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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

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GC Sailor

Corsair Pulse 600

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Pretty standard traveller system on smallish boats. That boat should be fast enough to get the apparent flowing to not need the mono slug habit of trav up.

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Pretty standard traveller system on smallish boats. That boat should be fast enough to get the apparent flowing to not need the mono slug habit of trav up.

Does an A-cat count as small and fast? Don't see it as a mono thing. They have a nice tight sheeting angle for the jib on the Pulse, would have thought you would want the trav up to get boom on centerline for speed AND pointing ability. Have not sailed it, so easy for me to say from desk, but for what it costs that trav set-up surprises me as much as the crew weigh minimums.

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Lets remember, windward sheeting the traveler is used for relatively light air to get the boom on centerline, while reducing mainsheet tension to get the appropriate twist at the head of the sail. Very high aspect ratio mains with very light booms are going to need windward sheeting far less than a boat with a big heavy boom and low-roach main. So the pulse may rarely need it. I wonder if the class rules will allow the adition of one?

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I've never seen an A with a traveller up set up - and I've seen plenty. The sail plan doesn't suit it. Very high aspect sail. Similarly the pulse main is pretty high aspect and has a lot of twist already built in.

The jib sheeting position looks a little choked to me. Maybe dictated by the width of the cabin top. I'm guessing plenty of people will use barber haulers.

Anyway some fleet sailing with similar boats will soon sort these things out. Particularly when they are finally sailed on decent breeze.

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I'm converting my TT720 traveller to a center setup (ease of set and forget thru tacks compared to the twin end setup I had and able to make it endless also for rope management) and I figured I''d basically "barber haul it to windward on those occasions that I needed it. Time will tell if it works for me.

 

What struck me about the Pulse setup is that it is only 2:1... ok on a Hobie 16 ...not so sure on a more powerful boat. My old setup was 3:1 and inadequate the new one will be is 4:1

 

In a stiff breeze it is going to be interesting to adjust that. Just my $0.02

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We will have a pulse racing against a mix of other corsairs next week in Florida. I'm looking forward to seeing how the boat sails, especially in a very mixed fleet.

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I'm converting my TT720 traveller to a center setup (ease of set and forget thru tacks compared to the twin end setup I had and able to make it endless also for rope management) and I figured I''d basically "barber haul it to windward on those occasions that I needed it. Time will tell if it works for me.

 

What struck me about the Pulse setup is that it is only 2:1... ok on a Hobie 16 ...not so sure on a more powerful boat. My old setup was 3:1 and inadequate the new one will be is 4:1

 

In a stiff breeze it is going to be interesting to adjust that. Just my $0.02

 

Yeah 2:1 isn't great. As the traveler gets closer to the centerline the load increases exponentially. In any kind of breeze, that's going to get real old real fast if you're the type of person that plays the traveler continuously.

 

I personally find on the F24II and F25C that especially in mixed fleets (monos with multis), in lightish air (<10kts), that being able to get the main up really helps with pointing, and thus, gives you more options to get around other boats or squeeze by a mark or work against an adverse current. More importantly, right after the start when everyone is in pinch-till-your-butt-cheeks-hurt mode, clawing for height, getting the traveler up really helps with holding your position until things open up. Then again, the P600 system is a lot simpler and lighter and maybe it won't matter.

 

Looking forward to taking one for a sail when they show up in SF.

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We are talking about controlling the twist in the head of the main in light air.... so not sure if it is a function of whether its got a jib or not? or is it a bigger issue with masthead rigs compared to fractional?

 

I'm hoping that it won't be a huge issue for me ( fractional largeish square top main and square top jib) and I'm not a racer anyway so happy to lay off a bit and go faster.

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The 1st day results are posted. The Pulse scored 4 DNC on Friday. Anyone know what happened? He may have been a no show. Today looks like it was the best wind of the weekend. The forcast gets really light Sat and Sun.

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They didn't race today. Took a little extra time setting up then had some sort of failure, not sure what. The motive 25r was not sailing to its rating.

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They didn't race today. Took a little extra time setting up then had some sort of failure, not sure what. The motive 25r was not sailing to its rating.

 

 

Extra time?!?!?!?!?

 

Didn't they advertise that you rig it in 20 mins. Hmmmm!!!! Weta rig in 20mins, Pulse rig in 20mins, f22 rig in 20mins. Really!!!!?!?!

 

No one who has these boats have ever corroborate to me that it rigs in the time advertised. it is much longer.

 

So, multihull vendors. how about the truth on ringing times.

 

cheers,

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The boat got there late last night and they got to it later than they would have liked this morning. In addition to the skippers meeting it took more time than the two crew thought.

 

For the sprint I can easily say its 45min from race setup to on the trailer rolling down the road.

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They didn't race today. Took a little extra time setting up then had some sort of failure, not sure what. The motive 25r was not sailing to its rating.

 

 

Extra time?!?!?!?!?

 

Didn't they advertise that you rig it in 20 mins. Hmmmm!!!! Weta rig in 20mins, Pulse rig in 20mins, f22 rig in 20mins. Really!!!!?!?!

 

No one who has these boats have ever corroborate to me that it rigs in the time advertised. it is much longer.

 

So, multihull vendors. how about the truth on ringing times.

 

cheers,

 

To be fair, those rigging times are not going to be for a brand new boat without all the setting up done. i think that these times relate to a boat that the crew have sorted and packed it up themselves the last time out.

 

As far as the factory F-22 goes, 20 mins is do-able without running around like a couple of nutters. The whole rig and trailer is really well sorted.

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Yes, 20 minutes or less was easy and even fun. Our only problem (not just with the F22) was disruption by inquisitive onlookers, but sometimes that was fun too.

 

We have had similar times with the F27, but I would have to say the 22 left you feeling like you had done no heavy lifting in the process. Trying not to laugh as you dance up and down in the trailer tub is the hard part.

 

Peter

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Does anyone know what happened with the Cherry Pie Regatta? There have been no results posted since Friday.

http://www.regattanetwork.com/clubmgmt/applet_regatta_results.php?regatta_id=11495

 

The pulse 600 dnc all races, anyone know why?

 

Wow, that's a small turn-out. Didn't that used to me a much bigger regatta for multis or am I thinking of Nationals at Pensy?

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Does anyone know what happened with the Cherry Pie Regatta? There have been no results posted since Friday.

http://www.regattanetwork.com/clubmgmt/applet_regatta_results.php?regatta_id=11495

 

The pulse 600 dnc all races, anyone know why?

Wow, that's a small turn-out. Didn't that used to me a much bigger regatta for multis or am I thinking of Nationals at Pensy?

You are thinking of nationals. This was the 4th year of the event and we had a few boats drop out last minute. Still a great event with 14 boats on the line. It would be nice to have 20 next year.

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They didn't race today. Took a little extra time setting up then had some sort of failure, not sure what. The motive 25r was not sailing to its rating.

 

 

Extra time?!?!?!?!?

 

Didn't they advertise that you rig it in 20 mins. Hmmmm!!!! Weta rig in 20mins, Pulse rig in 20mins, f22 rig in 20mins. Really!!!!?!?!

 

No one who has these boats have ever corroborate to me that it rigs in the time advertised. it is much longer.

 

So, multihull vendors. how about the truth on ringing times.

 

cheers,

 

I have not been able to get my 18' tri on the water in 20 minutes due to some folding issues I've been having that take more time than I'd like, but I do think it's do-able if you use it often and have the boat pre-setup well. I think the key is - fast folding with tramps that self setup while the amas fold out. And very simple standing rigging. If you can fold in under 5 minutes and stand and tension the mast in under 5 minutes, I think it's pretty reasonable to put the outboard and rudder on the back, and put the sails and running rigging on in less than 10 minutes. I use almost all quick release shackles to shorten the assembly time. And I leave my main sail with battens in and flaked on the boom, so all it takes to rig is to drop the gooseneck in the track, hang the lazy jacks, clip on the main sheet block, and attach the halyard and it's ready to raise. The takes just a minute or so to hank on and the jib sheets just live in place, so it's just a matter of clipping them to the clew.

 

Anyway, I think with a well sorted boat you could go from highway to sailing in 20 minutes with just one person if you have everything well sorted. I think the take down time might be just a bit longer to make sure its all organized for the next trip. It would be a good bit longer if you want to tear down everything, pull the battens, etc., but I do that once a year for winter storage. The rest of the time I leave the sails ready to go.

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Anyone know why there are two handicaps in the Sprint 750 class? Looks like a split between MkIs and MkIIs. Something local maybe, as I didn't see it in the Nationals results.

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They didn't race today. Took a little extra time setting up then had some sort of failure, not sure what. The motive 25r was not sailing to its rating.

 

 

Extra time?!?!?!?!?

 

Didn't they advertise that you rig it in 20 mins. Hmmmm!!!! Weta rig in 20mins, Pulse rig in 20mins, f22 rig in 20mins. Really!!!!?!?!

 

No one who has these boats have ever corroborate to me that it rigs in the time advertised. it is much longer.

 

So, multihull vendors. how about the truth on ringing times.

 

cheers,

 

I have not been able to get my 18' tri on the water in 20 minutes due to some folding issues I've been having that take more time than I'd like, but I do think it's do-able if you use it often and have the boat pre-setup well. I think the key is - fast folding with tramps that self setup while the amas fold out. And very simple standing rigging. If you can fold in under 5 minutes and stand and tension the mast in under 5 minutes, I think it's pretty reasonable to put the outboard and rudder on the back, and put the sails and running rigging on in less than 10 minutes. I use almost all quick release shackles to shorten the assembly time. And I leave my main sail with battens in and flaked on the boom, so all it takes to rig is to drop the gooseneck in the track, hang the lazy jacks, clip on the main sheet block, and attach the halyard and it's ready to raise. The takes just a minute or so to hank on and the jib sheets just live in place, so it's just a matter of clipping them to the clew.

 

Anyway, I think with a well sorted boat you could go from highway to sailing in 20 minutes with just one person if you have everything well sorted. I think the take down time might be just a bit longer to make sure its all organized for the next trip. It would be a good bit longer if you want to tear down everything, pull the battens, etc., but I do that once a year for winter storage. The rest of the time I leave the sails ready to go.

 

 

HI all,

 

I have a Weta. It takes me at least one hour from trailer to sailing.

 

I admit that I can be social to the onlookers, nevertheless; 20mins as advertised, no way!!!

 

For de-riging it is a different story as I always have Sam keeping me company. It can take a long time and I do not care.

 

Sam Adams that is.

 

Cheers,

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I guarantee that I can rig your Weta, from trailer to sailing in less than 25 minutes. I can do mine in less than 15, as I've learned a few tricks that allow some components to be left installed. Now when I first got it, it did take an hour, and the next few times probably 30 minutes, but shortly I was doing it in under 15, unless I was talking to other guys on the beach.

 

It is possible the Pulse can be rigged in the time advertised, but it's going to take some repetition to get used the steps and to perform them in the most timely manner.

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They didn't race today. Took a little extra time setting up then had some sort of failure, not sure what. The motive 25r was not sailing to its rating.

 

 

Extra time?!?!?!?!?

 

Didn't they advertise that you rig it in 20 mins. Hmmmm!!!! Weta rig in 20mins, Pulse rig in 20mins, f22 rig in 20mins. Really!!!!?!?!

 

No one who has these boats have ever corroborate to me that it rigs in the time advertised. it is much longer.

 

So, multihull vendors. how about the truth on ringing times.

 

cheers,

 

I have not been able to get my 18' tri on the water in 20 minutes due to some folding issues I've been having that take more time than I'd like, but I do think it's do-able if you use it often and have the boat pre-setup well. I think the key is - fast folding with tramps that self setup while the amas fold out. And very simple standing rigging. If you can fold in under 5 minutes and stand and tension the mast in under 5 minutes, I think it's pretty reasonable to put the outboard and rudder on the back, and put the sails and running rigging on in less than 10 minutes. I use almost all quick release shackles to shorten the assembly time. And I leave my main sail with battens in and flaked on the boom, so all it takes to rig is to drop the gooseneck in the track, hang the lazy jacks, clip on the main sheet block, and attach the halyard and it's ready to raise. The takes just a minute or so to hank on and the jib sheets just live in place, so it's just a matter of clipping them to the clew.

 

Anyway, I think with a well sorted boat you could go from highway to sailing in 20 minutes with just one person if you have everything well sorted. I think the take down time might be just a bit longer to make sure its all organized for the next trip. It would be a good bit longer if you want to tear down everything, pull the battens, etc., but I do that once a year for winter storage. The rest of the time I leave the sails ready to go.

 

 

 

If I had the Weta on it's dolly at the hoist or ramp, 20 minutes was a rush but doable.

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Anyone know why there are two handicaps in the Sprint 750 class? Looks like a split between MkIs and MkIIs. Something local maybe, as I didn't see it in the Nationals results.

At nationals in Pensacola they were scored this way so the same was done here.

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Having never set up a weta, I can't really speak to the ins and out of setup. From what I see on youtube it takes a bit of rope routing and mast assembly. It's certainly possible that a slightly different style may be a bit faster. Mostly because almost everything ropewise stays in place when I go down the highway. On my trimaran the trampolines for example remain attached so you slide out the floats and pin them and the tramps are basically in place ready to rock. They each have a couple velcro straps, but it's not like lacing up a tramp. I also leave the shrouds attached and have 4;1 cam blocks to tension, with marked line, so standing the mast is as easy as taking the mast out of the cradle, sticking the base on the step, walking up, and then attaching the forestay. Then I walk back and pull each shroud block to it's sailing mark and the rig is ready to go. I think it's a bit faster than my last beach cat. The jib sheets are just stored in place with the excess line dropped in the companyonway. The traveler is left setup. etc. I also have a swing centerboard, so no setup. Just pull and cleat the "down" rope once you're in the water. - (I forgot to do that once and couldn't figure out why the heck I couldn't tack worth a crap for hours before I finally got in the water to see what the heck was wrong and realized that it just wasn't in the down position.)

 

It may even be a more basic rig than the Weta. And I don't have a spin setup yet, so it's even simpler without it. The setup for the first time in the spring is an hour or two. After that it's pretty darn quick.

 

I pretty much use these guys everywhere I can: 41uOTsaY7TL._SY355_.jpg

 

I think the Pulse *could* be setup pretty darn quick by an experienced owner. Setting up for optimal racing performance might be more time consuming than going for a casual day sail though where you don't care so much about resetting the batten tension and things of that nature. Unfortunately I often have a few people waiting in 100 degree weather on an asphalt ramp for me to get setup, so time is of the essence when I'm getting ready to launch. Tear down is a bit more relaxed and usually requires a few beers.

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All the lines and stays are left in place on the Weta. You roll up the side shrouds and bungee them to the tramp handles. The halyards are left on the mast and bungeed to the upper mast ferrule when you secure the mast on the dolly. Only the forestay needs to be taken off, although that could possibly be left on as well with a bit of thought. The screecher furling line is also left in place, bungeed to the spirt, while the screecher sheets are only untied from one side of that sail, pulled through the blocks and then coiled and then secured along with the sail in the sail bag. The screecher stays attached to the sprit at the tack point.

 

Frankly, if I really pushed it, I think I can easily rig the Weta in 10 minutes from dolly to water.

 

I strongly suspect the Pulse rigging time can be reduced with some thought and practice. Mast raising is the one thing that seems to take a bit on most boats. The Weta mast is just tossed up onto the mount in a quick motion; the Pulse has, I think, a gin pole and winch system which will make fairly quick work of that. Just going to take some time for owners to get used to it and develop their own time saving tricks. I think.

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Jeez. What's all the rush with rigging? Just leave yourself an hour or so to rig and launch. Relax, have a sandwich, and BS with your mates.

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Yeah, really. Even when I left mine assembled at the club I rarely splashed it within half an hour.

 

Live slow. Sail fast.

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All the lines and stays are left in place on the Weta. You roll up the side shrouds and bungee them to the tramp handles. The halyards are left on the mast and bungeed to the upper mast ferrule when you secure the mast on the dolly. Only the forestay needs to be taken off, although that could possibly be left on as well with a bit of thought. The screecher furling line is also left in place, bungeed to the spirt, while the screecher sheets are only untied from one side of that sail, pulled through the blocks and then coiled and then secured along with the sail in the sail bag. The screecher stays attached to the sprit at the tack point.

 

Frankly, if I really pushed it, I think I can easily rig the Weta in 10 minutes from dolly to water.

 

I leave the sprit & screecher in place (screecher rolled and dropped) and pull the screecher sailbag over them, most of the screecher ending up under the boat cover.. I also keep the mast sections joined, and pull the jib and mail sailbags over either end of it (UV protection, plus making it more visible in the sail boat park as it considerably overhangs the dolly).

 

But this isn't a Weta thread :)

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Some drift going on but...

 

It's all just practice. If you're frantic, have the "quick release" shackles where applicable, and are comfortable with the level of "button up" you need...zip zap. I'm sure once the Pulse is out there a bit and enough people have been given the ugly eye while plugging up the launch ramp, there will be corners cut and the processes refined. 30 min doesn't seem unreasonable. With my wife (who barely has her head in the game), I can turn the truck off...and splash in 10-13 min with a H16. Practice, practice, practice. Each person knows their jobs/roles.

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All the lines and stays are left in place on the Weta. You roll up the side shrouds and bungee them to the tramp handles. The halyards are left on the mast and bungeed to the upper mast ferrule when you secure the mast on the dolly. Only the forestay needs to be taken off, although that could possibly be left on as well with a bit of thought. The screecher furling line is also left in place, bungeed to the spirt, while the screecher sheets are only untied from one side of that sail, pulled through the blocks and then coiled and then secured along with the sail in the sail bag. The screecher stays attached to the sprit at the tack point.

 

Frankly, if I really pushed it, I think I can easily rig the Weta in 10 minutes from dolly to water.

 

I leave the sprit & screecher in place (screecher rolled and dropped) and pull the screecher sailbag over them, most of the screecher ending up under the boat cover.. I also keep the mast sections joined, and pull the jib and mail sailbags over either end of it (UV protection, plus making it more visible in the sail boat park as it considerably overhangs the dolly).

 

But this isn't a Weta thread :)

 

I was responding to an earlier comment about how long it takes to rig the boat.

 

At any rate, regardless of boat type, the quicker it is to rig, the more time you get to actually spend sailing... And the less trouble it is to rig a boat, the more the boat seems to get used. So anything you can do to speed things up, without rushing yourself and making rigging mistakes, is generally a good thing.

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It used to take me about an hour and a half to rig and an hour and a half de-rig a Hobie 18, usually last boat on the beach as I wanted to enjoy the whole day then just race, flat out de-rig and get out of there, never understood that.

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With the obsession of rigging/de rigging times somebody should setup a Le Mans style race ... start gun is with every one in the car park and boats on the trailer. ... sail a set course while road crew drive to finish line and boats are de rigged and on the trailer. ......

 

 

Or we could just chill and enjoy the day :)

 

45 minutes to an hour fro our TT720... sure I can do it faster but its more fun chatting with interested onlookers etc etc.

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Still no video of the Aussie boats, are they not being used ?

Been a few vids of Aussie boats posted here. I was hoping to get on a Pulse when in Sydney for the F18 Nats. Unfortunately my mate who has two had to travel down to Mebourne when I was in Sydney. I did catch up with him briefly before he left and saw the 2 boats in the flesh. I have to say, it is a LOT of boat for 20 feet and well finished. There is some serious hull volume as well. I am hoping I can catch up with him again at some stage and get out for a sail.

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Hey, why buy just one when you can have two? Must make for a pretty awesome party raft when the wind's down. ^_^

 

Did your mate share any thoughts about the Pulse's performance in various conditions?

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Still no video of the Aussie boats, are they not being used ?

Been a few vids of Aussie boats posted here.

 

Not seen any of the final production boats with the larger main and spinny, surely for all the talk, there would have been someone wanting to show off their new toy.

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Still no video of the Aussie boats, are they not being used ?

Been a few vids of Aussie boats posted here.

Not seen any of the final production boats with the larger main and spinny, surely for all the talk, there would have been someone wanting to show off their new toy.

The blue boats in the videos are the final production boats.

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Hey, why buy just one when you can have two? Must make for a pretty awesome party raft when the wind's down. ^_^

 

Did your mate share any thoughts about the Pulse's performance in various conditions?

He is the Aus importer. He had the Ronstan boat at his marina and his personal one in his driveway where I was staying whilst in Sydney. He crewed Nacra 5.8, Tornado and F18s for me over 10 years and is very performance oriantated. He loves the Pulse and how hard the boat can be pushed downwind. He has also taken his young family out on it and enjoys being able to share his experience on a family friendly yet quick boat.

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Great video, but they should all be smiling more when the fun factor rises.

Cost of a used boat is up on the dealer's site now for any interested in AUD.

 

http://www.multihullcentral.com/corsair-pulse-600-1/

69K AUD ($50 USD) for a demo boat? That's optimistic.

 

 

Yeap!!!! I also have another word for it

 

Expensive!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I still cannot believe the pricing.

 

Cheers,

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Great video, but they should all be smiling more when the fun factor rises.

Cost of a used boat is up on the dealer's site now for any interested in AUD.

 

http://www.multihullcentral.com/corsair-pulse-600-1/

 

Just to clarify, the boat for sale is my boat, not a dealer demo boat. I have some major changes coming up in my life in the near future and I need prepare myself for this which unfortunately means the boat has to go. I would love to keep the boat, but there will always be another opportunity when my life is in less flux.

 

It is nearly new and only sailed 3 times so far. It is available immediately, located in Melbourne and I would consider delivering to Sydney or Adelaide.

 

Price is negotiable, so contact the dealer if genuinely interested.

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Great video, but they should all be smiling more when the fun factor rises.

Cost of a used boat is up on the dealer's site now for any interested in AUD.

 

http://www.multihullcentral.com/corsair-pulse-600-1/

 

69K AUD ($50 USD) for a demo boat? That's optimistic.

Yeap!!!! I also have another word for it

 

Expensive!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I still cannot believe the pricing.

 

Cheers,

Less than half an F22R and you can get it before you are ready for a nursing home!!!!

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WetnWild

 

That is funny on the timing.

 

Yes, that is because the F22R was also initially advertised at half the price of what it is to be sold.

 

Cheers,

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New nice videos from Viv Manessis team:

 

 

I think that they should have done better but 4 adults is too much weight for 6 meter trimaran. Although two last races they were almost as fast as the Flying Tiger.

 

suigeri

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Cool beans! How'd they do? I couldn't figure out which boat it was in the results.

 

Rather a wet ride. Any idea on the GPS camera?

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Looks like it still maintains the'Weta' experience; it looks as wet as a beach cat, thats a pretty light sea-state.
Probably a bit less payload/weight redistribution and it will perform better- How well does that submarining foredeck cover keep the vegemite sanga's dry?
Looks fun!

post-63466-0-43402000-1456262062_thumb.jpg

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Cool beans! How'd they do? I couldn't figure out which boat it was in the results.

 

Rather a wet ride. Any idea on the GPS camera?

Cruising/ racing division R6000 Wide a Wake is the Pulse600. Easy Tiger is the Flying Tiger and Calamari Run is the Melges 24.

 

Suigeri

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. Although two last races they were almost as fast as the Flying Tiger.

 

suigeri

 

Yes, it appears that in the heavier air it was.

 

In the lighter air on the 15th it was very slow.

corsair took 50% more time to complete course than FT.

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Not impressive at all. Ok about the payload but for a sport- racing tri this kind of effort is ridiculous. All 3 hulls hits the water in moderate waves for Christ sake. I'm very disappointed from this anticipated tri. Still French are far away ahead.

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Hi zzarganas

 

We were sailing at Geographe Bay Race Week for fun holiday with a couple of mates we haven't sailed with for over a decade, we certainly weren't there for serious racing. We needed to meet both Yachting Australia Cat 6 regulations as well as the Western Australian Govt regulations for sailing 5+ nm offshore, so between the four of us & all the safety gear, motor, fuel etc I'd guess we loaded about 400kg onto the boat. It's hardly surprising we were not competitive in the very light winds of the first three days of racing, but we had fun.

 

When it did blow it was a lot of fun. Two thirds of the way through the last race, which included a lot of shy reaching, we passed the lead boat, a 40 foot Farr First as well as the Flying Tiger & got a round of applause from all the boats at the front.

 

I ordered the boat hoping it had many of the characteristics of our Weta, with greater carrying capacity & it's certainly exceeded my expectations. It's a boat worthy of consideration if you want to purchase a new boat that you can use for a bit of racing, a bit of social sailing (it's licensed for 6 people), and that you can trailer easily.

 

PS The camera was a Garmin VIRB.

 

Cheers

 

Greg

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Hi zzarganas

 

We were sailing at Geographe Bay Race Week for fun holiday with a couple of mates we haven't sailed with for over a decade, we certainly weren't there for serious racing. We needed to meet both Yachting Australia Cat 6 regulations as well as the Western Australian Govt regulations for sailing 5+ nm offshore, so between the four of us & all the safety gear, motor, fuel etc I'd guess we loaded about 400kg onto the boat. It's hardly surprising we were not competitive in the very light winds of the first three days of racing, but we had fun.

 

When it did blow it was a lot of fun. Two thirds of the way through the last race, which included a lot of shy reaching, we passed the lead boat, a 40 foot Farr First as well as the Flying Tiger & got a round of applause from all the boats at the front.

 

I ordered the boat hoping it had many of the characteristics of our Weta, with greater carrying capacity & it's certainly exceeded my expectations. It's a boat worthy of consideration if you want to purchase a new boat that you can use for a bit of racing, a bit of social sailing (it's licensed for 6 people), and that you can trailer easily.

 

PS The camera was a Garmin VIRB.

 

Cheers

 

Greg

 

Hey, congrats on the boat and thanks for sharing. That looked like a really fun day. I'll bet most of the rail meat on the monos you were rolling were wishing they were with you. That's a lot of fun in a tidy little package. Good stuff!

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Greg i'm sure you have fun at the videos. But this boat is a 50.000 $ mistake. I"m sorry but this is my opinion.

 

I have to agree with Greg on this. Whilst there is lots of complaints on this forum about boat price, I would like to know of another boat on the market which is 6.0m long, fully folding, brand new, on the water, tax paid in Australia, with trailer and outboard for less than US$50,000.

 

The fact is boats are expensive and the price exponentially increases with length and functionality.

 

I had my Pulse out last weekend at a beach in Geelong. We had 4 adults and 4 kids on board with lots of room to spare. Winds were 10-12 knots and the water was flat. We easily got 10 knots of boat speed and peaked at about 14 knots. You only got wet if you were on the leeward side and I sailed it on and off the beach several times during the day. I even had the spinnaker up a few times and the kids absolutely loved it.

 

Glynn

Pulse 600 #20

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Looks like it still maintains the'Weta' experience; it looks as wet as a beach cat, thats a pretty light sea-state.

Probably a bit less payload/weight redistribution and it will perform better- How well does that submarining foredeck cover keep the vegemite sanga's dry?

Looks fun!

 

Good point. How wet did it get in there? Is there a seal under the removable cover? I don't see one on the boat with it removed.

 

It looks like the extra flotation worked pretty well when they stuffed the bow. Wondering if part of it was due to the extra weight on board.

 

Are these the originally released or the post-Phuket regatta revised sails that we've read about?

 

And, Greg, thanks again for getting these videos out there. We've been chomping at the bit for a while now.

 

Ninja edit: Disregard the seal question. I think I see one on the Brittany video at the 1:15 mark.

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Greg i'm sure you have fun at the videos. But this boat is a 50.000 $ mistake. I"m sorry but this is my opinion.

 

How is the boat a mistake? What do you think this boat should cost?

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Keep in mind that under any given wind, the boat may appear different and sail at different speeds with a different crew and/or a different trim, technique, etc. I don't think we have yet to see what this boat is really capable of, particularly with just a couple of people on board in good wind.

 

Without disparaging anyone's sailing ability, in these videos I would have had the crew situated so that the windward hull was out of the water on every point of sail. It appears there was enough wind to do it and with a little more emphasis on boat trim a lot more speed was possible.

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Hi Guys

 

We were definitely social racing rather than being serious. The other girl on the boat, Bron, hasn't sailed in years, spending her time on her clubs' Committee Boat & the guy, Jon, is a good sailor but has very limited vision (he can't drive) & since this regatta was the first time on the boat for either of them, I'm hardly going to put them under pressure. It was for fun. There was generally plenty of wind, whilst there are obvious lighter periods the Bureau of Meteorology has a wind gauge at the end of the Busselton Jetty and it was regularly hitting twenty knots. We were all surprised how flat the sea state looks in the videos, it certainly felt lumpier than it appears.

 

http://www.bom.gov.au/products/IDW60801/IDW60801.95602.shtml

 

Regarding the covered forward area under the pop top, we took a little water under the seal, but nothing to speak of. The forward area under floor locker, which has a proper waterproof lid, was completely dry. Any water we did take into the cockpit drained quickly.

 

I've got the beefed up rig & I'm not sure if there were any structural changes to the boats post their first regatta. Like any new boat there are a few things that need tweaking, but Corsair has them in hand. They have provided really good after sales services on the few things I've needed.

 

Over the off season I'll have a frame fabricated to mount the cameras on the same bracket that is used to support the rear of the mast in transit. I think it will make a better camera mount than the boom (like on the Diab 24s).

 

Cheers

 

Greg

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Hi Guys

 

We were definitely social racing rather than being serious. The other girl on the boat, Bron, hasn't sailed in years, spending her time on her clubs' Committee Boat & the guy, Jon, is a good sailor but has very limited vision (he can't drive) & since this regatta was the first time on the boat for either of them, I'm hardly going to put them under pressure. It was for fun. There was generally plenty of wind, whilst there are obvious lighter periods the Bureau of Meteorology has a wind gauge at the end of the Busselton Jetty and it was regularly hitting twenty knots. We were all surprised how flat the sea state looks in the videos, it certainly felt lumpier than it appears.

 

http://www.bom.gov.au/products/IDW60801/IDW60801.95602.shtml

 

Regarding the covered forward area under the pop top, we took a little water under the seal, but nothing to speak of. The forward area under floor locker, which has a proper waterproof lid, was completely dry. Any water we did take into the cockpit drained quickly.

 

I've got the beefed up rig & I'm not sure if there were any structural changes to the boats post their first regatta. Like any new boat there are a few things that need tweaking, but Corsair has them in hand. They have provided really good after sales services on the few things I've needed.

 

Over the off season I'll have a frame fabricated to mount the cameras on the same bracket that is used to support the rear of the mast in transit. I think it will make a better camera mount than the boom (like on the Diab 24s).

 

Cheers

 

Greg

I enjoyed your videos especially the people smiling and enjoying themselves, I was impressed with the load carrying capacity and the bouyancy of the floats, keep having fun.

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Those wide angle action cams tend to flatten the water surface quite a bit. A two foot chop will come out looking like 6-inches.

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Very cool, Cordial! Thanks for editing, uploading and sharing the videos.

 

I'm not clear on your screecher sheet routing. Does the sheet go to some sort of hexarachet type turning block on the stern? Sometimes it seems like it is holding tension on it's own, but clearly you were able to quickly dump it when you nearly went down the mine. How is it rigged?

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i don't argue with idiots. BYE

 

I'm not sure if you are directing that comment at me, but I'll reiterate the question:

 

Why do you think the P600 is a $50K mistake?

To produce a boat with the same design brief and construction, what would you expect the price (not cost) should be?

 

Simple questions asking you to elaborate on your opinion, not an argument.

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Very cool, Cordial! Thanks for editing, uploading and sharing the videos.

 

I'm not clear on your screecher sheet routing. Does the sheet go to some sort of hexarachet type turning block on the stern? Sometimes it seems like it is holding tension on it's own, but clearly you were able to quickly dump it when you nearly went down the mine. How is it rigged?

 

The spinnaker sheet is routed via a block on the rear beam, then forward to a block on the forward beam, then to the cockpit. This allows the spinnaker trimmer to sit well forward.

 

Both blocks are Ronstan Series 55 Ratchet Orbit Blocks (RF56101).

 

I keep the rear block ratchet OFF and i keep the forward block in Auto mode so that it will freewheel as soon as I release the sheet. Others may set this up differently.

 

Hope this answers your question.

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Hi Guys

 

We were definitely social racing rather than being serious. The other girl on the boat, Bron, hasn't sailed in years, spending her time on her clubs' Committee Boat & the guy, Jon, is a good sailor but has very limited vision (he can't drive) & since this regatta was the first time on the boat for either of them, I'm hardly going to put them under pressure. It was for fun. There was generally plenty of wind, whilst there are obvious lighter periods the Bureau of Meteorology has a wind gauge at the end of the Busselton Jetty and it was regularly hitting twenty knots. We were all surprised how flat the sea state looks in the videos, it certainly felt lumpier than it appears.

 

http://www.bom.gov.au/products/IDW60801/IDW60801.95602.shtml

 

Regarding the covered forward area under the pop top, we took a little water under the seal, but nothing to speak of. The forward area under floor locker, which has a proper waterproof lid, was completely dry. Any water we did take into the cockpit drained quickly.

 

I've got the beefed up rig & I'm not sure if there were any structural changes to the boats post their first regatta. Like any new boat there are a few things that need tweaking, but Corsair has them in hand. They have provided really good after sales services on the few things I've needed.

 

Over the off season I'll have a frame fabricated to mount the cameras on the same bracket that is used to support the rear of the mast in transit. I think it will make a better camera mount than the boom (like on the Diab 24s).

 

Cheers

 

Greg

 

thanks for the videos, especially with the embedded GPS data gives a good idea what you were up to

from a Weta user perspective, those were very nice gybing angles, something like 85 deg... good VMG...

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Very cool, Cordial! Thanks for editing, uploading and sharing the videos.

 

I'm not clear on your screecher sheet routing. Does the sheet go to some sort of hexarachet type turning block on the stern? Sometimes it seems like it is holding tension on it's own, but clearly you were able to quickly dump it when you nearly went down the mine. How is it rigged?

 

The spinnaker sheet is routed via a block on the rear beam, then forward to a block on the forward beam, then to the cockpit. This allows the spinnaker trimmer to sit well forward.

 

Both blocks are Ronstan Series 55 Ratchet Orbit Blocks (RF56101).

 

I keep the rear block ratchet OFF and i keep the forward block in Auto mode so that it will freewheel as soon as I release the sheet. Others may set this up differently.

 

Hope this answers your question.

 

Definitely answers it - thanks! This info goes into the data bank for my boat....

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Greg i'm sure you have fun at the videos. But this boat is a 50.000 $ mistake. I"m sorry but this is my opinion.

 

zzarganas, just in case you show up here again:

where are you from, and what is your affiliation with Astus?

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Greg i'm sure you have fun at the videos. But this boat is a 50.000 $ mistake. I"m sorry but this is my opinion.

would you buy it for 30k?

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