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Corsair Pulse 600

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Earlier in the day we achieved 9 knots with 4 adults and 4 kids on board. Winds were about 8-10 knots at that time. I am still very much learning to sail competently and my crew had very limited sailing experience.

 

Matching wind speeds while that heavily loaded with a relatively inexperienced crew sounds pretty awesome! Nice that adding some weight doesn't automatically kill the performance, especially with lighter winds like that. Where did you put everybody? :)

 

Have you had a chance to experience 2-5 knots of true wind?

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Speng, I think the " device " you saw is not a vang but some kind of mast-rotation control system?

thats a good description of it

The black line attached to the stainless steel arm is the mast rotation control. It can reduce the rotation to almost aligned with the boom. It is NOT attached to the deck.

 

The white and green line is the out haul for the main. It runs internally in the boom.

 

Neither affect the boom furling. After a few errors, I have now got the hang of raising and lowering the main and it is getting very easy now. I am use to winches so doing it without whilst on the water has been a new experience, but is coming together.

Does that mean no rotation control if you roller reef?

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Speng, I think the " device " you saw is not a vang but some kind of mast-rotation control system?

thats a good description of it

The black line attached to the stainless steel arm is the mast rotation control. It can reduce the rotation to almost aligned with the boom. It is NOT attached to the deck.

 

The white and green line is the out haul for the main. It runs internally in the boom.

 

Neither affect the boom furling. After a few errors, I have now got the hang of raising and lowering the main and it is getting very easy now. I am use to winches so doing it without whilst on the water has been a new experience, but is coming together.

Does that mean no rotation control if you roller reef?

 

correct

I think they should go the mast spanner to deck method as the roller reefing is a winner and not change that.

any one design rules up yet??

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Speng, I think the " device " you saw is not a vang but some kind of mast-rotation control system?

thats a good description of it

The black line attached to the stainless steel arm is the mast rotation control. It can reduce the rotation to almost aligned with the boom. It is NOT attached to the deck.

 

The white and green line is the out haul for the main. It runs internally in the boom.

 

Neither affect the boom furling. After a few errors, I have now got the hang of raising and lowering the main and it is getting very easy now. I am use to winches so doing it without whilst on the water has been a new experience, but is coming together.

Does that mean no rotation control if you roller reef?

 

 

I do not believe the intention is for the excess sail to be rolled around the boom when reefing.

 

I have yet to try reefing myself, but when I do, I intend to drop the sail so I can re-attach the cunningham and clew, and then the excess sail is rolled up and held in place with the zippers which can be seen on the attached photo.

 

post-57370-0-07311400-1451461658_thumb.jpg

 

Note: in the photo, I had forgot to attached the mast rotation at the time I took the picture. It was attached later in the sail, once I realised it was not in place.

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I have completed the sailing video for our sail on Monday.

 

For the first sail, we had 4 adults and 4 kids on board, plus lots of food and kids play things. We had about 8-10 knots of breeze. Even with the extra weight, the Pulse still felt quite alive and was very roomy even with all the kids on board. I will definitely be doing this again with the kids.

 

Later in the afternoon, I went back out with my mate. The breeze had picked up slightly to between 10-13 knots. We managed a new top speed of 14.5 knots and sustained at about 13 knots. I still have a lot to learn to keep her in the groove, but I am having a lot of fun.

 

 

Hope you enjoy.

 

Glynn

Pulse 600 - V20 - KatRat II

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Corsair are working closely with ISAF to establish The class rules. Their aim is to become an ISAF recognised class within the next 12 months. Need min of 75 boats on the water.

Huh, class org or manufacturer has to start somewhere and its not with ISAF unless you intend of changing the design??

What you are saying is dont buy now better to wait till someone makes the design/sail/rigging rules

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Watch the webinar and it will explain it further. What I got was they will base it off the current specs and write the rules to advise what changes can and can't be made to the boat to remain class legal. Rules surrounding fittings, systems, boat min weight, crew min / max weight, crew numbers, replacement sail construction.

 

They are consulting with ISAF and other OD class asociations to help create / word their class rules. They will remain in place for 12 months, then reviewed (owner feedback) before locking in long term. If a change to the boat is necessary, previous boats will be grandfathered.

 

Also some good info re what they learned from the prototype, what changes they made and why. Such as mast profile, spinnaker, folding struts etc. Info on pricing, availability, cradles, trailers, outboards, launching, motoring and more.

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Yea the minimum crew weight was a surprise at almost 400lbs (for 2 folks - Dang those are big folks). We routinely sail our F27 w only two of us weighing in at ~300 lbs.

 

Either way, show me US east coast fleets and I'll have to get off my wallet and Laser diet.

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Sort of predictable re the weight, when I sailed it with the early small rig I was quite impressed that in about 8 knots of wind, with only two on board, you could almost fly the central hull. I said at the time that Corsair didn't really need a bigger rig in lighter airs, just get the one they had, better sorted by one of the European sail makers.

 

Now having gone to a bigger rig to cope with lighter winds, they must be finding that they need the extra ballast to calm things down a bit when it blows up a bit, certainly the Amas can take the loading, but have they perhaps gone too far as now in light winds the 400lbs min weight on a narrowish central hull, is going to be a real handicap. With the bigger sail areas, they are also going to be punished in handicap racing. I hope they haven't entered that horrible spiral of big rig, big weights, slow boat in lighter airs syndrome so many manufacturers seem to get into.

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Sort of predictable re the weight, when I sailed it with the early small rig I was quite impressed that in about 8 knots of wind, with only two on board, you could almost fly the central hull. I said at the time that Corsair didn't really need a bigger rig in lighter airs, just get the one they had, better sorted by one of the European sail makers.

 

Now having gone to a bigger rig to cope with lighter winds, they must be finding that they need the extra ballast to calm things down a bit when it blows up a bit, certainly the Amas can take the loading, but have they perhaps gone too far as now in light winds the 400lbs min weight on a narrowish central hull, is going to be a real handicap. With the bigger sail areas, they are also going to be punished in handicap racing. I hope they haven't entered that horrible spiral of big rig, big weights, slow boat in lighter airs syndrome so many manufacturers seem to get into.

I admit I don't understand it. I get its not self righting but 400lbs of racing stupid is going to put the boat over just as fast as 300lbs of racing stupid and anyway its more likely its the inexperienced family daysailing w kids that gets into trouble and causes them bad press if that is what they are worried about.

 

I can't think of many double-handed racing dinghies that have minimum (or optimal) crew weights of 400lbs so if they wanted to join this OD class they get to buy a "multihull and add correcter weight??" :wacko:

 

Why even have a minimum crew weight? Is it purposeful or are they just lacking insight and experience in OD? I am baffled.

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Sort of predictable re the weight, when I sailed it with the early small rig I was quite impressed that in about 8 knots of wind, with only two on board, you could almost fly the central hull. I said at the time that Corsair didn't really need a bigger rig in lighter airs, just get the one they had, better sorted by one of the European sail makers.

 

Now having gone to a bigger rig to cope with lighter winds, they must be finding that they need the extra ballast to calm things down a bit when it blows up a bit, certainly the Amas can take the loading, but have they perhaps gone too far as now in light winds the 400lbs min weight on a narrowish central hull, is going to be a real handicap. With the bigger sail areas, they are also going to be punished in handicap racing. I hope they haven't entered that horrible spiral of big rig, big weights, slow boat in lighter airs syndrome so many manufacturers seem to get into.

I admit I don't understand it. I get its not self righting but 400lbs of racing stupid is going to put the boat over just as fast as 300lbs of racing stupid and anyway its more likely its the inexperienced family daysailing w kids that gets into trouble and causes them bad press if that is what they are worried about.

 

I can't think of many double-handed racing dinghies that have minimum (or optimal) crew weights of 400lbs so if they wanted to join this OD class they get to buy a "multihull and add correcter weight??" :wacko:

 

Why even have a minimum crew weight? Is it purposeful or are they just lacking insight and experience in OD? I am baffled.

 

 

IMO, I doubt this boat is targeted at young fit sailors. Young fit sailors are probably far more interested in sailing OTB High Performance Cats. They are cheaper, faster and a lot more sexy especially if they foil.

 

Like me, this boat is more aimed at the middle aged, beyond their prime sailors. Cash-up, probably with kids, looking for a boat that is reasonably fast, versatile, but can also be sailed OD.

 

When I weighed 110 kg (240 pound), I was told the only way to sail a Hobie 16 competitively was to find a small 13 year old girl to be my crew to get to close to the ideal weight. The optimal crew weight for a Hobie 16 is 130 to 140 kg (285 to 310 pound). My crew would need to be no more than 70 pound (31kg). My 8-year old daughter almost weighs this. This did not sound like the right way to go for me, so I decided to get a Nacra 16^2 instead as I could sail one-up and not really be penalised by weight.

 

I now weigh 85 kg or 190 pound. If I sailed a Hobie 16 now, I would still need a crew with a weight less than 55 kg (or 120 pound). I still think I would prefer the 180 kg (400 pound) minimum limit for the Pulse 600 since it will matter little if my other crew is a similar weight to me. Also, it will encourage me to put a third crew on board, which could be one of my kids once they are a little older.

 

The rules must be fit the target audience, not ultra competitive sailors.

 

Just my opinion.

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I raced F18s and Tornados for most of my time at 180kg plus so my old crew and I would be ideal weight. That said, I do believe it is too high. 150 or 160 kg would be more realistic......... But here is the thing, they will run the class rules for a year and gain feedback from class members. If they believe it is too high then no doubt they will resolve it.

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correct

I think they should go the mast spanner to deck method as the roller reefing is a winner and not change that.

 

any one design rules up yet??

 

What deck? Consider where the mast is stepped, there is no deck to run a rotation limiter to.

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correct

I think they should go the mast spanner to deck method as the roller reefing is a winner and not change that.

 

any one design rules up yet??

 

What deck? Consider where the mast is stepped, there is no deck to run a rotation limiter to.

 

Good point. Maybe you could run a hoop out to the side? Might be kinda awkward but I'm not sure how else you could do it. I suppose you could also do something like the Hobie 16 with a limiter built into the mast step? It's kinda basic, but gets the job done.

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400lbs in full gear isn't unreasonable if the goal is two adult men. The average USA male is 194.5lbs We're kinda chunky over here. The average German weighs 182lbs. If me and a sibling wanted to race we'd be pretty close to the minimum.

 

OTOH it does make it a PITA if you're smaller or have female crew.

 

What would you racers think about a handicapping rule where say 400 is a rule minimum, but if your crew is under 400lbs, you have to be handicapped by adding say 50% of the difference to the center hull. So if your total crew is 300lbs, you have to add 50lbs of say water bags? to the hull. That way you add some weight, but since it's not mobile like a person would be I think it's more fair to have a bit less. And it's cheap. Ballast bags for wake boarding are cheap and easy to find. $$59 For a 150lb capacity bag. http://www.amazon.com/Straight-Line-150lb-Ballast-150lbs/dp/B00BP3BR7G/ref=sr_1_sc_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1451597294&sr=1-2-spell&keywords=balast+bag Plus an $8 scale http://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Digital-Fishing-Batteries-Included/dp/B00QFCN7DE/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1451597400&sr=1-2&keywords=hang+scale and you're in business. Just tossing out an off the cuff thought on it. I'm not a racer so I'm not sure if this would appease everyone or anyone.

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Many classes run 50% the weight difference crew are below the min....... The Corsair webinar also mentioned the use of weights in the rules they are writing.

No problem in AUS. OMR (the multihull handicapping system) has a crew weight factor built in to the formula.

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Why have a minimum weight at all? They just ruled this boat out for virtually every husband/wife, parent/kid, or junior team, no? Not to mention most existing dinghy teams. Who buys a multi to ADD weight?? Hope I am missing something but I don't get it.

 

Smart rules + manufacturing controls + boats for trial in OD hotspot locations = OD success

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Anyone who races OD or Formula classes understands the importance of minimum weight for class racing. Most of the time it is forgotten about in club racing but enforced for State, National and World Champions. The secret is to have the right weight. I personally believe the 180 kg is too heavy and should be 150 to 160kg. The class members with Corsair no doubt will decide after the 12 month review period.

 

There is also nothing stopping you running 3 up if you are too light which I believe could be their intentions. Min 2 crew, max 4 crew for class OD racing.

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Anyone who races OD or Formula classes understands the importance of minimum weight for class racing.

I am not sure but I believe both the 49er and 470 are Olympic class 2 person dinghies. Do either have a minimum crew weight and what is it?

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49er

Min weight - 135kg

Max weight - 170kg

They also have a weight equalisation system which I believe is done through moving wings in and out.

 

I researched the 49er, I will leave it to you to research the 470.

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Not aware of any for the 470 and 300 lbs for the powered up 49er. Sounds about right and about where I came in... 300 lbs...

 

You a Corsair dealer BTW? No intention to trash the boat. Just thinking they missed it...

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I don't get the min weight thing,as long as the crew weight is locked in at the start of an event, not changing to suit the day I cant see the problem,if you sail light,you are at a disadvantage in a blow,and the reverse in light conditions,a side effect is also less people, less hands to get stuff done. I race a 20 ft tri(ostac tramp) single handed, race weight including crew about 700kg. I'm 80kg,some regattas insist I carry a crew,i have a 58kg guy that can sheet the kite. weight is the enemy, just slows the boats responsiveness.

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Not a dealer mate, just very interested in the boat. It looks like the kind of boat I will want to buy in a few more years when my two little girls are old enough to go on it. And for that reason, I am looking at the boat in a positive way. Many here like to view everything in a negative way because they seem to enjoy criticising more......... But hey, it is SA :D

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Not a dealer mate, just very interested in the boat. It looks like the kind of boat I will want to buy in a few more years when my two little girls are old enough to go on it. And for that reason, I am looking at the boat in a positive way. Many here like to view everything in a negative way because they seem to enjoy criticising more......... But hey, it is SA :D

Understand and agree. Got the T-shirt and the 2 girls (who skippered and called tactics at Corsair Nationals with a fat man pulling strings as commanded for them) and an F27.

 

Its intended as constructive criticism. I would love to see a 2 person trimaran OD class emerge. Never mind Olympics... just get back to where the F28 was in its heyday or the Weta is today.

 

I just honestly don't think you need weight limits for that and especially that a 400 lbs class minimum is highly contrary to the boat getting converts from existing dinghy classes. To the best of my knowledge neither Weta or the F28 ever had similar restrictions. Seems contrary to class growth/traction.

 

Hey, I gotta go blow for New Year's fireworks and get some shut eye before racing my Laser tomorrow so I am signing off. Enjoy those girls; they grow up fast. My oldest just entered USNA as a plebe so I miss my racing co-skipper...

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So why not make it a low weight, not sink it,bog it down? Laser dinghys the ultimate one design, leave weight up to the skipper, light and capable, will beat fat and slow,in most cases even high winds. It becomes the skippers call,to carry weight over the limit,if he thinks that's what is needed, me, I don't have enough fat mates.

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I have completed the sailing video for our sail on Monday.

 

For the first sail, we had 4 adults and 4 kids on board, plus lots of food and kids play things. We had about 8-10 knots of breeze. Even with the extra weight, the Pulse still felt quite alive and was very roomy even with all the kids on board. I will definitely be doing this again with the kids.

 

Later in the afternoon, I went back out with my mate. The breeze had picked up slightly to between 10-13 knots. We managed a new top speed of 14.5 knots and sustained at about 13 knots. I still have a lot to learn to keep her in the groove, but I am having a lot of fun.

 

 

Hope you enjoy.

 

Glynn

Pulse 600 - V20 - KatRat II

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I think this video show the niche that the pulse fits it. Want to race two up? add some weight and go. Three up? Just race. Want to cruise with 5, no problem. Pretty cool

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I'm all for min weight limits, being of the upper percentile weight myself after gourging and feasting on Xmas and New Year delights ( by the way seasons greetings to all ) so being around 95kgs is not going to be a problem and all my sailing buddies are around 75 -85 kgs so for us elderly lot, which this boat is aimed at, its going to do away with all those little lightweight hotshot jockies which so frequent and dominate the sailing results. If dad and 2 kids want to sail then again the 400lbs is not going to be far off. Will the hotshot 70kg jockies sail this boat anyway, they are more likely to be sailing beach cats. As per the F16 class, I would suspect that few clubs will bother enforcing the weight limits and in worse case if some dimbo protests a crew, then ballasting up maybe the option.

 

Anyway on this particular boat that extra 20kgs that we are saying is a bit Billy Bunterish ( or set up by American's for average American physiques :unsure: ) is actually not going to be such a big deal, in light air that extra 20kgs can be balanced on the leeward hull, with the Amas being so large the waterline is not going to submerge much and hence the water drag is not going to vary that much.

 

Probably in real life conditions 400lbs is going to be pretty good for this boat and light or heavy, the best crews will always shine through.

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I'd be looking at sailing this boat with my 2 boys and there is now way we will get near that weight for at least another 4 or 5 years.

I'd be looking at sailing this boat with my 2 boys and there is now way we will get near that weight for at least another 4 or 5 years.

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400 lbs is ridiculous.

 

My entire family including pets do not add to 400lbs.

 

I did not know Corsair would penalize people for staying in shape.

 

Getting more crew makes it more difficult as we all have busy lives.

 

After they marketed so much that the boat can be easily single handed and for family sailing, they expect you to race with 3 big guys.

 

Yeap!!! that is puzzling.

 

Cheers,

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For racing most of this discussion is irrelevant anyway because around the world most racing will be mixed fleet handicap racing. So for most buyers the local handicap system will either ignore weight or if a little more sophisticated will include varying weight in the formula. If enough boats are eventually sold to form a few OD fleets in pockets around the world then maybe a class association could be formed to work on class rules along with the manufacturer who seem open to review of their suggestions about weight. But for most people it's just s matter of fitting in to your local racing organisations for mixed fleet.

For cruisers/day sailors simply make your own decisions about how much weight is on board.

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they expect you to race with 3 big guys.

 

180kg = 396lb

 

3 "big guys" = 60kg each or 132lb each, not sure about that???

 

Most reasonably fit men weigh about 80kg or 176lb which 2 up is 160kg or 352lb

 

So at 160kg, I would expect you would need to carry 10kg of ballast if you want to race a championship event in this format. From what I have seen most racing so far has been 3 up. I personally would sail two up as that is what I am use to. I am currently racing at just over 170kg, previously at 184kg

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I'd be looking at sailing this boat with my 2 boys and there is now way we will get near that weight for at least another 4 or 5 years.

I'd be looking at sailing this boat with my 2 boys and there is now way we will get near that weight for at least another 4 or 5 years.

This is exactly the reason you want a higher minimum weight. Genuine OD racing is still several years away. If they set the minimum weight to suit you and your boys at your current weight (say 150kg total) in 4-5 years you will be over weight and complaining about the young fit sailors winning all the races. If you are under weight now and racing OD, just add some extra ballast in the water proof compartment. It is low and forward and will have little adverse affect. In 4-5 years, you can remove it and still be on the same level playing field. This is not a penalty, it is making all boat even so you can race true OD, otherwise the light teams are getting an advantage over the heavy teams.

 

If you are racing OMR in Australia, I have been told for a light boat like the Pulse it is probably better with a heavy crew (probably 3 up) anyway to get a more favourable handicap. I have yet to test this theory, but the advice has come from regular winners under OMR.

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Is the weight of the boat 370 kg or 450 kg, it is not clear on Corsair pubs, it seems there are two versions.

 

370 kg was the original design weight of the boat.

 

Since then, then a rigid folding system which allows folding on and off water has been added, a heavier mast has been added and a number of other items as well. In addition, the boat has been actually built and weighed.

 

450 is the correct sailing weight for the boat. My certificate is stamped as 458 kg, but I am yet to get the exact inventory of the boat when weighed. I am not sure what sails, rigging or extra's are included in this weight.

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I see that a pulse 600 is registered for the Cherry Pie Regatta in Sarasota, FL. Usually that is a pretty windy event in flat water, I look forward to watching it go.

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The webinar has the total built so far (From November last year) and forecast of build. From memory I think they had nearly 30 built with a similar number of sold boats waiting for build. They are building at a rate of 2 boats per week.

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MOST OF THE TIME, the mast will rotate to the correct angle by itself. If you sight up the luff you will see that the sail and mast blend together to form a smooth curve at the leading edge. If you reduce this " natural " rotation ( by using the mast rotation control arm ) when sailing upwind you will effectively begin to depower the main because you have interrupted the smooth flow of air along the luff. Corsair may have more specific guidance on rotation when using the screecher. Sail On!

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I see that a pulse 600 is registered for the Cherry Pie Regatta in Sarasota, FL. Usually that is a pretty windy event in flat water, I look forward to watching it go.

 

We've had a mix of breeze and light since it started a few years ago. I'm hoping the boat goes good, but also hope it doesn't completely kill the 750 class.

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New Pulse 600 video

:)

 

suigeri

 

Hi Suigeri,

 

Disclaimer: I am no film critic.

 

I love videos on this boat, so please keep them coming.

 

However I would like to ask you to please keep the camera pointing still in a particular direction more than a fraction of a second; maybe several seconds. I almost vomited my breakfast. I figured you were probably too excited to stay still :-). I would have been too.

 

Cheers,

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Call me crazy… BUT, what I THINK I'm seeing ( while trying not to blow lunch ) is a speed/heading device, maybe a Velocitek device, that has heading info in the top box and speed info in the bottom box. What I THINK I am seeing, again with beginning vertigo, is upwind speeds in the 7-9 range and one brief shot of 13 -14 with the screecher. IF I saw what I THINK I saw, it's a good way from the elusive 20KT grail. Other observations?

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Call me crazy… BUT, what I THINK I'm seeing ( while trying not to blow lunch ) is a speed/heading device, maybe a Velocitek device, that has heading info in the top box and speed info in the bottom box. What I THINK I am seeing, again with beginning vertigo, is upwind speeds in the 7-9 range and one brief shot of 13 -14 with the screecher. IF I saw what I THINK I saw, it's a good way from the elusive 20KT grail. Other observations?

 

 

those are good numbers, and right between what I'd see on the Weta (although it would do 14 all day) and the Multi 23, which was 9-11 upwind and 18ish off the breeze in a good blow.

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New Pulse 600 video

:)

 

suigeri

 

Hi Suigeri,

 

Disclaimer: I am no film critic.

 

I love videos on this boat, so please keep them coming.

 

However I would like to ask you to please keep the camera pointing still in a particular direction more than a fraction of a second; maybe several seconds. I almost vomited my breakfast. I figured you were probably too excited to stay still :-). I would have been too.

 

Cheers,

 

Sorry Vaplaya, but it's not my video. I just found it from youtube. I have to agree that the camera is moving too much but otherwise it's very nice video. I think that best speed was 14.9 knots.

 

Suigeri

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Call me crazy… BUT, what I THINK I'm seeing ( while trying not to blow lunch ) is a speed/heading device, maybe a Velocitek device, that has heading info in the top box and speed info in the bottom box. What I THINK I am seeing, again with beginning vertigo, is upwind speeds in the 7-9 range and one brief shot of 13 -14 with the screecher. IF I saw what I THINK I saw, it's a good way from the elusive 20KT grail. Other observations?

It is a Velocitek device, almost certainly a Pro-Start, and provides a lot more information depending on which screen you call up. It may indeed have been on the speed screen and the device default for speed is in knots.

 

The Weta is just getting started at 14 knots and will do a lot more in the right conditions. But even in this video the Pulse doesn't appear fully powered up; nobody is out on the rail holding the boat down. It looks like it's just idling along at an easy pace. So I'd suspect the Pulse will also do a lot more than the speeds you see the device providing. I can't fathom that the boat will top out at just 13 to 14 knots if it's pushed hard in the right conditions.

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Makes 20kts look pretty effortless. Impressive!

 

How you get that it was 20knts??

 

Cheers,

 

Looks like 19.6 to me. 19.9 in pic 2. Later in the video this is 13.2, but the lower part shows a 4 - and it looks quite a bit different to me from a 9. Of course that could be mph or km/h too, so 19.9mph is 17kts, 19.9km/h is about 10kts. Looks faster than 10kts, but it's hard to tell.

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post-29576-0-99134600-1452117873_thumb.jpg

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Makes 20kts look pretty effortless. Impressive!

 

How you get that it was 20knts??

 

Cheers,

 

Looks like 19.6 to me. 19.9 in pic 2. Later in the video this is 13.2, but the lower part shows a 4 - and it looks quite a bit different to me from a 9. Of course that could be mph or km/h too, so 19.9mph is 17kts, 19.9km/h is about 10kts. Looks faster than 10kts, but it's hard to tell.

See the "M" to the left of the top number? Want to guess what is stands for? Hint: Its not shorthand for MPH.

 

Speed is the bottom number. Top is a c _ _ _ _ _ _ .

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I can't tell from the pics that there's an "m" next to the top number. Seems to make more sense though.

 

As a side note i looked up that puck - $600?!? nobody's actually paying $600 for something all of our smart phones already do better for free are they?

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The Speed Puck is more like $300 - at least that's what I paid for mine. The beauty of it is how simple it is to use and how easy it is to read on the water and under way. Plus, water doesn't hurt it. Coupled with the GPS Action Replay software, it provides a plethora of features that I have yet to fully explore. I find it bargain and would buy another in a heartbeat.

 

The unit on the Pulse in the video is the Pro Start which is more of a combination race timer, placer, starting line finder, distance meter, etc. It has a lot of features that some racers evidently find worth the $500 - $600 price.

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Those last two videos from opposite sides of the nicest multihull country in the world are priceless, thanks heaps fellas! It shows that when the BS dries up, the proof is in the sailing.

 

I have now been able to redefine my bucket list to match sailing days. I need

 

1. Foiling moth for dreaming.

2. Weta for solo blasting in the big breezes.

3. Pulse for short-handed quick trips.

4. F22 for racing and anything longer than a quick trip.

5. Schionning 53 for ocean racing.

 

Just have to un-retire to fund 5, and add a DeLorean at 6 to go back in time to sail 1.

 

Peter

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Those last two videos from opposite sides of the nicest multihull country in the world are priceless, thanks heaps fellas! It shows that when the BS dries up, the proof is in the sailing.

 

I have now been able to redefine my bucket list to match sailing days. I need

 

1. Foiling moth for dreaming.

2. Weta for solo blasting in the big breezes.

3. Pulse for short-handed quick trips.

4. F22 for racing and anything longer than a quick trip.

5. Schionning 53 for ocean racing.

 

Just have to un-retire to fund 5, and add a DeLorean at 6 to go back in time to sail 1.

 

Peter

Hah. Am laughing in agreement with the idea. But I wonder if I can do 1-4 and get OD too with a foiling beach cat. Would save a bundle of $s but likely too old for it. And I hate traps.

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Jetboy, I THINK the shots you posted show heading in the top box and speed in the bottom. If you watch closely, I think you'll find the top box ( heading ) changes to correspond to tacking and gybing. The speeds are significantly lower than the ones that may appear to be in the 19KT range. Nice boat regardless!

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Jetboy, I THINK the shots you posted show heading in the top box and speed in the bottom. If you watch closely, I think you'll find the top box ( heading ) changes to correspond to tacking and gybing. The speeds are significantly lower than the ones that may appear to be in the 19KT range. Nice boat regardless!

That's how the Prostart is configured

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The Speed Puck is more like $300 - at least that's what I paid for mine. The beauty of it is how simple it is to use and how easy it is to read on the water and under way. Plus, water doesn't hurt it. Coupled with the GPS Action Replay software, it provides a plethora of features that I have yet to fully explore. I find it bargain and would buy another in a heartbeat.

 

The unit on the Pulse in the video is the Pro Start which is more of a combination race timer, placer, starting line finder, distance meter, etc. It has a lot of features that some racers evidently find worth the $500 - $600 price.

I can understand the value in simplicity. And the easy to read screen in bright sunlight.

I use a Galaxy S5 phone which is past my contract period, so whenever I upgrade it'll just be a boat puck - It's waterproof already. I was just going to suggest if you wanted a bit more data the sailing tactician app is pretty good. It does all the usual GPS stuff like speed, heading, countdown, etc - and looks pretty much just like a puck if you want it to, but also adds some other features like calculates current direction and speed, calculates VMG to the next mark, time to next mark etc, and overlays on a map if you want. And as a side benefit - it's free! Anyway, back to the Pulse.

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Jetboy, I THINK the shots you posted show heading in the top box and speed in the bottom. If you watch closely, I think you'll find the top box ( heading ) changes to correspond to tacking and gybing. The speeds are significantly lower than the ones that may appear to be in the 19KT range. Nice boat regardless!

I'm pretty sure you're right. Sometimes it's hard to tell relative speed from a shaky camera, but it did look a bit slower. I thought watching it - if that's what 20kts looks like, holy shit that's amazing.

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Looks like a great day on the water.

 

I'm wondering why the trampolines don't have a way to raise the leading edge up to the height of the beam? At the 4:30 vicinity you can clearly see water squirting through there on both sides... not sure why you'd have nice high beams and then leave the trampoline seining below them.

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If this was my boat I would change the tramp nets.... the material is great to sit on but acts as a sail when caught sideways in a blow. Just ask Bob who when in a thunderstorm with his wife and 2 kids aboard running out of room tried to go about and go head to wind.

Ian Jones

F82 R in OZ

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If this was my boat I would change the tramp nets.... the material is great to sit on but acts as a sail when caught sideways in a blow. Just ask Bob who when in a thunderstorm with his wife and 2 kids aboard running out of room tried to go about and go head to wind.

Ian Jones

F82 R in OZ

Maybe they are building in the endplate effect!!!

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Another boat about to go boomless, WnW? Can you buy me some A class booms before you come home, I need some tiller extensions.

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Another boat about to go boomless, WnW? Can you buy me some A class booms before you come home, I need some tiller extensions.

Haha Mr Hackett. A number are rethinking the Boomless plan after the Nationals. Besides, if I gave you one of those bent booms for a tiller you would just steer round and round in circles.

And another thing, every crew who comes on board my boat loves the ease of furling around the boom - including yourself😀

When are we going to see your Corsair go Boomless?? Now there is a good new name for it!

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Nice vid, I appreciate all the editing, and letting us see the corners. Its always fun blowing by a big mono and you do it several times there. Why do you leave the spin tacked to the bow? It seems like you are giving it a good washing every time you go sailing isn't that white rope with green flecks your tack line.

 

I really like the way the spin sheets are routed, I think I may copy that on my F-27. Its also interesting to note that the little rings holding the tiller extensions have already failed. I tried double extensions, but found that the friction of the unused extension deadened the feel of the helm.

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Nice vid, I appreciate all the editing, and letting us see the corners. Its always fun blowing by a big mono and you do it several times there.

 

I really like the way the spin sheets are routed, I think I may copy that on my F-27.

Actually, I thought the spin sheet route needs a little fine tuning. It looks to me that as the line runs between the stern block and the forward block it should go inside the shroud. There seems to be unnecessary friction as it rubs against the shroud the way it is routed in the video. In fact, does one really need that forward block?

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I saw that too, thought it should go inside shroud too, I think the forward block is a good idea if its not a friction nightmare, a bit easier on cockpit crew,when sitting out trimming.

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The forward block gives you almost 180 deg of wrap around the ratchet block, giving almost double holding power. Didn't notice the interference with the shroud. I imagine they can sort that out pretty quickly though.

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The forward block appears to be moveable via some sort of strap or clamp on the forward aka. Where it is located now, the sheet running from the rear block to the forward block should be inside the side shroud. No need for it to rub like that. Not a big deal and obviously there is plenty of room for movement and adjustment.

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The forward block gives you almost 180 deg of wrap around the ratchet block, giving almost double holding power. Didn't notice the interference with the shroud. I imagine they can sort that out pretty quickly though.

Good for strong winds, bad for light winds. Perhaps not use forward block in light winds. I, too, am sure they can sort it out, that is why I referred to it as fine tuning. In fact, I bet they already noticed it themselves and corrected it the next time they sailed.

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