Sign in to follow this  
Sol Rosenberg

Anyone Contract Ebola Today (August 10)?

Recommended Posts

There is never a business message on the sign, just religious sayings.

 

And it is only about half a mile from the Peace River.

 

Charley blew it away and it resurrected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is this incompetent boob of a President thinking? Sending the National Guard now to West Africa?

 

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/ebola-virus-outbreak/obama-may-send-national-guard-liberia-fight-ebola-sources-n227336

 

Why, so they can all contract Ebola and bring it home to their families?

 

 

What needs to be done in this country and in other Western nations is the development of a definitive cure, developed with our research and medical expertise. Then, when that is available, provide these countries with that, not troops.

 

Sending the National Guard to Liberia does nothing but put more Americans at risk, as does the absence of a travel ban to quarantine the epidemic. These people are insane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What the fuck is an evangelical flooring store. I have never heard of Jesus Flooring. I wonder how it holds up in a flood

 

It's just a flooring store. This sign is the first time I noticed any sort of evangelical message.

 

Of course, I don't pay much attention to it much. There is an ice cream store across the street and I prefer watching the busty server leaning into the cold case to scoop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

What is this incompetent boob of a President thinking? Sending the National Guard now to West Africa?

 

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/ebola-virus-outbreak/obama-may-send-national-guard-liberia-fight-ebola-sources-n227336

 

Why, so they can all contract Ebola and bring it home to their families?

 

 

What needs to be done in this country and in other Western nations is the development of a definitive cure, developed with our research and medical expertise. Then, when that is available, provide these countries with that, not troops.

 

Sending the National Guard to Liberia does nothing but put more Americans at risk, as does the absence of a travel ban to quarantine the epidemic. These people are insane.

 

This guy's beyond incompetent. Truly. Let's wait for Sol to come up with something funneee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to see the RNC spin machine working over time on this, and just in time for the election too. Spreading Malarky is so excited by the possiblities of a pandemic that he's getting friction burns.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

 

Nice to see the RNC spin machine working over time on this, and just in time for the election too. Spreading Malarky is so excited by the possiblities of a pandemic that he's getting friction burns.

I think the spin cycle is in overdrive in both parties but the only one that really matters is the dipshit dem in the whitehouse at the moment

 

How dare you denigrate the "smartest man in the room".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

 

I was monitoring it

I almost feel bad for you.

 

Why is that? I married a Doctor and my daughter is an epidemiologist who has been to the Congo and Mozambique on contract with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). Her father in law is currently serving with the French Military in Côte d'Ivoire. You could say I have a vested interest in the subject.

was that wife 1, 2 or 3?

 

My wife. I have only one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to see the RNC spin machine working over time on this, and just in time for the election too. Spreading Malarky is so excited by the possiblities of a pandemic that he's getting friction burns.

It's the playoffs. Gotta support the team.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

 

Nice to see the RNC spin machine working over time on this, and just in time for the election too. Spreading Malarky is so excited by the possiblities of a pandemic that he's getting friction burns.

It's the playoffs. Gotta support the team.

 

 

things you can count on in life. ..

 

run out of blazing saddles quotes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Pham going to NIH.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/16/health/us-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

 

It's a scramble but is being handled properly, imo.

She will be a couple of floors and down the hall from where I sit at this moment.

 

Give 'er a warm "SA Welcome".

 

In all seriousness, I hope she pulls thru OK, Docs/Nurses aren't supposed to die for doin' their jobs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

 

 

Pham going to NIH.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/16/health/us-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

 

It's a scramble but is being handled properly, imo.

She will be a couple of floors and down the hall from where I sit at this moment.

 

Give 'er a warm "SA Welcome".

 

In all seriousness, I hope she pulls thru OK, Docs/Nurses aren't supposed to die for doin' their jobs.

 

Big time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good luck to her. In the best hands I'm sure.

 

Glad to hear condition was classed as "good" earlier today, but who knows if that was truthful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Pham going to NIH.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/16/health/us-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

 

It's a scramble but is being handled properly, imo.

She will be a couple of floors and down the hall from where I sit at this moment.

 

 

Good to know you're around chief.

I won't be of any use to her, but there will be a lot of people here doing whatever they can and even more just hoping real hard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Pham going to NIH.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/16/health/us-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

 

It's a scramble but is being handled properly, imo.

She will be a couple of floors and down the hall from where I sit at this moment.

 

Give 'er a warm "SA Welcome".

 

In all seriousness, I hope she pulls thru OK, Docs/Nurses aren't supposed to die for doin' their jobs.

Indeed.

 

Eerie that both are being taken out of Dallas, but not surprising, given the stories about conditions there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Nice to see the RNC spin machine working over time on this, and just in time for the election too. Spreading Malarky is so excited by the possiblities of a pandemic that he's getting friction burns.

I think the spin cycle is in overdrive in both parties but the only one that really matters is the dipshit dem in the whitehouse at the moment

 

How dare you denigrate the "smartest man in the room".

When he is the only man in the room

 

Wouldn't that make him the dumbest, as well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Pham going to NIH.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/16/health/us-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

 

It's a scramble but is being handled properly, imo.

She will be a couple of floors and down the hall from where I sit at this moment.

 

Give 'er a warm "SA Welcome".

 

In all seriousness, I hope she pulls thru OK, Docs/Nurses aren't supposed to die for doin' their jobs.

Indeed.

 

Eerie that both are being taken out of Dallas, but not surprising, given the stories about conditions there.

That staff has to be completely demoralized by this experience and until hospitals here have their protocols down, it make sense to handle these patients in special isolation units.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

Pham going to NIH.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/16/health/us-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

 

It's a scramble but is being handled properly, imo.

She will be a couple of floors and down the hall from where I sit at this moment.

 

Give 'er a warm "SA Welcome".

 

In all seriousness, I hope she pulls thru OK, Docs/Nurses aren't supposed to die for doin' their jobs.

Indeed.

 

Eerie that both are being taken out of Dallas, but not surprising, given the stories about conditions there.

That staff has to be completely demoralized by this experience and until hospitals here have their protocols down, it make sense to handle these patients in special isolation units.

Agreed. Welcome back. You've been missed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Pham going to NIH.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/16/health/us-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

 

It's a scramble but is being handled properly, imo.

She will be a couple of floors and down the hall from where I sit at this moment.

 

Give 'er a warm "SA Welcome".

 

In all seriousness, I hope she pulls thru OK, Docs/Nurses aren't supposed to die for doin' their jobs.

Indeed.

 

Eerie that both are being taken out of Dallas, but not surprising, given the stories about conditions there.

I wouldn't fault Dallas in any way, I'm guessing they handled their baptism about as well as can be expected. I think the transfer is so that NIH can get a better look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

there are only two additional "special rooms" available where you are Moe.

 

You ok with that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed. Welcome back. You've been missed.

It is very nice to be missed. I checked in on y'all's antics from time to time, when I needed to get pissed off, so didn't feel quite the same sense of loss. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are only two additional "special rooms" available where you are Moe.

 

You ok with that?

I don't know. Are they reserved?

 

I think they were built at the time of the SARS epidemic and not used for it. Let's hope this fizzles too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

There are ELEVEN beds nationwide that can deal with this.

 

You still OK with that?



 

Agreed. Welcome back. You've been missed.

It is very nice to be missed. I checked in on y'all's antics from time to time, when I needed to get pissed off, so didn't feel quite the same sense of loss. :)

 

and he means it in the best possible way - he's focusing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are ELEVEN beds nationwide that can deal with this.

 

You still OK with that?

 

 

Agreed. Welcome back. You've been missed.

It is very nice to be missed. I checked in on y'all's antics from time to time, when I needed to get pissed off, so didn't feel quite the same sense of loss. :)

 

and he means it in the best possible way - he's focusing.

From what little I know about this kind of thing, Ebola should not require this level of isolation. Think of patients with active, multi drug- resistant TB or something truly terrifying, like smallpox or It's not my specialty and I am always overjoyed to be corrected, but it's my strong impression that with proper PPE and rigorous, well-trained, procedures, any relatively well-resourced hospital should be able to treat Ebola safely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

 

There are ELEVEN beds nationwide that can deal with this.

 

You still OK with that?

 

 

Agreed. Welcome back. You've been missed.

It is very nice to be missed. I checked in on y'all's antics from time to time, when I needed to get pissed off, so didn't feel quite the same sense of loss. :)

 

and he means it in the best possible way - he's focusing.

From what little I know about this kind of thing, Ebola should not require this level of isolation. Think of patients with active, multi drug- resistant TB or something truly terrifying, like smallpox or It's not my specialty and I am always overjoyed to be corrected, but it's my strong impression that with proper PPE and rigorous, well-trained, procedures, any relatively well-resourced hospital should be able to treat Ebola safely.

 

We've been told the same thing. Apparently experience has said something else or else those nurses wouldn't be transported. Regarding your PPE and training statement, I would love to agree, but I don't. These places don't have the resources to deal with the waste.

 

Not trying to be a dick, just want reality presented.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1of5 has likely shorted the market and in his own way, is helping to talk it down by overstating risks.

 

My wife relayed a story that 50% of Americans believe they are at risk of the Ebola.... So I'd say the fear-mongers are winning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1of5 has likely shorted the market and in his own way, is helping to talk it down by overstating risks.

 

My wife relayed a story that 50% of Americans believe they are at risk of the Ebola.... So I'd say the fear-mongers are winning.

I don't know what's in any individual's mind, but I think, as with lightning strikes and terrorist attacks, the magnitude of the threat (risk x consequence) is distorting people's estimation of the risk term. This seems to be one of those "fast thinking" tendencies.

 

Given that fear, per se, is not a rational response to anything, it's hard to say how afraid to be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm driving an Interstate tomorrow and sailing all weekend. I think both or either pose a greater risk than ebola.

 

In August I was sick for almost the entire month with a nasty case of bronchitis, this is the second year in a row that has happened. It makes me think that with age my resistance is slipping. I've never had a flu shot but may do so this year. Haven't given any personal thought to ebola at all.

 

In my personal risk of concerns ebola is near zero. For those of your really worried, stay at home and get a flu shot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

There are ELEVEN beds nationwide that can deal with this.

 

You still OK with that?

 

 

Agreed. Welcome back. You've been missed.

It is very nice to be missed. I checked in on y'all's antics from time to time, when I needed to get pissed off, so didn't feel quite the same sense of loss. :)

 

and he means it in the best possible way - he's focusing.

From what little I know about this kind of thing, Ebola should not require this level of isolation. Think of patients with active, multi drug- resistant TB or something truly terrifying, like smallpox or It's not my specialty and I am always overjoyed to be corrected, but it's my strong impression that with proper PPE and rigorous, well-trained, procedures, any relatively well-resourced hospital should be able to treat Ebola safely.

 

Hi Moe,

 

I made that point earlier. I am much more worried about MDRTB than Ebola in terms of contagion here, but with little except fluid and electrolytes to offer these patients, the emphasis has to be on containment, which means quarantines, isolation of patients in negative pressure rooms and universal precautions for healthcare workers to include respirators, IMO, because of the potential for aerosolization, even if that is a remote possibility at this point. Ebola will burn itself out eventually, but I'd just as soon see that happen someplace else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to see the RNC spin machine working over time on this, and just in time for the election too. Spreading Malarky is so excited by the possiblities of a pandemic that he's getting friction burns.

 

Really? How about this bull shit --

 

 

The WP gave that crock of shit 4 Pinocchios, BTW.

 

 

Here in CT we have a possible case at Yale. I have two close friends who are nurses there and - yes, I'm worried. They are both sailors, but Sol can take comfort that neither of them are PA posters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

 

Nice to see the RNC spin machine working over time on this, and just in time for the election too. Spreading Malarky is so excited by the possiblities of a pandemic that he's getting friction burns.

 

Really? How about this bull shit --

 

 

The WP gave that crock of shit 4 Pinocchios, BTW.

 

 

Here in CT we have a possible case at Yale. I have two close friends who are nurses there and - yes, I'm worried. They are both sailors, but Sol can take comfort that neither of them are PA posters.

 

Phew.. for a second I was concerned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

1of5 has likely shorted the market and in his own way, is helping to talk it down by overstating risks.

 

My wife relayed a story that 50% of Americans believe they are at risk of the Ebola.... So I'd say the fear-mongers are winning.

 

Talking down the market? You think I have some magic touch on the market? I wish.

 

Please see other thread where TMSail put it out that the market declines yesterday were due to Ebola.

 

My response? NOPE. This has more to do with a global slowdown than this. But you believe what you want and roll your own dice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

There are ELEVEN beds nationwide that can deal with this.

 

You still OK with that?

 

 

Agreed. Welcome back. You've been missed.

It is very nice to be missed. I checked in on y'all's antics from time to time, when I needed to get pissed off, so didn't feel quite the same sense of loss. :)

 

and he means it in the best possible way - he's focusing.

From what little I know about this kind of thing, Ebola should not require this level of isolation. Think of patients with active, multi drug- resistant TB or something truly terrifying, like smallpox or It's not my specialty and I am always overjoyed to be corrected, but it's my strong impression that with proper PPE and rigorous, well-trained, procedures, any relatively well-resourced hospital should be able to treat Ebola safely.

 

Hi Moe,

 

I made that point earlier. I am much more worried about MDRTB than Ebola in terms of contagion here, but with little except fluid and electrolytes to offer these patients, the emphasis has to be on containment, which means quarantines, isolation of patients in negative pressure rooms and universal precautions for healthcare workers to include respirators, IMO, because of the potential for aerosolization, even if that is a remote possibility at this point. Ebola will burn itself out eventually, but I'd just as soon see that happen someplace else.

You are wrong to not be paralyzed with fear. You are not helping The Team with that opinion. Shape UP!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

There are ELEVEN beds nationwide that can deal with this.

 

You still OK with that?

 

 

It is very nice to be missed. I checked in on y'all's antics from time to time, when I needed to get pissed off, so didn't feel quite the same sense of loss. :)

 

and he means it in the best possible way - he's focusing.

From what little I know about this kind of thing, Ebola should not require this level of isolation. Think of patients with active, multi drug- resistant TB or something truly terrifying, like smallpox or It's not my specialty and I am always overjoyed to be corrected, but it's my strong impression that with proper PPE and rigorous, well-trained, procedures, any relatively well-resourced hospital should be able to treat Ebola safely.

 

Hi Moe,

 

I made that point earlier. I am much more worried about MDRTB than Ebola in terms of contagion here, but with little except fluid and electrolytes to offer these patients, the emphasis has to be on containment, which means quarantines, isolation of patients in negative pressure rooms and universal precautions for healthcare workers to include respirators, IMO, because of the potential for aerosolization, even if that is a remote possibility at this point. Ebola will burn itself out eventually, but I'd just as soon see that happen someplace else.

You are wrong to not be paralyzed with fear. You are not helping The Team with that opinion. Shape UP!

 

Well, I am going to avoid the knish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1of5 has likely shorted the market and in his own way, is helping to talk it down by overstating risks.

 

My wife relayed a story that 50% of Americans believe they are at risk of the Ebola.... So I'd say the fear-mongers are winning.

 

"Hundreds" of people in the U.S. have Ebola. That's the word in the streets here half a world away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tell 'em we're dropping like flies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1of5 has likely shorted the market and in his own way, is helping to talk it down by overstating risks.

 

My wife relayed a story that 50% of Americans believe they are at risk of the Ebola.... So I'd say the fear-mongers are winning.

 

"Hundreds" of people in the U.S. have Ebola. That's the word in the streets here half a world away.

Shit! 50,000 of us will die with the fucking flu! Happens every year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tell 'em we're dropping like flies.

 

Great I'll have them running away from me and screaming as soon as they figure out where my weird accent comes from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, Bananny Gov. I hope you're well.

 

Nice to have my opinion confirmed. I would only add that any interventional trials will be much easier and more valid performed in tertiary facilities with on-site scientific capabilities, than in the field. I assume most of these patients will be getting something experimental.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The means of dealing with contasion are known. Of course, seeing folks in the plastic suit and headgear who had not secured the neck seemed just a tad silly.

 

1413299828019_wps_5_A_patient_transporte

 

Not as silly as this fella....what's going on with the protective clothing strategies....?

 

442913-61000424-5581-11e4-8677-4f002b90f445003-656fd110-5581-11e4-8677-4f002b90f

Has someone developed invisible versions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will continue to pray for you all. Luckily my Ebola Bunker can get to the WIFI from the neighbors, so I will monitor your success.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

Hey Moe, welcome back !

 

nyuk nyuk nyuk nyuk

 

LOL - woot wooot wooot wooot..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Nice to see the RNC spin machine working over time on this, and just in time for the election too. Spreading Malarky is so excited by the possiblities of a pandemic that he's getting friction burns.

It's the playoffs. Gotta support the team.

 

 

things you can count on in life. ..

 

run out of blazing saddles quotes?

 

"The nigger gets it" is hardly appropriate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Nice to see the RNC spin machine working over time on this, and just in time for the election too. Spreading Malarky is so excited by the possiblities of a pandemic that he's getting friction burns.

 

Really? How about this bull shit --

 

 

The WP gave that crock of shit 4 Pinocchios, BTW.

 

 

Here in CT we have a possible case at Yale. I have two close friends who are nurses there and - yes, I'm worried. They are both sailors, but Sol can take comfort that neither of them are PA posters.

 

Sol hasn't gotten to isolating 'us' to PA yet.

 

I'm still going with the racism angle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

vSUMmNW.jpg

 

Never happened, leftist propaganda at its worst. The indigenous indians were begging for liberation & boots on the ground

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

they wanted that Smallpox...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fortunately, we took the Ebola threat seriously around here, and came up with a proactive method of tracking the spread of this scourge of our time, so that our members are protected. Our perfect SA record is the result. Stay vigilant!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The means of dealing with contasion are known. Of course, seeing folks in the plastic suit and headgear who had not secured the neck seemed just a tad silly.

 

1413299828019_wps_5_A_patient_transporte

 

Not as silly as this fella....what's going on with the protective clothing strategies....?

 

442913-61000424-5581-11e4-8677-4f002b90f445003-656fd110-5581-11e4-8677-4f002b90f

Has someone developed invisible versions?

I already questioned the open neck on the top picture.

 

As to the aircraft boarding, I'm thinking that by the time the got her suited up the bodily fluids were inside the suit and everybody decontaminated with a bleach solution on the outside of the suits.

 

That is, if they followed protocol which is what the guy with the clipboard is ticking off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pham going to NIH.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/16/health/us-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

 

It's a scramble but is being handled properly, imo.

 

She will be a couple of floors and down the hall from where I sit at this moment.

Give 'er a warm "SA Welcome".

 

In all seriousness, I hope she pulls thru OK, Docs/Nurses aren't supposed to die for doin' their jobs.

Indeed.

 

Eerie that both are being taken out of Dallas, but not surprising, given the stories about conditions there.

That staff has to be completely demoralized by this experience and until hospitals here have their protocols down, it make sense to handle these patients in special isolation units.

I have spent many hours daily at a rehab facility across the street from Texas Health. One that gets post treatment patients from them. My sister used to be on staff at TH. The staff is a little upset. Various folks are using the provider infections to further their organizational or political agendas (what's new there?). The general feeling I see here in Dallas is the health care community still supports TH as a good facility and is more concerned with public panic and loss of confidence in the medical community leading to sick folks not seeking help as a bigger issue. Betting seems to be that we will see 4-6 additional cases from Dallas before it's over.

 

I'm flying back to BWI this evening after a final visit to "ground zero" this afternoon. Who wants to pick me up? Sol. Run your prayer beads a few times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I have spent many hours daily at a rehab facility across the street from Texas Health. One that gets post treatment patients from them. My sister used to be on staff at TH. The staff is a little upset. Various folks are using the provider infections to further their organizational or political agendas (what's new there?). The general feeling I see here in Dallas is the health care community still supports TH as a good facility and is more concerned with public panic and loss of confidence in the medical community leading to sick folks not seeking help as a bigger issue. Betting seems to be that we will see 4-6 additional cases from Dallas before it's over.

 

I'm flying back to BWI this evening after a final visit to "ground zero" this afternoon. Who wants to pick me up? Sol. Run your prayer beads a few times.

Stay vigilant, load up on Purell, and don't be launching your bodily fluids all over the place!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And just in case, toss back a Guinness

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

And just in case, toss back a Guinness

J Walker Black seemed to work last night but didn't help the Jets.

That'll kill off most anything....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I have spent many hours daily at a rehab facility across the street from Texas Health. One that gets post treatment patients from them. My sister used to be on staff at TH. The staff is a little upset. Various folks are using the provider infections to further their organizational or political agendas (what's new there?). The general feeling I see here in Dallas is the health care community still supports TH as a good facility and is more concerned with public panic and loss of confidence in the medical community leading to sick folks not seeking help as a bigger issue. Betting seems to be that we will see 4-6 additional cases from Dallas before it's over.

 

I'm flying back to BWI this evening after a final visit to "ground zero" this afternoon. Who wants to pick me up? Sol. Run your prayer beads a few times.

Stay vigilant, load up on Purell, and don't be launching your bodily fluids all over the place!

I've said a quiet prayer for all of us. This pandemic is just getting out of hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I'm flying back to BWI this evening after a final visit to "ground zero" this afternoon. Who wants to pick me up? Sol. Run your prayer beads a few times.

 

Send me PM if you need a ride next time. I'm not far from BWI. My yacht is south of napptown! I will show up in full PPE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stay vigilant, load up on Purell, and don't be launching your bodily fluids all over the place!

 

Hell no! My eczema sucks. I'm full of steroids that were shot in my buttcheek by a cute girl.

Now I have stuff I can't even pronounce to put on my skin with warnings about not touching my face or genitals.

 

Humiliating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Stay vigilant, load up on Purell, and don't be launching your bodily fluids all over the place!

 

Hell no! My eczema sucks. I'm full of steroids that were shot in my buttcheek by a cute girl.

Now I have stuff I can't even pronounce to put on my skin with warnings about not touching my face or genitals.

 

Humiliating.

Vigilance is not easy, but look at what we have accomplished.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I'm flying back to BWI this evening after a final visit to "ground zero" this afternoon. Who wants to pick me up? Sol. Run your prayer beads a few times.

Send me PM if you need a ride next time. I'm not far from BWI. My yacht is south of napptown! I will show up in full PPE.

Thanks but it's easy. My son is a junior at UMBC and wanted to put in some "shop hours" on this year's SAE Baja entry and my daughter was flying in after 2 months away at the same time so he picked us both up and transported us back south.

 

I'm truly shocked a non stop from Dallas wasn't met by CDC and a phalanx of thermometers and bleach sprayers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome back Moe!

 

Serious question...... one thing I've been wondering is for the patients that make a full recovery - the news reports said they were now immune from the virus just as if they had been vaccinated. Does that mean a recovered ebola patient could go into an ebola ward without PPE, bathe in the blood and diarrhea and still be immune? I had heard that many of the survivors in West Africa were coming back to help at the hospitals. Do they still have to wear PPE? Could they be carriers of the disease?

Hi, Jeff!

 

Immunity is always relative, with varying amounts of decay over time and varying amounts of overlap between different strains of the infectious agent. Different agents provoke more and less effective and lasting immune responses and have different degrees diversity, so measles, mumps, and rubella is, like, two shots or something, and you need a flu shot every year. I don't know where ebola falls on this spectrum, but it's clearly not as diverse as influenza or as stable as measles. There is thought to be substantial immunity after recovery from infection, but as far as I know, survivors are still wearing PPE, etc.

 

NGS probably knows more than I do about this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far every person in this country who has been infected with Ebola got it by helping people. So relax Republicans, you're in the clear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sucked right back in Moe........

 

 

Cute Hobie.

 

My spouse, as some of you are aware, is a public health nurse. As such she receives updates about protocols for various diseases about 3 or 4 of late deal with Ebola. Few days back she gets the CDC regs on personal protection. All sounds great, on top of the situation..... Two three days later she gets a notice saying that the previous should be disregarded as it is insufficient to protect the healthcare worker in direct contact with a patient presenting symptoms and that new protocol will be issued shortly. I guess the good news is that the CDC is updating this all as more information becomes available. The bad news is that the old protocols are why these nurses in contracted in the first place. Seriously, these people have their heads up their asses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that Nina Pham is being treated experimentally with blood from one of the survivors.

 

That should be a test and a possibility for a cure for others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

I believe that Nina Pham is being treated experimentally with blood from one of the survivors.

 

That should be a test and a possibility for a cure for others.

 

or a complete waste of time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that Nina Pham is being treated experimentally with blood from one of the survivors.

 

That should be a test and a possibility for a cure for others.

Transfusing immune serum is a classic approach, which used to be a mainstay of treatment for viral diseases. It's risky though, because that serum contains a lot of foreign proteins beside the potentially good antibodies, any of which could provoke a potentially dangerous immune reaction in the recipient. A modification of that approach, with antibodies raised in animals, is still used for treatment of rabies exposure, measles, etc.. In patients with symptomatic ebola, this would not be a cure, but a way of reducing the viral load and giving the patient a better chance to survive. It's a reasonable thing to do until proven otherwise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I believe that Nina Pham is being treated experimentally with blood from one of the survivors.

 

That should be a test and a possibility for a cure for others.

Transfusing immune serum is a classic approach, which used to be a mainstay of treatment for viral diseases. It's risky though, because that serum contains a lot of foreign proteins beside the potentially good antibodies, any of which could provoke a potentially dangerous immune reaction in the recipient. A modification of that approach, with antibodies raised in animals, is still used for treatment of rabies and measles exposure, etc.. In patients with symptomatic ebola, this would not be a cure, but a way of reducing the viral load and giving the patient a better chance to survive. It's a reasonable thing to do until proven otherwise.

 

Sorry, should have said led to a possibility. I didn't meant to imply that the transfusion itself was an effective way to address the disease in a wider arena.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I believe that Nina Pham is being treated experimentally with blood from one of the survivors.

 

That should be a test and a possibility for a cure for others.

Transfusing immune serum is a classic approach, which used to be a mainstay of treatment for viral diseases. It's risky though, because that serum contains a lot of foreign proteins beside the potentially good antibodies, any of which could provoke a potentially dangerous immune reaction in the recipient. A modification of that approach, with antibodies raised in animals, is still used for treatment of rabies and measles exposure, etc.. In patients with symptomatic ebola, this would not be a cure, but a way of reducing the viral load and giving the patient a better chance to survive. It's a reasonable thing to do until proven otherwise.

 

Sorry, should have said led to a possibility. I didn't meant to imply that the transfusion itself was an effective way to address the disease in a wider arena.

No such implication inferred.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(1) Anyone flying in should be on mandatory house arrest if they come in from an affected country. Period. 25 days of "rest and relaxation". This of course, will be an economic burden on many ... but safer than risking an outbreak, and may deter many from coming for the medical tourism if it will carry an "after burn".

 

(2) Anyone who has come in contact with a patient who turns positive, Mandatory house arrest for 25 days (with pay - recognising it's one of the risks of their job to be frontline defense in situations like this - you want them to come back to work, not be so angry they look to work elsewhere)

 

(3) Family members of either of the above (living elsewhere, not sharing quarantine) - daily medical check-in as long as subject hasn't turned positive. May be transitioned to quarantine if family member < (1) or (2) above > turns positive.

 

Really - what's so hard to grasp about house-arrest/quarantine?

 

No visits, no family, someone leaves groceries on your doorstep, no nothing except a good book, a pot of tea, and a cat (not 'quarantine' if you're out walking the dogs) .. this could be an acceptable solution and certainly go a long way to containing panic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I believe that Nina Pham is being treated experimentally with blood from one of the survivors.

 

That should be a test and a possibility for a cure for others.

Transfusing immune serum is a classic approach, which used to be a mainstay of treatment for viral diseases. It's risky though, because that serum contains a lot of foreign proteins beside the potentially good antibodies, any of which could provoke a potentially dangerous immune reaction in the recipient. A modification of that approach, with antibodies raised in animals, is still used for treatment of rabies exposure, measles, etc.. In patients with symptomatic ebola, this would not be a cure, but a way of reducing the viral load and giving the patient a better chance to survive. It's a reasonable thing to do until proven otherwise.

Unfortunately, antibodies from survivors haven't proven very effective, far as I know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

(1) Anyone flying in should be on mandatory house arrest if they come in from an affected country. Period. 25 days of "rest and relaxation". This of course, will be an economic burden on many ... but safer than risking an outbreak, and may deter many from coming for the medical tourism if it will carry an "after burn".

 

(2) Anyone who has come in contact with a patient who turns positive, Mandatory house arrest for 25 days (with pay - recognising it's one of the risks of their job to be frontline defense in situations like this - you want them to come back to work, not be so angry they look to work elsewhere)

 

(3) Family members of either of the above (living elsewhere, not sharing quarantine) - daily medical check-in as long as subject hasn't turned positive. May be transitioned to quarantine if family member < (1) or (2) above > turns positive.

 

Really - what's so hard to grasp about house-arrest/quarantine?

 

No visits, no family, someone leaves groceries on your doorstep, no nothing except a good book, a pot of tea, and a cat (not 'quarantine' if you're out walking the dogs) .. this could be an acceptable solution and certainly go a long way to containing panic.

 

Wow one might think you're working with highly infectious diseases or something. Nahh..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

I believe that Nina Pham is being treated experimentally with blood from one of the survivors.

 

That should be a test and a possibility for a cure for others.

Transfusing immune serum is a classic approach, which used to be a mainstay of treatment for viral diseases. It's risky though, because that serum contains a lot of foreign proteins beside the potentially good antibodies, any of which could provoke a potentially dangerous immune reaction in the recipient. A modification of that approach, with antibodies raised in animals, is still used for treatment of rabies exposure, measles, etc.. In patients with symptomatic ebola, this would not be a cure, but a way of reducing the viral load and giving the patient a better chance to survive. It's a reasonable thing to do until proven otherwise.

Unfortunately, antibodies from survivors haven't proven very effective, far as I know.

I have no info either way and you probably know more than I do on the subject in general.

 

I heard a briefing from the clinical team and the NIAID leadership on Friday. Sounds like there will be investigation of the inflammatory pathways involved--I heard the term "cytokine storm" for the first time--and, apparently, two Phase I trials of different vaccine approaches are fully enrolled and moving forward. I believe the protocol this patient is on allows for a progression of experimental treatments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest One of Five

 

 

 

 

I believe that Nina Pham is being treated experimentally with blood from one of the survivors.

 

That should be a test and a possibility for a cure for others.

Transfusing immune serum is a classic approach, which used to be a mainstay of treatment for viral diseases. It's risky though, because that serum contains a lot of foreign proteins beside the potentially good antibodies, any of which could provoke a potentially dangerous immune reaction in the recipient. A modification of that approach, with antibodies raised in animals, is still used for treatment of rabies exposure, measles, etc.. In patients with symptomatic ebola, this would not be a cure, but a way of reducing the viral load and giving the patient a better chance to survive. It's a reasonable thing to do until proven otherwise.

Unfortunately, antibodies from survivors haven't proven very effective, far as I know.

I have no info either way and you probably know more than I do on the subject in general.

 

We had a briefing from the clinical team and the NIAID leadership on Friday. Sounds like there will be investigation of the inflammatory pathways involved--I heard the term "cytokine storm" for the first time--and, apparently, two Phase I trials of different vaccine approaches are fully enrolled and moving forward. I believe the protocol this patient is on allows for a progression of experimental treatments.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cytokine_storm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(1) Anyone flying in should be on mandatory house arrest if they come in from an affected country. Period. 25 days of "rest and relaxation". This of course, will be an economic burden on many ... but safer than risking an outbreak, and may deter many from coming for the medical tourism if it will carry an "after burn".

 

(2) Anyone who has come in contact with a patient who turns positive, Mandatory house arrest for 25 days (with pay - recognising it's one of the risks of their job to be frontline defense in situations like this - you want them to come back to work, not be so angry they look to work elsewhere)

 

(3) Family members of either of the above (living elsewhere, not sharing quarantine) - daily medical check-in as long as subject hasn't turned positive. May be transitioned to quarantine if family member < (1) or (2) above > turns positive.

 

Really - what's so hard to grasp about house-arrest/quarantine?

 

No visits, no family, someone leaves groceries on your doorstep, no nothing except a good book, a pot of tea, and a cat (not 'quarantine' if you're out walking the dogs) .. this could be an acceptable solution and certainly go a long way to containing panic.

 

The CDC had such power but it was watered down. Conflict with rights and all that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

(1) Anyone flying in should be on mandatory house arrest if they come in from an affected country. Period. 25 days of "rest and relaxation". This of course, will be an economic burden on many ... but safer than risking an outbreak, and may deter many from coming for the medical tourism if it will carry an "after burn".

 

(2) Anyone who has come in contact with a patient who turns positive, Mandatory house arrest for 25 days (with pay - recognising it's one of the risks of their job to be frontline defense in situations like this - you want them to come back to work, not be so angry they look to work elsewhere)

 

(3) Family members of either of the above (living elsewhere, not sharing quarantine) - daily medical check-in as long as subject hasn't turned positive. May be transitioned to quarantine if family member < (1) or (2) above > turns positive.

 

Really - what's so hard to grasp about house-arrest/quarantine?

 

No visits, no family, someone leaves groceries on your doorstep, no nothing except a good book, a pot of tea, and a cat (not 'quarantine' if you're out walking the dogs) .. this could be an acceptable solution and certainly go a long way to containing panic.

 

The CDC had such power but it was watered down. Conflict with rights and all that.

No such thing as "Emergency Protocols" anymore, wherein there are temporary measures (laws) put into force that may not support your right to freedom of congregation? I think what's lacking is political will, not ability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quarantine is, and always has been, a function of state and local health departments. They have plenty of enforcement authority. The Feds can only detain people entering or leaving the country or traveling between states.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Sol,

 

As part of our vigilance program..... maybe you should ask Scot and BJ if they would institute a method of screening new members to SA. What would prevent someone from Sierra Leone from signing up and infecting all of us. We get plenty of spammers already..... what if one of them has the ebola? Maybe we should take the temperatures of all those who sign up for a new account. Or even better yet - we should have a 25 day quarantine period before they are allowed to post.

 

Besides, we might be able to reduce the number of socks that show up. I hear LIS is particularly virulent......

 

Our perfect record of keeping SA free from Ebola is all the more miraculous, in light of the frenzy Ebola has caused. Our vigilance about tracking the spread of this African Death has been amazing, and serves as an example for online communities everywhere, of what a group can do when it takes the threat seriously and sets out to protect its membership. Still, I can't help but wonder if our perfect record is the result of somebody sneaking in some prayer on the sly. Ah well, it's the results that matter, and who can argue with ours?

 

As to our own group of signal to noise ratio circlejerks, I suspect that they would rather declare victory for Ebola now than suffer through Yoo Hoo later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Hey Sol,

 

As part of our vigilance program..... maybe you should ask Scot and BJ if they would institute a method of screening new members to SA. What would prevent someone from Sierra Leone from signing up and infecting all of us. We get plenty of spammers already..... what if one of them has the ebola? Maybe we should take the temperatures of all those who sign up for a new account. Or even better yet - we should have a 25 day quarantine period before they are allowed to post.

 

Besides, we might be able to reduce the number of socks that show up. I hear LIS is particularly virulent......

 

Our perfect record of keeping SA free from Ebola is all the more miraculous, in light of the frenzy Ebola has caused. Our vigilance about tracking the spread of this African Death has been amazing, and serves as an example for online communities everywhere, of what a group can do when it takes the threat seriously and sets out to protect its membership. Still, I can't help but wonder if our perfect record is the result of somebody sneaking in some prayer on the sly. Ah well, it's the results that matter, and who can argue with ours?

 

As to our own group of signal to noise ratio circlejerks, I suspect that they would rather declare victory for Ebola now than suffer through Yoo Hoo later.

 

I dunno. I think vigilance will only go so far in protecting our forum from a computer-borne ebola death. I think the mods need to be proactive to do better screening of new members and quarantining those that come from outside this country. Vigilance is great, but we must be decisive now to stop this from spreading in our community.

That stuff happens every couple of years or so it seems. The spammers find a way around the last batch of fixes, the mods go to work on getting a new batch of fixes, it gets even worse for a while, until even more new fixes are put in place, then it calms down for a year or two. wash, rinse, spin, repeat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are people paying enough attention to the possible N. Korean angle?

Perhaps, but that angle was taken off of the watch list along with a bunch of others yesterday. Thanks to our vigilance in tracking the spread of this insidious black death plague pestilence of our time, we here at SA have managed a record that even exceeds the national record of one dead and two more infected. Our perfection is a testament to our vigilance. Only through our vigilance, and this thread, have SA members remained Ebola free. Stay vigilant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't sell it short...Nigeria has been fixed as well

 

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/statements/2014/nigeria-ends-ebola/en/

 

 

WHO declares end of Ebola outbreak in Nigeria

Statement
20 October 2014

The Ebola virus was introduced into Nigeria on 20 July when an infected Liberian man arrived by aeroplane into Lagos, Africa's most populous city. The man, who died in hospital 5 days later, set off a chain of transmission that infected a total of 19 people, of whom 7 died.

According to WHO recommendations, the end of an Ebola virus disease outbreak in a country can be declared once 42 days have passed and no new cases have been detected. The 42 days represents twice the maximum incubation period for Ebola (21 days). This 42-day period starts from the last day that any person in the country had contact with a confirmed or probable Ebola case.

Today, 20 October, Nigeria reached that 42-day mark and is now considered free of Ebola transmission.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites