twelve years old and these guys were gods and boats were mythical to me then. This is a trip back to a time that would influence the rest of my life. I still look at 83-84 as the zenith of American yachting. Thanks for reminding me why I continue to come here every day when there's just so much time wasting bullshit to ware through. Glad I didn't skip today...

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There is quite a story behind that video appearing again after all those years. A friend Dave Kuhl in Annapolis had sent it to me in 1983/4 and I watched it often over the next few years but probably hadn't viewed it again for 20 years or more. I found it again in a drawer in my garage in Melbourne Australia earlier this year and about 6 months after I got rid of my last VCR. I contacted sailing historian and fellow Anarchist Richard Blakey in New Zealand about it and then posted it over to him. Richard had it converted and posted it on his excellent blog: rbsailing.blogspot.com and from there it has been picked up by many others and shown all over the planet. Sorry about the quality but 1983 video tape was never going to last all that well. It really is a time freeze of a great era in sailing, glad you are all enjoying it.

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The first minute, if no one noticed, Tom Blackaller....yea, Tom Rocks.

 

and the Canadians, well... Canada sucks.

 

 

oops so does Jobson.....puke.

 

 

 

Sailing rocks.

I don't think anyone, ever, didn't notice Tom Blackaller.

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"The world's best boats, the best sails, and the best crews, especially in Class D"

 

Those were the days, right?

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Here is a link to another golden oldie, also posted by RB. This one is the '82 Clipper Cup (as it was known then)

 

I may like this one even better, if only because it has some decent footage of Police Car and Windward Passage in it (two of my all time favs), plus some good blooper action.

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Those were the days, right?

 

+1

 

I see Jobson has somehow managed to retain all that narrative excellence 30 years on.. how does he do it?!

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The Clipper Cup 82 video also came from the depths of my garage via Richard Blakey. It was compiled from out-takes from Australian Channel 10 TV coverage so you will see lots of repetition in that one but it is still a fantastic window to the glory days of IOR racing. And how fashions have changed; check out the shorts.

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I was there. Draft beer at St. Pete YC was 75 cents, Kevlar sails were cool, everything was hydraulic and some crews actually slept on the boats.

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Sailing footage of rule beater Cascade at 33:55

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There is quite a story behind that video appearing again after all those years. A friend Dave Kuhl in Annapolis had sent it to me in 1983/4 and I watched it often over the next few years but probably hadn't viewed it again for 20 years or more. I found it again in a drawer in my garage in Melbourne Australia earlier this year and about 6 months after I got rid of my last VCR. I contacted sailing historian and fellow Anarchist Richard Blakey in New Zealand about it and then posted it over to him. Richard had it converted and posted it on his excellent blog: rbsailing.blogspot.com and from there it has been picked up by many others and shown all over the planet. Sorry about the quality but 1983 video tape was never going to last all that well. It really is a time freeze of a great era in sailing, glad you are all enjoying it.

Thank You.

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Watched it this morning, Fantastic.

 

I was 14 then and remember how I couldn't wait for the March Issue of Sail and Yacht Racing & Cruising to come out. The only way we could get the scoop back then.

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I was there. Draft beer at St. Pete YC was 75 cents, Kevlar sails were cool, everything was hydraulic and some crews actually slept on the boats.

 

 

You have not lived until you wake up inside and empty, damp IOR hull to someone banging on the outside after a hard night post the Lauderdale Race at Pier Sixty Six. The dock boy will be outside with a paper, the room service menu, wanting to know where you want the phone installed. The desk phone with a wire.... The younger and poorer sleeping on the boat scratch their heads in the fog... Then some realizes you can use that phone to call room service and have stuff delivered to the boat on the boat tab. That is one step up from the 75 cent draft at St. Pete. Until the owner gets his slip bill delivered on a hand truck.

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those were great days......designers/builders/owners that drove the boats......no one design......business and work and fun for everybody........now kaput.

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those were great days......designers/builders/owners that drove the boats......no one design......business and work and fun for everybody........now kaput.

I would render a guess that those cats had zero use for you then as we do now

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Mike Levin built Bright Finish, campaigned it hard for a year, was shut out of the Admiral's Cup team, and promptly quit the sport. Took up polo. Really. Polo.

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I loved the segment with the navigator on Kialoa about navigation electronics at 41:15. "About every hour and a half we get an updated position . . . . . . . . Amazing".

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Lot of memories there, the boat I was driving is featured around 50:00, we ended up 3rd in class F and 15th in fleet, Migizi (with a younger Jud Smith on) smoked us, much better boat. Coolest part of that series was the last race showdown with Locura and Scarlett, their class had a general recall so they were moved to the last start so everyone could get going. Their fleet came ripping through our class, Scarlet

passing us just before the last weather mark and Locura humping by on the spinnaker reach to the finish. We caught a tow on them and rode them most of the way to the finish to end up 2nd in class for the race. For all the bad things that were said and written about IOR, it still made a damn good rule for stuff like this, most obvious by the number of boats there.....



I loved the segment with the navigator on Kialoa about navigation electronics at 41:15. "About every hour and a half we get an updated position . . . . . . . . Amazing".

 

That navigator was Fang, he went on to become one of the best international judges in sailing, really god guy.

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Every now and then there are rumbles among the current SORC folks about resurrecting the st. Pete lauderdale race on the off years of the pineapple cup.

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I loved the segment with the navigator on Kialoa about navigation electronics at 41:15. "About every hour and a half we get an updated position . . . . . . . . Amazing".

 

 

Once you left the comfort of US Loran you had to wait for a satellite to fly over... and hopefully your Sat Nav would see it and get a fix.

 

The docks could be interesting in so many ways. Every vendor had reps pimping and plying their magic go fast wares. One afternoon hanging on the decks along maxi row. A bright eyed sales pimp showed up with some new line. Kevlar was brand new in 82,83 and even 84 and everyone was trying to figure out where to put the Kevlar magic to good use. This poor sales schmuck was convinced he had some new line and braid everyone should have. Finally one of the guys on Ondine took him up on his claims and pitch. Ran the magic line between two drums, draped the line with foul weather gear. Told to grinders to spin the handles. POP! like wet toilet paper.... "This line is shit" or something like it. Shortly there after the poor sales guy walked away with his two bits of frayed line. Next!

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Every now and then there are rumbles among the current SORC folks about resurrecting the st. Pete lauderdale race on the off years of the pineapple cup.

 

 

If Obama would throw the doors open to Havana... We would have something.

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.

 

and the Canadians, well... Canada sucks.

 

Geez - sorry, eh.

 

 

Every now and then there are rumbles among the current SORC folks about resurrecting the st. Pete lauderdale race on the off years of the pineapple cup.

 

 

If Obama would throw the doors open to Havana... We would have something.

 

Ain't gonna happen until Fidel dies.

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Watched it this morning, Fantastic.

 

I was 14 then and remember how I couldn't wait for the March Issue of Sail and Yacht Racing & Cruising to come out. The only way we could get the scoop back then.

 

The earlier issue of Sail with all the new boat info was the one I loved - still have all mine - a treasure trove of IOR history.

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There is quite a story behind that video appearing again after all those years. A friend Dave Kuhl in Annapolis had sent it to me in 1983/4 and I watched it often over the next few years but probably hadn't viewed it again for 20 years or more. I found it again in a drawer in my garage in Melbourne Australia earlier this year and about 6 months after I got rid of my last VCR. I contacted sailing historian and fellow Anarchist Richard Blakey in New Zealand about it and then posted it over to him. Richard had it converted and posted it on his excellent blog: rbsailing.blogspot.com and from there it has been picked up by many others and shown all over the planet. Sorry about the quality but 1983 video tape was never going to last all that well. It really is a time freeze of a great era in sailing, glad you are all enjoying it.

 

Awesome find and thanks for bringing this back to life for those of us who lived it at one time. Thumb's up!

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Magazine coverage of the SORC and the Admirals Cup was sail porn for me when was younger. Totally loved reading about it from afar,

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Agree to a lot of the above about the boats, waiting for the magazines, etc. We used to go down to St. Pete and Clearwater to stroll through the yards where the boats were being prepped. Saw quite a few starts at the top of the pier of the various versions of race 1 and then the St. Pete to Ft. Lauderdale race. One time on a downwind start a boat went about a 1/2 mile above the line, set their chute, and hit the line perfectly at speed while the others were bearing away and setting. They made about a 1/4 mile jump on everybody, just killed them.

 

Interesting to see the old St Pete YC building, torn down and replaced in the early 90's along with the old Skyway Bridge while the new one was being built. Been down those docks and raced out of there many a time, unfortunately not for an SORC. Great to hear the stories from the ones that did, I like the room service at the dock, classic.

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Are SORC results over the years posted anywhere online? If not, what magazines would have covered them back in the day? Does anyone have stacks of sailing porn mags from back in the day that have these results and would be willing to scan and post?

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There is quite a story behind that video appearing again after all those years. A friend Dave Kuhl in Annapolis had sent it to me in 1983/4 and I watched it often over the next few years but probably hadn't viewed it again for 20 years or more. I found it again in a drawer in my garage in Melbourne Australia earlier this year and about 6 months after I got rid of my last VCR. I contacted sailing historian and fellow Anarchist Richard Blakey in New Zealand about it and then posted it over to him. Richard had it converted and posted it on his excellent blog: rbsailing.blogspot.com and from there it has been picked up by many others and shown all over the planet. Sorry about the quality but 1983 video tape was never going to last all that well. It really is a time freeze of a great era in sailing, glad you are all enjoying it.

 

 

Thanks, mate! I was there on the Bruce Kelly 40' Chloe. Loads of fun.

 

Say a big hi to Dave Kuhl - tell him to get in touch. Fine guy, despite being the only Australian ocean racing sailor I ever met who didn't drink. I lost track of him in the blurry 80s.

 

And I agree about Fang - one of the greats.

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those were great days......designers/builders/owners that drove the boats......no one design......business and work and fun for everybody........now kaput.

I would render a guess that those cats had zero use for you then as we do now

 

Lets see now.........decent thread for real sailors.......you are a turd sandwich from douchebag........if there ever was someone to put on ignore it is your pathetic self, utilizing the epithet 'cats' from the 50's/60's......you must be a senile old troll with nothing but hate in your heart for your pathetic existence......bye bye.

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I was just getting interested in sailing and racing then- still think those pointy sterns and angled bows look just so fuckin' cool....

 

Thanks for posting!! Serge

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Every now and then there are rumbles among the current SORC folks about resurrecting the st. Pete lauderdale race on the off years of the pineapple cup.

 

 

If Obama would throw the doors open to Havana... We would have something.

Obama would love to, but would face relentless displeasure from the House as well as concerns from the Cubans.

 

The Cubans are more than a bit nervous about "throwing the doors open". They'd love to normalize, but are very worried about being inundated by Yankee cash. The mob-run 1950's were not a favorite time for Cubans, in spite of what we think was a great party town.

 

I suspect that events like boat races might actually be on of the baby steps that could happen. I took the Havana Director of Urban Development sailing on Puget Sound when he visited a couple of years ago. He had sailed as a kid out of a community sailing club. Loved sailing.

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Excellent video! Underscores how long it took for sleds to catch on even after Mr. Jumpa, Sweet Okole, and the Cook design from around 1978.

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This question really only applies to the North America.

 

People thought that taking the OD mentality from small boats to boats over 20' would be a good idea because it would lower costs and be more competative because they thought that hand building boats would result in identical boats.

 

Eventually the builders built to the lowest common denominators so we have behind the current tech OD boats that the builder and potentially a sail maker has control over and inflates the prices accordingly. Meanwhile the less athletic of us continue to drive down the tech of the boats, resulting in more and more boring, slow boats that have few ways to be tweaked except to long board a bottom and buy new sails as often as possible. But the boats are still slow and boring.

 

Meanwhile there are handicap style boats that are faster, more fun and cheaper than most of the prevelant OD's but stand no chance because the leadership follows the pack and the pack says they want over priced, under performing OD. Those of us that can afford boats but enjoy current tech and speed, walk away and do something that generates more adrenalin. Commercial backers see and think the same thing, they want exciting and there is exciting everywhere in sports, except in very limited occasions in sailing. The outliers such as ACats and TP52's.. But nothing for the middle class boat buyer to get excited about.

 

So being as how I was 13 then, can someone briefly explain how it all fell apart?

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Are SORC results over the years posted anywhere online? If not, what magazines would have covered them back in the day? Does anyone have stacks of sailing porn mags from back in the day that have these results and would be willing to scan and post?

 

Hi Vigil Ant, here are a couple of pages of results from this series. There's an article in Yachting NZ too that I'll get around to scanning soon.

post-52234-0-08285600-1406667684_thumb.jpg

post-52234-0-56440700-1406667744_thumb.jpg

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I was just getting interested in sailing and racing then- still think those pointy sterns and angled bows look just so fuckin' cool....

 

Thanks for posting!! Serge

 

So agree..........the new stuff needs the tractor tires to look useful.............best, Coleman and Mahoney.

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Foredeck, I agree. Running an A cat is like a mini campaign from these golden years. So much fun and minimal cost compared to a keel boat.

 

Great to watch this video and learn more about the SORC. Wish I could have done it.

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Great video! I still think that era was the hight of great looking race boats. Hard to imagine a better looking boat than Infinity...

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Great video! I still think that era was the hight of great looking race boats. Hard to imagine a better looking boat than Infinity...

You should see Infinity + 1!!

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Jesus, I was 11 when this happened. Totally born at the wrong time.

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Those were the days, long nights on the rail eating instant coffee and drinking Jolt, top of the line Line 7 foul weather gear that kept the water out and the sweat in, Kevlar sails that lasted one race before looking like garbage bags, navigation by RDF and then Loran , huge quarter waves on sterns and boats that could not get on a wave and surf even if towed by the Queen Mary. I sailed several of these series as a youth and will never forget the boats and characters on them. GREAT STUFF

 

Those were the days, long nights on the rail eating instant coffee and drinking Jolt, top of the line Line 7 foul weather gear that kept the water out and the sweat in, Kevlar sails that lasted one race before looking like garbage bags, navigation by RDF and then Loran , huge quarter waves on sterns and boats that could not get on a wave and surf even if towed by the Queen Mary. I sailed several of these series as a youth and will never forget the boats and characters on them. GREAT STUFF

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Those were the days, long nights on the rail eating instant coffee and drinking Jolt, top of the line Line 7 foul weather gear that kept the water out and the sweat in, Kevlar sails that lasted one race before looking like garbage bags, navigation by RDF and then Loran , huge quarter waves on sterns and boats that could not get on a wave and surf even if towed by the Queen Mary. I sailed several of these series as a youth and will never forget the boats and characters on them. GREAT STUFF

 

 

+1! Jolt was so awesome! The precursor to Red Bull, Monster, and all those other energy drinks. I even remember their slogan..."All the sugar and twice the caffeine."

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that was the only time that I wished I lived on the east coast. Only one boat from the PNW had gone, John Buchan's Glory that I knew of. I had sailed with him many times, but I had my own boat then and raising two kids, so missed it.

 

I still love those IOR days. Lot's of boats, great close racing. Not like now days when it is hard to scrape up enough boats in our class for a 6 boat fleet, and to do that you have to add in a J29 and a 2000lb 26fter.....oh well. And don't tell me to go one design, that is what dinghy's and small keel boats are for.

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This question really only applies to the North America.

 

People thought that taking the OD mentality from small boats to boats over 20' would be a good idea because it would lower costs and be more competative because they thought that hand building boats would result in identical boats.

 

Eventually the builders built to the lowest common denominators so we have behind the current tech OD boats that the builder and potentially a sail maker has control over and inflates the prices accordingly. Meanwhile the less athletic of us continue to drive down the tech of the boats, resulting in more and more boring, slow boats that have few ways to be tweaked except to long board a bottom and buy new sails as often as possible. But the boats are still slow and boring.

 

Meanwhile there are handicap style boats that are faster, more fun and cheaper than most of the prevelant OD's but stand no chance because the leadership follows the pack and the pack says they want over priced, under performing OD. Those of us that can afford boats but enjoy current tech and speed, walk away and do something that generates more adrenalin. Commercial backers see and think the same thing, they want exciting and there is exciting everywhere in sports, except in very limited occasions in sailing. The outliers such as ACats and TP52's.. But nothing for the middle class boat buyer to get excited about.

 

So being as how I was 13 then, can someone briefly explain how it all fell apart?

One of the neat parts of IOR was being able to build a quarter tonner (or a half/three quarter/one ton) with a stupid concept, pull all the gear off it when it proved to be a dog and have at it again. I don't see a class around at the moment where a person could do that.

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The Clipper Cup 82 video also came from the depths of my garage via Richard Blakey. It was compiled from out-takes from Australian Channel 10 TV coverage so you will see lots of repetition in that one but it is still a fantastic window to the glory days of IOR racing. And how fashions have changed; check out the shorts.

Thanks SC - that is very cool, Sir James was quite a fellow!!

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There we was on Secret Love. God we tanked the first race. Oh well, that's racing.

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Don't forget the BN parties at Ross Marine Clearwater just as the yard emptied for the first start. Or the ones after the Miami , Nassau.

 

 

The story of the beauty on Nassau and the chopped Conch.

 

Young as most of the crew, long unbrushed hair, slim, tan,in a long island hippy dress and not smilling. She was one pissed off witch. She came down to see the crew off with a knike and live Conch. She bent down chopped the thing up on the sunny, hot, crowded dock and spread its bits onto the water as we were casting off. She was saying something not very nicee nicee at the time in a low quiet voice....

 

But that was in the 70s a long time ago !

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post-3763-0-15364500-1406691015_thumb.jpg

 

That brings back the memories; really good ones cause we won the regatta!

 

We didn't know we had won until this guy showed up at the dock after the race with a GIANT bottle of champagne.

 

post-3763-0-57238200-1406691043_thumb.jpg

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There is quite a story behind that video appearing again after all those years. A friend Dave Kuhl in Annapolis had sent it to me in 1983/4 and I watched it often over the next few years but probably hadn't viewed it again for 20 years or more. I found it again in a drawer in my garage in Melbourne Australia earlier this year and about 6 months after I got rid of my last VCR. I contacted sailing historian and fellow Anarchist Richard Blakey in New Zealand about it and then posted it over to him. Richard had it converted and posted it on his excellent blog: rbsailing.blogspot.com and from there it has been picked up by many others and shown all over the planet. Sorry about the quality but 1983 video tape was never going to last all that well. It really is a time freeze of a great era in sailing, glad you are all enjoying it.

Thank You.

+ a bunch

 

those old winch farms sure are fun to watch.

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so much better than anything that was on tv tonight

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Brought back great memories, though the last SORC I managed to sail was 1974. Them were the days, when boats were yachts (not plastic tubes with pipe berths), new designs showed up every year, owners, builders, sailmakers, naval architects were approachable (especially at the bar).

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Great memories - that's me at the 14:30 mark photobombing Jim Kilroy. Fang was indeed a great bloke. His son Dallas is a great bloke as well, news photographer for the Sydney Morning Herald last time I checked

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I need some spare time to get my 505 upgraded. New boards, new poles and new sails sit in the basement, just need the time and I can get it back on the water.

 

But I'll be honest, I wish I had the option of a boat like the 505 that had a self draining cockpit, asym, and carbon mast that has more self depowering capability. The 505 is the ultimate small boat for it's technical capability and I'm still is awe of being on mine at the 2011 NA in 30kts+ and the boat is able to be set up to be in control. Amazing! But it's a lot of cash and work to keep it running for a 16'3" boat.

 

Foredeck you need a 505.

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This question really only applies to the North America.

 

People thought that taking the OD mentality from small boats to boats over 20' would be a good idea because it would lower costs and be more competative because they thought that hand building boats would result in identical boats.

 

Eventually the builders built to the lowest common denominators so we have behind the current tech OD boats that the builder and potentially a sail maker has control over and inflates the prices accordingly. Meanwhile the less athletic of us continue to drive down the tech of the boats, resulting in more and more boring, slow boats that have few ways to be tweaked except to long board a bottom and buy new sails as often as possible. But the boats are still slow and boring.

 

Meanwhile there are handicap style boats that are faster, more fun and cheaper than most of the prevelant OD's but stand no chance because the leadership follows the pack and the pack says they want over priced, under performing OD. Those of us that can afford boats but enjoy current tech and speed, walk away and do something that generates more adrenalin. Commercial backers see and think the same thing, they want exciting and there is exciting everywhere in sports, except in very limited occasions in sailing. The outliers such as ACats and TP52's.. But nothing for the middle class boat buyer to get excited about.

 

So being as how I was 13 then, can someone briefly explain how it all fell apart?

One of the neat parts of IOR was being able to build a quarter tonner (or a half/three quarter/one ton) with a stupid concept, pull all the gear off it when it proved to be a dog and have at it again. I don't see a class around at the moment where a person could do that.

 

We did that on Special Edition. In it's first go round, the engine was aft and it had a 4' scoop on the stern. We rebuilt the interior with the engine near the mast, cut the scoop off an put on a standard stern and the boat was like new. We did the circuit in 1980 and were near last in class. In this go round, we got hammered (along with Migizi) in the heavily weighted St. Pete-Lauderdale race when our alternator burned out before and we couldn't navigate efficiently. I really think that cost Migizi overall honors, and us certainly a top ten overall and a spot in class.

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This question really only applies to the North America.

 

People thought that taking the OD mentality from small boats to boats over 20' would be a good idea because it would lower costs and be more competative because they thought that hand building boats would result in identical boats.

 

Eventually the builders built to the lowest common denominators so we have behind the current tech OD boats that the builder and potentially a sail maker has control over and inflates the prices accordingly. Meanwhile the less athletic of us continue to drive down the tech of the boats, resulting in more and more boring, slow boats that have few ways to be tweaked except to long board a bottom and buy new sails as often as possible. But the boats are still slow and boring.

 

Meanwhile there are handicap style boats that are faster, more fun and cheaper than most of the prevelant OD's but stand no chance because the leadership follows the pack and the pack says they want over priced, under performing OD. Those of us that can afford boats but enjoy current tech and speed, walk away and do something that generates more adrenalin. Commercial backers see and think the same thing, they want exciting and there is exciting everywhere in sports, except in very limited occasions in sailing. The outliers such as ACats and TP52's.. But nothing for the middle class boat buyer to get excited about.

 

So being as how I was 13 then, can someone briefly explain how it all fell apart?

One of the neat parts of IOR was being able to build a quarter tonner (or a half/three quarter/one ton) with a stupid concept, pull all the gear off it when it proved to be a dog and have at it again. I don't see a class around at the moment where a person could do that.

 

One of the un-neat parts of the IOR was the tendency of designers to exploit unwholesome parts of the rule, so that a lot of boats were squirrely as hell downwind and sometimes right scary downwind when it blew.

 

That being said, I have a "right on!" to say to two cold dogs, for he is dead on-target. I raced on a dog-slow & totally inappropriate 1/2 Tonner in the '71 Nats, and was deeply impressed by the imagination and ingenuity of the 1/4 Ton guys (some of whom went on to Fame & Fortune designing bigger boats).

 

Utterly Useless Aside: I spent a recent week umpiring Opti team races, and one of my fellow umps knew all the boats I raced in the 70s & 80s in Chicago, so I asked what her maiden name was. Turned out that her dad was one of the hot-shot 1/2 Ton guys from back in '71, who I (decades later) ran into when crewing at vintage sporty-car races @ Elkhart Lake. Small worlds.

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What a great time this series was. I was 22. As GJ points out, the boats in F seemingly sailed twice the distance as the rest of the fleet. This series was one of the toughest as the winds just seemed to blow hard for the entire lenght of it. Someone mentioned the guy selling Kevlar line. I felt bad for the Sterns Rep who had to deal with all the fallen spars. I think they were most if not all Sterns masts.

 

During the ST Pete Lauderdale race, while off the Keys, thinking Sombrero Light, the Navigator pops out from below yelling to drop the sails... We were all like "WHAT?" He just yelled it again and to do it right now! We got the sails on deck and you could see the wind line coming and it must have blown about 40-50 for about 20 seconds and then it was over. Up went the sails and on we went. The Navigator had heard of boats upwind of us getting hit and loosing their rigs. Pretty good call on his part,

 

Great video. Good to see Mark Soverel again and well. He was at the top of his game then.

 

SJ

 

 

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This question really only applies to the North America.

 

People thought that taking the OD mentality from small boats to boats over 20' would be a good idea because it would lower costs and be more competative because they thought that hand building boats would result in identical boats.

 

Eventually the builders built to the lowest common denominators so we have behind the current tech OD boats that the builder and potentially a sail maker has control over and inflates the prices accordingly. Meanwhile the less athletic of us continue to drive down the tech of the boats, resulting in more and more boring, slow boats that have few ways to be tweaked except to long board a bottom and buy new sails as often as possible. But the boats are still slow and boring.

 

Meanwhile there are handicap style boats that are faster, more fun and cheaper than most of the prevelant OD's but stand no chance because the leadership follows the pack and the pack says they want over priced, under performing OD. Those of us that can afford boats but enjoy current tech and speed, walk away and do something that generates more adrenalin. Commercial backers see and think the same thing, they want exciting and there is exciting everywhere in sports, except in very limited occasions in sailing. The outliers such as ACats and TP52's.. But nothing for the middle class boat buyer to get excited about.

 

So being as how I was 13 then, can someone briefly explain how it all fell apart?

One of the neat parts of IOR was being able to build a quarter tonner (or a half/three quarter/one ton) with a stupid concept, pull all the gear off it when it proved to be a dog and have at it again. I don't see a class around at the moment where a person could do that.

 

We did that on Special Edition. In it's first go round, the engine was aft and it had a 4' scoop on the stern. We rebuilt the interior with the engine near the mast, cut the scoop off an put on a standard stern and the boat was like new. We did the circuit in 1980 and were near last in class. In this go round, we got hammered (along with Migizi) in the heavily weighted St. Pete-Lauderdale race when our alternator burned out before and we couldn't navigate efficiently. I really think that cost Migizi overall honors, and us certainly a top ten overall and a spot in class.

I was good friends with Colin on Special Edition. Great guy. We had a blast.

 

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What a great time this series was. I was 22. As GJ points out, the boats in F seemingly sailed twice the distance as the rest of the fleet. This series was one of the toughest as the winds just seemed to blow hard for the entire lenght of it. Someone mentioned the guy selling Kevlar line. I felt bad for the Sterns Rep who had to deal with all the fallen spars. I think they were most if not all Sterns masts.

 

During the ST Pete Lauderdale race, while off the Keys, thinking Sombrero Light, the Navigator pops out from below yelling to drop the sails... We were all like "WHAT?" He just yelled it again and to do it right now! We got the sails on deck and you could see the wind line coming and it must have blown about 40-50 for about 20 seconds and then it was over. Up went the sails and on we went. The Navigator had heard of boats upwind of us getting hit and loosing their rigs. Pretty good call on his part,

 

Great video. Good to see Mark Soverel again and well. He was at the top of his game then.

 

SJ

 

We heard the same radio transmissions (the squall line blew the rig out of Razzle Dazzle, Celebration stood by and got recompensed enough time to win class, Evelution was pissed), we dropped our headsail, got everyone up on the rail and reached off a bit in it under full main alone, it lasted a minute or two and then we put the big sail up and took off again.

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I don't know what dates this video more, the overhangs on the bows or the short shorts. Bitchin' dude. Sadly many of those owners are in sailing heaven but lots of us remember their awesome programs. Good times,

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Thanks for posting all of this info. I'm truly envious of you guys who participated in what seems culturally to be the golden era of big boat racing. I often hear great stories at yacht clubs, and can't help but wonder, what will my generation be talking about in twenty years at YC bars? In my opinion, the stories of my generation do not stand up so far. My impression is that sailors from the 70's and 80's did a lot more with a lot less. Keep the pictures coming.

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Thanks for posting all of this info. I'm truly envious of you guys who participated in what seems culturally to be the golden era of big boat racing. I often hear great stories at yacht clubs, and can't help but wonder, what will my generation be talking about in twenty years at YC bars? In my opinion, the stories of my generation do not stand up so far. My impression is that sailors from the 70's and 80's did a lot more with a lot less. Keep the pictures coming.

 

In 20 years, we'll be lucky if there are any YC bars remaining, to tell our stories in.

 

Yes, fast is fun and progress and innovation is good, but this thread proves that those qualities alone are not enough to sustain racing. Participation and close, competitive racing are what make yacht racing exciting, and keep people coming back for more.

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Thanks for posting all of this info. I'm truly envious of you guys who participated in what seems culturally to be the golden era of big boat racing. I often hear great stories at yacht clubs, and can't help but wonder, what will my generation be talking about in twenty years at YC bars? In my opinion, the stories of my generation do not stand up so far. My impression is that sailors from the 70's and 80's did a lot more with a lot less. Keep the pictures coming.

 

In 20 years, we'll be lucky if there are any YC bars remaining, to tell our stories in.

 

Yes, fast is fun and progress and innovation is good, but this thread proves that those qualities alone are not enough to sustain racing. Participation and close, competitive racing are what make yacht racing exciting, and keep people coming back for more.

I almost wrote that exactly, but didn't want to put too much of a dark cloud over it :)

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Exactly! No doubt the boats are faster and easier to sail now, but what a great time that was! The 50-foot class was the epitome of that.

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Clipper Cup 1982- remember seeing the boats leave the harbor while surfing Ala Moana on my twin fin. that may have been the year some guys drove their rental car down the launch ramp into the water and parked it there.

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You said it when you said participation. Its not the top programs that matter, its having a fleet deep enough that everyone has fun from just being out there with someone to race against. Look at the video and you will see a lot of small boats participating when they can (a J29) and a lot of less than full on race boats having fun against the cream of the cream. I was racing about this time on less than full on boats, and while we loved to get a gander at the fancy programs, we were still out there ourselves having fun.

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Does anyone remember the feeder race from Lauderdale to Key West that year?

 

The morning of the start...55MPH Breeze due east blowing down Lauderdale inlet on a ebbing tide. The breaking waves in the inlet were pushing 15-18+ feet That was more fun than people should have. We were among the few that went out for our start and made it back in with the rig still in the boat. "A" division was able to start but the pin end of the line would not stay put. The anchor just kept dragging. Several boats had trouble. INDIGO did a reverse broach on her way out and rolled in the trough of the wave and came up with only one crew member still aboard and no rig. By that time, the Coast Guard had had enough and forced the Comittee to cancel the race. Forgot the number of rescues they performed but it was remarkable.

 

My facts on Nirvana might be off. They hoisted their main, and it blew apart. They hoisted their spare and that one came apart also. We saw them motoring back in under bare poles. Guess they had spent enough money that day.

 

 

SJ

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Two Dogs,

 

Did you know Colin Brown from Barry ONT? He did this SORC on SPECIAL EDITION.

 

SJ

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SORC back then was certainly the big leagues and was endlessly fascinating but keep in mind that it was still only the principal U.S. qualifier for the Admirals Cup - THAT was the world series.

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Does anyone remember the feeder race from Lauderdale to Key West that year?

 

The morning of the start...55MPH Breeze due east blowing down Lauderdale inlet on a ebbing tide. The breaking waves in the inlet were pushing 15-18+ feet That was more fun than people should have. We were among the few that went out for our start and made it back in with the rig still in the boat. "A" division was able to start but the pin end of the line would not stay put. The anchor just kept dragging. Several boats had trouble. INDIGO did a reverse broach on her way out and rolled in the trough of the wave and came up with only one crew member still aboard and no rig. By that time, the Coast Guard had had enough and forced the Comittee to cancel the race. Forgot the number of rescues they performed but it was remarkable.

 

My facts on Nirvana might be off. They hoisted their main, and it blew apart. They hoisted their spare and that one came apart also. We saw them motoring back in under bare poles. Guess they had spent enough money that day.

 

 

SJ

 

I remember hearing stories of that race that year. Missed it as I was finishing up college and couldn't hitch my way down there. Quite some yarns were told.

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Great racing, great stories and those IOR boats.......

That year was also ushering in a change with more production or semi-

production boats racing; Morgan 45s, there was a Beneteau 42 being

raced by the North Loft from St. Thomas, J-29, NY 36, the Peterson

and Farr 37s. The back stories on how some of the boats got there

or were being hidden there out of the site of divorce proceedings. And

the opening of the then new Miamarina. Lots of fun for a 20 something.

I might even have the program for that year. I'll see if I can dig it up and

post it.

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Clipper Cup 1982- some guys drove their rental car down the launch ramp into the water and parked it there.

"Launch Ramp Chicken"! Best drinking game EVER. Back the car down the ramp as far as you dare, when you feel it starting to sink the ramp you hit the gas. Farthest down the ramp wins.

 

One of my favorite moments from that regatta was watching [a friend I'll leave unnamed] swim out of the window of the rental car, holding his drink up so it wouldn't spill. *master*-level win.

 

Remember, always be sure to get the damage waiver when headed this direction ;-)

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Two Dogs,

 

Did you know Colin Brown from Barry ONT? He did this SORC on SPECIAL EDITION.

 

SJ

 

Yes, he was our BN for the circuit in '83.

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Does anyone remember the feeder race from Lauderdale to Key West that year?

 

The morning of the start...55MPH Breeze due east blowing down Lauderdale inlet on a ebbing tide. The breaking waves in the inlet were pushing 15-18+ feet That was more fun than people should have. We were among the few that went out for our start and made it back in with the rig still in the boat. "A" division was able to start but the pin end of the line would not stay put. The anchor just kept dragging. Several boats had trouble. INDIGO did a reverse broach on her way out and rolled in the trough of the wave and came up with only one crew member still aboard and no rig. By that time, the Coast Guard had had enough and forced the Comittee to cancel the race. Forgot the number of rescues they performed but it was remarkable.

 

My facts on Nirvana might be off. They hoisted their main, and it blew apart. They hoisted their spare and that one came apart also. We saw them motoring back in under bare poles. Guess they had spent enough money that day.

 

 

SJ

 

I think it was War Baby, ex. Tenacious, that spit their main, they came back downwind through the cut with the upper half stuck up the rig, out of control and making all the boats trying to get out to the start dodge them. We were right behind that mess so we got to watch the whole thing.

 

Interesting about Indigo, it was chartered to a friend of mine, Jack Holt. The start was originally supposed to be around 10:00 in the morning but after most of the boats got out there it was postponed while the RC waited to see if the breeze would abate. Indigo blew out their hydraulics so they came back in during the postponement and rigged up a block and tackle for the vang and baby stay and rigged a worm wheel for the backstay. They went back out and sailed over the spoil spot just south of the cut, the waves were cresting at about 15' and breaking. Indigo actually started but the RC blew off the race (Class A had actually already started, Thunderhead and Infinity kept going to KW, they never got the message the race was canceled) and when they came back they went through the spoil spot. Jack was standing in the cockpit and the wave that rolled them came over the second spreader, the floor gave in and Jack ended up below in the nav station. The boat rolled, rig got ripped out and half the crew was wiped off, they got picked up about 1/2 hour later by the CG. Another CG tender came up, threw a hawser over one of the cabintop winches and floored it, ripped the winch right off the deck. The boat eventually ended up at Derecktors, when we went over to look at it, it was half sunk and there was klegecell floating in little bits all around it. Boat was trashed. The same spoil spot claimed Jackknife, they ended up washing up on the beach, rigless.

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One of my favorite moments from that regatta was watching [a friend I'll leave unnamed] swim out of the window of the rental car, holding his drink up so it wouldn't spill. *master*-level win.

 

Remember, always be sure to get the damage waiver when headed this direction ;-)

CF. so many stories....

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Gigantic symmetric spinnakers, 100 winches on deck, good times...

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One of my favorite moments from that regatta was watching [a friend I'll leave unnamed] swim out of the window of the rental car, holding his drink up so it wouldn't spill. *master*-level win.

Remember, always be sure to get the damage waiver when headed this direction ;-)

CF. so many stories....

 

 

.

lol. I still have the photo, somewhere...

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Just watched the vid on the Clipper Cup 1982 from Front Page...What another gem of a vid and treat to watch. Remember fondly that race and longing to one day be able to sail it. Boats during that event were majestic to say the least, and not sure it will ever be replicated to such class and characters. Thanks again SportsCar for providing such gems from The Vault!

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Does anyone remember the feeder race from Lauderdale to Key West that year?

 

The morning of the start...55MPH Breeze due east blowing down Lauderdale inlet on a ebbing tide. The breaking waves in the inlet were pushing 15-18+ feet That was more fun than people should have. We were among the few that went out for our start and made it back in with the rig still in the boat. "A" division was able to start but the pin end of the line would not stay put. The anchor just kept dragging. Several boats had trouble. INDIGO did a reverse broach on her way out and rolled in the trough of the wave and came up with only one crew member still aboard and no rig. By that time, the Coast Guard had had enough and forced the Comittee to cancel the race. Forgot the number of rescues they performed but it was remarkable.

 

My facts on Nirvana might be off. They hoisted their main, and it blew apart. They hoisted their spare and that one came apart also. We saw them motoring back in under bare poles. Guess they had spent enough money that day.

 

 

SJ

 

I think it was War Baby, ex. Tenacious, that spit their main, they came back downwind through the cut with the upper half stuck up the rig, out of control and making all the boats trying to get out to the start dodge them. We were right behind that mess so we got to watch the whole thing.

 

Interesting about Indigo, it was chartered to a friend of mine, Jack Holt. The start was originally supposed to be around 10:00 in the morning but after most of the boats got out there it was postponed while the RC waited to see if the breeze would abate. Indigo blew out their hydraulics so they came back in during the postponement and rigged up a block and tackle for the vang and baby stay and rigged a worm wheel for the backstay. They went back out and sailed over the spoil spot just south of the cut, the waves were cresting at about 15' and breaking. Indigo actually started but the RC blew off the race (Class A had actually already started, Thunderhead and Infinity kept going to KW, they never got the message the race was canceled) and when they came back they went through the spoil spot. Jack was standing in the cockpit and the wave that rolled them came over the second spreader, the floor gave in and Jack ended up below in the nav station. The boat rolled, rig got ripped out and half the crew was wiped off, they got picked up about 1/2 hour later by the CG. Another CG tender came up, threw a hawser over one of the cabintop winches and floored it, ripped the winch right off the deck. The boat eventually ended up at Derecktors, when we went over to look at it, it was half sunk and there was klegecell floating in little bits all around it. Boat was trashed. The same spoil spot claimed Jackknife, they ended up washing up on the beach, rigless.

 

 

Watched Jack Knife have her initial troubles south of the breakwater and the CG was attempting to take her in tow. At some point, one of the crew ended up in the water and the CG went after him and let the boat drift into shore and it was too late to recover her. She ended up on the beach. Managed to get some photos of Nirvana coming back in under bare poles. One of the crew, Dale Valentine, later told me the story about the two mains and the owner felt they had spent enough money that day and they came in.

It was pretty amazing that the RC elected to attempt a start. I am not sure anything like that will ever happen again. During a distance race, maybe but never a start in such poor conditions.

SJ

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Watched the SORC vid yesterday, was great to see some of the old wardogs and the guys who sailed them. A skinny Corlett and young Wingate were priceless. And By God there was no lack of winches and treadmanster. No wonder these things hunkered down like they did.

 

Then watched the Clipper cup vid today. Man, what memories. Was great to see Mik Beattie, retelling WP's Molokai crossing. T. David Fenix, was also one of the guys who knew how to have fun...and spend money. Great Fun, Bullfrog, Bravura (with Irv's sideburns....man!!), Irrational, High Noon, Police Car, Hitchiker....those are a bunch of boats and names I hadn't thought about in a long time. Other guys at the meetings and on deck...Zan Drejes, Jim Coggin, Bone (with hair), Mudcat, Clay Bernard, Noel Robbins, "Colonel" Ken Morrison and his shameless promoter, Dick Gooch, and course, Sir jim...On and On...

 

Thanks again Sportscar for, saving these for posterity.

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Thanks for the memories. Great to see people enjoying sailing and not just in it for the money.

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One of my favorite moments from that regatta was watching [a friend I'll leave unnamed] swim out of the window of the rental car, holding his drink up so it wouldn't spill. *master*-level win.

Remember, always be sure to get the damage waiver when headed this direction ;-)

CF. so many stories....

 

.

lol. I still have the photo, somewhere...

Please post. Impossible to shame the guy more than he has shamed himself over the years. You can black out K's face if you have to.

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So being as how I was 13 then, can someone briefly explain how it all fell apart?

 

Not trying to be political but maybe there is a relationship with this: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/07/29/the-middle-class-is-20-percent-poorer-than-it-was-in-1984/?tid=sm_fb

 

Washington Post: The middle class is 20 percent poorer than it was in 1984
Foreclosed-House.jpg.jpg
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/respres/" target="_blank">Jeff Turner</a>/Flickr

Nostalgia is just about the only thing the middle class can still afford. That's because median wealth is about 20 percent lower today, in inflation-adjusted dollars, than it was in 1984.

Yes, that's three lost decades.

Now, as you might expect, the middle class has been hit particularly hard by the Great Recession and the not-so-great recovery. It's all about stocks and houses. The middle class doesn't have much of the former, but it does have a lot of the latter. And that's bad news, because, even though the crash decimated both, real estate hasn't come back nearly as much as equities have. So the top 1 percent, who hold more of their wealth in stocks, have made up more of the ground they lost. But, as the Russell Sage Foundation points out, the slow housing recovery means that, in 2013, median households were still 36 percent poorer than they were a decade earlier.

In fact, the housing bust was big enough to erase all the gains the middle class had made the past 30 years—and then some. As you can see below, median households didn't add much wealth between 1984 and 2007. That's what happens when real wages don't increase, and the cost of a middle class lifestyle—housing, healthcare, and higher education—does. So, as Dean Baker points out, when the crisis did come, it devoured these meager gains and left the middle class with 20 percent less wealth than they had when it was "Morning in America."

But there's a big caveat here. Households don't necessarily stay in the same percentile from one year to the next, let alone for 30 straight. There's a life-cycle to it all. People start off with little, or negative, wealth when they take out loans to go to school or buy a house. Then they gradually build it up as they get bigger paychecks and pay back what they owe.

In other words, just because median households are poorer now than they were in 1984 doesn't mean that middle class families from back then have lost money since. It means that people at the middle now have lower net worths than people at the middle did then. Though, to put that in depressing perspective, it's still a heckuva lot better than households in the bottom 25 percent, whose wealth never grew during the good times, and then plunged 60 percent during the bad ones. That's because, for both the middle and working classes, real wages have been stagnant the past 30 years, and housing equity has taken a nosedive.

At this rate, it won't be long until the American Dream isn't even a memory for the middle class.

Matt O'Brien is a reporter for Wonkblog covering economic affairs. He was previously a senior associate editor at The Atlantic.

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$100,000,000 = 1 12 passenger "yacht" 300 feet plus or minus. So that's 8.3 mil/person.

 

How many brand new 505s with all the trimmings and extra sails and $20k for regattas for 5 years does that equal? 1818. That's 3600 people out enjoying boating.

 

Loss of the middle class.

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Clipper Cup on Superwitch - epic Molokai race, too many stories from that one race. That boat only did two regattas with the US crew under Lowell North, LBYC Race Week & CC 82. It's a shame she did not race the next TransPac as she was a rocket off the wind. The boat was a 'team building' exercise for Yamaha boats, they let their in house designers have free rein to design/build the boat. We did OK in LBYC, than stuck in a new spar for Hawaii, & a new Nelson/Mareck keel just before that. So the first triangle race we did not know what to expect in breeze. No one onboard had any serious time sailing a big fractional sailplan either. So first weather leg we've got full (dacron w/kev leach) and the dac #4 up. Dog slow, we might have been the last boat in our class around the weather mark. But with the spi up we passed seven boats on the two reaches. next upwind leg we tried single reef & kev #3, that worked a whole lot better. Now we could hang with the front of the class upwind & wait for the offwind legs to pass. Hitchiker was blazing fast upwind - on the molokai race she tore her kev main just off black point & we zoomed past. Later at dusk as we came up under the end of Molokai we spot her sailing across in front of us easily a mile ahead. But she could not go downwind in the breeze, so we had our revenge when we passed her near the top of Molokai.

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Does anyone remember the feeder race from Lauderdale to Key West that year?

 

The morning of the start...55MPH Breeze due east blowing down Lauderdale inlet on a ebbing tide. The breaking waves in the inlet were pushing 15-18+ feet That was more fun than people should have. We were among the few that went out for our start and made it back in with the rig still in the boat. "A" division was able to start but the pin end of the line would not stay put. The anchor just kept dragging. Several boats had trouble. INDIGO did a reverse broach on her way out and rolled in the trough of the wave and came up with only one crew member still aboard and no rig. By that time, the Coast Guard had had enough and forced the Comittee to cancel the race. Forgot the number of rescues they performed but it was remarkable.

 

My facts on Nirvana might be off. They hoisted their main, and it blew apart. They hoisted their spare and that one came apart also. We saw them motoring back in under bare poles. Guess they had spent enough money that day.

 

 

SJ

I was sailing on Class F "Circuit Breaker". Boat was brand new, un-sorted, and had a crap rudder. A couple of us more experienced hands took a look at the ocean and had a very late breakfast. The owner was furious that we missed the "start" but we probably saved the boat. Didn't Pipe Dream go on the beach?

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Did a couple of races (Boca Grande, Lipton Cup) on Class F "Circuit Breaker", a Morgan-built Nelson-Merek design. Great experience. Thanks for the memories!

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I like the Alan Parsons 'Raven' music as they head out for the Around Hawaii race. Best music of the whole vid.

 

Brings back memories, sailed a Cal 20 across the Molokai Channel to Kaunakakai and back, just the dad and I. What a ride with just the main and jib back to Oahu.

 

Thanks for posting the vids.

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thanks for the memories., some of the best sailing ever.. best boats, even better crews and some unforgetable generous owners and trusting business men who let us BN's watch over and tune there toys.... any one remember the IBNA motto?.... I still have my t-shirt form that time... thanks again for both films..

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...And of course, these boats had to be sailed to the regatta... so there were plenty of opportunities for people to get an intro and start to network their way up the fleet.

Later, boats became full professional programs, delivered on ships and only the established rockstar pro-crews got a callup....

As the fleet diminished in size, the few rockstar pro-crews remaining got aggressively competitive and protective of their spots in an attempt to lock in a ride...

So, more money required, fewer boats, fewer opportunities, more aggro, more cliques, less fun....that's how it happened!

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thanks for the memories., some of the best sailing ever.. best boats, even better crews and some unforgetable generous owners and trusting business men who let us BN's watch over and tune there toys.... any one remember the IBNA motto?.... I still have my t-shirt form that time... thanks again for both films..

 

"in Us They Trust". Do you remember the IBBA motto?

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This question really only applies to the North America.

 

People thought that taking the OD mentality from small boats to boats over 20' would be a good idea because it would lower costs and be more competative because they thought that hand building boats would result in identical boats.

 

Eventually the builders built to the lowest common denominators so we have behind the current tech OD boats that the builder and potentially a sail maker has control over and inflates the prices accordingly. Meanwhile the less athletic of us continue to drive down the tech of the boats, resulting in more and more boring, slow boats that have few ways to be tweaked except to long board a bottom and buy new sails as often as possible. But the boats are still slow and boring.

 

Meanwhile there are handicap style boats that are faster, more fun and cheaper than most of the prevelant OD's but stand no chance because the leadership follows the pack and the pack says they want over priced, under performing OD. Those of us that can afford boats but enjoy current tech and speed, walk away and do something that generates more adrenalin. Commercial backers see and think the same thing, they want exciting and there is exciting everywhere in sports, except in very limited occasions in sailing. The outliers such as ACats and TP52's.. But nothing for the middle class boat buyer to get excited about.

 

So being as how I was 13 then, can someone briefly explain how it all fell apart?

This is the best post in the entire life of SA.

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The Kialoa navigator was a little optimistic when he said they had 5-foot position accuracy. The Navy Navigation Satellite System (NNSS) available then had an accuracy of 150 feet RMS or 2/3 of the time.

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